Disney / Peter Pan

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"The second star to the right shines with a light so rare,
And if it's Never Land you need, its light will lead you there."

Disney Animated Canon entry #14, and the last one to be distributed by RKO Pictures. It is based on the 1902 stage play (and, by proxy, its 1904 book adaptation) by James Barrie, and is also the last film that all nine of Disney's Nine Old Men worked on together.

The well-remembered 1953 Disney animated movie presents a cozier version of Peter Pan, keeping most of the incidents, but virtually none of the original dialogue. Furthermore, it is one of the earliest examples of when the play's usual casting tradition was waived and a male actor was cast for the title role.

During their Direct-to-Video sequel period, Disney made Return To Never Land, in 2002, one of the few animated sequels to get a theatrical release (but still not part of the Disney Animated Canon itself). Their publishing arm has released a series of prequel novels written by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. Finally, their take on Tinker Bell has long been something of a mascot character for the company, and, in the new millennium, the Spin-Off Disney Fairies line of books, merchandise, and a made-for-DVD film was launched focusing on her and other (original) pixies (similar in concept to the Disney Princess line). And, for the boys (though it features a token girl) is a pirate-adventure flavored take on the Dora the Explorer and Go Diego Go formula called Jake and the Never Land Pirates, where a group of kid pirates match wits with Captain Hook and Smee.


Peter Pan provides examples of:

  • Adaptation Species Change: In the original Peter Pan, Nana is a Newfoundland, but here, she is a Saint Bernard.
  • Adaptational Wimp: Captain Hook. As Internet reviewer Unshaved Mouse notes:
    Even his own men don’t seem to fear him and he’s murdering them on a regular basis! [The book] mentions that Hook is feared by “the Sea-Cook”. As in, Long John Freakin’ Silver was afraid of this guy. The Disney version wouldn’t scare Captain Crunch.
  • Adult Fear:
    • Wendy doesn't want to admit she's growing up. The thought of getting a room of her own and being separated from her brothers saddens her. Her adventure in Neverland proves that growing up can have its benefits, in that you're not The Chew Toy in a resident of boys and murderous fairy creatures.
    • Mrs. Darling is concerned when Wendy says she has Peter's shadow, and that Peter may return for it. Namely, she hopes the children will be all right with her and George at the party, and Nana locked up outside. When they get home, she freaks out on seeing Wendy not in bed.
  • Affably Evil: Smee. Though he is a pirate and is loyal to Hook, he cares more about his captain's well-being than about actually being evil.
  • All Animals Are Dogs: The crocodile occasionally wags his tail and begs.
  • As You Know: In their opening scene, Hook and Smee explain the backstory of Peter Pan cutting off Hook's hand and throwing it to the crocodile. It's done rather smoothly in the form of Hook exploding at the thought of having to show "good form."
  • Bad Boss: Hook shoots one of his own men for singing off-key.
  • Bare Your Midriff: Mr. Smee is a male, non-fanservice example. Usually, his belly just shows a little from his short shirt. At other times, he is hoisted up by his shirt, exposing his belly a lot more. In fact, when he first appears, he was being belly-jabbed with a sword by a pirate and had to suck his belly in to avoid the sharp sting.
  • Barred from the Afterlife: Captain Hook is preparing to drown the Indian Princess Tiger Lily to force her to tell him where Peter Pan's hideout is. He threatens her with this trope as he does so.
    Captain Hook: Remember, there is no path through water to the Happy Hunting Ground.
  • Berserk Button: Peter Pan does not like being called a coward. Captain Hook uses this to advantage in the climax so that he won't fly away "like a cowardly sparrow" when he fights him.
    Peter: Nobody calls Pan a coward and lives!
    • Captain Hook gets rather temperamental at Mr. Smee for saying shooting a man in the middle of his cadenza is bad form, since Peter Pan chopping off his hand and throwing it to the crocodile isn't exactly good form either.
    "Good form, Mr. Smee? BLAST GOOD FORM! Did Pan show good form when he did this to me?!"
  • Better Living Through Evil: The pirate song.
  • Big Bad: Captain Hook.
  • Big Ol' Eyebrows: Most of the pirates have these.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: The mermaids attempt to drag Wendy underwater under the pretext of 'greeting' her, and then protest innocence. Tinker Bell's jealousy qualifies her as well; she's really only cooperative when the plan becomes 'take Wendy home'.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: The mermaids in the lagoon scene are blonde, redheaded, and black-haired.
  • Bond Villain Stupidity: Hook really shouldn't have locked up Tinker Bell in that lantern once he got the information that he wanted — where Peter's hiding spot was. When she overhears that he's planted a bomb in the hideout, she immediately breaks free and rushes in time to save Peter from the impact.
  • Bound and Gagged: John, Michael and the Lost Boys, when captured.
  • Bowdlerise: The Indians' skin color was changed to be less... well, red in the DVD release. The Blu-Ray edition restored their original color.
  • Braids, Beads and Buckskins: There's some justification, since Neverland is a British child's Theme Park Version of a Western Hemisphere island. The tipis and the chief's war bonnet suggest that the tribe of Native Americans came from the Great Plains area and are referred to as being Blackfoot, but for some reason they also have totem poles (which belonged to people from the Pacific Northwest) and Princess Tiger Lily wears a beaded and feathered headband (worn by Northeastern people). It's also possible that the 'aborigines' of NeverLand, like its pirates and Lost Boys, originated on Earth and once belonged to several different nations.
  • Break the Haughty: Peter's overconfident ego takes a hit when it nearly costs his dearest friend her life. After this, he seems to have some understanding that things can't always go his way, and thus willingly returns the Darlings home.
  • Breakout Character:
    • Tinker Bell.
    • To a lesser extent, the Crocodile. He (or at least Expies of him) makes guest appearances and cameos in a lot of subsequent Disney productions.
  • Break-Up/Make-Up Scenario: Peter is angry at the other kids for wanting to leave Neverland. But it won't stop him from wanting to save them.
  • British Stuffiness: John Darling, Wendy to a lesser extent.
    • "I'm frightfully sorry, old chaps. This is all my fault", John upon leading an expedition party that gets captured by Never Land's local Indian tribe.
  • Brutal Honesty: Peter tells the kids that if they want to leave, he won't stop them, and he can't, but once you grow up you can never return to Neverland.
  • But Not Too Red: All of the Indians have skin the color of a tomato except for Tiger Lily, who looks more like a white person dipped in tea (and thus, ironically, more like an actual Native American).
  • Captain Obvious: When Wendy walks the plank, Pan rescues Wendy before she hits the water, so the pirates just see her fall out of their sight and then hear nothing. A crewman then informs everyone that they just heard no splash, which seems to annoy Captain Hook; he makes one himself by throwing that crewman overboard.
  • Centipede's Dilemma: Peter briefly doesn't know how to answer Wendy when she asks how he flies.
  • The Chew Toy: Mr. Darling.
  • Clap Your Hands If You Believe: Averted; in fact, we never see Tinker Bell recover from the bomb. She gets better with no explanation. On the other hand, this is played straight in the sequel when Jane's newfound belief revives Tinker Bell.
  • Clingy Jealous Girl: Peter inspires clinginess and jealousy in all the female characters of NeverLand, although Tinker Bell's is the only jealousy that becomes important to the plot. Even Wendy gets a helping of this during the Indian tribal song. In the sequel it's shown that Peter's aware of this, but he doesn't seem to know why. (See next trope.)
  • Clothing Damage: Between Peter and the crocodile, Captain Hook's pirate finery is constantly being mangled and demolished.
  • Clueless Chick Magnet: Peter Pan. He lampshades it himself it the sequel:
    "Aw, [Tinker Bell]'s just jealous. All girls get like that around me."
  • Comedic Sociopathy: Watching Hook fight for his life against the crocodile by all means shouldn't be funny. But somehow, it is. VERY funny.
  • Conspicuously Light Patch: The rock that turns out to be a hippo during "Following the Leader".
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass:
    • Smee. It's not obvious, but he has his moments. For example, his reaction to the crew threatening him is to stick his tongue out and resume the business of shaving his captain. He also shoos the crocodile away politely with his foot, rows like mad to save Hook from the reptile, and captures Tinker Bell in a surprise ambush.
    • Michael and John in battle. Michael manages to weaponize his teddy bear by slipping a cannonball in it, and John reveals himself to be a strategist when facing the pirates.
  • The Dandy: Captain Hook.
  • Dangerously Close Shave: Played for Laughs when Smee mistakenly believes he's accidentally cut off Captain Hook's head while shaving him.
  • Dartboard of Hate: Sort of. When we first see the pirates, they're throwing daggers at a drawing of Captain Hook, angry that they've had been forced to abandon pillaging ships, and stay in Neverland until Hook somehow manages to get his revenge on Peter for cutting off his hand.
  • Death by Genre Savviness: Before revealing Peter's hideout location, Tinker Bell extracts a promise from Hook that he won't "harm" Peter. She specifies that he won't lay a "hook" or a finger on him. He still tries to kill Peter, to her chagrin.
  • Dirty Coward: Hook's rage is usually greater than his fear, but any time he's losing he becomes utterly craven.
  • Disney Villain Death: Averted for Captain Hook but played straight for the crew member he shoots. Though Hook does end up falling into the crocodile's mouth, he bursts out of his mouth a moment later, scared out of his mind.
  • Disproportionate Retribution:
    • Hook shoots a pirate for singing and interrupting his train of thought.
    • Peter continually makes Hook's life miserable, despite the man seemingly having done nothing to originally spark the boy's malice.
  • Double Standard: When Wendy comes to Neverland, the residents either try to kill her or make her do chores, due to her being female; the Indians, mermaids and Tinker Bell really have it in for her. When the boys come to Neverland, Michael and John are allowed to pursue adventures, and are only threatened with death once.
  • Drowning Pit: Hook ties up Tiger Lily on a cave inside Skull Rock and threatens to leave her to the tides unless she tells him where Pan's hideout is.
  • Eat the Camera: The camera zooms into the Chief's mouth toward the end of "What Made the Red Man Red?"
  • The Edwardian Era: The children come from late-19th-century London.
  • Efficient Displacement: Happens when Michael jumps through a waterfall.
  • Epic Fail: Smee throughout the movie attempts to care for his captain, but he's not very good at it. While giving him a shave, he accidentally shaves a seagull that lands on Hook's head and injures the captain with some comical antics. When the crocodile gives chase, Smee accidentally hits Hook with the oar. When Hook has a headache from the antics with the crocodile, Smee annoys him by hammering DO NOT DISTURB signs on the cabin door, hitting Hook with the hammer and knocking him senseless, and putting too much hot water in his foot bath.
  • Even Bad Men Love Their Mamas: The pirates (except for Hook) are briefly moved to tears by Wendy's song about mothers, and Hook is apparently enraptured.
  • Evil Plan: Though it doesn't drive the entire plot, all the conflict generated by Hook is centered around killing Peter Pan.
  • Exact Words: Hook believes that adhering to Exact Words is sufficient for him to be an 'honorable' person.
    • Captain Hook swears to Tinker Bell "not to lay a finger, or a hook, on Peter Pan." Hook still wants to kill him, of course, so upon learning of his hiding place, he uses a bomb instead. Tink is not happy when Hook reveals his intentions to Wendy and the Lost Boys within her earshot.
    • At Peter's mercy in the climax, Captain Hook begs shamelessly for his life and offers to 'go away forever'. Which he intends to do... as soon as he kills Peter.
  • Exposition: Rather brazen, under the guise of "Good Form", about everything involving Peter, Captain Hook, and the ticking Crocodile. Captain Hook agrees with Smee that cutting off his hand was but a childish prank; feeding it to the Crocodile was Peter's major crime.
  • Failure Is the Only Option: For Hook, sadly this is true.
  • Fairy in a Bottle: Tinker Bell is captured in a lantern after spilling the location of Peter Pan's hiding place to Hook, and upon learning of Hook's intentions of killing Peter Pan with a bomb (see Exact Words above) she escapes the lantern and flies to Hangman's Tree just in time to keep the bomb from claiming him.
  • False Reassurance: When Captain Hook promises, say, "not to lay a finger — or a hook — on Peter Pan," or "not to harm a hair on Peter Pan's head," rest assured, he won't do that.
    Hook: Captain Hook never breaks a promise...
  • Fate Worse Than Death: When threatening to let Tiger Lily drown, Hook claims "There is no path through water to the Happy Hunting Ground." Whether he has any idea what he's talking about, or whether Tiger Lily buys it, is another matter.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Captain Hook.
  • Flipping the Table: "BLAST GOOD FORM!"
  • Fluffy Fashion Feathers: Hook's large hat plume.
  • Forgot About His Powers: The climax involves several characters being threatened with Walk the Plank despite the fact that they can fly. And Wendy flies several times throughout the movie so it's not like it was a one time thing either.
    • Possibly Justified in that the pixie dust wears off over time. After her ordeal with the mermaids, Wendy had to flap her arms to fly on two occasions just to catch up to Peter.
  • Forgot to Mind Their Head: Mr. Darling is introduced searching through his drawers for his missing cufflinks and hitting his head on an open drawer above him.
  • Free-Range Children: It is Neverland, after all...
  • Frothy Mugs of Water: Notably averted: Smee is seen drinking brandy, and is very drunk. Also, both Hook and Pan smoke at a few different points and John smokes a peace pipe.
  • Godiva Hair: One of the mermaids, in lieu of a Seashell Bra. As a Parental Bonus, she's the one who sneers about Wendy wandering around in 'nothing but a nightdress'.
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress: Captain Hook finds this out as he duels with Peter Pan at Skull Rock and forces the both of them off the edge of the cliff, conveniently forgetting that Peter can fly while Hook can't and then has to scramble back to safety before he falls, only to fall just far enough for him to cling to the crevice by his hook.
  • Green Around the Gills: During the "What Makes The Red Man Red" number, John's face turns green when he inhales the smoke from a calumet.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: The mermaids do not take kindly to Wendy's presence and attempt to drown her. Tinker Bell, who is also jealous of Wendy, is tricked into revealing Peter's hiding place by Captain Hook, who uses her jealousy against her.
  • Hair Decorations: Wendy, who even sleeps with her hair bow in place. Which is particularly hard to miss since she spends the whole movie in her nightgown.
  • Hand Gagging: Happens once to Michael (when an Indian grabs him) and twice to Wendy (by Peter and then a pirate).
  • Hartman Hips: Tinker Bell, to her dismay. Those hips were responsible for getting her stuck in a keyhole.
  • Heel Realization:
    • Tink gets it when she realizes that betraying Peter to Hook will lead to the only human she likes getting killed. She immediately tells him, while possibly dying, that he needs to rescue Wendy and the boys from the pirates. During the fight she also tries to stop the pirates from killing the Lost Boys in the crews's nest.
    • Peter also gets it after the bomb nearly kills him. He realizes that Tink was right, and that she decided to die for him.
  • High-Heel–Face Turn: An inverted example: Tinker Bell's jealousy against Wendy leads her to betray the location of the hideout to Hook. When Hook traps her under a jar and weasels out of his promise "not to lay a finger or a hook on Peter Pan", she escapes and turns back by saving Peter.
  • Hollywood Natives: The Indians are hyper-stereotypes who smoke pipes, wear feathered headdresses, speak in Tonto Talk, and live in teepees. They even come complete with a truly cringeworthy song, "What Made the Red Man Red?"
  • Honor Before Reason: Having given his word of honor not to fly in his final duel with Captain Hook, Peter doggedly refuses to do so even when Hook proves to be the superior swordsman, having forced him to the corner of a mast leading to a fall that can kill him.
  • Hook Hand: Captain Hook is the picture for this trope page.
  • Human Hammer-Throw: During the fight with the Lost Boys, one of the Indians grabs the Boy wearing a fox costume by the tail, swings him around and throws him back into the main brawl.
  • Humiliation Conga: Fights between Peter and Hook are so lopsided that they devolve into a series of terrifying and shameful experiences for Hook.
  • I Gave My Word: Both Peter and Captain Hook take giving their word seriously. But Peter keeps the spirit of his promises; Hook only cares about the Exact Words.
  • I Just Shot Marvin in the Face: Captain Hook orders Smee to shoot Peter Pan but his constant flying about makes him a difficult target. With his eyes closed, Smee aims for Peter as he's flying in front of Hook and fires. He misses but for a moment, it appears that Hook has fallen to his death. He turns out to be fine.
  • I Surrender, Suckers: After Peter spares Hook's life (see Please, I Will Do Anything!), Hook then tries to attack Peter, who is crowing in victory, using his hook since Peter threw his sword aside — conveniently forgetting that Peter can fly and can easily dodge out of Hook's way, which he does, and it's down into the waiting jaws of the crocodile Hook goes.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: Hook's a legitimate threat to everyone... everyone except his two greatest enemies, Peter Pan and the crocodile.
  • Ink-Suit Actor: Peter Pan, Wendy, and Captain Hook were all modeled after their voice actors.
  • Interacting with Shadow: When Peter first meets Wendy his shadow has been ripped off his body, and Wendy sews it back on (it attaches at the feet).
  • It's Personal:
    • Hook wants to kill Peter for cutting off his hand and tossing it to the crocodile.
    • For most of the movie Peter treats Hook like a Friendly Enemy, in that he toys with him and mocks the captain at every point. When Hook's bomb nearly kills Tinker Bell, and the pirate tries to kill Wendy and the Lost Boys, however? Peter tells him "This time you've gone too far!" and fights him more seriously.
  • Jerkass Has a Point: Perhaps George Darling overreacted a tad by forcing Wendy to move out of the playroom the following day, but he was justifiably upset when the boys took his coat cufflings to use as buried treasure for their game without asking and drew a treasure map on his shirt front for his company party where he was the guest of honor. Wendy didn't know what the boys did, since she was surprised to see the map on his shirtfront, but maybe she should have reminded the boys to be more careful. He also has a bit of justification for having Nanna put outside, as he had just tripped on Nanna, knocking her over slightly while he got his foot caught on a toy wagon and went flying across the room, hitting the wall hard. Guess who his family showed their condolences to solely?
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold:
    • George Darling.
    • Also Peter and Tink, when push comes to shove.
  • Join or Die: Captain Hook gives Wendy and the boys the option of joining his crew or Walking the Plank.
  • Kick the Dog: See Killed Mid-Sentence below.
  • Kid Hero All Grown-Up: In the sequels, Wendy and her siblings have grown up and lived normal lives, while Peter an the Lost Boys have remained the same age. (This notion is drawn from the novel.)
  • Killed Mid-Sentence: Make that killed mid-song. During a conversation with Smee, Captain Hook is interrupted by an accordion-wielding pirate in the rigging, singing about the pirate's life. Without so much as glancing back, Hook draws a pistol, aims it over his shoulder and fires. Cue a drawn-out, falling note and a splash. To make things all the more ironic, the unfortunate crewman's last words (well, lyrics) were: "The life of a pirate is short!"
    Smee: Oh, dear, dear, dear, Captain Hook. Shooting a man in the middle of his cadenza? That ain't good form, you know.
  • Large Ham: Hans Conried, the voice of Captain Hook, was clearly having a blast while recording his lines.
  • Leitmotif: "Never Smile at a Crocodile" becomes one for the crocodile. Peter Pan has one as well, instantly recognizable just from its first three notes. The movie gets a lot of mileage out of those three notes.
  • Let's Get Dangerous!: Peter is a boy who can fly and is immortal. Thus, he tends to treat adventures, flying, and people frivolously. But any time he fights? He uses flight to his advantage and can match Hook blow for blow.
  • Lighter and Softer: Than the original novel/play, but Darker and Edgier than the sequel.
  • Little "No"/Big "NO!": Hook says these in succession when, at Skull Rock, he hears the Crocodile coming toward him, after Peter Pan teasingly asks, "Do you hear something?"
  • Loophole Abuse: See Exact Words.
  • Lost in Imitation:
    • Disney was the first to have the Lost Boys unable to fly (though in Return to Neverland they are briefly seen flying to show Jane how pixie dust works), a trend that was replicated by future adaptations.
    • In the book, Slightly, not Curly/Cubby, was the pudgy Lost Boy. Disney chose to make Curly/Cubby the fat one, and every adaptation since then has done the same.
    • This was also the first movie version of Peter Pan to break the stage tradition of having Peter Pan be played by a woman. This is somewhat ironic since casting adult women as the voices of young boys is a common practice in the animation industry to this day. Nevertheless, Disney cast Bobby Driscoll, its juvenile star of the day, as Peter's voice. However, Disney kept the stage tradition of having the same actor play Mr. Darling and Captain Hook.
  • Meaningful Echo: Mr Darling, while heading out to the party at the beginning of the movie comments that the kids need to grow up and be practical. After Peter says that the Darlings are staying in Neverland, Wendy says the exact same thing to him.
  • Mickey Mousing: This movie was one of the classics that codified the musical traditions of Disney.
  • Minion with an F in Evil: Smee. Though he DID try to convince Hook to return to the "good ol' days" of plundering and slitting throats outside of Neverland. It's more-so that he personally has no grudge against Peter, and while genuinely evil, is too stupid to accomplish any effective villainy.
  • Musicalis Interruptus: See Killed Mid-Sentence.
  • Mythology Gag: A couple involving Captain Hook, calling to attention traits of J. M. Barrie's Hook that the Disney version avoids or subverts:
    • In the beginning, when John and Michael are playing Peter Pan and Captain Hook in the nursery, John is wearing the "hook" on his right hand, like Hook in the original novel/play. However, Wendy steps in and corrects him that Hook misses his left hand, a change the Disney animators consciously made because it made Hook easier to animate if he could still use his right hand properly.
    • During Hook and Smee's first scene, after Hook has shot a pirate "in the middle of his cadenza" and Smee hints that this can hardly be said to be good form, Hook explodes with "Good form, Mister Smee? BLAST GOOD FORM! Did Peter Pan show GOOD FORM when he did THIS TO ME?!" This is in direct contrast to the original Hook, to whom "good form" was extremely important. (Though it has to be said, he too killed his own pirates without thought for petty reasons, such as ruffling his lace collar.)
    • Near the end, the Darlings return home to find Wendy's bed empty, only to find her asleep by the window. A nod to the original play where they return home to find their children missing, since they left with Peter. The film makes it seem as if it was All Just a Dream.
    • The ending has Mr. Darling recognizing the pirate ship as 'something he'd seen before'. In-universe, this suggests a much earlier trip to Neverland before he lost his love of fantasy, but it doubles as a very subtle reference to the fact that in many stage productions, the same actor who plays Hook usually plays Mr. Darling.
  • Never Say "Die": Averted. There are quite a few references to death, several killing attempts — as well as one off-screen killing in Hook's first scene (detailed above).
  • Never Smile at a Crocodile: Tick-Tock the Crocodile. He even had a song about him that was cut from the film, though the instrumentals remain in part, which is the Trope Namer.
    • Behavior wise, the Disney Croc differs from his book counterpart in that the Croc in the original story was singlemindedly vicious toward Hook. The Disney Croc isn't exactly fussed about getting at Hook, and is happy to simply mess with his head, though the ending shows he will happily take a bite (or more!) out of Hook if the opportunity presents itself.
  • Nobody Calls Pan a Coward and Lives!: Peter takes some stupid risks once he's goaded.
  • Not Now, Kiddo: Michael spots an Indian trying to capture him and the other boys, but he can't tell the others, because he's inhibited by Huddle Power.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • Wendy gets this twice. First when she is falling toward a bunch of sharp-looking rocks after the Lost Boys fire various weapons at them. Then as she exits Hangman's Tree and finds herself surrounded by the pirates, who have captured her brothers and the Lost Boys.
    • Hook gets several of these:
      • When he first sees the crocodile approaching the ship fearing he would eat him.
      • When he finds himself standing in thin air due to Peter's distraction.
      • As he notices the crocodile approaching him while hanging onto the cliff he fell off of.
      • When he screams "WHOAAAAH!" as he sees the crocodile swimming toward him.
      • When he sees Peter show up alive after believing he died in the explosion. Smee gets the same reaction at the same time.
    • Peter reacts this way when he realizes his present is actually a bomb just a second before it explodes.
  • Oh My Gods!: John exclaims "By Jove!" during his second attempt to fly.
  • One Dialogue, Two Conversations: George Darling tells Nana that children have to grow up; the scene immediately transitions to Wendy telling Mary Darling that she doesn't want to grow up.
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: Peter is constantly laid-back and jovial. Even when he has to banish Tinker Bell, he does so in a dramatic voice. But he suddenly gets very serious when the Lost Boys want to leave Neverland.
    Peter: But I warn you, once you're grown up, you can never come back. Never!
  • Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping: Bill Thompson, voicing Smee, occasionally tries to pronounce the odd word with an Irish accent. It's not exactly convincing, so it's hardly surprising that Jeff Bennett, who voices Smee in modern Disney productions (including Return to Neverland), completely drops this and makes Smee an all-out American.
  • Opening Chorus
  • Our Mermaids Are Different: They seem like the self-absorbed, girly kind we've come to accept as normal, but when they realize Wendy's stolen Peter's attention, they make some not-so-subtle attempts to drown her (reflecting the more dangerous mermaids of folklore). This is vastly different than the quirky, innocent version of mermaids from later Disney canon.
  • Overly Long Name: How Wendy introduces herself to Peter:
    Wendy: My name's Wendy. Wendy Moira Angela Darling.
    Peter: Wendy's enough.
  • Panty Shot: Tinker Bell, many times.
  • Please, I Will Do Anything!: Just when it looks like Hook has the drop on Peter Pan (see Prepare to Die below), Peter grabs the ship's skull-and-crossbones flag and wraps up Hook in it. In the process, Hook loses his sword, Peter takes it and threatens Hook with it, which leads to Hook nervously saying basically this phrase:
    Hook: You wouldn't do old Hook in now, would you, lad? I'll go away forever. I'll do anything you say.
    Peter: Well... all right. If you... say you're a codfish.
    Hook: (swallows nervously) I'm a codfish.
    Peter: Louder!
    Hook: (wailing) I'M A CODFISH!!
    Peter: All right, Hook, you're free to go and never return.
  • Polite Villains, Rude Heroes: Captain Hook and Peter Pan, respectively.
  • Prepare to Die: Said word for word by Hook when he finally has Peter cornered and weaponless, in stark contrast to Disney's later reluctance to refer to death in any way.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • When a boy wants to drag you to his home to be his "mother," that is to love him and sing stories and all, he's probably not going to have that much in the compassion department. Wendy finds out that even though Peter keeps her safe and take her to see the mermaids, he's a bit too self-centered and immature to consider her feelings.
    • As it turns out, happy thoughts will not enable you to fly. Peter Pan is quick to realize this after the Darling children first attempt it. The real solution is fairy dust, a fantasy element introduced by J.M. Barrie in order to address concerns that the "happy thoughts will enable you to fly" thing could be taken seriously by impressionable children.
  • Say My Name: "SMEEEEEEE!!!"
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: Subverted with Smee, who attempts to sneak off in a lifeboat with a chest (presumably containing the pirates' treasure) rather than help Hook or the others fight Peter. His plan to bug out alone is disrupted when a bunch of other pirates fall overboard and land in his boat.
  • Seashell Bra: Some of the mermaids wear seashells or — in one case — starfish as pasties.
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: John does this quite a bit.
  • Silk Hiding Steel: Wendy, a very mature girl with the ability to influence someone like Peter Pan himself. During the Walk the Plank scene, she was the definition of composed.
  • Somewhere Song: "The Second Star to the Right".
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Captain Hook. In the book, he is simply swallowed up by the crocodile, but in the movie, he immediately jumps out of the crocodile's mouth unharmed shortly after being swallowed up and later swimming away screaming for Smee with the crocodile still behind him. There's an interesting story behind this. Originally, Disney was going to make Hook an evil, intimidating character who would die like his literary counterpart. However, they discovered that the slapstick scenes with the crocodile effectively ruined any sense that he was a serious threat. Therefore, they went all out and played him as an Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain. They kept him alive because they figured the audience wouldn't want to see such a humorous, non-threatening villain die.
  • Spin-Off: Tinker Bell, besides being practically the second mascot of Disney after Mickey Mouse (appearing in many commercials and in the studio's Vanity Plate), has become a Breakout Character and now stars in a series of her own.
  • The Stoic: Tiger Lily hardly speaks at all.
  • Suddenly SHOUTING!: Twice directed at Smee and twice the same word is used.
    • First:
      Peter: (mimicking Hook) For the last time, Mr. Smee, take the princess back to her people! UNDERSTAND?!?!?
    • And second:
      Hook: You will go ashore, pick up Tinker Bell, and bring her to me. UNDERSTAND?!
      • And twice Mr. Smee responds, "Aye-aye, sir!"
    • During Hook's intro scene when Smee scolds him for offing the pirate who was singing, telling him that it isn't good form:
      Hook: (calmly, at first) Good form, Mr. Smee? (gets angry and upends the table) BLAST GOOD FORM!!! DID PAN SHOW "GOOD FORM" WHEN HE DID THIS TO ME?!?
  • Super-Persistent Predator: The crocodile has stalked Hook for years, yearning to finish the job.
  • Team Mom: After Peter explains the concept of a 'mother' to Peter, he decides she can be the Team Mom for he and his boys.
  • Tempting Fate: George tells his wife on the way to the party that of all the ridiculous stories from their daughter, Peter Pan is wihtout a doubt the most so. As he is speaking, the camera pans up to the rooftop to Peter Pan sitting on top of it.
  • This Cannot Be!: Inverted and played straight: Hook has this very revelation when the pirates learn the answer of where's the splash that Wendy was supposed to have made after walking the plank: Peter Pan, having escaped being blown up by the Time Bomb that Hook tried to use to kill him, had saved her and then confronts Hook.
    Hook: It can't be!
    Smee: It's his blinkin' ghost what's talkin'!
    Hook: (drawing his sword to battle Peter) I assure you, this "ghost" has blood in his veins!
  • Time Bomb: What Hook tries to use to kill Peter instead of poison like the original.
  • Tonto Talk: The Indians all talk this way, even getting a whole musical number devoted to explaining why words like "How" and "Ugh" are defining marks of their culture. It's painful for several reasons.
  • Tranquil Fury: Peter in the final battle. Oh, he's still happy and playful during the whole ordeal, but he just got back to the ship after Tinker Bell almost died in an explosion, and he had also arrived just in time to save Wendy from falling into the water after walking the plank.
    Peter Pan: You're next, Hook! This time you've gone too far!!
  • Tribal Carry: When the Lost Boys are captured by the Indians.
  • Tribal Face Paint: The Indian chief and a couple of his warriors wear it, as does Michael while he's their guest.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: Check out the Darling parents — their father is a chubby, boorish old guy, and their mom looks pretty, young, and has a nice figure.
  • Underlighting: Underlighing was used to make Tinkerbell glow.
  • Vile Villain, Laughable Lackey: Captain Hook is one of Disney's more serious villains, and he has this dynamic with Smee, who was dumb enough to shave a seagull's tailfeathers while trying to shave Hook, and then think that he'd accidentally decapitated Hook after the gull flew away.
  • Villain Song: "A Pirate's Life" and "The Elegant Captain Hook".
  • Voice Changeling: Peter makes his voice sound like Hook's to trick Smee into returning Tiger Lily back to her tribe.
  • The Voiceless:
    • Tinker Bell. While she does talk in the book, it makes a bit of sense for the movie — See Fridge Brilliance in the Fridge tab.
    • Tiger Lily was reticent most of the time. However, she did speak at least once, when she let out a brief but water-stifled cry for help.
    • Tootles is the Lost Boy who speaks the least.
  • Wham Line: After presenting an unreasonable, pragmatic image throughout the film, Mr. Darling gets a glimpse of the flying ship and muses:
    George Darling: You know, I have the strangest feeling that I've seen that ship before. A long time ago... when I was very young.
  • Where's the Kaboom?: During the scene where Wendy walks the plank. Out of sight of the pirates, Pan rescues Wendy before she hits the water, and a Captain Obvious crewman remarks that there was no splash. Captain Hook seems annoyed at the insistence that there must be a splash when someone walks the plank, so he throws said crewman overboard to create one.
  • Why Did It Have to Be Crocodiles?!: Very, very justified in Hook's case — when your missing body part has converted an ordinary crocodile into a Super-Persistent Predator, you have ample reason to be antsy when that "tick-tock" starts up...
  • Wicked Cultured: Captain Hook, who has grand manners and a Sunday set case of hooks and also plays the harpsichord.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Disney/PeterPan