Disney: Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure

Disney's 1955 classic Lady and the Tramp is revisited in this new animated family video. The story finds Lady and Tramp the proud parents of a litter of pups that includes three well-behaved girls and one rambunctious boy puppy named Scamp (voiced by Scott Wolf). In search of adventure and a "real" dog life, Scamp strays far from home and meets the cute Angel (voiced by Alyssa Milano), Buster (voiced by Chazz Palminteri), and Buster's gang of Junkyard Dogs. Although he found the adventure he was looking for, Scamp finds his thoughts returning to home and the loved ones he left behind.

Here is the character sheet.

Tropes this Disney sequel provides examples of:

  • Adult Fear: Imagine that after a fight with your child, they run away when you're not looking.
  • An Aesop: The film's message is to treasure your family.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: Scamp wishes he could be a "wild dog", but after presumably losing Angel, caught by The Dogcatcher, and abandoned by Buster, the puppy soon realizes how wrong his ambition was.
  • Big Bad: Buster.
  • Betrayal by Inaction: Buster reveals his true nature to Scamp when he sees the puppy about to be taken in by the dog catcher and does nothing to help him, but simply walks away with a smirk.
  • Bowties Are Cool: At the Fourth of July picnic, Scamp's sister wear a bow version of their collars. Angel wears a pink bow after she's adopted by Scamp's family.
  • But Now I Must Go: Angel's sad reaction after Scamp gets reunited with his family. Scamp stops her.
  • Butt Monkey: The dogcatcher is constantly getting harassed by the Junkyard Dogs.
  • Can't Get Away with Nuthin' : The entire conflict is kicked off by Junior throwing a ball out the window, Scamp chasing it and bringing it back, Junior immediately throwing it again into the next room, and Scamp unintentionally making a mess as he goes after it. As punishment, he's chained outside and shamed by the entire family, save Lady.
  • Continuity Nod: The dogcatcher cart that Trusty caused to crash in the first movie is seen at the junkyard, and Angel refers to the family's neighbourhood as "snob hill", just as Tramp did in the original.
  • Demoted to Extra: Lady has a marginally smaller role in the sequel.
    • Si and Am don't have as many lines in this movie.
  • Dodgy Toupee: While looking for Scamp, his parents, Jock, and Trusty mistake a wig for him.
  • Everybody Lives: No one dies in the sequel. Not even Buster.
  • Flanderization: The dogcatcher in this film is even more of a Jerkass than in the first film; though he's still just doing his job, his assholish qualities seem to be played up here, particularly when he taunts Scamp after capturing him.
    The Dogcatcher: No collar? It's a one-way trip to the pound for you!
  • Generation Xerox: Scamp wants to be a "wild dog" who can come and go as he pleases, just like his father was.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: Buster (male grown dog) pursuing Angel (female teen-aged dog).
    • Another similar example is Ruby (female grown dog) flirting with Scamp (male teen-aged dog).
  • Hakuna Matata: The Junkyard Dogs give off shades of this.
  • Happily Adopted: See Happily Ever After.
  • Happily Ever After: Except for Buster, all of the Junkyard Dogs get adopted, Angel too in Scamp's family.
  • Hope Spot: After being caught by The Dogcatcher, Scamp sees Buster and barks at him for help, thinking that the older dog would help. He soon realizes that Buster isn't coming.
  • Hypocrite: For most of the film, Buster holds the philosophy "Buster's trouble is Buster's trouble," scoffing at the idea of helping others, and encouraging the rest of the Junkyard Dogs to feel the same way. After he gets trapped under a pile of garbage, he starts begging the others for help, saying "Buster's trouble is everybody's trouble!
  • I Just Want to Be Free: Scamp's song, A World Without Fences could be the song version of this trope.
  • "I Want" Song: See I Just Want to Be Free.
  • Jerk Ass: As noted above, the dogcatcher.
    • Buster turns out to be this as well.
    • Otis, a stray Chinese crested in the pound is this; He taunts Scamp after he is thrown into the same cell as Reggie, and cracks a joke at Tramp's expense when it looks like Scamp was killed by the vicious stray.
  • Like Father, Like Son: Jim and Junior when they are introduced to Angel do the same thing to get her to trust them.
  • Loose Lips: Out of impulse and wanting to stop the Junkyard Dogs' teasing, Scamp accidentally reveals that Angel wants to be a house dog.
  • Man Child: The Dogcatchher shows shades of this.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Scamp's reaction to revealing Angel's secret and being betrayed by Buster, who he thought would help him.
  • No Name Given: What's the name of the new dogcatcher?
  • The Nose Knows: Double subverted. At first when Trusty thinks he smells Scamp in the river, it's actually a wig. A few seconds later, Scamp reveals to have been in the river, but a little farther from his folks and uncles.
  • The Reveal: Scamp eventually learns that his father had been a famous stray dog, much to his shock.
  • Not So Different: After Scamp (on impulse) tells the Gang that it's Angel who want to be a "house dog", Angel coldly remarks that Scamp probably isn't different from the rest of them.
  • Official Couple: Angel and Scamp.
  • Puppy-Dog Eyes: This is what Jock, Trusty, Scamp's sisters, Lady, Tramp, Scamp and Angel do to convince Jim Dear to adopt Angel. Needless to say, it worked.
  • Ragtag Bunch of Misfits: The Junkyard Dogs. Except for Buster, they probably still hang out with each other after being adopted.
  • Retired Badass: Tramp.
  • Revenge by Proxy: Buster lets Scamp get taken away by the dogcatcher, just to spite his father.
  • Sanity Slippage: Buster briefly falls into this during his rant about Tramp becoming a housedog. On the final sentence, he actually sprays some spit, and his eyes have contracted into dots.
  • Shared Family Quirks: Scamp and Tramp have the same style of scratching behind their ears.
  • Spaghetti Kiss: Subverted for Rule of Funny. Scamp and Angel wind up at the same restaurant Scamp's parents visited, dine on an identical bowl of spaghetti, and even do the meatball push...and then proceed to devour the bowl in a very realistic, doggy manner.
  • Spin Off Spring: Lady and Tramp's son, Scamp, is The Protagonist.
  • Title Character: The sequel has Scamp's name in it along with his parents.
  • Tough Love: What Jim Dear and Tramp believe is best for Scamp.
  • Was Too Hard on Him: Tramp worries that Scamp ran away after he scolds his son for wanting to be a wild dog.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Angel calls out Scamp from willingly running away from a home where people really care about him.
  • You Are Grounded: Tramp tells this (in a way) to Scamp when the latter is being disrespectful.