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Disney: Big Hero 6

Disney + Marvel's Anime-ted film

Our origin story begins. We're gonna be SUPERHEROES!
Fred

Big Hero 6 is the 54th Disney Animated Canon film, inspired by the superhero comic book series of the same name by Marvel Comicsnote . It is Disney's first animated film featuring Marvel characters.note  Interestingly after years of dabbling in fantasy, mythology, and even games; without counting Pixar's The Incredibles, this is their animated canon's first superhero film.

In fictional San Fransokyo (a portmanteau of San Francisco and Tokyo), robotics prodigy brothers Hiro and Tadashi Hamada live with their aunt over a coffee and bakery shop, and Tadashi attends the prestigious university San Fransokyo Tech. Tadashi invents an inflatable all-purpose, gentle, child-like nurse robot named Baymax for the good of mankind and hopes it can be used in hospitals in the future, but a sad fate halts that dream. When a threat to the city arises caused by the mysterious criminal Yokai, Hiro upgrades Baymax into a fighting, flying machine and recruits his four best friends to form the ultimate superhero team Big Hero 6 to stop him!

Big Hero 6 was released on November 7th, 2014, accompanied by the short film Feast.

Previews: Sneak Peek. Teaser trailer. Trailer 1. Trailer 2 Japanese trailer.

Full Recap: (spoiler-tagged)

This film provides examples of:

  • Accidental Murder: The cause of Tadashi's death.
  • Action Girl: Honey Lemon and Gogo both qualify.
  • Adapted Out: Silver Samurai and Sunfire do not appear in this movie, as the film rights to the X-Men franchise are owned by 20th Century Fox, not Disney or Marvel. Not that they would fit in anyway, since the film's world is now a more tech-based sci-fi world, and mutants with superpowers would seem very out of place.
  • Adorkable: Hiro. Actually the whole team save GoGo, who's really too much of a tomboy badass to count.
  • Adult Fear: Professor Callaghan starts his quest for revenge after losing his daughter. Though in context, it doesn't quite fit, as it's a bit more fantastical, due to an error that results in her being sucked into a portal.
  • Aerith and Bob: Subverted. There are names like Cass, Abigail, Fred, Hiro, and Tadashi alongside Gogo, Honey Lemon, and Wasabi — but the latter three are nicknames.
  • Affectionate Parody: Appears to be one to token anime hero archetypes, such as The Kid with the Remote Control, Master Swordsman, Magical Girl Warrior, Ace Pilot and a Kaiju.
  • All There in the Manual: A good chunk of the characters' backstories are only mentioned in pre-release materials. Also, antagonist Yokai is never named in the film.
    • Also the filmmakers had the idea that San Fransokyo is based in a parallel universe in which San Francisco was largely rebuilt by Japanese immigrants in the aftermath of the devastating 1906 earthquake (hence the rename), although this premise is never actually stated in the film.
  • Alternative Foreign Theme Song: The Japanese version of the movie uses Ai's "Story" as the ending theme. Amusingly enough, even though the artist originally sang it in Japanese, it instead uses the English version of the song.
  • Always with You: Baymax tells this to Hiro as he allows the latter to leave the dimension with Callaghan's daughter.
  • American Kirby Is Hardcore: Rare inversion. The American trailer focuses more on action and comedy, while the Japanese trailer delves more into the drama of the story. This has the resulting effect of Japanese film goers being unprepared for the amount of action found within the movie.
  • Americasia: San Fransokyo.
  • And the Adventure Continues: The film ends on this note, with the Big Hero 6 now established, on to their next crime fighting patrol together.
  • Anger Born of Worry: Tadashi, when he rescues Hiro from some thugs at the robo-fight. Shortly after, Aunt Cass when she has to bail Hiro and Tadashi out of jail.
  • Animesque:
    • Downplayed in the film itself, which keeps the traditional Disney style for the most part, though there are still hints that it's influenced by anime (Hiro's hair comes to mind). However, as far as marketing is concerned, several toys and plushiesnote  are made ostensibly in this style and it's even getting its own official Manga adaptation through Yen Press.
    • The end credits definitely apply here, as the characters are drawn in typical anime and manga format with Marvel comics pastels and printing.
  • Another Dimension: Entirely ambiguous as to what is up with the world within the portal.
  • Apocalyptic Log: Not exactly recounting the apocalypse, but the tie-in book Hiro's Journal shows us the events of the movie from the perspective of diary entries.
  • Arc Words: "Will X improve your emotional state?" When Baymax takes Hiro's mental health into consideration.
  • Armor-Piercing Question:
    • Delivered by Baymax in the wake of Hiro's attempted murder of Yokai/Callaghan.
      "Will terminating Callaghan improve your emotional state?"
    • As well as:
      "Is this what Tadashi would have wanted?"
  • Ascended Fanboy: Fred, who's an obvious fan of Comic Books and Kaiju, ends up becoming a kaiju-based comic book hero.
  • Badass Bookworms: Most of the team are already in a field of science and will use their own field when they officially form the team.
  • Berserk Button:
    • Hiro turns Baymax into a killing machine when Yokai/ Callaghan says Tadashi's death was his own fault.
    • Yokai/ Callaghan doesn't take it well when Krei calls the loss of his daughter a setback.
  • Big Bad: Yokai aka Professor Callaghan.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: Baymax's sole motivation is the survival and physical health of his patients, making him hard to work with at first. He becomes much more co-operative when he adds Mental Health to the list and is convinced that helping Hiro will improve his mental health. He also considers just about everyone a patient.
  • A Boy and His Robot: Hiro and Baymax.
  • Brain–Computer Interface: The microbots are controlled by a headband neural interface, which Yokai incorporated into his kabuki mask.
  • Brick Joke:
    • The picture of Fred's parents may look familiar to Marvel fans. It shows up again in The Stinger and his dad really is a Stan Lee cameo.
    • Baymax takes a Scotch tape dispenser from a cop's desk while patching himself up. During the credits, Hiro gives the cop a ribbon-wrapped new one.
  • Broken Pedestal: When Hiro meets Professor Callaghan, he clearly idolizes him. Which makes the realization that Callaghan was responsible for Tadashi's death even harder to take.
  • But Not Too Foreign: A rare non-character example with the city of San Fransokyo, a mash-up of California and Japan.
  • Call Back:
    • When Hiro first meets Baymax, he suggests to Tadashi that Baymax would charge faster if he used supercapacitors instead of a lithium-ion battery. Later in the movie, Baymax recharges in mere seconds—apparently Tadashi took his brother's advice!
    • At the end of the movie, Hiro hurls himself into the Portal because "someone needs help" despite the possibility of it exploding, just like Tadashi did when he ran into the fire.
    • Baymax gives Hiro his I Can Not Self Terminate instructions when they first meet. Those words come back in the climax.
    • "I am satisfied with my care," the phrase that causes Baymax to deactivate.
    • "Tadashi is here," said by Baymax. He has a video of Tadashi in his memory, which he uses to snap Hiro out of his Heroic BSOD.
    • "Megabot, Destroy", the command Hiro gave to his fighting robot in the beginning used to a chilling effect when he told Baymax to kill Callaghan.
    • "Last hug."
    • "Try looking at things from a different angle," said whenever Hiro is trying to find a solution to his problems.
    • "Flying makes me a better healthcare companion" First said as a question by Baymax and later as an affirmation of knowing what Hiro needs him to do.
  • Calling Your Attacks:
    • Fred seems to enjoy this. In the climax, everyone does this in true anime fashion.
    • Hiro does this whenever Baymax attacks, though it's justified because Baymax doesn't know when to attack, so Hiro is giving him instructions on what to do. Until Baymax does it himself.
  • The Cameo: Stan Lee appears in The Stinger, rounding out the Brick Joke.
  • Cast of Snowflakes: Thanks to Disney's new Hyperion rendering engine, not only does every named character have a unique face, but so does every unnamed character.
  • Chase Scene: The team's first encounter with Yokai, before they've built their super-suits, ends with them fleeing in a car with Yokai pursuing. Starts out very comedic, with Fred geeking out and Wasabi insisting on obeying red lights and road rules, but gets more serious and dramatic as it progresses.
  • Chekhov's Gun:
    • Tadashi's advice to "look at things from a different angle" initially helps Hiro figure out what to make to get into a science college. In the final battle, it helps the heroes escape Yokai's clutches when he has each of them cornered.
    • Baymax's upgraded medical scanner. It's what allows him to see Abigail Callaghan through the Krei portal.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: There are only 14 named characters in the ENTIRE film. (15 if you include Stan Lee in the stinger) Now subtract the titular six big heroes, and the mystery villain himself. Now remove the four who are obviously supporting characters or extras. That leaves exactly three characters who could be the villain. The first guy would require some extremely out-of-character justification to make him the villain, and he very definitely dies heroically early on. The second guy is blatantly implied to be a bad guy through the whole movie. The third guy exists only to be idolized by the hero and warn him that, no, really, that second guy is REALLY bad, and then he dies as well. Except we don't ever see his body. Now, take a wild guess who the villain actually is.
    • Although to be fair, everything that was mentioned in favor of suspect three could just as easily be applied just as equally to suspect one and vice versa. Additionally, both their pictures were shown at the funeral, and there were a ton of fans gunning for suspect one to be the villain.
  • Chekhov's Skill: Hiro's friends' areas of scientific expertise are all shown in their introductory scene—Gogo's maglev bike, Wasabi's plasma laser cutter, and Honey's chemical know-how—and all of these end up as the focuses of their respective suits. Fred, on the other hand, has no scientific knowledge, but he sure knows how to spin a sign, which becomes useful in the climax.
  • City of Adventure: San Fransokyo, obviously.
  • Close on Title: The movie's title is the last thing to appear before the credits, following a shot of the team jumping towards the screen and Hiro narrating, "Who are we?"
  • Color-Coded Characters: The titular team. While in their hero suits, each has their own color scheme.
    • Baymax = Red, with purple highlights
    • Hiro = Purple, with red highlights
    • GoGo = Yellow and black
    • Wasabi = Green and blue—exception to this would be his iconic headband, which is orange
    • Fred = Blue with orange highlights, yellow "eyes"
    • Honey Lemon = Pink, with orange highlights and darker purples. Her chemical balls also default to warm colours like orange, red, and purple before being injected and thrown.
  • Comic Book Adaptation: The movie is getting a Manga adaptation. Also counts as a Recursive Adaptation, since the film itself is based on a comic book series.
  • Comic Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Inverted. We never learn the real name of Wasabi, Gogo and Honey Lemon.
  • Connected All Along: Abigail turns out to be Yokai/Robert Callaghan's daughter.
  • Cool Down Hug: Hiro, still clearly upset with himself for wanting revenge against Callaghan, apologizes to the others for going off the deep end. GoGo surprises everyone by shutting Hiro up with a hug.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive:
    • Alistair Krei appears to be one, being more focused on profit than standards, which combined with his interest in Hiro's microbots leads the team to believe he's Yokai. He's not, and appears to be a generally decent person under it all. Evidence of his alleged "cutting corners" amounts to his pushing his portal demo forward with Abigail as the human test subject, despite the diagnostics reading an irregularity. Abigail, notably, went ahead with the demo willingly, and Krei pushing the project forward despite the risk is mostly due to the presence of a very imposing general, whose approval would determine whether Krei would get the backing to move the project ahead.
    • Comes up as Conversational Troping by Fred, who shows the gang various comics where corrupt businessmen are the main villains.
  • Creative Closing Credits: The credits include a Where Are They Now epilogue drawn in the style of Japanese anime mixed in with Marvel comics textures.
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: At first, we are led to believe that the Big Bad Yokai is Krei, which leads to the question why he would go through the trouble of stealing Hiro's microbots and start using them for supervillain schemes instead of patenting them and selling them. However, this is subverted later on when the true identity of Yokai is revealed as Callaghan, who is motivated by revenge, not profit.
  • Dare to Be Badass: Tadashi invokes this in a subtle manner when, instead of taking Hiro to another robo-fight, he takes him to his lab at San Fransokyo Tech and introduces him to Professor Callaghan and the other students in his "nerd lab", and then shows him Baymax. He hopes to inspire Hiro to do more with his life than compete in illegal robo-fighting, and by the time they leave the lab, Hiro makes it his goal to attend San Fransokyo Tech.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Apparently it's a Hamada family trait.
  • Death by Irony: Yokai attempts to invoke this on Alistair Krei by killing him with the same teleporter that enveloped Yokai's daughter.
  • Death by Origin Story: At its core, the film is a Disney Deconstruction of both the hero and villain variants of this trope. Hiro is deeply affected by Tadashi's death, not even eating or going to the school he just got accepted to, despite that being what both he and Tadashi wanted. And when he finds out that the person (Callaghan) Tadashi died trying to save not only survived, but actually caused his death and then coldly dismissed it, Hiro loses it and tries to kill Callaghan immediately afterwards. For Callaghan, even though Abigail turns out to still be alive, her perceived death is enough to turn him into a revenge driven supervillain who has no regard for the people he hurts along his path of revenge. The only difference is that Hiro has the support of his friends and family to keep him from going through with revenge, while Callaghan has no one and thus is not as easily convinced to give it up.
  • Death Is Such an Odd Thing: Baymax is momentarily perplexed by how a young man in good physical health like Tadashi could suddenly die.
  • Detachment Combat: Hiro's battle robot in the beginning appears to be easily bisected in the first round. In the second, it pulls itself together, then pulls itself apart to wrap around the opposing robot and unscrew its arms.
  • Devil in Plain Sight: The movie doesn't bat around anything and immediately paints Krei as this. It's trying to trick you.
  • Diabolus Ex Machina: When Hiro and Baymax are helping Abigail out of hyperspace, one last chunk of debris that they didn't see coming crashes into them, disabling Baymax's rocket boosters and forcing him to perform a Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Disney Death: At the climax, Baymax sacrifices himself to save Hiro and the person they're rescuing. He's lost forever in the void—except he gave Hiro the chip containing his programming, memory, and consciousness, so Hiro can build him a new body and bring him back.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: Baymax on low battery power comes off a lot like drunkenness.
  • Drives Like Crazy: GoGo Tomago. Comes with the territory of being a bike courier.
  • Drunk on Milk: When Baymax is losing energy, his body starts deflating and he moves, walks, and talks as if he's incredibly drunk.
  • Dude, Not Funny!: invoked One of the books has Tadashi asking his brother for ideas for a new invention. Hiro came up with a fire-breathing invention, but Tadashi "wasn't into that".
  • Easter Egg: One of Fred's comics is published by "DPIX (Disney Pictures) Comics".
  • Edible Theme Naming: Wasabi, GoGo Tomago (corruption of Japanese tamago), and Honey Lemon. The cat's name is Mochi. The odd nature of them is lampshaded by Hiro; Tadashi mentions the names being given by Fred. Wasabi's in particular came from a Never Live It Down incident, while the origins of the ladies' respective nicknames goes unsaid.
  • Eldritch Location: The only possible way to describe the dimension Abigail Callaghan was accidentally sent to.
  • Enhance Button: Security footage was drastically magnified to reveal plot sensitive information.
  • Eureka Moment: While trying to come up with a project to demonstrate at the student expo, Hiro notices his battle-bot, which is composed of three units that are magnetically bound together. He comes up with the idea of constructing millions of miniature versions of his battle-bot units, which he calls "micro-bots".
  • Everything Is An I Pod In The Future: Played with; while the rest of San Fransokyo looks like early 21st century America, Baymax invokes this trope with his all-white body, minimalist design, and rounded surfaces. The San Fransokyo Tech labs also have a similar look, albeit a little more colorful.
  • Evil Makeover: The microbots themselves. When Hiro demonstrates their use, the batch has a gray scheme and they reform themselves into various hard architectural shapes, emphasizing their use as beneficial machines. Yokai's collection, however, is all encompassing black, stretches and spreads, and generally comes off more alien and menacing.
  • Expy: Besides their comic counterparts, Disney's Big Hero 6 are also partially inspired by a few Marvel heroes and other fictional characters. For example: Hiro being a combination of Peter Parker and Tony Stark.
  • Face Palm: Hiro adopts this pose at the end of the first trailer after his attempt to suit up Baymax ends in failure.
  • Five-Man Band:
    • The Hero: Hiro — The protagonist. The one with the vision and the purpose who gets the team together to avenge a slain loved one.
    • The Lancer: GoGo — The grim, stoic twenty-something woman, contrasting with Hiro's energetic, idealistic Kid Hero. The first to take charge when Hiro doesn't.
    • The Smart Guy: Wasabi — The orderly, strategic one with the most refined technical skills.
    • The Big Guy: Fred — The loud, boisterous one, and the only one without scientific training. Eventually dons a robot suit that makes him resemble a brutish monster.
    • The Chick: Honey Lemon — The happy, optimistic one with the people skills.
    • Team Pet/Sixth Ranger: Baymax.
  • Five-Token Band: Due to the Race Lift: Hiro is biracial (half Japanese and half Caucasian), Wasabi is black, Honey Lemon is Hispanic, Fred is white, and GoGo is Korean.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • The scene where Krei tries to tell Hiro that he could make a lot of money with his inventions.
    • Right after Baymax unpacks himself for the second time, Hiro starts tinkering with his fighting robot. He talks to him for a few seconds and already he's starting to snap out of his depression.
    • It's funny when Hiro changes the face on his fighting robot from smiley to angry. When he does the same to Baymax, it's not nearly as funny.
    • The way Baymax catches Hiro when they're tumbling out of a warehouse window. It's the same general sequence of shots as when Baymax protects Hiro from the debris in the portal dimension. It also hints at Baymax's heroic spirit (and by extension, Tadashi's) where he considers the life of the people around him important enough to risk his own personal well-being.
    • When Hiro learns the fire wasn't an accident, the background music becomes darker, indicating a possible Start of Darkness.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus:
    • Guess who's wanted by the police of San Fransokyo? Prince Hans! In the same scene, when the shot cuts to Hiro and Baymax fleeing the station, pictures of Bolt and Ester (who ran the pound in the same film) can be seen on the officer's desk.
    • On the left side of that background, there is a wanted poster for Flynn Rider as well. And there are likely several in Hiro and Tadashi's room with all the action figures and posters. A prominent one appears to be a large clock using either Gigantor or a Mazinger, though the arms seem to always be showing the same time throughout.
    • One of Fred's throw pillows features the face of Stitch, as does one of the framed photos in Hiro's house.
    • When the gang is talking in Fred's den, there are models of the Marvel villains Black Talon and Orka in the background.
  • Funny Background Event: Hiro tries to sneak Baymax past Cass while she's not looking.
    • At the very end of the scene where Hiro describes his first encounter with Yokai to the police officer, the officer's computer monitor can be seen. He's playing a game of solitaire on it.
  • Gentle Giant: Baymax.
  • Gone Horribly Right: In one story of the Comic Book Adaptation, Fred asks Hiro to make an invisible suit. Hiro does such a good job that neither him nor Fred can find it afterwards.
  • Happily Adopted: Hiro and Tadashi are both on good terms with their Aunt. Hiro even mentions that he never knew his parents since they died when he was three, but it's obvious he considers Cass his mom.
  • Hard Work Montage: Parodied when Hiro sets out to design something impressive for the expo. "Eye of the Tiger" plays, he sets up his drafting space — and then it comes to an abrupt halt when he can't think of anything to design. Then played straight when he comes up with his project, and the scene cuts to a fast-forward montage of Hiro filling up several recycling bins with his microbots.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Baymax performs this in the end, launching Hiro and Abigail out of the portal at the cost of stranding himself in hyperspace. He ultimately survives as he stashes his original data chip in the rocket fist used for the launch.
  • Head Desk: Hiro does this when he fails to come up with any ideas for the student expo.
    Hiro: Nothing! No ideas! Useless, empty brain!
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Several in a row!
    • Callaghan attempts to bring poetic justice upon Krei for killing his daughter by destroying his entire company, and then Krei himself, through the same portal that took his daughter.
    • However, Hiro wrecks Callaghan's plan by luring his microbot swarms to the portal, depriving him of his only weapon.
    • ...and the portal undoes Callaghan's original motive by allowing Baymax and Hiro to rescue his daughter from the dimension, rendering his revenge plan all for naught.
  • Honor Before Reason: Tadashi's sense of nobility is what ultimately leads to his death. It's certainly very courageous that he goes into a building COMPLETELY engulfed in flames to save Callaghan, but this is especially lacking in reason because of two things: not only is there nothing but one account that Callaghan is still inside that leads Tadashi to go in, but Tadashi doesn't even consider that his hot-headed 14-year-old brother will go in after him, which Hiro does in fact attempt to do after a moment's hesitation.
  • Hyperspace Is a Scary Place: Also a mind-numbingly gorgeous place, but you wouldn't want to be stuck there forever.
  • I Am Not Left-Handed: In the robot fight in the beginning, Hiro pits his seemingly useless bot against the champion's bigger bot. After his bot is easily smashed, Hiro doubles the stakes then has his bot reassemble itself, revealing that the little robot is actually far more dangerous than its appearance would suggest.
  • I Can Not Self Terminate: One of the reasons Baymax needed Hiro to give the command. Otherwise, Baymax's desire to stay with Hiro and Abigail would have been stronger than his capability to fire his fist.
  • If You Kill Him, You Will Be Just Like Him: After almost having Baymax destroy Callaghan, Hiro learns that he would be no different from Callaghan if he killed him out of vengeance for Tadashi like Callaghan is trying to kill Krei out of vengeance for his daughter, so Hiro chooses to spare Callaghan instead of delivering the final blow at the end of their final battle.
  • Ignored Expert: Krei ignored the warnings raised by his own engineer during the live demonstration of his teleportation experiment, leading to the apparent death of Professor Callaghan's daughter. At the same time, however, the expert clearly wasn't panicking, and Krei did check the screen to make sure everything was still within the parameters that had been set.
  • Implacable Man: Yokai enjoys chasing Hiro, Baymax, and even the rest of his team, with aid from microbots all around San Fransokyo!
  • Inspired By: In as much as Frozen could be considered "adapted" from Hans Christian Andersen's fairytale, Big Hero 6 takes massive strides with its characters and source material. Marvel has even gone on record that they wanted Disney to make it an original film of their own and have no plans to rerelease the comics which may interfere with the film.
    The characters and stories that have appeared in our comics are very different from what they are in the film. We wanted the Disney folks to be able to create their own unique style and story, unencumbered by those older stories.
  • Ironic Echo: "Are you satisfied with your care?"
  • It Always Rains at Funerals: It suddenly rains while Hiro's family attends Tadashi's funeral.
  • The Jeeves: Heathcliff.
  • Killer Rabbit: Hiro's battle bot looks like a cheap, poorly-made toy at first glance. However, it's actually made up of three independently moving parts that are impossible to catch and can tear other robots apart. Bonus points in that its default form looks like a black robot rabbit due to the three part's joints.
  • Late-Arrival Spoiler: The trailers never really tried to hide the fact that Tadashi dies, although it happens early in the film.
  • Literal-Minded: Baymax. Justified, as he's a robot and takes words at their face value. He easily learns what expressions are, however. This is also in effect when Baymax suffers a Disney Death. He tells Hiro that "he will always be with him" and at first it appears to be a figurative thing to encourage Hiro to save himself, but it turns out he was referring to his central programming chip that he took out, letting Hiro easily bring him back.
  • Malevolent Masked Man: The main villain is a man in a trench coat and Kabuki mask with an army of microbots he controls with telepathy. His design would be the sort of thing you'd expect to see in a hardcore action game, not a Disney film.
  • Market-Based Title: The film is called Baymax in Japan.
  • Mascot: Fred describes himself as "school mascot by day, but by night...I am also a school mascot."
  • Meaningful Echo:
    • Hiro quotes Tadashi's motivational speech to spur the team to save themselves from Yokai.
    • Baymax saying "Tadashi is here."
  • Multinational Team: Likely the reason behind the race lifts.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Fred once asked Honey Lemon to devise a formula for him that would allow him to turn into a giant lizard monster at will. This is pretty close to his superpower in the Big Hero 6 comics. Also serves as Foreshadowing.
    • Honey kissing Hiro is a nod to the fact she and Hiro were love interests in the original comic book, before he met someone closer to his own age.
    • The costumes of several obscure Marvel characters can be seen in Fred's room. These include Sleepwalker, Black Talon, Orka, and Manphibian.
    • There is a statue in Fred's house that looks almost identical to his Kaiju form in the comics, just with an extra pair of arms.
  • Nanomachines: The microbots act like them, though individual units are quite visible with the naked eye.
  • Never Found the Body: Tadashi and Callaghan's bodies are never recovered from the fire, so it's presumed that they both died. In reality, only Tadashi died; Callaghan used Hiro's microbots to shield himself from the fire and faked his death in order to plot his vengeance against Krei.
  • Never Live It Down: In-Universe, Wasabi's nickname comes from having spilled the condiment on his shirt just once.
  • Never Say "Die":
    • "Dead" is used only once. The rest of the time, the characters, after a noticeable pause, say "Gone" instead. It reflects how uncomfortable everyone is about the subject.
    • "Kill", however, is used a few times in one chase sequence.
    • One notable example is when Hiro tells Baymax to "destroy" Yokai, after learning that he's Callaghan, who is responsible for the explosion that killed Tadashi. In real life, even professional killers, like soldiers, tend to euphemize murder, much less a 14-year old boy - a nice callback to his own bot fighter being commanded to ruthlessly destroy his opponent in the intro. In the aftermath, the two use "terminate" repeatedly.
      • The aftermath of this has the rest of the team declare that they never agreed to kill Callaghan, but the wording is awkwardly vague ("wasn't part of the plan", "never signed on for this", etc.) because they have to avoid using the actual word.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain/Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: Odd variants - while Hiro's wrath does allow Callaghan to get away, it does allow his ultimate plan, using the portal that sucked in Callaghan's daughter to succeed... and if it hadn't, Baymax would have never detected Callaghan's daughter on the other side of the portal, leaving her forever lost in the void.
  • The Nicknamer: Fred is responsible for Wasabi's, Honey Lemon's, and GoGo's nicknames.
  • No Hugging, No Kissing: Well, lots of hugging and a couple of cheek kisses, but as far as romance goes, there is none.
  • Noodle Incident: We know that Wasabi got his nickname because he spilled wasabi on his shirt, but no explanation is given for how Honey and GoGo got their nicknames.
  • No Plans, No Prototype, No Backup: Nicely averted; Hiro rebuilds Baymax at the end of the movie. Given that Tadashi was an engineering student, it makes sense that he'd have saved the schematics.
    • A prototype endoskeleton can actually be seen in several scenes.
  • Off Model: While it isn't obvious at first, Honey Lemon's face has a slightly different construction depending on whether or not she's in her suit.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: Honey, GoGo and Wasabi are all nicknames courtesy of Fred. Their real names are unknown. note 
  • Only Sane Man: Wasabi frequently plays this role for the team, remaining grounded when everyone else is getting overly enthusiastic or excited. However, GoGo is the only one who remains calm during a dangerous scenario.
  • Overly Long Gag:
    • While at the police station, Baymax has some holes in his left arm, which begin deflating... loudly. He then very slowly borrows some tape from a policeman's desk and plugs the holes one by one. Once he finishes, his right arm starts leaking...
    • When Baymax is activated behind Tadashi's bed, in order to get to Hiro, he looks down, considers, sidles left, looks down, considers, turns, looks down, considers, sidles left again...
  • Parental Abandonment: Hiro and Tadashi's parents were both killed in an unspecified accident when Hiro was three.
  • People in Rubber Suits: Fred wears a monster costume... that breathes fire.
  • Personal Arcade: Fred has several arcade video game cabinets among the action figures and comic books in his mansion.
  • Personality Chip: Baymax has a base personality/medical one installed by Tadashi with more slots in the port for more skills. This comes in handy when Baymax gives it to Hiro before his Heroic Sacrifice at the end, allowing Hiro to restore his personality when his original body is lost.
  • Pink Means Feminine: Honey Lemon wears a lot of pink as part of her superhero persona. Plus, when Tadashi introduces her to Hiro, she demonstrates her metal embrittlement compound, which turns a four-hundred pound ball of tungsten carbide pink before converting it to dust.
  • Police Are Useless: After the villain attacks Hiro, the kid tries to report him to the authorities. Unfortunately, saying that a man in a kabuki mask attacked him with an army of flying mind-controlled microbots doesn't really get the police to believe him.
  • Popping Buttons: The first trailer has Hiro learning what happens when you try to stuff a large, squishy robot like Baymax into armor that he could barely fit into.
  • Proud to Be a Geek: Invoked and implied throughout. In fact, this whole movie could be seen as a nerd empowerment piece.
  • Race Lift: Wasabi is black, Honey is Hispanic, and Fred is white, while they were all Asian in the comics. GoGo is still Asian, but she is now Korean rather than Japanese. Hiro is now half white, most likely to match with his voice actor who shares the same mixed heritage.
  • Ragtag Bunch of Misfits: Our hero team consists of a teen genius, a squishy robot, a high-strung sushi chef, a daredevil courier, a lanky chemistry geek, and a comic book fanboy. In their first fight, they end up accidentally interfering with each other.
  • Reality Ensues:
    • What happens (in the teaser) when Hiro tries to shove the squishy, pear-shaped Baymax (who is essentially a hugging robot) into a suit of armor. After a few seconds of looking heroic in it, all the armor promptly pops off.
    • In the movie proper, it turns out that just making Powered Armor and practicing a bit won't actually prepare you to fight a supervillain willing to kill you, especially as a team.
    • The video clip of Tadashi shows that it took dozens of attempts just to get Baymax to start up right, with him having to repeatedly work out the various kinks that kept popping up each time. Almost any engineering student can attest to how much Truth in Television that is.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: When Hiro removes Baymax's caregiver memory card and leaves him with only the combat information, rendering him a remorseless attacker perfectly capable of killing without hesitation, his eyes glow red.
  • Red Herring:
    • Krei is not the Big Bad.
    • A few scenes give Baymax's batteries pointed note, with Hiro and Tadashi mentioning the type of battery used and Baymax's Low Battery drunkenness. However, ultimately, nothing comes of it.
  • Revenge: A driving theme of the movie is how corruptive a motivation this is: Professor Callaghan became Yokai to avenge his daughter's apparent death, becoming He Who Fights Monsters in the process, and this almost happens to Hiro as well in his desire to avenge Tadashi on Callaghan.
  • Rewind, Replay, Repeat: When Hiro and company find the footage from Project Silent Sparrow, they rewind several parts and replay them as they try to piece together who Yokai is and what his motive could be.
  • Robot Buddy: Baymax, played straight. Hiro sometimes finds him difficult to work with at first, but this is because Baymax's Benevolent A.I. programming is functioning as designed.
  • Running Gag: Baymax fistbumping and saying "Bata-lata-la".
  • Scenery Porn:
    • San Fransokyo is gorgeous. The rendering was so intensive to get the level of detail that was achieved (with special computational engines designed to create both the background characters and all the trees as well as the texture modeling and lighting) that Disney had to create their own supercomputer cluster just to get what they were after.
    • So is the world beyond the portal, with rubble from Krei Industries making some nice Scenery Gorn to go with.
  • Science Hero: The eponymous Big Hero Six all receive their powers from super-science and engineering.
  • Screams Like a Little Girl: Wasabi, the largest and toughest-looking of the team, screams like a little girl when he's nearly crushed by a shipping container thrown by Yokai.
  • Sentai: They're a color-coded Japanese-esque superhero team. Not much else you can call it.
  • Senseless Sacrifice: Tadashi went back into the burning science hall to save Professor Callaghan. Not only did he fail to save Callaghan, it's later revealed that the microbots protected Callaghan - who set the fire - from the fire anyway. Hiro does NOT take it well upon finding out his brother died for nothing.
  • Shadow Archetype: Callaghan/Yokai is one to Hiro — brilliant, but driven by revenge to the point of throwing away his morals. While Hiro is pulled back from the edge before he goes too far, Callaghan isn't.
  • Shared Family Quirks: Cass, Tadashi, and Hiro are all Deadpan Snarkers, although the amount of snark varies for each of them.
  • Ship Tease: Honey gives Hiro cheek kisses and he looks stunned. And if one looks closely, you can see him blushing.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The sneak peak features footage from Wreck-It Ralph on a big screen at the center-left. If you listen closely you can even hear some of the Japanese-dubbed lines.
      • Some of the toys Hiro accidentally causes to fall off his shelf include a baby Cy-Bug and a Hero's Duty soldier. If one looks closely, the soldier seems to have a bit of a gut, so it might even be Ralph himself dressed up in the armor.
      • Fred has a life-sized Hero's Duty figure in his room. And apparently one of Satan/Satine as well.
    • Characters from Frozen and Bolt make appearances in Freeze Frame Bonuses.
    • Hiro has a clock in his room showing a robot that looks like the love child of Tetsujin 28-go and Mazinger Z.
    • Speaking of which, Baymax's iconic "Rocket Fist" is an immediate call out to Mazinger Z's signature attack.
    • Prince Hans is on a wanted poster at the police station. Next to it is one of Flynn Rider's wanted posters.
      • Additionally, when Hiro and Baymax take off on their first flight, they crash into a statue of Prince Hans. And nothing of value was lost.
    • At the tech, Fred holds up a comic book that has an Expy of the Incredible Hulk on the cover.
    • During the scene where Honey uses a blowtorch, closer inspection shows that the dragon on the blowtorch looks very similar to the dragon that sometimes appears in the Japanese Dragon Ball logo.
    • Who knew GoGo had awesome Drift Racing skills?
    • While obscure elsewhere, viewers who have been to Japan may notice the Chocobi candy mascot in the credits.
    • Not to mention the pale looking Domo cameo in the credits.
    • The teleportation devices look suspiciously similar to Stargates.
    • The supplemental materials show that Fred got to be the school's mascot based on a letter of recommendation from one R. Richards. The letter was addressed to one T. Dugan.
    • In Fred's room, there are two video game cabinets. The one on the right is a Lawyer-Friendly Cameo of Area 51 titled "District 51", down to the lettering and not-a-Kronn.
      • On his bed are a red and blue pillow. They are of the title characters of Lilo & Stitch.
    • One of the toys in the background of Hiro and Tadashi's room is a plushie with a red head and wide yellow eyes poking up out of a box. Likely, this is Ultraman.
    • During the portal test, a technician notices some anomalous readings, but is told that they are within acceptable limits and the test should proceed.
    • The reveal trailer is very similar in premise to The Incredibles reveal trailer, featuring a plus size hero attempting to fit into a red supersuit, which proceeds to explode due to the hero's midsection.
    • The beginning of the movie where there was a remote-controlled robot fight might remind some of Real Steel. One of the robots even looks like Noisy Boy.
    • The confrontation and pleading between Yokai and Krei is reminiscent of a similar showdown from The Princess Bride.
      "I can give you anything you want!"
      "I - want - my - daughter - BACK!"
    • Wasabi and Fred's interactions regarding how to defeat Yokai on Akuma Island is similar to the "plan of attack" scene from The Avengers, as seen here.
    • The costumes of several obscure Marvel characters can be seen in Fred's room. These include Sleepwalker, Black Talon, Orka, Manphibian, and Turbo.
    • The credits sequence includes a lot of imagery designed to invoke this, such as a suit of armor looking suspiciously like Speedy Cerviche/Yattarou.
    • As there is a robot protagonist, The Terminator gets a shout out when things get dangerous, such as unplugging a Morality Chip causing grim determination and - for some reason - red eyes.
    • Baymax's Heroic Sacrifice is a reference to The Iron Giant. Both are huge robots saving their master's lives at the cost of their own. Both also live on in either a personality chip or a way of rebuilding themselves.
    • GoGo being an Asian tomboyish Action Girl with a purple streak in her hair? Where has that shown up before?
    • Yokai's design, especially his mask, might remind some anime fans of a certain Shinigami's Hollow mask.
    • The design on Hiro's T-shirt appears to be a Mecha styled Iron Man.
  • Shown Their Work:
    • In creating the film's version of Baymax, Disney's Chief Creative Officer John Lasseter had the Big Hero 6 team do a lot of research into robotics, with the help of places like Caltech. Baymax being made from inflatable vinyl is an actual thing, being developed by engineers at Carnegie Mellon, and even more so for his field of work - "soft robotics" with vinyl are meant to not hurt patients when they're picked up.
    • San Fransokyo may be a mashup of San Francisco and Tokyo, but it incorporates a lot of accurate native details from both cities.
    • A McMaster-Carr catalog is shown on the lab table at the end of the film, found in science and engineering labs around the world.
    • Honey Lemon mentions actual chemical names. Not only that, but Tungsten Carbide is actually capable of being made into powder quite easily. Her "four hundred pound" ball of it, however, would really be about four thousand (unless it's hollow). Tungsten Carbide is very, very dense.
    • Honey occasionally pronounces Hiro's name in a manner closer to how it would be pronounced in Japanese, although her voice actress states it to actually be a usage of Latina accent instead.
    • The 3D printer Hiro uses to make Baymax's first suit of armor is completely realistic apart from being incredibly fast. It prints columns of support material to hold up the parts as they're being printed and the parts' surface finish is exactly what you'd expect from fused deposition modeling. We also see a futuristic (but plausible) 3D printer building up metal parts layer by layer.
  • Spiritual Antithesis: To The Incredibles, which featured a predominantly white Badass Family cast (and a token minority), with innate superpowers facing a tech based villain and his robot, who do not balk at killing their enemies. This movie, on the other hand, features a racially diverse lineup of unrelated-by-blood heroes with their powers derived from technology based on their individual expertise alongside a robot among their ranks, all of whom adhere to Thou Shalt Not Kill, while the villain is motivated by the loss of his daughter.
  • Spoonerism: At one point, when Baymax's batteries are low, he utters, "I am health care, your personal Baymax companion."
  • Squick: In-universe. After Fred regales the group with how he manages to get 4 days out of his underwear, Wasabi visibly and audibly heaves.
  • The Stinger: A somber moment with Fred with a cameo from Stan Lee, who is both Fred's dad and a superhero!
  • Stock Sound Effect: When Hiro first begins his microbot demonstration, he gets a little feedback from the microphone.
  • Stock Superhero Day Jobs: Of the "Student" and "Freelance" variety. Hiro is the former, which is believable for someone his age, regardless of his vast intellect. The rest of the team falls into the latter category. Wasabi works as a sushi chef, Honey Lemon is a part-time barista despite her talent in chemistry, and GoGo is a bike courier. And despite being mistaken for a comic-book fanboy who lives under a filthy bridge, Fred actually comes from an extremely wealthy family that owns an enormous mansion, tennis court, Olympic-sized swimming pool, and a personal vacation island to boot.
  • Superhero Origin: What brought together four robotics students, a school mascot, and a lovable balloon robot to do battle against Yokai and his army of microbots.
  • Super Team: The titular Big Hero 6 group.
  • Take a Third Option: In the climax, Hiro has to encourage the other four to do this to get away from the microbots attacking them, since their normal attacks don't seem to work. Wasabi, pinned between slabs on concrete on either side, cuts into the concrete at his feet to escape. GoGo, trapped in an orb of microbots, starts circling inside them to build up enough heat to burn her way out. Honey, trapped in her own dome of chemicals to protect herself while it is failing, attached her chemicals to the attacking microbots instead to pull herself out. And Fred, with the limbs of his suit seized, realizes that it's like his mascot costume and pulls his arms out of the suit's arms to grab debris to free himself with.
  • Team Shot: Used when they get inspired to create a superhero team, while looking at some of Fred's superhero art. And again after the climax, with a notable gap where Baymax should be.
  • Team Title: Like the comic counterpart, the six heroes will don the superhero team title "Big Hero 6".
  • Teen Genius: Hiro. Tadashi was one as well, given that he created Baymax.
  • Teleporter Accident: Involving Professor Callaghan's daughter, and what motivated him to revenge.
  • That Poor Cat: During the sequence where Baymax is following the microbot and Hiro is running after him, occasionally tripping over or running into things.
  • There Are No Therapists: Zig-zagged. There's no mention of Hiro receiving therapy or counseling after Tadashi's death, even though he's showing obvious signs of severe depression for several weeks. However, after he tells Baymax that his pain is emotional rather than physical, Baymax downloads information on grief counseling and makes it his objective to improve Hiro's emotional state.
  • They Fight Crime: He's a boy genius reeling from the loss of his big brother! He's an obese medical robot! Together, they fight a supervillain!
  • Thou Shalt Not Kill: Baymax has this built in as a primary protocol. It can be removed, as Hiro would later demonstrate, though upon reinstalling- Baymax locks the access port to prevent that from happening again. The rest of the team was also less than thrilled when Hiro does the above, and are adamant about catching Yokai, not killing him.
  • The Thunderdome: The movie begins with Hiro taking part in a robo-fight. The emcee even announces, "Two bots enter, only one bot leaves!"
  • Tomboy and Girly Girl: GoGo Tomago and Honey Lemon respectively. GoGo dresses more like a tomboy, and gives off a tough vibe by her laconic manner. Honey is more excitably dorky, and her supersuit even includes a purse.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Tadashi. Bless his heart, but Tadashi. He doesn't just run into a burning building — he runs into a building that's engulfed in flame from end to end and visibly on the cusp of exploding, intending to save a single person in an unknown location. We hope Hiro isn't reading this.
  • Trailers Always Lie: Where to start? Most of the scenes talking about "Baymax's Carbon Fiber Underpants" don't actually show this set of armor, but the final metallic one. Also, there was a remarkable lack of a first suiting up scene with the aforementioned metallic armor. It's safe to assume that the teaser trailer was intended to fill that gap, but for whatever reason, didn't make the final cut.
    • Averted with the scene at the police station; the film version is even funnier because Baymax sprouts leaks in both arms.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: The advetising in the UK shows Hiro wanting to kill Yokai.
  • Twenty Minutes into the Future: A banner marking the 95th Anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge on one of the streetcars puts the film as being set around 2032. While there are Metropolis/Blade Runner-style skyscrapers, giant turbines floating in the sky, and robots are common enough that nobody looks twice at the sight of Baymax, the neighborhoods look like old brownstones and the cars are mostly boxy subcompacts from the late '80s to early '90s, including the one that Wasabi drives.
  • Two Girls to a Team: GoGo Tomago and Honey Lemon.
  • Vague Age: The ages of Hiro's allies are never disclosed, although considering they're all college students (and doing work far beyond freshman level), it's probably reasonable to ballpark them as being somewhere around their early 20s.
  • The Verse: This universe is designated Earth-14123 in the overall Marvel Multiverse.
  • Weak, but Skilled: Honey Lemon.
  • Wham Line:
    • "Baymax, destroy."
    • When the teleportation device is collapsing in the climax.
      Baymax: My sensors are indicating human life.
  • What the Hell, Hiro?: Hiro gets called out big time by the others for reprogramming Baymax to try killing Callaghan.
  • Where Does He Get All Those Wonderful Toys?: Hiro presumably gets funding for his Cool Garage from hustling robot fighters. Notably, his build quality improves when Fred chips in with his ludicrously large amount of money and the rest of the team helps.
  • White Mask of Doom: Yokai, obviously.
  • Wide Eyes and Shrunken Irises: When Callaghan and his microbots descend on Krei's press conference during the climax, Krei's eyes go wide with terror, and his irises visibly narrow.
  • You Are Better Than You Think You Are: Tadashi wants Hiro to go to college and apply himself instead of wasting his talents on scamming robot fights for cash.
    Tadashi: When are you gonna start using that big brain of yours?
  • You Are Not Alone: Honey, Fred, Gogo, and Wasabi tell this to Hiro as they console him after Tadashi's death.

"Hairy baby! Hairy babyyy."