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Darker And Edgier: Videogames

  • Super Adventure Rockman was this to the Mega Man (Classic) franchise. There was a dark story, a horrifying load of Game Over cutscenes the player could get, ranging from Dr. Wily taking over the world after killing Roll, to Shadow Man destroying Rock Man with an arm cannon. Quick Man also has a death. A legitimate death, not an explosion. He even gets buried by Rock Man. You can't continue after the darkest game overs, by the way.
  • Mega Man 7 isn't quite as bad, but it still has Mega Man seriously considering killing Wily in cold blood (the English translation played this up, but it was present even in the original Japanese version).
  • Id Software did this. Their earlier publication, Commander Keen, was a lighter hearted game that was quite intended for children and maybe relatively more innocent hearted adults. Id Software is famous for popularising the first person shooter in the form of Wolfenstein 3D and Doom.
    • The Doom series itself gets progressively darker (literally) and edgier. The first game is quite colorful and most areas brightly lit. Doom II has an overall darker ambiance and a greater emphasis on horror. Doom 3 takes it to the extreme, with monochromatic textures, realistic gore, and many areas in total darkness.
    • Strangely enough the characters of all these games appear to be related, as discussed here
  • Max Payne gets progressively darker and more serious through each installment.
  • Bioware games as a whole have been going through this. Their first few games (Baldur's Gate, Neverwinter Nights, etc) were fairly idealistic High Fantasy games. Their later ones, though? The game worlds are grim, bloody and crapsack, Black and Gray Morality runs rampant, and almost every major quest (and quite a few sidequests) end in a Sadistic Choice where even the seemingly best option has disastrous consequences. Oh, and about 99.9% of the available party members have severely traumatic pasts.
    • Dragon Age II is easily their darkest game. While their other games lately have been dark, they have all carried a feeling of hope and eventual triumph over a great evil. The Mass Effect series is a perfect example of this. However, Dragon Age II is darker on a personal scale with two sides that both have grave flaws and are utterly convinced that they are correct and everyone else is wrong. This leads to a situation where compromise is impossible with the protagonist, Hawke, stuck in the middle of everything. Where other Bioware games have had the feeling of hope and triumph, Dragon Age II does not give this.
    • Mass Effect 1 was rather serious and bleak to begin with. Mass Effect 2 didn't necessarily get that much darker, but where the first game only made hints, the second goes all the way. The very first scene is an absolute Curb-Stomp Battle, in which a voiceless and faceless enemy appears from nowhere and completely rips your ship from the first game apart, with you still inside it. Then you join forces with a ruthless survivalist organization whose agents you killed by the dozens in the first game, because there are much more pressing matters at hand. The Black and White Morality of the first game is abandoned and nobody blinks an eye when you murder a mechanic with his own power tool because you have to slow down the repairs on the vehicle he is working on. In every space port you'll find a couple of people talking about sex, or have your team scientists give you advice for sex with aliens and mentioning something about zoophilia on the ship.
    • Mass Effect 3 has the Reapers arriving, and their first target was Earth. Remember, the events of Arrival delayed their invasion. And by the looks of it, the Reapers are not easy to destroy. And like Dragon Age II, doesn't exactly give you the feeling of hope and triumph either.
    • While Knights of the Old Republic II wasn't made by Bioware like the first game, it definitely took a hard right into this direction. Instead of helping old Twi'leks across the street or drinking the blood of space puppies, it's either helping someone who comes to you with a problem, thus making them a target for other people to kill, or just cutting out the middleman and murdering them yourself for kicks. Every act, good or evil, is deconstructed by Kreia, who helpfully points out that they die either way, all because you happened to kill some Mooks. She even explains why you're gaining experience points. It's because for everything you kill, you absorb the Force from them and feed off of them, however you kill them.. However, according to Chris Avellone and the Obsidian team, the whole game is not simply darker just to invoke the trope, but deliberately intended to be a deconstruction of the absolutes and the black-and-white "simplicity" of classic Star Wars (the latter being a Genre Throwback to the early days of space opera and essentially heroic fantasy IN SPACE!), especially of the "good Jedi, evil Sith" dualism, which Avellone deemed "childish".
    • Baldur's Gate 2 is definitely darker than it's predecessor, starting out with the main character and his/her party captured and tortured, two of the party killed, and another whisked away to an insane asylum for wizards. The main city of the game, Athkatla, is also a lot seedier than the titular city from the first game, featuring a bloody faction war between a guild of thieves and assassins and a horde of vampires. And Throne of Bhaal is quite possibly even darker, centered around 5 of the Bhaalspawn forming an alliance to wipe out all other Bhaalspawn (including the player,) with the body count escalating early on when they succeed in destroying the city where the other Bhaalspawn were taking refuge.
  • When the first Metal Gear came out, people saw it as a little fun and cheesy action game with a twist on stealth elements. Then starting with the second game and the Solid series, the darkness was beginning to set in. By the time of Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots, you could expect the world to blow up at any moment and can't do a thing about it. It's actually surprising that at the end of the series, that about 80% of all named characters died. For most of the time, it feels like there would be a lot fewer people to make it to the end alive.
    • Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain is this to a very heavy level, which is understandable, since it concerns Big Boss and his fall from hero to villain. It includes torture (present in every MGS game, but never to this level), surgery performed without anesthetics, explicit portrayal of Child Soldiers (only discussed or implied in previous games) and heavily implied gang rape, and that's just what's been shown in trailers.
  • The original Phantasy Star was your standard science-fantasy affair, starting as a revenge story before turning towards saving the universe from an ancient evil. Things took a turn for the dark in Phantasy Star II, however, with the destruction of one of the three planets in the Algol system, then the subsequent destruction of the supercomputer that had transformed the hostile desert world of Motavia into a habitable paradise, followed by The Reveal that said supercomputer was made by a race of people from a planet called Earth as part of their plan to take over the system. By Phantasy Star IV, Motavia has reverted back to a hostile desert planet, with monsters running rampant and technological progress starting to regress.
  • The idealistic Ultima IV: Quest of the Avatar was followed up with Ultima V, which involved resisting an oppressive tyrant using twisted versions of the very virtues the previous game was founded on to keep power. THAT was followed up by Ultima VI: The False Prophet, which STARTS OUT with the hero narrowly avoiding being sacrificed as part of a terrible and brutal interspecies war.
    • And that trilogy was the Age of Enlightenment. Let's not get started on the Age of Armageddon. Ultima VIII, for the first time in the series, requires the Avatar to commit evil acts.
  • Although the Fallout series isn't exactly cheery to begin with (what with being set in a post apocalyptic wasteland and all), the first 2 games mainly focus on various towns and civilizations rising from the ashes and trying to rebuild, and contained a lot of dark humour and pop culture references, especially Fallout 2, which is considered the silliest game in the series. Fallout 3, on the other hand, was much darker by comparison, being set in and around a sparesly populated and desolate Washington D.C., which was directly hit by the bombs, where every day is a fight for survival as towns and groups barely manage to stay alive. Because of this, it is generally considered the darkest and most depressing game in the series.
    • Fallout: New Vegas, however, swung back to the other side with a more populated, civilised area with a clear blue sky and various vegetation, full of different factions vying for control of the titular area, which was barely hit by the bombs at all. Because of this, it has more of a World Half Full feel to it instead of the pure grimness of 3. It also brought back a lot of the zany humour that was largely absent from 3. It's definitely not the lightest game in the series though, due to a large dose of Grey and Gray Morality in its main story, and some of the terror-filled DLC's released with it, especially Lonesome Road and Dead Money.
    • In a wider sense, the canon itself is supposed to be Darker and Edgier. However, since the comedic moments do draw a portion of their fanbase and the game is, in part, a dark satire of the 1950s, they have relegated some of the zanier comedy to noncanon status, never mentioning it in future games, glossed over it Broad Strokes style, or, in the rare case it is plot relevant, downplayed as much as possible
  • The shift in style between Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy and its successor, Jak II took place during the opening cinematic. In the original, the tone was light, the hero was a Heroic Mime, his rodential sidekick joked all the time, and the combat was minimal and hand-to-hand. At the beginning of Jak II the heroes traveled forward in time, released an extra-dimensional evil onto the world in the process, then skipped over two years of Jak being tortured under lab settings. After that, Jak got a voice, a sardonic attitude, a gun, and became a card-carrying Phlebotinum Rebel; Daxter got some dirtier jokes, and was dropped from the title. This Time Travel based change was a plausible way to change the world of the game drastically in one scene. Jak 3: Wastelander reverses the tone a little bit. The world is notably brighter and more colorful.
  • The original Double Dragon was already a gritty game to begin with, but the arcade version of Double Dragon II: The Revenge attempted to up the ante by killing off the girl from the first game, changing the objective from rescuing her to avenging her death. All the returning enemy characters were redesigned to look more punkish (Linda the female mook for example, was given a mohawk and a chain whip) and the new bosses includes a masked wrestler who leaves behind his mask when he dies and an André the Giant-lookalike with Terminator-esque sunglasses whose stature dwarfs Abobo from the original game.
  • A much less successful video game example was Bomberman: Act Zero for the Xbox 360. That's right, Hudson tried to make Bomberman Darker And Edgier. To be fair, the original concept of Bomberman was rather dark (robot-like beings trapped in an underground arena and forced to kill each other with bombs) and the lighter feel of the original game was actually a compromise. However, none of the other games in the series make any references to Act Zero in any way, choosing to stick with the familiar Hello Kitty-esque Bombermen.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog is overall somewhere between Mario and Zelda in terms of creepiness, but its tone became darker eventually than it was when starting out.
    • Sonic the Hedgehog CD has Bad Future versions of each of its zones, and an overall higher concentration of horrifying material than the Sonic games before it. Also, the American release had some very scary music, in contrast to the upbeat music from the JPN/EUR release.
    • Sonic the Hedgehog Spinball features a much darker aesthetic than the main series games. One of the bosses actually shows the animal robotization process in horrid detail.
    • The Sonic Adventure series goes beyond Sonic games prior to it in intensity; the first deals with large-scale destruction dealt to modern cities by creatures reacting to atrocities committed by ancient civilizations led by tyrannical, abusive fathers, and the second surpasses THAT by dealing with use of "weapons of mass destruction" (and yes, they are actually called that in the game) to threaten whole countries, a military conspiracy involving the deaths of numerous innocents in a space colony, and threats to the survival of the entire world from anguished people with a vendetta against it. A case can be made for this game's 'Final Story' being the grimmest part of any game in the Sonic series. Gerald's diary is pure horror, containing such lovely lines as "I lost everything, I had nothing more to live for, I WENT INSANE!" (this part is helped by the fact that Gerald's voice actor was actually really good).
    • Shadow the Hedgehog, where Sonic's Evil Twin Shadow (introduced in Sonic Adventure 2) was given the chance to drive cars, shoot guns, swear on a regular basis, and brood over his purpose in life.
    • Sonic the Hedgehog (2006) attempts to toss Sonic into a hyper-realistic world, where he protects a princess who is the container of Iblis, one half of Solaris, a time god from Eggman. Along the way, he, Shadow, and Silver deal with a conspiracy where it is revealed in the final storyline Sonic dies to upset Elise to release Iblis ancient monster from her body, allowing that and the other villain, Mephiles, to merge to form Solaris, slaughtering the entire space-time continuum in the process. And then Elise kisses Sonic, reviving him with the power of the Chaos Emeralds, and restoring the space-time continuum from the damage dealt by Solaris, in the process.
    • Sonic Chronicles: The Dark Brotherhood is somewhat dark. It doesn't help that it was made by BioWare, creators of Mass Effect and Dragon Age.
    • In Sonic Unleashed, Sonic gets a Superpowered Evil Side that is the Werehog. However, the Werehog can also be considered a partial subversion of this trope, seeing as he has many comical-looking moves, and his stretchy arms — also, Sonic himself takes the whole thing in stride rather admirably.
      • And then, the game explicitly tells you that the only reason why Sonic isn't massacring everyone is because he's got a will of titanium laced with diamonds, and that's what's keeping his Werehog side from going on a total rampage. The Werehog is very much not harmless at all, it's only Sonic's willpower keeping it on a leash that manages to somehow defuse its threat factor.
    • Sonic Colors is significantly more lighthearted in tone, almost having a Saturday morning cartoon approach to it, despite Eggman's evil schemes getting even more dangerous and threatening.
    • Sonic Generations is somewhat dark, with the whole concept that when Sonic's friends were turned into statues, their souls were left floating in a dark, endless void. Several fans have also picked up the implication that if Eggman had succeeded in his plan to undo all of his previous defeats, he would later go onto wiping Sonic and friends out of existence. Despite all of this, the game still manages to retain the lighthearted humor of its predecessor.
  • Wipeout started out with a subtly alien setting and enthusiastic optimism after the discovery of anti-gravity technology. The sequel Wipeout 2097/XL was set in an environment that resembled Blade Runner and you could actually kill other pilots now. Then the N64 semi-port had a track set on an active volcano because the audience was getting bored and a pilot was quoted as saying "We race, we die. There is no beauty anymore". Then Fusion featured widespread corruption, sabotage and murder; the only team still dedicated to the "beauty of the sport" was publicly mocked by their competitors. This lasted until the Pure reboot, which restored the old clean and high tech futuristic setting and the series stuck with it ever afterwards.
  • Compared to any other 'verse in the Fire Emblem series, the two games taking place in the Jugdral series are the darkest. To wit, the plot as a whole is far more complex compared to its predecessors, the Akaneia games (and even more so than Awakening for sure), the actions and personality of the main Lord, Sigurd, are steadily deconstructed as time passes (for one, he is unaware that his home kingdom is seeking to conquer the continent, and he's unaware of it the entire time), and there's also the fact that he and the rest of the cast from the first half of the game die at the game's halfway point. And most infamously, tying with the loads of Rape, Pillage, and Burn that we don't see as much of in later games, there's lots of incestuous references, both in the story and in gameplay.
  • Zigzagged in Fire Emblem Awakening. Yes, there's the horrifying Bad Future that the Children come from, where everything literally went to Hell when the Player Character went through a Grand Theft Me from the Evil God and the Religion of Evil then took over and killed the whole First Generation characters, and not to mention several characters portray some stock anime tropes rather seriously (like Sumia's deconstruction of Naďve Everygirl, and Lon'qu deconstructing Cartwright Curse)... but ultimately, the game has what's most likely the happiest endings in the whole franchise. Double if the Player Character essentially commits an Heroic Suicide to totally kill off the Evil God within him/her and, after being briefly erased from existence, is reunited with the rest of the cast.
  • The teaser trailer in Kingdom Hearts suggested that Kingdom Hearts II would be Darker And Edgier and involve people in black raincoats fighting in a dark city.
    • And then there's Kingdom Hearts: 358/2 Days, featuring a much more depressing story, culminating with a Downer Ending.
    • Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep continues that trend, as shown by a line from the Keyblade Graveyard:
      Ven: I'm asking you, as a friend. Just... put an end to me.
    • Kingdom Hearts kind of inverts the usual use of Darker and Edgier. Aesthetically, it has stayed pretty even for the entire series. Thematically, it's changed from a nostalgic romp through Disney worlds in search of missing friends to a thorough exploration of what it means to care wholeheartedly about other people - which in itself tends to run the gamut from impossibly cute fluff to emotional pain so unbearable that not having a heart seems preferable.
      • Kingdom Hearts Chainof Memories and 358/2 Days are exceptions to the rule, though. Chain of Memories keeps a moderately hopeful tone, but doesn't have the protagonists walk away without consequences. One forgets everything and is put in a coma with an unknown duration, the other deals with his massive guilt from earlier actions while simultaneously dealing with possession and magical corruption. Days ends with one main character dead and completely forgotten by everyone she loves, one main character memory wiped and in a false reality that he won't escape from, and one main character who, knowing either of the first two would eventually result in the death of the other, used lies, deceit, and force to try and keep them both alive as long as possible... all of which turned both them and his only other friend away from him, leaving him alone.
  • While on the subject of Disney related games, Epic Mickey for the Wii had concept art of creepy steampunk cyborg versions of both Mickey Mouse and Goofy. The artwork really speaks for itself. For a Disney game, that is pretty damn dark. But in the final product, it had a different kind of dark to it. Rather than dealing with Body Horror robotic chimeras of our favorite Disney characters like first expected, it's about the consequences of Mickey's irrationality and how he must make up for it.
  • In the 90's, the space sim genre dominated by X-Wing and Wing Commander wasn't exactly sunshine and rainbows to begin with. But then FreeSpace appeared with a much more serious tone, but it also got far surpassed by FreeSpace 2, which was even darker and edgier and comparable in mood to Halo: Reach, if anything.
  • Advance Wars: Days of Ruin is clearly Darker And Edgier than the other three Advance Wars games, which sometimes bordered on silly. It pulls it off just fine, thanks in part that it's a brand new continuity, plus the fact that it recognizes that adult themes don't necessarily mean throwing out all humor. It works because the setting is After the End but the survivors are trying to make the best of things. The doctor exemplifies this, saying that it's times like this you need to laugh. The last mission is called Sunrise.
  • The original Rayman was packed to the brim with cheery, bright colours, silly characters and all sorts of silly things that make its sequel, Rayman 2: The Great Escape, look extremely grim in comparison. Fortunately, the latter also added an additional sense of mystery and wonder, and consistency, to Rayman's world, so it all works out. Afterwards, the slide is balanced in Rayman 3, which has dark visuals but lots of comedy, and pushed beyond the cheeriness in the Rabbids series and Rayman Origins. Then Rayman Legends contains the same zany humor as Origins, but adds in a few dark and serious elements, as well as a whole series of levels that pay homage to Splinter Cell.
  • Painkiller could be said to be the dark cousin to Serious Sam. Both are FPSes recreating the old-skool style of gunning down massed Mooks in War Sequences, but where Serious Sam's levels are bright and colourful with fantastic and cartoonish monsters, those of Painkiller are grim and subdued with hellish dark fantasy-style beasts. It is worth noting, though, that the two titles are done by different companies of different nationality (Croatian Croteam for Serious Sam and Polish People Can Fly for Painkiller), though, so this comparison may be the fault of a mind that thinks too much.
    • Moreover, when Serious Sam was released, some reviewers thought that the game was a bit too bright, light-hearted and silly, which didn't exactly keep up with the game's old-school Doom and Quake influence, or in one reviewer's words, "too Braindead and not Aliens enough". With its significantly meaner attitude, it looks like Painkiller was the game these reviewers wanted Serious Sam to be.
    • Considering Serious Sam not only recreated but also parodied the "gunning down masses of Mook" gameplay (and gleefully lampshades its parodies), it seems said reviewers completely missed the point.
  • Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time/Darkness. While the first game's offered a character that simply tried to ruin your protagonists' lives and was a cosmic Jerk Ass, the sequel goes further by sending your protagonist duo to the literal End of Days, having to face down a legendary Pokémon that has become an evilly subverted primal force of nature, and a Big Bad who not only traps children in unending nightmares, but also poses as an "ally" who suggests that it's all your fault and the best way to fix things is to kill yourself.
    • Gates to Infinity is similarly dark in tone, taking place in a world that's lost hope to the point that the negative emotions of Pokemon in the world have created an Eldritch Abomination that threatens to destroy everything. The resident team of villains is also rather similar to a suicide cult, having grown so sick of the world that they're trying to protect the aforementioned Eldritch Abomination (By hunting down and "defeating" the humans that were called to the world to destroy it), feeling they have nothing left to live for and that a better world could be born from the destruction. Their leader gets extra points for essentially committing the cold-blooded murder of a kind, lovable Pokemon, and nearly killing the hero immediately after.
    • Pokémon Platinum. In Diamond/Pearl, we get Dialga and Palkia, and the Team Galactic storyline ends at the Spear Pillar. In Platinum, we get Giratina's shadow interrupting the proceedings from another dimension, and have to carry the chase onwards into the Distortion World. Nothing lives in the Distortion World except for Giratina, making it a literal Ghost World. It's just...eerily calm. It also has some issues with proper gravity.
    • Black and White definitely qualify, too - the game does not in fact end with the Champion as in the previous four generations, the villainous team takes a much heavier role in the plot than before, the plot itself is much less of an Excuse Plot, and on top of all that we also have the single most despicable villain in the series.
    • Just look at the title screens. The first gen features the protagonist Red with the first stage of the version mascot. The second gen shows the version legendary flying above the clouds/swimming in the ocean while heroic music is playing. The third gen's theme tune is already a lot more eerie, with the title screen showing the version legendary in a volcano/the bottom of the ocean, with only its silhouette and glowing lines clearly visible (the actual games weren't too dark aside from the stuff involving said legendaries, though.) Then the fourth and fifth gens comes along and you get a creepy piano and ominous remix of the main theme (respectively), with the version legendary standing in a glowing void, and a Scare Chord playing upon hitting start, or in Platinum and Gen V's case, the version legendary screaming at you.
    • You can also see the increasingly darker and edgier nature of the Pokémon universe by looking at the main bad guys:
    • Pokémon Colosseum, the Nintendo GameCube Spin-Off series set in Orre, is like this. The first game stars a Pokémon-stealing Anti-Hero from the Team Rocket-like organization running off with a prototype Pokémon-theft device in a desolate desert land, with more than few shades of Used Future. He eventually discovers a plot to "seal the hearts of Pokémon" — while it sounds really cheesy when you put it that way, it actually involves removing all sense of compassion from a Pokémon so that its primal bloodlust can be unlocked. The second game was Lighter and Softer in comparison, but was still set in Orre, which, even when "cleaned up" significantly, is still pretty grim.
    • Even with the lighter-hearted story, the Shadow Pokemon experiments have taken an even harsher form of experimentation, the biggest example would be the mascot Pokemon, Shadow Lugia. While the other game had Legendaries, they could be purified just like all the rest, this one is an experimental Pokemon that COULD NOT be purified (at least by the original methods). It's permanently lost its compassion and shows this through its twisted appearance. And in the ending, while the Big Bad surrenders with some persuasion by one of his sons, the other son vows to restore the organization to its former glory, and make you his first target afterwards.
    • Pokemon XD is also the only game in which the evil syndicate implicitly commits mass murder. It isn't shown on-screen, but Shadow Lugia picks up a ship from the ocean in the opening scene, and later you find the ruins of this ship in the desert. There are no suggestions anywhere in the game that any of the crew survived.
    • Orre, by the way, is officially based off the American Southwest, Arizona in particular. Thinking of Arizona as a Mad Max wasteland is amusing.
  • Done well for the nightmarish Twisted Metal: Black. To put this in perspective, Twisted Metal began as a series about a burn victim inheriting genie like powers, and putting on a no holds barred kill or be killed destruction derby in densely populated areas between maniacs with heavily armed vehicles. They went darker from there.
  • Rather than an adorable Astro Boy-esque android, the Blue Bomber of Mega Man X is a morally conflicted hero. Similarly, the comical Dr. Wily was succeeded by Sigma, a ruthless (and seemingly indestructible) robot bent on the total annihilation of the human race. It was still done rather well, Capcom Sequel Stagnation aside. Still, apparently Capcom knew when enough was enough, as a later series in the franchise, Mega Man Legends, significantly dials down the angst with less hard-edged artwork, a more reasonable difficulty level, and a comical cast of characters.
    • Mega Man Zero was hands down the darkest in the series, what with the hero being on the losing side of the war (at first), giving the players the "pleasure" to see countless allies die. Plus the horrible backstory (bridging this series with X), which later gets incorporated into the main plot, and a truly Omnicidal Maniac as the main Big Bad...
    • ZX was lighter than Zero...except for the backstories of the four protagonists, the general atrocities caused by the antagonists, and Giro falling victim to Zero's death curse. It was still done well.
    • Mega Man 7 is a classic example. It turned Mega Man into a Perpetual Frowner, removed the happy expression on the One Ups, and Mega Man tried to kill Wily in all versions, including the American Kirby is Hardcoreless version.
    • Mega Man Star Force was definitely darker than its predecessor, Battle Network. Geo Stelar starts out being understandably depressed about his dad to the point where he won't go to school... But his depression quickly lifts the longer The Power of Friendship thing hangs around (Then it hits a roadblock when Pat betrays him and Geo goes into a short-lived fit of Wangst).
    • Star Force 2 contains one of the darkest plotlines in the entire series. The Apollo Flames "second quest" involves an alternate universe After the End scenario where every human has been killed off thanks to the Precursor To Ruin.
    • The third Star Force game has some decidedly un-cheery plot elements, such as two war orphans trying to use an Eldritch Abomination to destroy the world's technology, a corrupting, quasi-Hate Plague, and one character being killed before Geo's eyes (Luckily they turn out to be Only Mostly Dead).
  • In Prince of Persia: Warrior Within, the likable prince of the previous game had apparently given up both shaving and nicety after years of being chased by the Dahaka, justified plot-wise by the poor treatment the prince receives from the inhabitants of the island, mostly monsters and a demon. The game also became more combat-heavy, and threw out the atmospheric Middle-Eastern soundtrack of the previous game for fist-pumping heavy metal. And the lesser antagonists are women in Stripperiffic outfits, one of whom is introduced with an extreme close-up aimed directly at her thong-clad ass. Prince of Persia: The Two Thrones scaled back on the edgy while keeping the improved combat system.
  • Not even an obscure series like Snowboard Kids can escape this trope, with the DS installment gutting nearly everything that gave the earlier games their quirky charm for the sake of appealing to teenagers. Neither the critics nor the small but dedicated fanbase were amused, which possibly spells doom for the franchise.
  • Though Halo started off fairly grim in the first place, as the series progressed it went ever deeper down the tunnel. By Halo 3 there's some serious nastiness going on, especially regarding the Flood and the terror inherent to some of Cortana's messages.
    • The story goes that the original script for Halo 3's ending had a much lighter tone, with all the main characters returning to Earth to a hero's welcome. Marty O'Donnel, Bungie's musical director, thought that this ending was too light and soft and didn't portray the grim consequences of being a "hero" in a 30-year war. Subsequently the script was re-written to have a much Darker And Edgier ending in which several main characters die and Master Chief is stranded in deep space with Cortana, presumed dead by the rest of humanity.
    • Halo: Reach is supposed to be the darkest depressing game thus far since you already know everyone what will happen to you, your comrades and the planet itself . It's about the heroism and sacrifice of those people on a doomed planet watching their friends and everything they love fall. Even look at the medals when you perform a feet (Double Kill/Triple Kill), in Halo 3 they were bright and brightly colored, in Reach they are darker, and look metallic, yes even these meta-game symbols are darker AND edgier.
    • According to Frank O'Connor, the as-yet un-subtitled next-gen Halo will be darker than the other Halo titles.
  • Devil May Cry 2 was clearly made under the assumption that the overblown camp of the first game was a bad thing, and decided to play the B-movie setting straight, as evidenced by changing the stylish wise-cracking, cowboy-esque, demon hunter Dante to a generic, stoic badass who barely gets any lines. It might also have to do with the fact it was rushed into production without informing or involving the original creators. To say the least, it didn't turn out well. Capcom made up for it with a return to the appeal of the original with Devil May Cry 3.
    • Dante in Devil May Cry 4 grew up and apart from bishounen self in previous installments, sporting five-o-clock shade and somewhat cynical and wisened behaviour.
    • This appears to be what Ninja Theory is going for with DmC, which is a reboot featuring a younger, more rebellious Dante.
  • While the GTA III era was more lighthearted and comical, comparing with the GTA IV era, the "Stories" sequels deserve a mention:
    • Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories is much edgier than the previous three sequels. Mainly because the level of cruelty in the game is quite high, even more than its predecessor. Several missions includes doing atrocious acts: bomb the area of a city (Fort Staunton), stealing corpses, dismember a man with an ax and then carrying his remains to a butchery, etc.
    • In addition, Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories. Several moments in the game are played by the drama, including: Marty's cruel treatment of his wife, the kidnapping and rape of Louise by Jerry Martinez and the subsequent kidnapping (and alleged rape and torture) and murder of Louise for Armando Mendez. And unlike their predecessors of the same era, this was the first to have a Bittersweet Ending and not very nice. In fact, this sequel was an early indication of some of the things the series would do in later years.
    • Done in Grand Theft Auto IV, replacing the cheesy crime dramas with an immigrant story wrapped in a crime drama, while retaining the humor.
      • If anything, people complain because Niko wasn't dark enough.
      • To be more specific, every GTA game before this pretty much lets you get away with anything and people will rarely question your actions. In GTA 4, Niko's actions and decisions during certain missions will alter who you see later on and you may even get reminded about what you done, especially if it was a bad choice. The final missions also changes based on what choice you make and the outcome affects Niko greatly. Decided to take Dimitri's deal? Your girlfriend dumps you because you're greedy for money and Dimitri kills your cousin at his wedding. Did you decide to kill Dimitri instead of taking the money? The mafia gets their own revenge by killing your girlfriend.
      • The current generation of Grand Theft Auto IV plays to a cynical darker tune. The Lost and Damned DLC turns the Grim Dark Up to Eleven, with the protagonist Johnny partaking in a series of events which leads to the death of his best friend Jim at the hands of Niko, being betrayed by childhood friend turned Big Bad Billy Grey who tries to have Johnny and Jim killed during a drug deal and later attempts to sellout everyone to save his own ass after said drug deal gets him arrested, and said arrest leading to a civil war that wipes out more than half of the Lost. Once everything is over with Billy dead, Johnny and the survivors of the whole ordeal (One of whom happens to be a paraplegic crippled in an accident caused by Billy's carelessness) decide to just burn down the clubhouse to put it out of its misery after it and the club have been ruined over the course of the game. This leaves the player with a single, run down safehouse that is in one of the most run down areas of the city and used to belong to one of the Lost members Johnny had to kill in the civil war.
      • Subverting the first two main stories of the IV generation, the last IV DLC The Ballad of Gay Tony went in the Lighter and Softer direction, with the return of some over the top elements of games from the III era, and an overall happy ending that doesn't end in the deaths of any major characters close to the protagonist Luis or anything being left in ruins.
  • Super Mario Bros.:
    • Super Mario Bros. 1 was fairly light and soft, with a generic "save the princess" story, fairly comical villains, and overall cartoony style. Super Mario Bros. 2 had more of a "seeing upon waking what you saw in a dream" story, and introduced a variety of spookier enemies, like the Sparks, the Albatosses (sic), the mousers, the tryclydes, the fryguys, and the ESPECIALLY intimidating Phantos. Even the hawkmouths eventually become enemies. It's also the first Mario game to involve the use of bombs. Many of the introductions are due to it being a Dolled-Up Installment of Doki Doki Panic.
    • Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door is darker and edgier than the first Paper Mario. The first example of many that this game will be darker than the last is probably the gallows in Rogueport's town square. This is also a game in which Mario does jobs for the Mafia. Nonetheless, the whole thing is fairly cheery and innocuous. Super Paper Mario is even darker, what with Mario and company saving the multiverse from an Omnicidal Maniac and his dysfunctional flunkies. Worst of the lot is Mimi, who has to break her own neck to initiate the transformation into her true form. There's also the end of Chapter 6, where Dimentio kills Luigi, then kills Mario, Peach and Bowser. The level immediately after is a thinly-veiled version of Hell.
    • Mario & Luigi went the same kind of way with the second game (Partners in Time), with the second game being based around an alien invasion of the past Mushroom Kingdom and having places like Toad Town and Princess Peach's Castle turned to ruins by the Shroobs, and some rather creepy things as background detail and music. It actually introduces a Christmas-themed village solely to destroy before Mario and Luigi even get there. Toad Town is just pieces of rubble tossed around; compare it to Toad Town of Bowser's Inside Story. Even Peach's Castle from the latter isn't as devastated and dangerous as Shroob Castle.
    • Mario Strikers did this among the sports branch of Mario games, albeit in a more tongue-in-cheek, over-the-top way. The sequel, Mario Strikers Charged invokes this in universe as the games have gotten so violent that metal body armor is now mandatory for all players.
    • The're also the times when Bowser unexpectedly comes back to life as a zombie and when Bowser tries to take over outer space.
    • Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon started out as following the first game's lead in being a parody of the survival horror genre. At that point, however, we hadn't learned that King Boo went from a Well-Intentioned Extremist to an unfettered sociopath.
  • Super Smash Bros.:
    • Super Smash Bros. in general is darker than some of Nintendo's cuter franchises by way of featuring them in a fighting game.
    • The first game was a cartoony fighting game with cute Nintendo characters and cartoony sound effects, and the artwork was done in a comic book style. The sequel, Melee, was not as cartoony, had more realistic sound effects, the characters had more realistic appearances, and truly villainous characters were playable for the first time (not counting Donkey Kong); it also introduced twisted and bizarre bosses like Crazy Hand and Giga Bowser. The second sequel, Brawl, went as far as to portray the characters as more aggressive (even the happy-go-lucky ones like Yoshi and Mario),(though most of this was well received, in Mario's case making him more Hot-Blooded helped to avert the flak he usually gets stuck with in his own series.) an adventure mode with high amounts of drama and symbolic (though not permanent) death. Two of the newcomers have stuff that may be considered "inappropriate" for a Nintendo game: Wario with his potty humor flatulence attack, and Solid Snake not only comes from a game series known for its violence, one of his grab attacks is actually similar to a garrotte take-down, and his Final Smash is a grenade launcher.
    • In Melee, Adventure Mode is a short 12-level story in which the selected character goes through various different universes, fighting characters in each of them. The whole Adventure Mode in Brawl, in comparison, is a very intricate 31-level story that consists of the Subspace story, where mysterious villains detonate what is essentially shadow nukes in order to draw large pieces of the world into a mysterious void. The first enemies you meet crawl out of a black mass, looking eerily like zombies at first. Some cutscenes are very dark, such as the one where Ness is kidnapped by Wario in an abandoned park, the one where the RO Bs look sadly down because they have to blow themselves up in order to trigger the nukes, the one where characters get possessed, and the one where Tabuu takes out all the heroes in one attack. To top it all off, Ridley from Metroid manages to top even his primary appearances in violence, by grabbing Samus and then grinding her against a wall in an attempt to crack her Power Suit. Her head rattles violently back and forth, and she is clearly helpless. This move was wicked enough to later make a canon appearance in Metroid: Other M.
  • Conkers Bad Fur Day was originally going to be a kid-friendly platformer starring a cute little squirrel in a blue hoodie. Indeed, the predecessor Pocket Tales for Game Boy Color had that tone. Rare kept the cute squirrel and the platforming, but changed everything else, adding enough sex, gore, and profanity to make it perhaps the most perverse title ever released for the N64. Ironically enough, the port for the Xbox was less offensive due to enforced censorship on swear words.
  • Regarding DC Comics, they agreed to make a crossover game called Mortal Kombat vs. DC Universe, being a lot more violent than other games of the license (but less violent than the Mortal Kombat brand due to Executive Meddling). And if that weren't enough, then came Injustice: Gods Among Us, another DC game by the same studio, which is basically a sequel to MK vs DC. It doesn't have any Kombat characters or setting (or gore, for that matter), but it does have the darkness - the story, for instance, features half the heroes entering He Who Fights Monsters territory. The premise of the game is, basically, "What would happen if The Joker breaks Superman?"
  • In regards of Mortal Kombat itself, the ninth installment took the gore, violence and the tone and drama of the story mode to a whole new level, which already says a lot for a series that was already Bloodier and Gorier than most games of the genre.
  • The unreleased Playstation game Thrill Kill is the Darker and Edgier form of Mortal Kombat. Yes, that is possible. The game was never released because it got an AO (Adults Only) rating for being too gory and sexual (AO-rated games are not allowed on consoles, San Andreas being an exception), and because Virgin Interactive was bought up by EA Games, who refused to release something like this.
  • As the Command & Conquer Tiberium series has progressed, it gradually went from being a fairly dark modern world-war with Green Rocks mixed in to a brutal struggle to simply survive a planet that's dying under alien terraforming.
    • In the first game, the worst thing to happen was one faction slaughtering a village and blaming it on the other; Tiberium was a minor nuisance when it was growing in the wrong place. In the third, Tiberium growth had reached catastrophic levels, over half of the world is in a state of anarchy, another world war breaks out and all that is topped by an alien invasion. How's that for Darker and Edgier? Though Word of God said that the fourth game is even worse with an Enemy Mine going on and YET ANOTHER visit from the Scrin on the horizon.
    • The Tiberium growth was stopped in the 4th series, but by no means the war is over. All this means is that Tiberium will no longer threaten the world as now anti-Kane Seperatists have their own agenda. And the Scrin remains to be a problem... or rather, they would if EA hadn't forgotten about them.
    • The mod Rise of the Reds for Command & Conquer: Generals is set in a very grim, militarised future where international diplomacy fails catastrophically on a regular basis and WMDs have become an accepted part of conventional warfare. It has been called a deconstruction of the Cold War era gone wrong, but the story has started to reflect a lot about the modern geopolitical climate and what it could potentially become.
  • Super Robot Wars had a slightly Darker And Edgier tone with Z being that a famous hero of an original franchise is given an evil spinoff. You can't save both psycho girls from Gundam and the bad ending route is possible again. This is as far as they go.
    • It only gets really Darker And Edgier if you pick Setsuko's route. Rand's route has several Camp elements and mostly considered light hearted. But Setsuko's route is just throwing you lots and lots of Break the Cutie moments to the poor heroine, and in the end... she doesn't get completely better...
    • It is darker compared to past games. There are personality issues and infighting with nearly all the members or your team for most of the game, you are duped and betrayed several times throughout the game. The villain who does the worst things is arguably the kindest since he isn't a psycho in it for the evil. Also your team at one point splits into factions and tries to kill each other with no Brainwashing involved. And the ending is bittersweet as some people are lost. It's pretty dark.
    • You actually can save both crazy Gundam girls if you plan carefully. Compare it to SRW A, where you are forced to choose between Master Asia and Gai Daigoji and can't save both no matter how hard you try. The storyline of Z is still dark as far as SRW games go, though.
    • Super Robot Wars Z2 continues the dark trend with some Doomed by Canon to boot!
  • Final Fight: Streetwise is a good example why you don't make it so damn Grim Dark. And they forgot our favorite transsexual Poison? For shame, for shame. Guy, the series Lawful Good Knight Errant, becomes a mob boss. Cody? He does drugs. And they heal his permanent injuries.
  • The Tekken games have both been an example and subversion of this trope. While the games have become more story based and darker (What with Jin's Wangst and all) they've at the same time introduced increasingly ridiculous elements like kickboxing kangaroos, endings where people are launched into space or blown up with bow ties, and training dummies that communicate through nonsensical clicking noises.
  • The Call of Duty series has the weird example of becoming darker and edgier three separate times throughout the series. Call of Duty 1, 2, and 3 were all T-rated World War II shooters which while showing the intensity and violence of war, weren't really that brutal or dark, all of them had happy endings for their protagonists. Call of Duty 2 and 3 were slightly darker and edgier versions of Call of Duty 1, but not by much only with minor cursing and intense hand-to-hand combat respectively. Modern Warfare amps it up with an M rated, major cursing, more violence, and a significantly darker story in which almost every major character dies, including one of the main characters by nuclear explosion and a lot more pessimistic view of things. And then World At War comes out which amplifies Modern Warfare by two, with a curse word being in every second sentence, dismemberments and charred corpses being standard fare, the opening mission which has one of your squadmates brutally tortured and his throat slit by a Japanese officer, and enough war crimes to fill an encyclopedia, especially by the more sadistic Soviets who are also supposed to be the good guys.
    • Modern Warfare 2 tops that off with you getting to witness your character being burned alive FROM FIRST PERSON.
    • Modern Warfare 3 is also quite dark, simply put the moment the cover went from men heroically attempting to break past the enemy lines to a silhoutte of a soldier with a gun was when the series became dark to the point of no possible return. Oh, and everyone except Price dies as usual.
    • Call of Duty: Black Ops goes even further, with the gore being amped to 11, in addition to the plot revolving around your teammates torturing you, and the scene were Weaver gets his eye dismembered and the infamous tunnel scene, among others. However, none of those top the fact that there is a torture scene, where YOU are the torturer!
      • And then there is the upcoming Call of Duty: Black Ops 2. The reveal trailer states that the future is black.
      • That said, one of the endings is actually for once isn't bleak and depressing compared to the Modern Warfare series
    • While both can be equal in tone, the Treyarch games tend to be this and Bloodierand Gorier than the Infinity Ward ones aesthetically.
  • Elevator Action featured an agent named Otto and was more spy themed, shooting down agents. Elevator Action Returns, however...did that.
  • Ratchet: Deadlocked (and, Up Your Arsenal) was obviously targeted towards a more mature audience:
    • Ratchet's new outfit hides his tail (and head throughout most gameplay) and makes him look suspiciously like Samus or Master Chief. (Likely intended to be the latter, considering the era it was released in.)
    • Clank, although still having a major role, had his name removed from the western titles, partly to make the game seem less friendship-themed (but mostly because he's relegated to Mission Control for the entire game).
    • The humour is less reliant on slapstick situations compared to the first two entries.
    • The weapons are often considered more "realistic" than those in the rest of the series, although that does not say much (even by sci-fi standards).
    • The American subtitle is not an obvious innuendo like the previous two games.
  • Star Wars: Republic Commando is dark to the point where some people complained it wasn't very Star Wars-like. For starters, no Opening Crawl is present, and there is blood and gore in heavy levels for a T-rated game. It's a first-person shooter in which you play as a clone trooper, and the scale, far from epic, is outright tiny. Not actually a bad game, in fact it's highly regarded, but definitely darker. The Star Wars Expanded Universe is veering towards this fast these days.
  • Massive, massive change in mood between R:1 and R:2 in .hack. The good AI are dead or apathetic, and players have gone from dealing well with depression to psychosis. It's possible that the third "season" R:X is trying to regain the innocence.
  • Team Fortress 2 parodies this somewhat; in contrast with the increasing violence and realism seen in many current online FPSes, all the characters look like they're from a Pixar movie. It's gory, yes, but a game where the standard infantry character was rejected from the army during WWII and got on a plane to Poland, going on a Nazi killing spree (in 1949) and awarding himself medals that he made for himself can't be anything but outlandish and silly.
  • American McGee's Alice is almost a literal definition of this.
  • There is some of this between The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind and The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion where major plot points are concerned. Not only does the player character in Oblivion spend the main quest helping the Empire's last heir sacrifice himself in order to provide a stopgap against demon invasion while simultaneously eliminating any possibility of such protection in the future, Oblivion also has the Dark Brotherhood series of quests wherein the player character can actually become an assassin with all that this entails. Further, many of Oblivion's NPC dialogues discuss events in Morrowind and involve events that overturn previous cheerful endings, such as Vivec disappearing and Ald'Ruhn being burned down. At the same time though it also censors a few in game books, and makes the gameplay much softer (the only way to fail most quests is your death or bugs).
    • Rather, Morrowind is lighter on the surface. Daggerfall featured nudity, graphic texts in books, insane dungeons, disease is instant death if not cured in time, etc..
    • If you include the spinoffs, The Elder Scrolls constantly went through two phases of going Darker and Edgier. Arena was pretty light, Daggerfall was darker, Battlespire pushed the darkness as far as it could go. Then Redguard went back to square one, followed by Morrowind and Oblivion being progressively darker. Skyrim meanwhile goes...in a bit of a zigzag. The world in Morrowind was pretty Crapsack, but you make it better. Oblivion is in a Crap-saccharine world. Skyrim goes right back to a crapsack world...even worse than the world in the previous games! Yet the story ends on a pretty idealistic side.
  • Donkey Kong Country 2 was subtly darker than the previous.
  • Blood Storm for all its Black and Grey Morality (only 2 were actual good guys, everyone else was either an Ax-Crazy sociopath or a bastard) and Bloodier and Gorier worth compared to Time Killers failed miserably to compare to Mortal Kombat since even in Mortal Kombat morality wasn't that grey. This caused the company to go bankrupt as a result
  • While the first Killzone wasn't sunshine and roses, it didn't have the feel or atmosphere of a dark game. Killzone 2 plunged right through that and made everything dark and gritty, with dark and oppressive vistas of muted colors, increased character death rate, blood everywhere and a general feel of hopelessness in the fight. Quite like with Jak and Daxter, going dark and edgy was a good choice here.
    • Ditto for Resistance series which is completely bleak from the get go and only gets worse with sequel for humanity.
  • Contra: Shattered Soldier went a long way to undo the optimistic ending of Contra III: The Alien Wars. Bill Rizer, the hero of the original games, is now a wrongly accused war criminal convicted for causing the destruction of 80% of the world's population, while his former partner Lance Bean is now a a terrorist leader seeking to overthrow the Triumvirate, who were responsible for provoking the alien invasions in the previous games.
    • Neo Contra inverts this by essentially being a self parody of the series.
  • Koumajou Densetsu, fulfills this trope by putting the characters from Touhou Project: Embodiment of the Scarlet Devil into a Castlevania inspired universe.
  • Spyro the Dragon, when you remember that the original games have a cute dragon fighting hilarious freaks who mostly ran away from him, and you regained health by collecting DRAGONFLIES, it's difficult to see how it progressed to the level of Grim-Dark in The Legend of Spyro. However, Spyro has since moved to Skylanders, which is on the lighthearted side.
    • It must be said that the first Spyro game had a much darker feel to it than the two games that followed, due to the fact that Spyro is the only good person alive, and so there are no cute characters to talk to, giving the game a sense of foreboding. The egg thieves also add some tension. However, dark levels (such as "Dark Passage") are a staple of the whole series. In fact some of the levels in the later games are harder than those in the first game despite seemingly being aimed at a younger audience.
  • Inverted with Backyard Sports. The executives wanted to make the series darker and edgier by making the kids older and giving them new designs, but it became Lighter and Softer, and its audience's age went down.
  • Square Enix has announced that Final Fantasy XV will be the darkest entry to the Final Fantasy series yet. The trailers and plot information released so far paints it as fairly bloody and bleak, so this is probably true.
    • Proven correct as it's cousin Final Fantasy Type-0 is also dark, bloody and depressing as well.
    • The ending for the first Final Fantasy XIII was averted somewhat, as it was a Bittersweet ending. Lightning, Snow, Hope, and Sazh are freed from their crystal stasis and their L'cie brands are gone, Serah and Dajh are freed from their crystal stasis aswell and they have a big happy reunion. However, Fang and Vanille are still trapped in Crystal, holding up Cocoon. The only consolation for this is that you know they still have each other.
    • For 13-2, it was true with the ending. Serah is dead, her sister is Taken for Granite, the villain's Time Crash plan pulled through, Valhalla consumes the living world, the Goddess of Valhalla is dead, and the villain got off scot-free. Frankly speaking, it was a real Downer Ending.
  • Dragon Quest games are often pretty idealistic, but as shown by Dragon Quest V they aren't afraid to make the heroes work hard for their happy endings. However, Dragon Quest VII is easily the darkest Dragon Quest game yet, with the heroes almost always finding a part of the world that suffered (or is about to suffer) some kind of unspeakable tragedy that would wipe out everything. Normally they put a stop to this and manage to save the town (and that part of the world) but there have been instances where they were too late or there wasn't anything they could do.
  • Radical Dreamers and subsequently Chrono Cross shifted dramatically in tone from the relatively lighthearted adventurous spirit of Chrono Trigger. The fact that the idealistic heroes from the previous game are strongly implied to have been unceremoniously offed is a pretty good indicator of the general tone of the games.
  • The Legend of Zelda:
    • The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask is pretty dark for a Zelda game, especially in comparison to the previous title. This is due to the apocalyptic concept of the moon falling into the land of Termina in three days. Twilight Princess is also pretty dark, even being rated T, suggesting that the "realistic" games are permanently taking a turn for the dark and edgy.
    • If one would branch the 3D Zelda games into two categories, Toon-style and Real-style, the "darkest" entry in the generally more cheerfully Toon-style category would be Spirit Tracks, which is one of the only two Zelda games in this style to not receive a regular E rating, but rather E10+ (the other game being the HD remake of Wind Wakernote ). It even features one of the shortest, but creepiest plot points of Twilight Princess as framework for a huge junk of the story: Princess Zelda's empty body being possessed by a male Sealed Evil in a Can.
    • The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword is in the middle between the darker style of Twilight Princess and the lighter style of The Wind Waker, which is evident by both the visual style and the storyline. Played literally with the final boss' weapon: a black Master Sword with a Serrated Blade of Pain.
  • Wild ARMs 3 is the darkest entry in the Wild Arms series due to having the most sinister villains, and Filgaia (normally A World Half Full) being a flatout Death World.
  • While not to the extent as other examples in this page, Tales of Rebirth is probably the darkest entry of the Tales Series. Overall, the game has a more grim atmosphere and serious story than its predecessors and successors (doesn't mean that the game doesn't have humor, it's just in smaller amounts). The game isn't universally considered the best of the franchise, but it's pretty high up there; so, an example of the trope working.
    • Tales of the Abyss qualifies as well. It followed the much Lighter and Softer Tales of Legendia and more idealistic Tales of Symphonia series. (Including Phantasia, which received a Game Boy Advance release months before Abyss was.) The game's Wham Episode involves Luke being tricked into causing a mining town full of people suffering from Miasma-poisoning into the Qliphoth. Those who didn't die in the initial fall then sank into the mud and died. Nothing quite like that happens (unless you include the mass-Suicide of the Replicas) later, but almost all the characters wind up losing someone important to them or going through hell to earn their happy ending... and they got a Gainax Ending. Plus the characters themselves. Jade is the only one who doesn't go through some kind of traumatic event. And given that Jade kind of created a Humanoid Abomination and nearly killed himself when he was younger...yeah. As with Rebirth, though, this trope mostly paid off. While not an all-time favourite like Symphonia or Vesperia, Tales of the Abyss is considered by many to have the best plot and Character Development in the series, and it also created one of the most beloved characters in the series' history.
    • Here's a fun statistic for you. In Tales of Symphonia, the protagonists are horrified to find out that there's a bridge powered by ten thousand Exspheres, because Exspheres are made of people. In Tales of the Abyss, the party is given the option to sacrifice ten thousand replicas and the protagonist in order to eliminate the miasma. And they do, despite the fact that they've already racked up a body count of over ten thousand from Akzeriuth alone. The game is so much Darker and Edgier you can actually calculate it!
    • From here, Tales of Vesperia really zig-zags the trope. The game as a whole is Lighter and Softer - Everybody Lives, the world's problems are solved, blah blah blah - than Tales of the Abyss. However, the protagonist is a much darker figure than the Tales of Symphonia hero, Lloyd, or even the Tales of the Abyss hero, Luke. We go from a Wide-Eyed Idealist and a bratty but well-meaning Sheltered Aristocrat to cold, snarky Vigilante Man Yuri Lowell who kills unarmed villains without a second thought. This was a positive example, though - Yuri ended up being an Ensemble Darkhorse for the entire series, and he is the most consistently popular character since Leon.
    • Later on, Tales of Xillia 2 was outright stated by the creator of the series to be the darkest entry yet. It really shows, between the much higher amount of blood in the cutscenes, the grisly deaths multiple characters suffer, and the endings being bittersweet at best (Excluding the non-canon joke ending), and downright horrific at worst (That being the bad ending, where Ludger kills the rest of the party and dooms the world and himself in the process).
  • Homeworld Cataclysm. Although we don't witness it directly, the Beast easily trumps the Taiidan in terms of brutality; at least the Taiidan stopped at annihilating a planet, the Beast only cares about making more of itself in a gruesome and (by the sound of it), REALLY F***ING PAINFUL way.
  • Army Of Two - The 40th Day was a much darker compared to Army Of Two, Morality decisions that is in the Black and Grey Morality section. A much darker plot and quite the number of people killed off.
  • Tales of Monkey Island. For starters, the sex jokes and double entendres are more frequent and overt. The comedic, silly deaths from previous games are mostly replaced by gruesome, occasionally-tragic deaths. LeChuck tones down his Large Ham persona. There's almost no fourth wall breaks. Oh, and Guybrush DIES...he gets better later on, but still.
  • Doom 3 is this compared to its predecessors. Especially ''darker''.
  • Zork Nemesis was a black sheep in the series, largely eschewing the light-hearted, satirical nature of the rest of the series for a dark, grim story set in an abandoned and ruined temple, where the only characters to interact with are four self-aware corpses and the Eldritch Abomination who killed them, and that's just the first area.
  • For a while the 3rd sequel to Kid Icarus seemed to be heading this way, looking more like Nintendo's answer to God of War. [1] Apparently, Pit was a adult and was "cursed for thousands of years for a crime and becomes a 'Fallen Angel" and had a tattoo on his arm bearing the inscription of said crime. Most of the fans did not like it (mainly because making Pit an adult would defeat the point of naming the game Kid Icarus). Fortunately for them, they went with the Brawl redesign and appear to have scrapped the old ideas.
  • King's Quest: Mask of Eternity took the series in a direction that embarrassed Sierra's designers. Among them were Jane Jensen, who wrote:
    "Me and my poor befuddled brain, trying to fathom a Sierra where... the most recent King's Quest involves killing things? Whatever happened to saving the cute little bee queen? HAS THE WORLD GONE MAD?"[2]
  • The Mother series falls under this somewhat. Mother 1 was a bit dark compared to Mother 2 which is the most cheerful and funny of the series, despite being a pretty dark game, it obscured it with bright colors and witty dialogue, then comes Mother 3 where your mother dies (in the first 30 minutes of the game, no less), your brother goes missing after trying to avenge your mother's death (although it's implied the main character thinks he's dead), your father dedicates his life to finding him, your brother is used by the big bad to pull the seven needles which if he gets more than half the WORLD ENDS, the big bad is an insane person who is thousands of years old and has the mind and body of a kid, and in the end your brother kills himself in order to rejoin your mother in the afterlife. Amazingly it does retain the humor of the previous games though. In addition, what little Itoi has talked about the Nintendo 64 version shows that it was going to be signifigantly darker, and even Dummied Out cutscenes and sprites(of which there are plenty) show that even GBA version was somehow going to be more depressing and dark still.
  • No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle is a darker followup of the first game. While it still retains the quirky, paradoxal, fourth wall-breaking, Tarantino-esque qualities of the first game, it continues the series’ theme of revenge that was only brought up at the end of the first game, a noticeably angrier Travis, and the brutal murder of Travis' friend Bishop, with his severed head in a paper bag being thrown through Travis' window at the beginning of the game. Interestingly, the second game also features some actual Character Development, with Travis starting to get sick of mindless killing and eventually deciding to quit the UAA because it disgusts him, as opposed to the first game, where he was just a violent, foul-mouthed Blood Knight. The darker tone of the game is echoed by the ambiance of the levels, most of them being explored during dusk time, representing an important transition for Travis and the characters supporting him.
  • Sengoku Basara is a game series that's known for being ridiculously over-the-top with all its character designs, Engrish, attacks, plotlines, ham, silly humour, cheese and the tendency to ignore actual history. Everything was turned Up to Eleven, and it was awesome in its own way. Then along came Sengoku Basara 3, kicking the previous poster boys out of the way and taking over with new serious plotline. Capcom also decided to be more history-accurate, making them NPC/killing off important characters along the way. Result? Previously "LET'S PARTY!" -characters overrun with angst.
  • The Star Fox series continuously bounces between this and Lighter and Softer. The lighter games are Star Fox 64 and Star Fox Adventures, both containing amusing dialogue spoken in rather dire situations. The darker games are Assault (following Adventures) and the original SNES game to a degree; in the latter, virtually no humor exists, and when your wingmen are shot down, they're Killed Off for Real. The former features a Hive Mind assimilation plot leading to The End of the universe as we know it, and rather painful sacrifices on the parts of Peppy and the Star Wolf Team, but they manage to survive. Command is somewhere in the middle; cheesy dialogue and story with rather questionable Multiple Endings.
    • If you count it, the unreleased Star Fox 2 is dark by the fact that interplanetary ballistic missiles are used to destroy Corneria. To top it off, the entire game is on a time limit of sorts. Don't take out the missiles, and Corneria is hopelessly glassed.
  • Syphon Filter was already rather dark to begin with, but Logan's Shadow especially turns up the angst factor, with the IPCA shut down, Logan sent on a botched mission by corrupt bureaucrat Robert Cordell, Lian accused of treason by Cordell, and Logan's and Teresa's possible death at the end. Ironically, it has a T rating, as opposed to the M rating of previous games.
  • Patapon 3 is a rather mild example. The art style is much darker in this one and music has lots of heavy guitar riffs in it.
    • The sequel is notably darker, instead of leading an army of Patapon, the Patapon are left to 4 survivors who are tossed into a dimension filled with dark demons and must fight them off with masks that can corrupt them.
  • EA released a game that plays like Diablo in a dark and gritty sci-fi universe. It's called Darkspore. Yes, that Spore.
    • Just like Spore, The Sims Medieval is darker than the older sim games as it breaks the three rules of Simology which is no religion, no murder (You can kill people in swordfights and executing them) and no alcoholism. It also introduces some things such as breastfeeding for instance.
  • While Transformers has had darker and lighter reboots multiple times, Transformers: War for Cybertron seems to be one of the darkest takes yet. For once it focuses on the fighting on Cybertron and how absolutely brutal it was, and we see cities getting torn apart, a nightmarish Decepticon war prison, and it's not just the Decepticons who have large numbers of unnamed expendable soldiers.
  • The "Wonderful Life" subseries of Harvest Moon are extremely dark compared to the other games. For one, unlike the other HM games, once you've chosen who to marry, the game clearly spells out to you that the lives of the other potential brides are now completely, irrevocably ruined.
    • For the second, characters age in real time, which means the end of A Wonderful Life is a wonderful death.
  • Arc The Lad 2: the game takes every trope and cliche found in Japanese RPGs, then apply with bullheaded consistency Murphy's Law, turning the sequel of a generic RPG into one of the most sadistic game on the first Playstation.
  • The general direction of Dwarf Fortress updates is that each is darker and edgier than the last, if it's more than bug fixes, to bring more Fun. Highlights include:
  • Compare Robot Unicorn Attack to the sequel. The original is fabulous, while the sequel is darker.
  • Castlevania: Lords of Shadow is extremely dark and cynical for Castlevania series. For better or for worse.
  • Telltale's Sam & Max: Freelance Police games went from being a collection of lighthearted (but satirical) stand-alones in the first two seasons, to the much more serious and epic Season 3, The Devil's Playhouse, which (while still a total comedy) had a strong overarching plot, was less satirical, and deconstructed the Black Comedy stuff into more serious and emotionally-affecting Black Comedy. It went down really well with the fanbase, though.
  • Hard Truck series started out as a trucking simulation game. Then Hard Truck Apocalypse spinoff was released where events take place in post-apocalyptic Europe.
  • Would you believe LittleBigPlanet 2? It's still a fairly light, silly game, but... well, the previous titles were about traveling an imaginary world, helping people. This one is about stopping an Eldritch Abomination from destroying an imaginary world, complete with some genuinely creepy levels and enemies.
  • According to Kevin Conroy, Batman: Arkham City would be this compared to the first game. That's saying something considering how dark Arkham Asylum was.
    • Batman: Arkham Asylum itself was essentially a MUCH darker version of the animated series. In fact, it was so dark and filled with so much scary stuff, that many people who play are shocked that it didn't get rated M. One wonders how they got away with a Teen Rating for Batman: Arkham City.
  • Tomb Raider went this direction. The first game had Lara Croft simply hunting for artifacts and getting into shootouts for self-defence. As the games progressed the character became darker and more violent, with the player being unable to avoid killing in order to proceed with a level in some cases. One game's cutscene has Lara cold-bloodedly allowing a man to fall to his death, while a mission in Tomb Raider Anniversary chronicles Lara's first killing of another human being. (See Literature for how Lara got even more darker and edgier.)
    • Especially with the new reboot of the series, pictured at the top of the page. It follows Lara on her first archeological expedition, just after college. She ends up stranded on an island occupied by crazy, homicidal cultists and must learn to survive and kill, or die. Features copious amounts of physical and psychological trauma.
  • Tenchu isn't exactly a family friendly game but its prequel, Birth of the Stealth Assassins, elaborated on Rikimaru and Ayame's tragic back story.
  • Golden Sun: Dark Dawn is darker and edgier than its predecessors. Weyard in the two previous games was largely at peace, and the only characters who tended to kick the bucket were the villains. Now Angara, and very likely the other continents of Weyard, is full of budding countries who frequently war with each other, and once the the Grave Eclipse is activated, townspeople start dropping like flies in the face of an overwhelming monster horde, with even a few named characters both good and bad getting Killed Off for Real.
  • Portal 2, while still being as hilarious as the first game, has a noticeably darker and more serious plot.
  • While Mabinogi isn't exactly one of the cheeriest games around, its prequel game Vindictus, focusing on humanity's war against the Fomors to reach The Promised Land (Mabinogi's original setting Erinn) is as violent as all get-out and has a lot more serious themes. In the third major episode, a young cadet that you spent the first few episodes getting to know is viciously murdered, and as the game goes on, we learn it's only the beginning of how bad things are getting.
    • It doesn't help that the cutscene where he's killed is right before the boss fight in a mission. And it's unskippable. Given the luck-factor in finishing quests, it's not uncommon to see him murdered over and over and over again.
  • Rocket Knight Adventures was a cute game about a silly opossum who wears knight armor and a jet pack, and fights an army of pigs, who, when defeated, run around in their underwear after their armor is knocked off. There were two sequels released shortly after, both named Sparkster, one for the SNES and one for the Genesis. The music is no longer as upbeat, the enemies are replaced with wolves or lizards (depending on which sequel), the humor and silliness are gone, Rocket Knight (now Sparkster) himself is no longer chubby and happy looking but instead slim and grim, and a lot of the original charm is gone. The wolf enemies are also used in the XBLA/PSN remake, simply titled "Rocket Knight".
  • Final Fantasy also has its fare share of Darker and Edgier moments. A particularly notable example is Final Fantasy VI: There are hints at unethical experimentation towards a sentient race by The Empire, the amnesiac main character, when knocked out, experiences a particularly horrifying recollection about her being outfitted with a slave crown in a manner that is implied to be unwilling on her part, then being forced to torch fifty of the imperial troops alive, and the war speech made by the Emperor. In addition, the main villain, a psychotic jester named Kefka Palazzo manages to gleefully poison a civilization's water supply and was implied to have wiped out said civilization in what is essentially an act of Genocide, with the Empire also suffering losses from the same poison as well, and then proceeds to stab the Emperor in the back and cause the world to be significantly ruined, remaining this way throughout the second act, and it is implied that the world's condition is slowly getting worse, with the main bad guy (now a god) murdering various people with his Light of Judgement, even orphaning various people, and then trying to destroy the entire planet.
  • League of Legends' newer skins as of August 9th, all of them felt a lot darker and grittier.
  • Hyperdimension Neptunia was a fun light-hearted Console Wars game filled with a fun cast and a happy game overall. The second game starts off with the four goddesses on the receiving end of a curb stomp, piracy monsters are rampant, and in one of the endings murdering fellow goddesses to power up the sword, only to find out that Nepgear was being controlled by the Big Bad.
    • And then there's the upcoming Hyperdimension Neptunia Victory II. The upcoming teasers, as well one of official artworks depicting Gamindustri into ruins, indicating that this game much darker than previous main games.
  • Need for Speed is seemingly heading into this territory with Need for Speed The Run.
  • Compared to the rest of the series, Hitman: Contracts is the darkest. All of the missions take place at night and it's usually raining. The game also has really haunting background music, and at least 4 of the missions have already dead bodies, one who was horribly butchered.
  • Darwinia, released by Introversion Software, centers around saving a race of small, green machine-intelligence entities known as Darwinians from a virus that has infected their computer system. However, in the process, the player introduces the Darwinians to a previously unknown concept: organized conflict. The result can be best seen in the slogan for the sequel, Multiwinia:
    Multiwinia ~ Darwin is dead. Prepare for war.
  • NHL '99, where the menus had a grittier feel to them. However, this didn't change the content of the game.
  • Although Metroid is already a darker and edgier Nintendo franchise, it reached a new level with Metroid Prime 2: Echoes. In addition to including a Dark World, its backstory tells about much more tragic events, including the rise, decline and near-extinction of the Luminoth, the death of the Galactic Federation soldiers, and the Space Pirates being frightened before the presence of an Evil Counterpart of Samus Aran. The next game, Corruption, is aesthetically less dark due to the lack of a Dark World, but Samus does witness the death of several fellow hunters, several planets (not just one anymore) being affected by Phazon, the renmants of a merciless attack towards a GF ship, and Samus herself being gradually corrupted by Phazon.
  • Playing the first few games of the Soul Series, you think that the Soul Calibur is the "good" sword to the evil of Soul Edge, right? Not as of IV - Calibur is Knight Templar, just as evil as Edge. Previously-sympathetic characters like Taki become major bitches. Justified as Soul Calibur was made from a purified shard of Soul Edge.
  • Sly Cooper had a major shift between the first and second game. The first had Spyro the Dragon and Crash Bandicoot-like gameplay with a slightly darker story, while the second had actual thieving, a "spice" smuggling business, an evil FBI authority that tried to brainwash Carmelita, and so much more.
  • X3: Albion Prelude compared to X3: Terran Conflict. The previous game's eponymous Space Cold War goes hot when one of the characters from X3: Reunion suicide-bombs Earth's Torus Aeternal (a massive space station ringing Earth), killing millions of Terran civilians instantly (never mind the surfacer deaths from deorbiting debris). The Terrans deploy their entire fleet in a Roaring Rampage of Revenge against the Argon, who retaliate with artificially intelligent warships reverse-engineered from the Xenon.
  • Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer compared to the original campaign. So much so that some people wonder how the same company could have created the lighthearted Troperiffic romp through the Sword Coast, then turned around and created an original, dark, atmospheric campaign in MotB.
  • Ghost Recon and Rainbow Six shifted to a darker direction as the newer soldiers are more like Military Mavericks than by the orders soldiers and Spec Ops, Rainbow Six Vegas exemplified the notable shift.
  • Perfect Dark is a darker and edgier Spiritual Successor to Golden Eye 1997. The prequel, Zero, while still rather grimdark, moved in the Lighter and Softer direction.
  • The Professor Layton series escalates in terms of the amount of violence with each installment. The first game had precisely one death, which happened before the start of the game, setting the plot in motion. The second game was the same, but also had a more sinister feel to it, referring to things like pregnancy and murder. The third game ramps this up absurdly. During the plot's climax, Clive's Humongous Mecha demolishes a good chunk of London, seemingly killing hundreds of people. The fourth game was significantly less dark than the third, but still had quite a bit of violence, especially during the Spectre's scenes. The animated film wasn't quite as dark as the games, but the plot was started by the death of a young girl, and the premise of the Anti-Villain's plan was very disturbing. The thing that prevents this film from matching the level of violence of the games is that, when the Crown Pettone is destroyed, it is at first implied that everyone aboard it was killed, but it is later revealed that the Evil Minions had loaded them into a submarine and sent them back to shore.
    • The crossover with Ace Attorney is dark by both series' standards. To mention one example of how hardcore this game can get: young girls accused of witchcraft are sealed inside a cage that looks disturbingly similar to an Iron Maiden, screaming and begging for help all the way, then plunged into a pit of fire. This is already horrifying by itself, but what makes it worse is the people's reactions. Because they are overly scared of witches and easy to refer to anything they don't understand as magic, they are quick to accuse any girl of witchcraft, rush their trials, and stubbornly refuse to listen to them. This leads to many innocent young ladies being burned to a crisp.
  • Borderlands 2, although quite a bit Denser and Wackier than its predecessor, is stuffed with Black Comedy, and in contrast to the first game's Excuse Plot, has a genuine — and frequently very dark — plot. The antagonist, Handsome Jack, hops across the Moral Event Horizon early on and doesn't let up from there.
  • Worldof Warcraft seems to go this way in the expansions.
    • In Vanilla there was less focus on evil villains as opposed to the player factions.
    • In Burning Crusade there were some rather frightening demonic areas.
    • In Wrath of the Lich King there was some more creepy undead areas. The player even has the option of becoming a death knight. They start out working for the villainous Lich King. The quests force the player to some things more disturbing than normal, like torture soldiers with pointy metal spikes with red hot tips.
    • In Cataclysm the villainous Deathwing the Destroyer makes all Azeroth more Darker and Edgier. His Cataclysm was able to ruin signature Vanilla questing areas like Auberdine in Darkshore, causing a giant volcano to sprout in Ashenvale, splitting the Barrens through the middle, and making a line of destruction across the Badlands called Scar of the Worldbreaker. And that isn't even considering how the war between the Alliance and Horde is escalating and how the factions hate each other so much they fight each other even in the face of the world being broken.
    • And in Mists of Pandaria we get a world that looks pretty lighthearted. However with the presence of the Mogu, Mantid, and worst of all, the Sha, Pandaria is very much a Crap Saccharine World. In fact, the questions to the player faction's morality ("Why must you bring your war here? Was there nothing worth fighting for where you come from?") makes this one of the most personal expansions yet.
  • Psycho Soldier was your fairly typical and uncomplicated action game that brings us the team up of to Athena Asamiya (descendant of the original Athena) and Sie Kensou, who would become famous through The King of Fighters. Athena: Awakening of the Ordinary Life, however, introduces a more complicated storyline with dinosaurs, a Government Conspiracy, and quite the bit of Break the Cutie for Athena herself.
  • Far Cry 2 and its sequel were considerably darker. Tackling the futility of war and how it dehumanises everyone, the player included.
  • Assassin's Creed III, the last one had a relatively good conclusion to Ezio's life but Connor's been dealt nothing but sorrow as in this series the morality of the Assassins Templar Conflict is of the Black and Grey Morality compared to the previous series where the Templars was incapable of anything but one atrocity after another.
  • Episode 11.5 and Part Iv Nirvana of Asura's Wrath are darker then the rest of the game, which already has a rather serious story as a whole despite the over the top action. It's also darker and edgier then a lot of Capcom's other IP's as well.
  • From the Ace Attorney franchise, Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies is the first game in the series to be rated M (ages 17 and older) where all games before it were rated T (13 and older). The first case shows a full courthouse of people running for their lives as a bomb explodes and destroys the courtroom. You also encounter a witness who is so petrified of monsters that she starts hallucinating and believes she actually sees them. Then there's the finale where, through a flashback, you get to see a young Athena Cykes covered in her mother's blood as she tries to "fix" her with machines due to her naivety on how people get treated for injuries (luckily her mother was long dead before Athena used the machines). Due to the upgrade to 3D, all the grim details aren't left out.
    • The series started to turn to the darker and edgier route early on. While the first game had your standard crime themes and motives for killing, Justice For All cranks it up by making everything grittier and high stakes; a con artist panics seeing a police officer nearby so he kills him out of fear, snapping the guy's neck from a fall. An overworked nurse accidentally causes 14 patients to die under her care. A wheelbound circus actor plots to kill a young and childlike girl who accidentally caused his brother to go into a coma and she remains oblivious to the dire situation, but the killer accidentally kills his father figure instead by dropping a safe on him. A woman hangs herself after being dumped by an actor she used to date and then being dumped by another actor when he found out she used to date his rival, which also causes her confidant to commit suicide as well, but fails. Yikes.
    • Trials and Tribulations continues the tread. In addition to having one of the darkest prosecutors in the form of Godot, the game also introduced us to Dahlia Hawthorne and Morgan Fey, two of the darkest, most horrifyingly evil villains in the entire series.
    • Apollo Justice seems Lighter and Softer, but things quickly take a turn for the worse. The justice system is shown to have gone from "merely" incompetent to outright corrupt, and the Big Bad is basically a male version of Dahlia if her raving lunacy was replaced with cold, detached sociopathy.
  • Final Fantasy IX: The first quarter of the game, aside from a couple of darker moments (like Blank's petrification and the Black Waltzes) is generally very lighthearted and whimsical, particularly when you consider some of previous installments in the series. The game very suddenly and definitely takes a turn into darker territory starting with all that happens in Burmecia, Garnet's Eidolon extraction and the destruction of Cleyra, and stays that way.
  • Shadows Of The Damned is this for Goichi Suda's works. In addition to being a horror-themed third-person shooter rather than an anime or comic book-themed action/hack-and-slash game, it also has the grimmest and darkest visuals out of any Suda/Grasshopper game, lots of horrific imagery, none of the iconic bizarreness of Suda's other works, and a very creepy and eerie tone. It does have a lot of humor just like other Suda games, but that still doesn't stop it from being extremely grim compared to the others.
  • According to the trailers and E3 demo, Bayonetta 2 already looks like it'll be this. Bayonetta tries to summon the Infernal Demons out of her hair as usual, but then they break free and turn against her, and she must fight them. Jeanne then tries to save Bayonetta from being attacked by Gomorrah, but instead gets her soul thrown out of her body and taken away to Inferno (Hell), so Bayonetta must get into Inferno to rescue her. Also, we find out that Father Balder was not the last Lumen Sage, there is also another one, and his goal is to eliminate all remaining Umbran Witches.
  • Anarchy Reigns is much more serious than its predecessor, Madworld. There isn't as much humor, most deaths are played out seriously, electrocution is portrayed realistically rather than cartoonishly, Howard and Kreese (the announcers from Madworld) are gone, and there are several Tear Jerker moments during the campaign.
  • Telltale's The Walking Dead, as the game goes on. Chapters 1 and 2 start out as no better or worse than a lot of Zombie Apocalypse stories, but from that point on, the Holy Shit Quotient just goes up and up. Example: Chapter 1 has only two on-screen major character deaths, both at the hands of zombies. Chapter 3 has one major character being murdered in cold blood after a heated argument, one character committing suicide, and the on-screen death of a child. By the end of Chapter 5, nearly every character in the group has either left or been killed off, including Lee himself. The tone of the characters shifts dramatically too: Lee gets bitten and turns into an angry and determined dead-man-walking who doesn't care if he lives or dies, Kenny descends into alcoholism and depression and seemingly gets eaten just as he finds hope, pregnant Christa is seen downing an entire bottle of liquor in an implied attempt to kill her own baby, and Clementine ends up wandering lost and alone, grieving the loss of both her parents and Lee.
  • Popolocrois Monogatari II. And the Japanese love it for it. And this is a highly colourful style, too.
  • Emerald City Confidential is a noir retelling of sorts of the Land of Oz series of books. The main character is a cynical private detective who lives in a Crapsack World filled with crime and corruption.
  • Metal Slug 5, at least in comparison to the other games in the series. Series Big Bad Morden and his Dragon Allen O'Neal, as well as the Rebel Army, are not in the game, and instead, you fight a different group of enemies ranging from veiled terrorists to armed mecha. As a result, the game lacks some of the humor found in the other games. However, most of the enemies in the game are all edits of Rebel soldier sprites. The game also features a heavy metal soundtrack.
  • As far as CarmenSandiego games go, CarmenSandiegoWordDetective. The artstyle is much less colourful than previous styles, the music is far less upbeat. To top it off, unlike other games, the villains will try to harm the player character, ending with a nice Freeze-Frame Bonus of the players about to have their face bitten off by an alien or about to be stabbed by a sword. They all get away with this, too.
  • The rest of the games in the Shin Megami Tensei franchise often feel like this to fans who started with Persona 3 and 4, especially with the latter. Within the franchise itself, Persona 2 and Digital Devil Saga 2 are much darker than their predecessors. "Not that Digital Devil Saga was happy to begin with..."
  • Quest for Glory IV. The first two games were pretty lighthearted even when things got serious, and after proving himself in the first game the hero always had allies close by to rely on, and his reputation frequently preceded him. Even in the third game, which was Bloodier and Gorier and slightly darker than before, the Hero still had Rakeesh and Uhura to count on. This time, he's completely cut off from everyone in a strange land where no one knows who he is, nor do they take kindly to his presence. He's then tasked with stopped an Eldritch Abomination in a very moody setting with lots of creepy characters and backdrops and plenty of tragic backstories to go around. Fortunately, it also manages to still retain the humor from the previous games, and is still considered possibly the best game in the series.
  • Samurai Shodown started getting gradually darker starting with the third game. Whereas the first two games were fairly lighthearted (aside of the occasional killing of your rival if you give the last slash in the right moment and spot), and the protagonist role is split between a fairly easygoing guy who just likes to get in fights (Haohmaru) and one of the poster-children for Moe characters in video games (Nakoruru), the third features the Kid Hero Shizumaru with a Dark and Troubled Past who may or may not be suffering from Demonic Possession. Further games would start introducing characters like a psychotic vengeful spirit (Basara Kubukiri) and a giant man-eating youkai (Kusageredo), while the games also started getting Bloodier and Gorier, featuring staight-up and personalised fatalities starting with the fourth game. The sixth game actually reversed all this, though, removing all fatalities and even blood (though it all came back for the next installment.)
  • Spec Ops: The Line is an example of this both for the Spec Ops franchise (of which it is a kind of Continuity Reboot) and for the modern military shooter genre in general, for which it serves as a Genre Deconstruction by examining in detail the brutality and horrors of war that more straightforward entries in the genre tend to overlook.

ToysDarker and EdgierWeb Animation
Tomb Raider (2013)ImageSource/Video GamesTonic Trouble

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