Creator / Noteworthy Disney Staff

We all love Disney's enormous selection of classic films and characters, but without these people, we might not have ever gotten all of those classics made! So here's a veritable pantheon of notable Disney staff, past and present, for your reading pleasure.

Compare to Noteworthy Fleischer Staff, Noteworthy Looney Tunes Staff and Noteworthy MGM Cartoon Staff.


     The Walt Disney Family and the Nine Old Men 

The Disney family and their closest associates:

  • Walt Disney: The man himself, co-founder of the company, co-creator of Mickey Mouse, and creator of Disneyland. While Walt didn't really draw anything after Mickey Mouse's creation, he was a director of many shorts. He stopped for a few years, did a brief return to directing in 1935 with The Golden Touch and loathed that short so much that he never directed another cartoon again. He was a talented storyteller, having a key role in a lot of the studio's early animated films, though he took on more the role as a businessman over the years until he died of lung cancer in Christmas 1966; his death sent the company into a Dork Age until the 1984 management shift.
  • Roy O. Disney: Walt's older brother and company co-founder. While Walt was the creative one, Roy ran the business side and remained Chairman, CEO, and President of the company until his death in 1971. A hardworking man, he cancelled his retirement to oversee Walt Disney World's completion, dedicating it to his late brother.
  • Lillian Disney: Walt's wife. She worked as an inker and secretary in the company's early days, acting as a conservative foil to her husband's daring. Following Walt's death, she worked along Roy to complete Walt Disney World, and funded CalArts too. Although she died in 1997, Lillian's last gift was The Walt Disney Concert Hall.
  • Diane Disney Miller: Walt's first daughter. While never an employee of her dad's company, she had close links to the company, opening the family museum in San Francisco. She died in 2013, and has a dedication to her in Saving Mr. Banks and a special thanks credit in Pixar's Inside Out.
  • Sharon Mae Lund Disney: Walt's second daughter, adopted due to Lillian's difficulty with childbirth. Her husband Bill Lund had helped identify a suitable place to build Walt Disney World in Orlando. She died in 1993.
  • Joanna Miller: Granddaughter of Walt Disney.
  • Ron Miller: Diane's husband. He was a producer and crewmember on several films, and became the boss of Disney throughout most of their Dark Years. He did start up the Disney Channel and after a few darker than normal Disney features, founded Touchstone Pictures to make PG-13 and R rated films, the first of which was Ron Howard's classic, Splash, which helped toward The Little Mermaid. This wasn't enough when an attempted corporate raid led to stockholders and Roy E. Disney ousting him and replacing him with Michael Eisner, and Miller retired. He has recently been given a special thanks credit on 2015's Inside Out, though
  • Roy E. Disney: Roy's son and Walt's nephew. He spent much of his life in Disney as a writer, editor, producer, and eventually executive on the board. He ousted Ron Miller to save the company, bringing Michael Eisner (who brought Jeffrey Katzenberg with him) and Frank Wells to shake things up. During the Disney Renaissance, he became head of the animation department. He and Eisner fell out due to the latter's Executive Meddling and ousted Eisner out too. He returned to the company in 2005 as Director Emeritus until his death in 2009.
  • Disney's Nine Old Men: Disney's most notable animators who invented and perfected the animation style and techniques that made Disney a household name. They are:
    • Eric Larson: Joined Disney in 1933 as an assistant to Ham Luske, and animated a lot of the animal characters in Disney's animated films, but he did animate Cinderella. Eventually took on a trainer role, and was the only one of the Nine Old Men to still be a part of the studio when the 1984 Management Shift happened and Jeffrey Katzenberg began overseeing animation when Michael Eisner gave it to him and said "that's your problem". Larson retired in 1986, but died in 1988; he was last credited on The Great Mouse Detective.
    • Frank Thomas: Joined the studio in 1934 and specialized in animating Tearjerker scenes such as Snow White in the glass coffin as well as Baloo coming to grips and having to tell Mowgli to go to the man village when he hears Shere Khan is in the picture. He joined World War II, but returned and animated tense scenes such as Ichabod Crane's ride before encountering the Headless Horseman. Also animated the infamous Lady Tremaine in Cinderella, the Trope Naming Spaghetti Kiss in Lady and the Tramp, the three fairies in Sleeping Beauty, Robin Hood in disguise, and the majority of Bernard and Bianca in The Rescuers, which he thought highly of. He retired after The Rescuers, and provided commentary on these movies and cameos in others such as The Iron Giant note  and The Incredibles alongside best friend Ollie Johnston, but he passed away in 2004.
    • John Lounsbery: Originally an assistant to Norm Ferguson, he was first credited with Honest John and Gideon in Pinocchio and animated a handful of bit characters in Disney movies such as Ben Ali Gator in Fantasia and Maleficent's minions in Sleeping Beauty. He directed the third Winnie The Pooh short, Tigger Too!, and was supposed to direct The Rescuers, but he sadly became the first of the Nine Old Men to pass away instead, in 1976; Robin Hood is the final Disney Canon film made while all of the men were alive.
    • Les Clark: Was hired by Ub Iwerks right out of high school in 1927, making him the first of the Nine Old Men to be recruited in (the others didn't join Disney until the mid 30's, nearly a decade later). This made him a major MVP at Disney immediately, working the skeletons in the original Silly Symphony Skeleton Dance and taking over as Mickey Mouse's animator when Iwerks departed the studio. He dealt with a lot of emotional scenes in the Classic Disney Shorts and secured his position by animating the most complicated dwarf scenes in Snow White. Other major reveals he supervised were Sorcerer Mickey waking his broom up in Fantasia, the dance in Cinderella, Lady's present box being opened at the beginning of Lady And The Tramp, and directing parts of Sleeping Beauty and the Paul Bunyan featurette. He stuck to educational material after that until his death in 1979.
    • Marc Davis: He started with animating Snow White herself, then Cinderella receiving her gown, then Alice and Tinker Bell. His biggest achievement is animating two classic villainesses, first Maleficent in Sleeping Beauty, and the more difficult Cruella de Vil in 101 Dalmatians. This second one, however, convinced Davis to transfer to Imagineering, where he worked on a lot of Disneyland material until his retirement. Being the idol of several villain designers such as Andreas Deja, Davis passed away in 2000.
    • Milt Kahl: Joining Disney in 1934, he animated Mickey in a few cartoons and the forest animals in Snow White, but he really got going with animating Pinocchio himself when the puppet came to life. He animated several more down to earth characters in the 50's such as Peter Pan and Prince Phillip in Sleeping Beauty, and moved on to more major characters such as Big Bad Shere Kahn in The Jungle Book and the main villains of The Rescuers, which was his last project.
    • Ollie Johnston: Started as a cleanup artist on Mickey's Garden, and became the main assistant of the dwarfs in Snow White. He animated the signature scene of Pinocchio trying to lie to the Blue Fairy and several other personality scenes, but got thrown a curveball with the evil stepsisters in Cinderella, and then did Mr. Smee in Peter Pan. At this point, he began working on characters that best friend Frank Thomas was assigned to, such as Mowgli and Baloo in The Jungle Book. He retired after The Rescuers, and was the last of the Nine Old Men to pass away (he died in 2008).
    • Ward Kimball: Joined the studio in the mid 30's, but almost walked out at the end of the decade before he was assigned to Jiminy Cricket in Pinocchio. He mastered the Disney Acid Sequence when he animated the title song number in The Three Caballeros and directed the short Toot, Whistle, Plunk, and Boom note , and did "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" in Mary Poppins, but resigned in 1973 when he clashed with the new bosses of the studio that followed Walt and Roy O.'s deaths, although he was tapped for EPCOT in the 80's.
    • Wolfgang "Woolie" Reithermann: Effectively the de facto leader of the Nine Old Men, Woolie joined Disney in 1934, and immediately mastered in the animated action and tension scenes in the Disney movies such as the escape from Monstro in Pinocchio, Timothy doing his scare in Dumbo, the key retrieval at the end of Cinderella, Tramp's fights in Lady And The Tramp, and directing the iconic/classic final confrontation with Maleficent in her fearsome dragon form (and the castle escape and thorn garden just prior to this scene) in Sleeping Beauty. Woolie got more responsibilities in the 60's and began directing the Disney Animated Classics himself starting with The Sword in the Stone and ending with The Fox and the Hound, which most of the Disney Renaissance staff started on. Woolie outright took over animation when Walt died and kept the position until he retired and died in a car crash in 1985, taking the old style of animating with him; Wolfgang Reithermann was spiritually succeeded by Jeffrey Katzenberg and Roy E. Disney, who were succeeded themselves by Ed Catmull and John Lasseter.

Other Noteworthy Disney Cast Members over the years:

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    A 
  • A. O. Scott: New York Times film critic who co-hosted the At The Movies program from Disney for its final season.
  • Aaron Blaise: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; one of the characters he animated is Yao from Mulan.
  • Aaron Springer: One of the creators and showrunners of the multi-award winning Mickey Mouse (2013) rebooted cartoon series.
  • Abbe Raven: The chairman of the A&E network, which is a collaboration between Disney/ABC and Hearst Corporation.
  • Abbey Konowitch: General manager of Walt Disney Records.
  • Adam Driver: Former U.S. Marine who enlisted after 9/11, but was medically discharged prior to being deployed in Iraq. Plays Big Bad/The Dragon Kylo Ren of the Knights of Ren in the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy and in Disney Infinity; he previously appeared in Steven Spielberg/DreamWorks's Lincoln as Samuel Beckwith (this film was distributed by Disney/Touchstone at the time).
  • Adam Green: Head of animation on the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get a Horse!.
  • Adam Sandler: A handful of his movies were distributed by Disney.
  • Adriana Caselotti: The voice of Snow White in Walt's original animated timeless classic. The contract stipulations prevented her from being involved with anything else.
  • Aerosmith: Rock/Metal band who is the star attraction in Disney's Hollywood Studios' Rock 'n' Roller Coaster and whose soundtracks have been used for the Disney Infinity series and the teaser trailer for Inside Out.
  • Aimee Scribner: A co-producer of Frozen Fever.
  • Al Bertino: Animator who worked on Pinocchio and Fantasia
  • Al Dempster: Animator who worked with Walt during the Golden Years.
  • Al Eugster: A former Fleischer veteran who migrated to Disney and specialized in animating the Donald Duck cartoons. He eventually returned to the Fleischer studio in 1940.
  • Al Hirschfeld: The late artist was the artistic consultant on the Genie in Aladdin and the classic Rhapsody In Blue number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Al Hoffman: One of the music composers for Cinderella.
  • Al Perkins: One of the screenwriters for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Al Zinnen: Animator on several Disney Classics.
  • Alaina Yohe: Assistant digital production manager of Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Alan Baumgarten: One of the editors of The Muppets.
  • Alan Bergman: President of the Walt Disney Studios.
  • Alan Burnett: The DC/Warner vet wrote a handful of Ducktales episodes and wrote the screenplay for that cartoon's theatrical adaptation, which is the only made-for-cinema project he's ever worked on (Batman: Mask of the Phantasm was meant to go Direct-to-Video before WB ordered it for the big screen.)
  • Alan Fine: President of Marvel Entertainment.
  • Alan Horn: Succeeded Rich Ross as studio head, he is the current incumbent in the position.
  • Alan N. Braverman: Senior executive vice president and general counsel for Disney.
  • Alan Silvestri: Music composer who has done a few Disney films.
  • Alan Tudyk: Actor who has been playing roles in the Disney Animated Classics movie series starting with Wreck-It Ralph and continuing to today.
  • Alan Wagner: The founder of the Disney Channel.
  • Alan Young: The current voice of Donald Duck's uncle Scrooge McDuck, who is the lead character in Ducktales, as well as the voice of Flaversham in The Great Mouse Detective.
  • Alan Zaslove: An associate of Tad Stones on the Disney Afternoon programming in the 80's and 90's.
  • Albert Hurter: Character designer on Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs.
  • Alice Dewey: The producer of Hercules.
  • Alex Ebert: Music composer for Feast.
  • Alex Hirsch: The creator of Gravity Falls.
  • Alex Kupershmidt: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; he animated Stitch in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Alf Clausen: The composer provided orchestrations for Splash and helped arrange the second version of the Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers theme song.
  • Alfred "Tops" Cruz: The layout artist for the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get A Horse!.
  • Alfred L. Werker: Hollywood director who was tapped by Walt to helm the first live-action/animation hybrid film from the studio, the experimental and touring The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Amy Rabins: One of the founders of Disney's It's A Laugh Productions.
  • Andre Fenley: Assistant supervising sound editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Andrea Romano: Voice director who worked on several Disney Afternoon cartoons.
  • Andrea Van de Camp: Disney board member who supported the ouster of Michael Eisner in the mid 2000's, something Eisner did not take well, reportedly.
  • Andrea Warren: The producer of the Pixar short Lava.
  • Andreas Deja: Started at Disney as a concept artist for The Black Cauldron, animated Mickey in The Prince and the Pauper, and was the supervising animator for King Triton, Gaston, Jafar, Scar, Hercules and Lilo. His most recent work was supervising the animation for Tigger in Winnie-the-Pooh.
  • Andrew Jimenez: Pixar short producer.
  • Andrew Kam: President of Hong Kong Disneyland.
  • Andrew Lacy: The former chief operating officer of Disney's Tapulous studio.
  • Andrew Millstein: Current president of Walt Disney Animation Studios.
  • Andrew Page: Director of music production on Tarzan.
  • Andrew Stanton: The director of Finding Nemo, Pixar's masterpiece Wall E, and John Carter. His next film will be Finding Dory.
  • Andrew Sugarman: The executive vice president of Disney Publishing Worldwide.
  • Andrew Temesvary: Assistant to the producer of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Andy Bird: Chairman of Walt Disney International.
  • Andy Devine: Voiced Friar Tuck in Robin Hood.
  • Andy Gaskill: Art director for The Lion King.
  • Andy Heyward: Main mind at DiC before, during, and after it was owned by Disney.
  • Andy Mooney: The former chairman of Disney Consumer Products and the person who pushed for the creation of the Disney Princess franchise after attending a Disney On Ice show, now the CEO of Fender Guitars.
  • Angela Lansbury: Actress who was the lead in Bedknobs and Broomsticks and who is the regular voice of Mrs. Potts in the Beauty and the Beast series; she also introduced the final number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Angus MacLane: Cast member at Pixar.
  • Ann Daly: Executive in charge of Walt Disney Home Video. She left the company in 1997 and has been with Jeffrey Katzenberg and DreamWorks Animation since.
  • Ann Sorenson: Assistant supervisor of color models on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Ann Tucker: A technical coordinator at Disney Animation.
  • Anne Gates: Former Disney executive, now with the Kroger grocery store chain.
  • Anne Marie Bardwell: Supervising animator for the character of Audrey in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Anne Sweeney: Longtime Disney executive of the Disney Channel, Disney/ABC, and Disney Media. She stepped down in 2014 to become a television director.
  • Annette Funicello: One of the original Mickey Mousketeers who passed away in 2013.
  • Annette Gayle: Production secretary of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Annie Guenther: Animator who reportedly inserted a shot of a bare-chested woman in a flying scene from The Rescuers; this shot was edited when it was discovered on the Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection VHS version of the film.
  • Anthony Connelly: Chief operating officer of the Disney Cruise Line.
  • Anthony Cookson: One of the second assistant directors for Never Cry Wolf.
  • Anthony Daniels: Plays C-3PO in almost all uses of the Star Wars character, including in Disney's films.
  • Anthony DeRosa: Lead animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Anthony Wayne Michaels: Lead animator of Sitka in Brother Bear.
  • Arden Chan: Layout supervisor for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Art Babbitt: Most known for turning Goofy into the character we all know and love. He also animated such characters as the Wicked Queen in Snow White, Geppetto in Pinocchio, the mushrooms in the Nutcracker Suite scene of Fantasia, and the stork in Dumbo—as well as contributed to the disastrous 1941 Disney studio strike, which led to his termination and feud with Walt and his family that went on until the 90's.
  • Art Palmer: Animator who worked with Walt during the Golden Years.
  • Art Rascon: Anchor at Houston's ABC station.
  • Art Riley: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Art Stevens: Major Disney animator who started with Fantasia and eventually co-directed The Rescuers and The Fox and the Hound before retiring.
  • Arthur Schmidt: The editor of Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Rocketeer, and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.
  • Artie Butler: Composed the musical score for The Rescuers.
  • Aurie Battaglia: Animator who worked with Walt during the Golden Age.
  • Aurora Miranda: Sister of Carmen Miranda who appeared as a Brazilian dancer in the Disney Animated Classic The Three Caballeros.
  • Axel Alonso: The editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics.
  • Axel Geddes: Editor at Pixar.
  • Aylwin Lewis: Current board member at Disney.
  • Ayn Robbins: One of the songwriters for The Rescuers.
    B 
  • Baker Bloodworth: Associate producer on Pocahontas.
  • Barbara Luddy: Voice actress on a handful of Disney Animated Classics such as 101 Dalmatians and The Many Adventures Of Winnie The Pooh.
  • Barbara McCormack: Ink and paint supervisor for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Barbara Parker: Script supervisor for Never Cry Wolf.
  • Barry Cook: One of the co-directors of Mulan.
  • Barry Johnson: Story artist at Disney Animation.
  • Barry Josephson: One of the producers of Enchanted.
  • Barry R. Kooser: Backgrounds supervisor for Brother Bear.
  • Barry Sonnenfeld: Hollywood producer who co-produced Enchanted with Josephson.
  • Barry Temple: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Bart Decrem: General manager of Disney Mobile.
  • Basil Davidovich: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Bela Temesvary: Publicity supervisor for the Walt Disney Classic Lilo & Stitch.
  • Ben Burtt: Sound designer for the Star Wars movie and the man who gave the vocal effects to the character of Wall E.
  • Ben Donovan: Co-founder and president of the Maker Studios online company.
  • Ben E. Wright: Voiced a few Disney Animated Classic characters, most notably Roger Radcliffe in 101 Dalmatians. His final role was as Grimsby in The Little Mermaid.
  • Ben Hurst: Writer who was the main mind behind Sonic The Hedgehog SatAM when the show was produced by DiC and aired on ABC. Disney took a bit of production credit note , but an executive canned everything on ABC's Saturday morning lineup, which included Sonic Sat AM, and Hurst never convinced anyone to revive it prior to his death.
  • Ben Lyons: TV personality who took over the At The Movies program from Disney for its next-to-last year of broadcast.
  • Ben Mankiewicz: Radio personality who took over the At The Movies program for its semifinal year alongside Lyons and later co-hosts the Treasures From The Disney Vault program on Turner Classic Movies with Leonard Maltin
  • Ben Sharpsteen: Was an early animator for Disney, and became a sequence director on Snow White, co-director on Pinocchio, director of Dumbo, production supervisor on Fantasia, Fun and Fancy Free, Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland.
  • Ben Sherwood: President of Disney-ABC Domestic Television.
  • Ben Stein: The host and main opponent in Win Ben Steins Money, which was made by Disney's Valleycrest Productions unit (the production company for Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, on Comedy Central.
  • Berenice Le Maitre: Post production supervisor on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Bert Glennon: Director of black-and-white photography on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Beth Collins-Stegmaier: Animation editor of Lilo & Stitch and Brother Bear.
  • Betty Lou Gerson: Actress who voiced Cruella De Vil in 101 Dalmatians, the opening narrator in Cinderella, and made a cameo in Mary Poppins.
  • Betty White: The wife of game show legend Allen Ludden was one of the stars of The Golden Girls, the first show produced by Touchstone; has subsequently lent her voice both a Disney Mini Classic called Operation: Secret Santa and one cartoon from the Paul Rudish Mickey Mouse cartoon classic series.
  • Bill Barry: Assistant production manager of editorial and recording on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Bill Berg: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Bill "Billy" Campbell: Played the titular character in the Walt Disney Studio Classic The Rocketeer, which led to a romance with leading lady Jennifer Connelly.
  • Bill Cottrell: One of the screenwriters for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Bill Damaschke: The longtime DreamWorks Animation supremo and Chief Creative Officer until their rut in The New Ten's started out as an office assistant on Pocahontas (which he was credited on; it's the only time he worked with Disney before he became a major opponent to them) prior to joining DreamWorks the year that film was released, where he would be until 2015.
  • Bill Ernest: Managing director of Disney Parks & Resorts Asia.
  • Bill Farmer: The current voice of Goofy.
  • Bill Hajee: Character animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Bill Justice: Animator on some of the classic Disney cartoons.
  • Bill Keil: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Bill Kelly: Writer who wrote Enchanted.
  • Bill Layne: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Bill Mechanic: Major player in Walt Disney Home Video; he had some input in the critical Walt Disney Classics series that saw the Disney Animation library finally reach the private home market.
  • Bill Melendez: Most famous for creating the Peanuts TV specials, he worked at Disney in the early 40s until he left due to the animators' strike. He went on to work for Warner Bros. and UPA before setting up his own shop.
  • Bill Nye: Personality who was the star of Bill Nye The Science Guy, which was produced by Disney and aired on PBS.
  • Bill Peet: Story artist for The Jungle Book.
  • Bill Recinos: Animated miscellaneous characters in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Bill Roberts: A sequence director for The Three Caballeros.
  • Bill Schwab: Art director at Disney Animation.
  • Bill Shaffer: AVID assistant editor of Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Bill Thompson: Voice actor who has worked with Walt Disney on several films such as Lady And The Tramp, which had him in 5 different roles.
  • Bill Walsh: Comic author who was a producer and writer for a multitude of Disney Studio Classics and who also wrote a few Mickey Mouse strips here and there.
  • Billy Bletcher: The original voice actor of recurring Big Bad Pete in the Disney cartoons.
  • Billy Connolly: Scottish actor who voiced characters in Pocahontas and Brave, along with the mini classic The Ballad Of Nessie.
  • Billy Joel: Provided the voice of Dodger in Oliver & Company and sung the opening number, a rendition of Pinocchio's "When You Wish Upon A Star" to open Simply Mad About The Mouse, a Direct-to-Video music program featuring contemporary versions of classic Disney songs.
  • Blaine Gibson: Inbetweener and assistant animator working on most features through 101 Dalmatians. Later became known as a key sculptor and modelmaker at Disneyland and other subsequent parks/resorts.
  • Bob Chapek: Succeeded Tom Staggs as the boss of Walt Disney Parks & Resorts when Staggs became president and Chief Operating Officer.
  • Bob Clampett: He didn't work in Disney's animation department (although he wanted to), but he and his grandma did help make one of the earliest Mickey Mouse dolls. He and Walt Disney would become friends later in life.
  • Bob Hoskins: Played Eddie Valiant in the cinema classic Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Mario in the infamous Super Mario Bros., which he considered to be his worst role and led to Disney, who purchased film rights, having to eat a $30 million pitfall on that movie.
  • Bob Iger: Originally the boss of ABC, he was promoted to the President and Chief Operating Officer position after Wells's death, Katzenberg's failure to claim the position, and Michael Ovitz's failure to hold onto it left the COO position open for Iger; he subsequently succeeded Eisner on short notice and immediately began negotiations to buy Pixar and bring Steve Jobs and John Lasseter into the full Disney fold. He succeeded, and under Iger's watch, Disney also bought Marvel and then Lucasfilm, and expanded their theme park business. Iger will retire in 2018.
  • Bob McCrea: Character animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Bob Newhart: Actor who played Bernard in the Rescuers movies.
  • Bob Peterson: Pixar storyboard artist who co-directed Up and who came up with the original concept for The Good Dinosaur, which he originally directed.
  • Bob Tzudiker: One of the screenwriters of Tarzan and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Bob Walker: Major layout artist on Lilo & Stitch
  • Bob Weis: President of Walt Disney Imagineering.
  • Bob Weinstein: Brother of Harvey and the co-founder of Miramax/Dimension Films, who had a distribution deal with Disney as set up by a pre-ouster Jeffrey Katzenberg from 1994 to 2009.
  • Bob Wickersham: The animator for the Mickey Mouse cartoon Thru the Mirror.
  • Bobby Driscoll: Disney actor who played Peter Pan, but his personal problems led to his death not too long after that movie.
  • Bonnie Arnold: Animation vet who produced Toy Story and Tarzan. She moved to DreamWorks Animation in the mid 2000's alongside Chris Sanders and Dean Deblois and produced the How to Train Your Dragon films, becoming co-president of their feature animation field following the firing of Bill Damaschke.
  • Bolhem Bouchiba: Supervising animator for "evil genius" Dr. Jumba, the creator of Stitch in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Brad Kuha: Animator at Disney Animation.
  • Brandy Hill: Assistant supervisor of digital film printing and opticals on Hunchback.
  • Brenda Chapman: Animator who has worked on-and-off for Disney, first as a story artist on Beauty And The Beast and The Lion King, and then as a creative force at Pixar following a stint at DreamWorks; she directed Brave, but transferred to ILM to get out of Disney, only to transfer back to DreamWorks when Disney bought ILM that month (although she finished up work she did at ILM).
  • Brent A. Woodford: The senior vice president of planning and control at Disney.
  • Bret Iwan: Took over as the voice of Mickey Mouse from Wayne Allwine when he died, and voices the character in every incarnation now except for Paul Rudish's cartoons.
  • Brian Bedford: The voice of Robin Hood in the 1973 animated classic. He passed away in January 2016.
  • Brian Boyd: The cinematographer for the Pixar short The Blue Umbrella.
  • Brian Cummings: Announcer on Walt Disney Home Video.
  • Brian Fee: A member of Pixar's senior creative team.
  • Brian Ferguson: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Brian King: Title designer for the Walt Disney Classic Lilo & Stitch
  • Brian Pimemtal: Major story art director during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Brian Smits: Software engineer at Pixar who who received an In Memoriam honor in Inside Out.
  • Brian Wesley Green: One of the animators of the Leviathan in Atlantis: The Lost Empire and the CGI townsfolk of Paris in Hunchback.
  • Brice Mallier: A supervising visual effects animator on Hunchback.
  • Brion McIntosh: First assistant editor of Brother Bear.
  • Broose Johnson: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; two of the characters he animated are Chien-Po and Ling from Mulan.
  • Bruce Anderson: Assistant production manager of layout on Lilo & Stitch and primary production manager of Brother Bear.
  • Bruce Botnick: Recorded and mixed the music of The Hunchbackof Notre Dame.
  • Bruce Broughton: Composed the score for The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Bruce D. Buckley: Supervisor of digital model development on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Bruce Vaughn: Former Chief Creative Executive at Disney Imagineering.
  • Bruce W. Smith: Key animator at Disney.
  • Bruno Maglione: President of Marvel International.
  • Bruno Tonioli: One of the judges on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Bryce & Jackie Zabal: Story writers for the Walt Disney Classic Atlantis The Lost Empire.
  • Bud Luckey: Character designer on Pixar films.
  • Bud Swift: Animator who worked on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Buddy Baker: Composed over two-hundred scores for films, shorts, and Disneyland attractions.
  • Burny Mattinson: Animator who started with Robin Hood and directed The Great Mouse Detective.
  • Burt Gillett: Stuck with Disney in the early years, known for directing Three Little Pigs and Lonesome Ghosts. At one point he left Disney to work on Van Beuren Studios "Rainbow Parade" cartoons, but returned as soon as the studio shut down. He worked at the Walter Lantz studio in the late 30s before retiring from the business.
  • Byron Howard: The eventual co-director of Bolt.
  • Byron Simpson: One of the animation screenwriters for The Rescuers Down Under.
    C 
  • Cammile Cavallin-Fay: Production manager for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Candy Candido: Voice actor who provided vocal effects for several minions in various Disney Animated Classics and voiced Fidget in The Great Mouse Detective.
  • Card Walker: Major Disney executive who oversaw the studio during its Dark Years. He remained an adviser to the studio until his death in 2005.
  • Carl Fallberg: Story developer for The Sorcerer's Apprentice number in Fantasia.
  • Carl Jones: Art director for The Firebird Suite in Fantasia 2000.
  • Carl W. Stalling: The man who composed the score for Steamboat Willie, and the Trope Namer for Mickey Mousing. Later worked with Warner Bros. on the Looney Tunes cartoons.
  • Carlos Granada: A reporter for the Glendale based ABC 7 TV station in Los Angeles, which is amongst other major Disney buildings.
  • Carol Connors: One of the songwriters for The Rescuers.
  • Carol Folgate: First assistant editor on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Carrie Ann Inaba: One of the judges on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Carrie Fisher: Is reprising the role of Princess/General Leia Organa in the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy.
  • Carrol Ballard: Director who helmed Never Cry Wolf, the very first film to be distributed by Walt Disney Pictures rather than Buena Vista and one of the few films from Disney to earn a perfect 100% on Rotten Tomatoes, alongside Pinocchio.
  • Carole Holliday: John Henry's character animator.
  • Catherine A. Jones: Assistant editorial production manager on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Catherine Hicks: Animator at Pixar.
  • Catherine Poulan: Disney Renaissance animator who worked on Tarzan.
  • CÚline Dion: The world-famous performer was the co-singer on the title track of Beauty and the Beast alongside Peabo Bryson, which is one of her signature songs.
  • Chad F. Rogers: Assistant production manager of story on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Charles Gibson: A major anchor on Good Morning America.
  • Charles Jarrott: Director who oversaw three Dark Age live-action Disney films, including The Last Flight of Noah's Ark and Condorman.
  • Charles Martin Smith: The actor stated he was more closely involved with Walt Disney Picture's Premiere Classic Never Cry Wolf, in which he played the lead character and narrator, and required him to walk around in the tundra naked.
  • Charles "Nick" Nichols: He began as an animator on the shorts and had most of the responsibility on the Pluto cartoons and was also the supervising animator for the Coachman in Pinocchio. He later went to work at Hanna-Barbera, where he directed the animated version of Charlottes Web.
  • Charles Phillipi: One of the art directors for The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Charles Thorson: A former designer for Disney in the 30's. Later left for work for Warner Bros. cartoons.
  • Charles Wolcott: One of the music composers for The Three Caballeros.
  • Charlie King: Editor on several Disney Afternoon programs.
  • Charlie O'Donnell: The late Wheel of Fortune and other game shows announcer announced the opening ceremony of Disney-MGM Studios (now Disney's Hollywood Studios) in Walt Disney World.
  • Cheech Marin: Comedian who was in Oliver & Company and The Lion King.
  • Chen-Yi Chang: Character design supervisor for Mulan.
  • Chicago Symphony Orchestra: The orchestra responsible for the music of Fantasia 2000.
  • Chip Davis: The leader of Mannheim Steamroller, who has worked with Disney.
  • Chris Bailey: Animator at Disney.
  • Chris Buck: Longtime animator who worked on Tarzan and directed Frozen.
  • Chris Diamantopoulos: The voice of Mickey Mouse in Paul Rudish's critically, popularly and Emmy/Annie acclaimed new series of Mickey Mouse cartoons.
  • Chris Harrison: The host of ABC's The Bachelor series and the current host of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire.
  • Chris Hecox: Assistant manager of ink and paint on Hunchback.
  • Chris Hemsworth: British actor who plays Thor in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Chris Hubbell: One of the storymen for The Little Mermaid.
  • Chris Montan: Music director at Disney and Pixar.
  • Chris Pratt: Plays Peter Quill/Starlord in Guardians of the Galaxy, which is part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Chris Sanders: One of the quirkiest people to work at Disney, Chris Sanders was one of the key animators of the Marahute's flight in The Rescuers Down Under. He later went on to contribute heavily to Mulan, and co-directed Lilo & Stitch with Dean Deblois. He was originally the director of Bolt, but was fired by John Lasseter and moved on to DreamWorks Animation, where he ended up co-directing How to Train Your Dragon to massive acclaim, followed by The Croods; he does continue to voice the character of Stitch whenever he appears outside of the anime (this includes the Kingdom Hearts series and Disney Infinity.
  • Chris Sauve: Animated miscellaneous characters in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Chris Thomas: Record producer for the soundtrack of The Lion King.
  • Chris Wahl: Disney Renaissance animator who worked on Tarzan and Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Chris Williams: Replaced Sanders as the director of Bolt and one of the co-directors for Big Hero 6.
  • Christian Bale: The Dark Knight Trilogy lead appeared in two Disney musicals: Newsies in 1992 and Pocahontas in 1995; these films convinced him to not do any more musicals. He also lent a voice to Disney's dub of Howls Moving Castle.
  • Christine Lawrence-Finney: One of the Clean-Up supervisors on Brother Bear.
  • Christine McCarthy: The current Chief Financial Officer of Disney, succeeding Jay Rasulo.
  • Christophe Beck: Music composer who has several Disney movies and shorts to his name.
  • Christophe Charbonnel: A character sculptor on Tarzan.
  • Christopher Boyes: Sound designer and supervisor of Lilo & Stitch; a Skywalker Sound employee.
  • Christopher Bradley: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Christopher Chase: Associate producer on Tarzan.
  • Christopher Emerson: Former major player in Disney.
  • Christopher Jenkins: Artistic coordinator on Atlantis: The Lost Empire and supervisor of visual effects on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Christopher Knott: Animation effects supervisor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Christopher Lloyd: Actor who played the Big Bads of Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Ducktales The Movie Treasure Of The Lost Lamp
  • Christopher W. Gee: Supervisor of digital film printing and opticals on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Christopher Ward: Music composer (one of his works is the second through final seasons of Jackie Chan Adventures) who co-produced the soundtrack for Tarzan.
  • Chuck Harvey: Character animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Chuck Jones: Had a very brief stay at Disney's with Ward Kimball after Warner Bros. briefly shut down their animation studio. While he respected Walt, he couldn't stand the lack of creative control there that he was used to at his old studio, and as soon as Warner Bros. reopened their studio, Chuck was gone.
  • Chuck Williams: Longtime animator at Disney.
  • Clarence Nash: The voice of Donald Duck until his death in 1985. He was replaced by animator Tony Anselmo.
  • Clark Spencer: Producer of Wreck-It Ralph and Lilo And Stitch.
  • Claude Coats: Background painter, who worked on Snow White, Fantasia, Dumbo, Saludos Amigos, Make Mine Music, Lady and the Tramp, Cinderella, and Peter Pan. Became a notable Imagineer during Disneyland's construction as a ride developer. Known for being very tall but a Gentle Giant.
  • Claudia Christian: Voiced Helga Sinclair in Atlantis The Lost Empire.
  • Claudio Chiaromonte: Executive VP and managing director of The Walt Disney Company.
  • Clay Morrow: One of the creators and showrunners of the multi-award winning Mickey Mouse (2013) rebooted cartoon series.
  • Cliff Edwards: The original voice actor for Jiminy Cricket from Walt Disney's Masterpiece Pinocchio to his death in 1971.
  • Cliff Nordberg: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Clifford Vaughan: Provided the orchestration for the True-Life Adventure film White Wilderness
  • Clyde Geronimi: Originally with the Lantz studio, he defected to Disney in 1931 and ascended to directing shorts, then becoming a co-director on the Disney Animated Classics from Cinderella to 101 Dalmatians (he actually walked away from Disney in 1959). He then worked on the Spider Man cartoon in the 60's before retiring.
  • Colin Michael Kitchens: One of the second assistant directors for Never Cry Wolf.
  • Colin Stimpson: Art director on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Colin Trevorrow: Jurassic World director/alumni who is set to direct Star Wars Episode IX, the concluding chapter of the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy; this film's scheduled release is 2019.
  • Colin Wilson: Associate editor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Connie Nartonis Thompson: One of the producers of the Waking Sleeping Beauty documentary.
  • Corey Burton: Voice actor who is associated with a lot of Disney projects; he's the current voice of Dale in the Chip N Dale chipmunk duo, and also had to redub Deems Taylor for Fantasia when his voice recordings got "misplaced" at some point between the Walt Disney Classics VHS/Laserdisc release of the movie and the DVD reissue in 2000.
  • Corey Feldman: One of the actor's first roles was as young Copper in The Fox And The Hound.
  • Cornett Wood: One of the animators on The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Courtney Holt: The Chief Strategy Officer at Maker Studios.
  • Craig Russell: Former co-executive lead of Imagineering; reassigned in Disney.
  • Cy Young: Major animator at Disney until the 1941 strike; he resigned for his part in it and to join the Air Force. Cy committed suicide in 1964.
  • Cynthia Hariss: Succeeded Paul Pressler as the boss of the Disney Theme Parks for a few years.
    D 
  • Daisy Ridley: Plays Rey in the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy.
  • Dale Baer: Longtime prolific animator for Disney, from Mickey's Christmas Carol to Winnie-the-Pooh.
  • Dale Barnhart: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Dale Drummond: Supervisor of look development on Tarzan.
  • Dale Oliver: Key assistant animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Dallas Raines: The meteorologist for ABC 7 Studios, which is a major Disney property in Glendale.
  • Dan Abraham: Animator who worked on story of How To Hook Up Your Home Theater, a 2007 installment in the "How To" Goofy cartoons.
  • Dan Alguire: Animator who was an assistant director of Robin Hood.
  • Dan Boothe: The director of Fantasia: The Making Of A Masterpiece, the first of a "Making Of A Masterpiece" documentary trilogy. The only known way of viewing this program is to obtain its 1991 gold-labeled VHS with the 1988 version of the Sorcerer Mickey Walt Disney Classics logo on it.
  • Dan Buckley: Publisher and chief operating officer at Marvel Worldwide.
  • Dan Chaika: Supervising 3D effects animator on Tarzan.
  • Dan Cooper: Associate art director on Tarzan.
  • Dan Fogelman: The screenwriter for Cars and Tangled.
  • Dan Hansen: Artistic coordinator on The Emperor's New Groove
  • Dan Kuenster: Was an assistant animator on the Walt Disney Mini Classic The Small One prior to leaving with Don Bluth.
  • Dan Lee: A key member of Pixar.
  • Dan MacManus: Effects animator, working on most of the Disney features during the period between 1935 until 1973.
  • Dan Molina: Major editor at Disney/Pixar; one of his works is Planes: Fire & Rescue.
  • Dan Rounds: Animator who is the producer of The Prince and the Pauper in 1990, the first Mickey Mouse-centric cartoon after The Simple Things in 1953 and the only one made during Frank Wells and Jeffrey Katzenberg's tenures.
  • Dan Scanlon: Pixar employee who directed Monsters University.
  • Dana Murray: Production manager on the Pixar mini classic Riley's First Date?
  • Daniel Cooper: Art director for the Pomp And Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Daniel Gaber: Assistant music editor on Tarzan.
  • Daniel Gerson: One of the screenwriters for Big Hero 6.
  • Daniel St. Pierre: Art director on Tarzan.
  • Daniela Bielecka: Background painter during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Daniela Mazzucato: Assistant production manager of backgrounds on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Danny Elfman: Composes music for Tim Burton's Disney films and other films.
  • Danny Galieote: The second animator for Clopin in The Hunchback of Notre Dame after Michael Surrey, who supervised him. Also animated Rourke alongside three other men for Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Danny Troob: One of Disney's most prolific orchestra conductors/arrangers starting with Beauty And The Beast.
  • Darla K. Anderson: Producer of Pixar films and shorts.
  • Darrell Johnson: An assistant animator on the Leviathan in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Darren T. Holmes: Editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Dave Bossert: Artistic coordinator and visual EFX supervisor at Disney Animation; one of his works is the Mini Classic The Little Matchgirl.
  • Dave Burgess: Disney Renaissance animator; he worked on Tarzan and Hunchback (the latter had him as the supervising animator of the Archdeacon).
  • Dave Goelz: Puppeteer who plays Gonzo in The Muppets and voiced the new incarnation of Figment in Epcot in 2002.
  • Dave Hollis: Publicity manager and vice president of Disney's theatrical endeavors.
  • Dave Metzger: Music arranger who is part of the Disney Revival.
  • Dave Michener: An animator during Walt's time.
  • Dave Pruiksma: Animator of Mrs. Potts in Beauty and the Beast.
  • Dave Smith: The first archivist for the Walt Disney Archives.
  • Dave Stevens: The creator of The Rocketeer graphic novel and a creative consultant for the film adaptation.
  • Dave Suding: Key assistant animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Dave Ward: Anchor at Houston's ABC station.
  • Dave Wasson: Storyboard artist for the Mickey Mouse (2013) series; he also cameos in a few of these cartoons.
  • Daveigh Chase: The voice of Lilo of the Lilo & Stitch duo in most of the character's appearances.
  • David Agnew: President of Walt Disney Records.
  • David Biello: Assistant production manager on story and visual development on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • David Block: Animator at Disney for works like Mickey's Christmas Carol.
  • David Blum: Assistant artistic coordinator on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • David Burgess: Disney Renaissance animator; he supervised Jane Porter's father in Tarzan.
  • David Carradine: Actor who played the titular Bill in the Kill Bill movies; both volumes were distributed by Disney in the 2000's.
  • David Cutler: A supervising animator on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • David Friedman: Arranged vocals on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • David Goetz: Art director of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • David Hall: Storyman who produced horrific story sketches and paintings for Alice in Wonderland and a few for Peter Pan.
  • David Hand: The director of many of Disney's animal cartoons, and was the director of Snow White and Bambi. He would later go over to Europe to make the obscure, short lived Animaland cartoon series.
  • David Hartley: The producer, arranger, and conductor of the "Perfect World" song, which opens and closes The Emperor's New Groove. Also arranged vocals fro the credits song.
  • David Hoberman: Producer who helmed a handful of Disney films; one of the most noteworthy is 2011's The Muppets. He also co-created Monk, which Disney had a hand in.
  • David Maisel: An associate of Michael Ovitz who followed him to Disney and then out. He took over Marvel in 2005 and facilitated their acquisition by Disney, at which point he left.
  • David McCamley: The supervising digital background painter on Tarzan.
  • David Metzger: Provided orchestrations for the music of Tarzan.
  • David "Joey" Mildenberger: Supervising visual effects animator on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • David Michener: Story animator at Disney.
  • David Muir: Anchor and managed editor of ABC World News Tonight.
  • David Newman: Composed the soundtrack to Ducktales The Movie Treasure Of The Lost Lamp.
  • David Ogden Stiers: Actor who has taken part in several Disney Renaissance movies, most notably Beauty and the Beast as Cogsworth, who he reprises whenever the character reappears, and Ratcliffe, the Big Bad of Pocahontas.
  • David Reynolds: Screenwriter for The Emperors New Groove; had previously provided additional screenwriting for Tarzan.
  • David Sarnoff: RCA boss who was contacted by Walt Disney to create the stereo system called "Fantasound".
  • David Schrader: Executive vice president of the Disney Theatrical Group, who administers the Broadway shows.
  • David Stainton: Former animation executive at Disney. He got replaced by Lasseter and Catmull.
  • David Tidgwell: Visual Effects supervisor for Mulan and an assistant in that job on Hunchback.
  • David Vogel: The executive who brought M. Night Shyamalan into Disney.
  • David W. Zach: Provided additional animation on Rutt the moose in Brother Bear.
  • David Zippel: Alan Menken's lyricist on Hercules and the "Star-Spangled Man" musical number in Marvel's Masterpiece Captain America: The First Avenger.
  • Dean Cundey: Cinematographer for Who Framed Roger Rabbit and The Parent Trap remake, and directed Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves, which is his only directing job and the third and final "Honey" film; this one was sent Direct-to-Video, was the first live-action Direct-to-Video film from Disney, and was the last appearance of Rick Moranis in a live-action role to date.
  • Dean Deblois: Chris Sanders's partner who co-directed Lilo And Stitch and followed Sanders to DreamWorks Animation.
  • Dean Gordon: One of the art directors for the Pines of Rome number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Dean Wellins: Director and writer at Walt Disney Animation Studios for shorts such as Tick-Tock Tale.
  • Debbie McClellan: The vice president of The Muppets Studio.
  • Deborah Scott: One of the costumers for Never Cry Wolf.
  • Deems Taylor: The host and one of the main helmers of Walt Disney's Masterpiece Fantasia. His voice recordings for the movie have sadly been lost; the remaining traces of it are on the 1991 Walt Disney Classics VHS and Laserdisc version of the film. note 
  • Del Connell: One of the writers of The Three Caballeros.
  • Denise Ream: The producer of The Good Dinosaur.
  • Dennis Brock: Gaffer on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Dennis Spicer: Effects assistant on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Dev Ross: Voice director who worked with Disney on Chip 'n' Dale Rescue Rangers.
  • Diana Blazer: An assistant production manager of layout on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Diane Sawyer: A major anchor at ABC News.
  • Dick Cook: Marketing mastermind who succeeded Peter Schneider as studio head. He spearheaded a revival of Disney's movie business, but was politely forced out by Iger in 2009 when Marvel was bought. He now sits on Legendary Pictures's board and started his own studio a la Katzenberg and Roth in 2015.
  • Dick Huemer: Former Fleischer veteran who became a prominent animator, storyboard artist and writer for the studio throughout the decades. He even directed two shorts; "The Whalers" and "Goofy and Wilbur".
  • Dick Lucas: Effects animator at Disney during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Dick Lundy: A very skilled animator and director, created the character of Donald Duck and directed several of his shorts. He would later go on work at MGM's cartoon department on the Barney Bear and Droopy cartoons, and after that went to Walter Lantz's studio to work on their Andy Panda, Musical Miniatures and Woody Woodpecker short subjects. He would contribute animation to Ralph Bakshi's Fritz the Cat and several Hanna-Barbera projects later on.
  • Dick Nunis: The boss of the Disney theme parks throughout the Dark Years, his success with the parks made him one of the few executives to survive the 1984 management shift.
  • Dick Rickard: One of the story writers for Snow White.
  • Dick Sebast: Story animator at Disney.
  • Dickie Jones: The voice of Pinocchio in the original masterpiece.
  • Doc Kane: A dialogue recorder at Disney Animation.
  • Dominic M. Carola: Animator who supervised the hula teacher in Lilo & Stitch and worked on Denahi in Brother Bear.
  • Dominique Monfrey: Disney Renaissance animator who supervised Sabor the cheetah, the Disc One Final Boss of Tarzan.
  • Don A. Duckwall: Production manager on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Don Bluth: Got his start as an assistant animator on Sleeping Beauty, did animation for Robin Hood and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too, and was the directing animator for The Rescuers. Directed The Small One and was animation director on Petes Dragon before leaving on his own under bad circumstances, becoming Disney's Arch-Enemy in the process for several decades until Rock-A-Doodle began the disintegration of his studio and Titan A.E., along with the coming of DreamWorksnote , ended his career; Disney dropped their feud with him afterwards.
  • Don Burgess: The cinematographer for Enchanted and Disney's Muppets movies.
  • Don C. Paul: Effects animator on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Don Chaffey: The live-action director of Pete's Dragon.
  • Don DaGradi: Screenwriter of several films, most notably Mary Poppins.
  • Don Davis: One of the producers of the soundtrack of Toy Story.
  • Don Dougherty: Screenwriter for Winnie-the-Pooh.
  • Don Duckwall: Production manager for The Rescuers.
  • Don Graham: A critical figure in the development of Disney animation, Graham hosted "Action Analysis" classes daily for animators at Disney from 1932 to 1941, not only giving them formal art training, but also having them analyze live action film at different speeds, as well as critique their own shorts as a means of how to improve them. He would later publish his own art book, "Composing Pictures", which is highly valued by many veteran animators.
  • Don Griffith: Layout artist on the Disney films from Victory Through Air Power to The Black Cauldron.
  • Don Hahn: Began working for Disney on Pete's Dragon. He also worked as associate producer on the animated sequences in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and later produced Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, Fantasia 2000, The Emperors New Groove, and Atlantis The Lost Empire, and the executive producer of Waking Sleeping Beauty, the Disneynature movies, and the live-action Disney Animated Canon remake movies.
  • Don Hall: One of the co-directors for Big Hero 6.
  • Don Harper: The conductor of the Disneynature jingle and Tarzan.
  • Don Knotts: Actor who appeared in a handful of live-action Dark Age Disney Studio Classics.
  • Don Lusk: A prominent Disney animator, and notably one of the last surviving Golden Age Disney artists—as of 2015, he is 102 years old!
  • Don Mink: One of the founders of Disney's It's A Laugh Productions.
  • Don Rosa: Noted writer for the Donald Duck comics.
  • Don Shank: Production designer for Up.
  • Donald A. Towns: Art director and background supervisor on The Little Mermaid.
  • Donald Halliday: Editor of Cinderella.
  • Donald W. Ernst: The primary editor for Ralph Bakshi's films in the 70's who moved from Bakshi to Walt Disney Feature Animation after the Management Shift and became a major helmer for Aladdin and Fantasia 2000.
  • Donn Tatum: A previous boss of Disney after Walt's death.
  • Dorothy Ann Blank: One of the writers of Snow White.
  • Dorothy McKim: The producer of the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get A Horse! and other Disney Shorts Classics.
  • Dorse A. Lanpher: Effects animator during Reithermann's tenure and then the Disney Renaissance.
  • Doug Ball: Background supervisor for Tarzan.
  • Doug Frankel: Character animator at Disney.
  • Doug Sweetland: Former Pixar employee and star who directed, wrote and starred in their mini classic Presto, which became the name of one of their animation systems.
  • Dreams Come True: The Japanese pop band that composed the music for the first two Sonic the Hedgehog video games has also worked on several Disney projects in Japan.
  • Drew Carey: The comedian was the star of ABC's The Drew Carey Show and Whose Line Is Is Anyway?, along with Disney/MGM Studios' "Sounds Dangerous". When all of these ended, he moved to CBS and became the current host of The Price Is Right.
  • Duane Capizzi: Editor and key member on a few episodes of Darkwing Duck and Aladdin: The Return of Jafar; went on to become one of the executive producers of Jackie Chan's cartoon Jackie Chan Adventures and moved on to other projects, one of which is with Dreamworks Animation.
  • Duncan Majoribanks: A supervising animator on The Rescuers Down Under.
    E 
  • Earl Ghaffari: Music editor on Tarzan.
  • Earl Hurd: One of the silent cartoon animator's final works was Walt Disney's Masterpiece Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs; he died three years after that film's theatrical release.
  • Earl Kress: Story animator on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Earl Rettig: Production manager on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Earl Woodin: Set decorator on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Ed Catmull: One of Pixar's notable members, he's the current head of animation at Disney.
  • Ed Ghertner: Layout supervisor for The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Ed Gombert: A longtime animator at Disney. In addition to working on a lot of the Disney Renaissance movies, he's also the author of the notorious fabricated memo written in Peter Schneider's name that changed the names of all the Disney Animated Classics in protest of The Great Mouse Detective's renaming, but he got his department in trouble instead when the bogus memo got to Jeffrey Katzenberg's desk and Jeffrey thought it was real.
  • Ed Love: An animator for Disney, later went on to work for Walter Lantz (animated the earliest incarnations of Buzz Buzzard), MGM and Hanna-Barbera.
  • Ed Penner: Composer who was part of the Reluctant Dragon song in that film/cartoon.
  • Ed Templer. Jr.: Layout artist on Robin Hood.
  • Ed Wynn: Played the Mad Hatter in Alice In Wonderland, the toymaker in Babes In Toyland, and took part in a few other Disney roles prior to his death in 1966. He's the inspiration for the King Candy character in Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Eddie Carroll: The second voice actor for the character of Jiminy Cricket from 1973 to his death in 2010.
  • Edgar Wright: The executive producer, writer, and early director of Ant-Man.
  • Edward Plumb: Provided orchestrations on several of Walt's films such as Dumbo.
  • Edwin Aardal: Animator who worked on Toccata and Fugue in Fantasia.
  • Eleanor Audley: The fearsome voice actress for Lady Tremaine The Wicked Stepmother and Maleficent The Dragon Mistress Of All Evil.
  • Eliot Daniel: The I Love Lucy composer wrote a song for Disney's So Dear To My Heart.
  • Elissa Knight: Pixar voice actress and voice worker who normally does additional voices and stand-ins, but also became the voice of EVE in Wall E
  • Elissa Margolis: The Senior Vice President and General Manager of The Disney Store.
  • Elita Loresca: The meteorologist for the Houston ABC News division.
  • Elizabeth Vargas: Major anchor at ABC.
  • Ellen Keneshea: Editor of The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Elliot Scott: Lead production designer for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Elmer Plummer: Animator who worked with Walt during the Golden Years.
  • Emery Hawkins: Sporadically worked at Disney for very short periods of time. Did some animation for Dumbo.
  • Emily Jiuliano: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Enrico Casarosa: The director of the Pixar Mini Classic La Luna.
  • Erdman Penner: The writer of Sleeping Beauty and the Mini Classic cartoon The Reluctant Dragon..
  • Eric Cleworth: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Eric Coleman: Senior vice president of Disney Television Animation.
  • Eric Daniels: Computer Graphics supervisor on Tarzan.
  • Eric Dapkewicz: Associate editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Eric Goldberg: After working for Richard Williams and running a commercials studio in England, came to Disney as supervising animator on Genie in Aladdin. Later animated Phil in Hercules, Louis in The Princess and the Frog and Rabbit in Winnie-the-Pooh. Co-directed Pocahontas and directed the "Rhapsody in Blue" and "Carnaval of the Animals" segments on Fantasia 2000. Briefly worked at Warner Bros. as animation director on Looney Tunes: Back in Action. He recently headed the 2D animation for the short Get a Horse!.
  • Eric Guaglione: Computer Animation supervisor for Mulan.
  • Eric Hansen: One of the background painters for The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Eric Radomski: Senior vice president at Marvel Television.
  • Erica Cassetti: A modeler on Atlantis: The Lost Empire and Hunchback.
  • Erik Benson: One of the story writers for The Good Dinosaur for Pixar.
  • Ernest Terrazas: One of the writers of The Three Caballeros.
  • Ernie Nordli: Animator who worked as layout artist on Dumbo, Fantasia, Sleeping Beauty, and 101 Dalmatians.
  • Erwin Verity: One of the assistant directors of the Reluctant Dragon cartoon shorts
  • Estelle Getty: One of the lead actresses in Disney's The Golden Girls.
  • Eugenia Bostwick-Singer: One of the screenwriters for Mulan.
  • Eva Gabor: Hungarian actress and sister to Zsa Zsa Gabor who played Duchess in The Aristocats and Bianca in The Rescuers movies; her death along with the second film, The Rescuers Down Under, underperforming in theaters, sent that film series and future official Disney Animated Canon sequels over the waterfall until Frozen and Wreck It Ralph revived talks for that idea in The New 10's.
  • Evelyn Kennedy: Music editor for Robin Hood & The Rescuers.
  • Eyvind Earle: Background artist and color stylist on such films as Peter Pan and Lady and the Tramp. He is also credited with giving the 1959 animated feature Sleeping Beauty its medieval look. Earle first rose to prominence at the studio in 1953, when an animated short that he worked on, "Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom", won both an Academy Award and a Cannes Film Festival Award. Earle died on July 20, 2000 of esophageal cancer.
    F 
  • Felix Arvid Ulf Kjellberg: The Let's Player known as PewDiePie (who is THE most subscribed-to channel on Youtube) is signed with Maker Studios, which is a Disney Consumer Products company
  • Ferrell Barron: The producer of Planes: Fire & Rescue.
  • Fess Parker: Actor who played Davy Crockett in the Disneyland TV series, which was recut into two full-length films, Davy Crockett King Of The Wild Frontier, and Davy Crockett And The River Pirates; this revived interest in the Tennessee and Texas Revolution figure himself.
  • Fitch Cady: Unit manager for the studio classic Never Cry Wolf.
  • Florence Gill: Voice actress who provided the voice of Clara Cluck, The Wise Little Hen (the cartoon that character appeared in is Donald Duck's Grand Premiere), and other chicken characters; she appears in The Reluctant Dragon in the recording room alongside Clarence Nash.
  • Floyd Gottfredson: Got his start as an early Disney animator, but moved on to being the top artist for the Mickey Mouse comic strip for 45 years.
  • Floyd Huddleston: Co-composed the "Love" song from Robin Hood.
  • Floyd Norman: One of the first African-Americans hired by the studio. To this day he still works at Disney as a storyboard artist.
  • Ford Beebe: One of the writers for Fantasia.
  • Francis Glebas: One of the story writers of The Lion King.
  • Frank Armitage: Noted Disney architect and Imagineer; he passed away on Jan 7, 2016.
  • Frank Churchill: Music composer during the 1930s and early '40s. Composed songs for Snow White, Alice in Wonderland Dumbo and Bambi.
  • Frank Eulner: Supervising sound editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Frank Maher: Sound recorder for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Frank Marshall: Lucasfilm/Spielberg collaborator who worked on most of the Star Wars/Indiana Jones films, M. Night Shyamalan's films The Sixth Sense and Signs, and several Studio Ghibli films.
  • Frank Wells: President and Chief Operating Officer from 1984 to 1994. Said to have been the voice of reason amongst the executives of the time. Known for wanting to climb the highest mountains in the world. Tragically died in a helicopter crash in 1994, which was the last straw that led to the split with those executives; Well's death eventually ended both Jeffrey Katzenberg and his boss/rival Michael Eisner's careers at Disney along with their decades-long relationship.
  • Frank Wolf: One of the producers of the Toy Story soundtrack.
  • Fraser MacLean: Artistic coordinator on Tarzan.
  • Fred Hellmich: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Fred Langhammer: Board member at Disney.
  • Fred Luckey: Story animator at Disney.
  • Fred Moore: Animator on Snow White and credited with updating Mickey Mouse's appearance in the late 1930s. Moore also served as an animator or directing animator for most of the animated features from Snow White to Peter Pan. Worked at the Walter Lantz studio for a brief period in the late 1940s.
  • Friz Freleng: Was an animator for Walt on the Oswald shorts.
  • Frode Fjellheim: Norwegian musician who composed the opening music to Frozen.
    G 
  • Galyn Susman: A short producer at Pixar.
  • Garrett Wren: Visual effects supervisor on Brother Bear.
  • Gary Goldman: Leading animator on Robin Hood, The Rescuers, Pete's Dragon, and The Small One, he defected with Don Bluth and worked alongside him ever since.
  • Gary Krisel: The founder of Disney Television Animation.
  • Gary M. Eggleston: Animator and layout artist on Mickey's Christmas Carol.
  • Gary Marsh: The president and chief creative officer of the Disney Channel.
  • Gary Rosen: General manager and chief marketing officer of Disney English, a Chinese branch dedicated to teaching Chinese children English through Disney characters.
  • Gary Rydstrom: Sound desiger who has worked with Pixar.
  • Gary Trousdale: Made his feature-directing debut with the Academy Award winning Beauty and the Beast. Trousdale has been with Feature Animation since 1984, and has contributed to the following films: Oliver & Company, The Little Mermaid and The Rescuers Down Under. Co-directed with Kirk Wise on The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Atlantis The Lost Empire. Currently a director at DreamWorks Animation.
  • Gene Siskel: A stretch; he was the film critic for the Chicago Tribune, but his review program with Roger Ebert was distributed by Disney.
  • George Bodenheimer: Executive chairman of ESPN.
  • George Bruns: A music director for several Disney Animated Classics.
  • George Gibbs: Mechanical effects supervisor for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • George Kalogridis: The current president of Walt Disney World in Florida.
  • George Katanics: Senior Development Technical Director on Tarzan.
  • George Lucas: The founder of Lucasfilm and its subsidiaries Industrial Light and Magic and Skywalker Sound as well as the original version of Pixar (before Steve Jobs, Ed Catmull, and John Lasseter got their hands on the firm), he created Star Wars and Indiana Jones, the latter of which he helmed with friend and director Steven Spielberg (the first two Indiana Jones movies were done at Paramount under Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg's watches, and they predate the two men jumping to Disney). The infamous fan pressures that began afflicting Lucas and his studio starting with the 1997 "Special Edition" reissues of the original Star Wars trilogy note  as well as The Phantom Menace note  and going from there, ultimately culminating in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, which introduced the "Nuking The Fridge" meme and eventually convinced Lucas to sell his entire studio to Disney after having worked with them on several theme park adaptations of these two franchises starting with Star Tours; he became a major holder in Disney, who scaled down the Star Wars universe and began work on a new series.
  • George Mitchell: Former Democratic congressman who was tapped to be chairman of the Disney company after Eisner was forced to concede that part of his position in a shareholder revolt in 2004, being forced to concede his entire Disney job altogether the next year so Disney wouldn't lose Pixar, whom Eisner had virtually driven away. Mitchell remained chairman for a few years, and resigned to join Barack Obama's presidental cabinet.
  • George Rowley: One of the animators on The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • George Scribner: Animator who directed Oliver & Company and The Prince and the Pauper.
  • George Stallings: Animator who worked with Walt during the Golden Years; one of his credits is Dumbo.
  • George Stephanopoulos: The chief anchor of ABC News.
  • Georges Abolin: Animated miscellaneous characters in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Geraldine Laybourne: Worked at Disney for 2 years after departing Nickelodeon, but left ABC and started up Oxygen Media.
  • Gerrit Graham: One of the storymen for The Little Mermaid.
  • Gil Zimmerman: Supervisor of model development on Tarzan.
  • Gilbert Gottfried: The voice of Iago the Parrot ever since that character's debut.
  • Gina Gaston: Anchor at the Houston branch of ABC.
  • Gina Spiro Kessler: Assistant music editor on Hunchback.
  • Glen Daum: The composer of the orchestral music for Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers.
  • Glen Keane: Began his career as an animator on The Rescuers. He animated the fight scene with the bear in The Fox and the Hound, and was directing animator on Ariel in The Little Mermaid, Marahute in The Rescuers Down Under, Beast in Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, Pocahontas and Tarzan. Was the initial director and later executive producer of Tangled. He left Disney in 2012 after working on Paperman to set up his own studio.
  • Glen Slater: Lyricist who worked with Alan Menken on a few Disney movies, the most notable being Tangled.
  • Glenn Close: Actress who is involved with Disney on three major projects: the live-action adaptation of 101 Dalmatians, where she received top billing as Big Bad Cruella De Vil (a role she reprised for that film's sequel), Kala, the adoptive gorilla mother in Tarzan, and as a major player in Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • Glenn McQueen: A key member of Pixar.
  • Gordon Wiles: Art director on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Gore Verbinski: The director of the Pirates Of The Caribbean movies.
  • Graham S. Allan: Manager of systems software development on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Greg Bailey: The sports director at Houston's ABC station.
  • Greg Coleman: VP of marketing at Walt Disney Animation Studios and Disneytoon Studios Worldwide.
  • Greg Hale: Chief Safety Officer for the Walt Disney Company.
  • Greg Snyder: The editor for the Pixar short classic Day & Night.
  • Gregory Griffith: One of the animators of the CGI crowds in The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • Gregory Perler: Editor of Tarzan.
  • Gretchen Maschmeyer Albrecht: Senior manager of ink and paint on Hunchback.
  • Grim Natwick: Got his start working for the Fleischer brothers and Ub Iwerks animating his creation Betty Boop, but was lured away by the idea of Walt making the first feature length animated picture. He contributed quite a bit during his stay at Disney, including animating much of Snow White herself. He left soon after to go back to the Fleischers after not getting the pay he was promised after Snow White on time—a move he regretted later down the road, as he would have loved to work on Fantasia.
  • Guy Vasilovich: Layout artist on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Gus Viseur: The music composer for the Pixar short Geri's Game.
  • Guy Deel: Layout animator during Reithermann's tenure.
    H 
  • H. Lee Peterson: One of the editors for the Walt Disney Classic Aladdin.
  • Hal King: Disney animator who worked on several projects such as Lady And The Tramp.
  • Hal Miles: Visual effects artist who produced the 1986 Sorcerer Mickey Walt Disney Home Video logo.
  • Hal Smith: Voice actor who worked with Disney on several productions such as Mickey's Christmas Carol, Ducktales as Big Bad Flintheart Glomgold and Gyro Gearloose, Owl in the Winnie The Pooh films and cartoons, and a role in Beauty And The Beast.
  • Haley Joel Osment: Actor who is the voice of protagonist Sora in the Kingdom Hearts series.
  • Ham Luske: Was the man who brought several of the Nine Old Men into Disney, and one of the directors of Lady And The Tramp.
  • Hamilton Camp: Voice actor who took part in a few Disney Afternoon productions
  • Hans Bacher: Production designer for Mulan.
  • Hans Zimmer: Composed the score for The Lion King.
  • Harley Jessup: A key member of Pixar.
  • Hugh Harman And Rudolph Ising: Two of Disney's top animators on the Oswald shorts. They would later go on to found the Warner Bros. animation studio, as well as MGM's animation department. They would also occasionally outsource some of their inkers and animators to Disney to help them out.
  • Harold D. Schuster: Hollywood director who was one of the helmers of Disney's hybrid classic So Dear To My Heart.
  • Harold Young: A sequence director for The Three Caballeros.
  • Harry Clork: One of the screenwriters for The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Harry Hester: Key assistant animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Harvey Toombs: Animator during Disney's golden age; he worked on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Harvey Weinstein: The boss of Miramax Films, who worked with Disney for 15 years and distributed several cinema classics such as Pulp Fiction.
  • Hayao Miyazaki: Acclaimed Japanese Anime maker and friend of John Lasseter. He was one of the main minds at Studio Ghibli, which Disney has a distribution deal with; all of Miyazaki's films are handled in America by the Walt Disney Studios.
  • Hayley Mills: British actress who appeared in several Disney Studio Classics, most notably The Parent Trap, which had her playing twins.
  • Heatherjane Smith: Administrator of post production on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Heidi Mollenhauer: Esmeralda's singing voice on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Hendel Butoy: One of the directors of Fantasia 2000; also co-directed The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Helene Hahn: Feared attorney who represented Disney during Katzenberg's tenure at the company; also known as "Attila The Hahn".
  • Henry Jackman: Music composer for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Henry Mancini: The legendary Pink Panther composer wrote the music and three songs for The Great Mouse Detective, which was one of only two animated films he scored before his death in 1994 (the other was the Tom & Jerry movie for Hanna-Barbera.)
  • Henry Selick: Associate of Tim Burton's who departed Disney with him. He worked with Burton on several other projects for Disney.
  • Hermann H. Schmidt: An animation editor on The Emperor's New Groove and Hunchback.
  • Herb Ryman: A talented concept artist who created the first designs of Disneyland. He also served as an art director on Dumbo and Fantasia. He developed artwork and designs for the other Disney resorts until his death in 1989.
  • Herb Taylor: Soundman for The Rescuers.
  • Hiro Narita: Cinematographer who worked on Never Cry Wolf, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, and The Rocketeer for Disney; the first of these won him the Boston Critics Award and the National Critics Award.
  • Holly E. Bratton: Assistant production manager of color models on Hunchback.
  • Homer Brightmen: One of the writers of The Three Caballeros.
  • Howard Ashman: Songwriter who was suggested for the studio by Katzenberg's friend and future business partner David Geffin, who oversaw Little Shop Of Horror, which Ashman co-wrote alongside Alan Menken (ironically, another Disney alumni, Peter Schneider, was also a part of that production.) He teamed up with Menken for the first few films of the Disney Renaissance, but died before production on Beauty and the Beast and Aladdin could be completed.
  • Howard Roffman: Executive vice president of franchise management at Lucasfilm.
  • Hugh Fraser: Animator on a large number of Walt Disney's Cartoon Classics.
    I 
  • Ian Cook: Animation production coordinator for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Ian Gooding: Co-art director for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Ian J. Coony: 3D effects technical director on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Ian White: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Idina Menzel: Actress who played Nancy Tremaine in Enchanted and then voiced Queen Elsa in Frozen, performing the classic song, "Let It Go".
  • Igor Khait: Production manager of Atlantis: The Lost Empire and associate producer of Brother Bear.
  • Igor Stravinsky: The only composer of a Fantasia number to be alive for the film, he was a consultant on the animation adaptation of his "Rite Of Spring" piece, but events beyond Walt's control left both men unimpressed with how the number turned out, and almost convinced Stravinsky to sue Disney. Another one of his works, "The Firebird Suite", was used as the classic Grand Finale number for the sequel, Fantasia 2000.
  • Ilene Woods: The voice of Cinderella in the original masterpiece.
  • Ilona Carson: Anchor at the Houston branch of ABC.
  • Irene Bedard: Actress who voiced Pocahontas.
  • Irene Mecchi: A major screenwriter who has worked often with Disney.
  • Irving Berlin: The composer wrote a song for So Dear To My Heart.
  • Irwin Kostal: Broadway composer who worked on Mary Poppins, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, Pete's Dragon, and Mickey's Christmas Carol along with a rerecording of Fantasia, though that recording would be scrapped for the original when the film saw its 50th anniversary reissue and following Walt Disney Classics VHS release onwards.
  • Issac "Ike" Perlmutter: The CEO of Marvel Entertainment.
  • Itzhak Perlman: Famed violinist who was the lead violin for Fantasia 2000; he also introduced the second number of the film, Pines of Rome.
  • Ivan Bilancio: Editor of The Lion King.
    J 
  • J. A. C. Redford: Music conductor who directed the Disney Orchestra and Choir on a few movies such as The Little Mermaid and Frozen.
  • J. J. Abrams: The leader of Bad Robot Productions and the director of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens.
  • Jack Buckley: Effects animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Jack Campbell: An animator who worked on The Reluctant Dragon, among others.
  • Jack Cutting: Key member of Disney Animation Studios.
  • Jack Donohue: Director who helmed Disney's version of Babes In Toyland.
  • Jack Dorsey: Board member at Disney.
  • Jack Everly: Conducted the singing numbers of The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Jack Hannah: Began working as an inbetweener and clean-up artist on many early Mickey, Donald, and Silly Symphony cartoons. He was a key animator on the Academy Award winning film "The Old Mill".
  • Jack Harper: News affiliate of ABC Boston who is noteworthy for hosting the 1986 NFPA video Firepower on the damage a house fire can do.
  • Jack Kinney: Animator/sequence director of films such as Pinocchio and Dumbo. He first directed Goofy in "Goofy's Glider" and soon became established as the director of the Goofy cartoons.
  • Jack King: Animator and sequence director on such films as Pinocchio, Saludos Amigos, Dumbo, The Three Caballeros, Make Mine Music, Melody Time, and The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad. Prolific director of the Donald Duck cartoons; was THE Duck Director until Jack Hannah took over completely.
  • Jack Lawrence: One of the score composers for Sleeping Beauty.
  • Jackie Zabal: One of the storymen for Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • James Algar: Animator on Snow White, the animation director of The Sorceror's Apprentice segment of Fantasia, and directed sequences in Bambi and The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad.
  • James Baxter: Animator on Who Framed Roger Rabbit primarily Roger, Jessica, and the weasels, animator of Ariel and King Triton on The Little Mermaid, supervising animator on Belle from Beauty and the Beast, Rafiki from The Lion King, and Quasimodo on The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and later directed the animated sequences from Enchanted.
  • James Bobin: The director of the two Muppets films done by Disney in The New 10's (the first of which introduced their current film logo), and 'Alice Through the Looking Glass''.
  • James Bodrero: One of the writers of The Three Caballeros.
  • James Cameron: Famed director who helmed Avatar, he is now working with Disney on an Avatar Land at the Animal Kingdom in Disney World.
  • James Capobianco: Story developer for the Piano Concerto No. 2 number in Fantasia 2000.
  • James "Jim" Coleman: Longtime animator at Disney who did background and color styling from The Rescuers to Beauty And The Beast. He eventually resigned from the studio in order to pursue a career in fine art, which saw him mixing Disney characters with.
  • James DeV. Mansfield: Major visual effects animator on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • James Earl Jones: Voiced Mufasa in The Lion King and introduced the "Carnival of the Animals" number in Fantasia 2000; also known as the voice of Darth Vader.
  • James Ford Murphy: The director of the Pixar short Lava.
  • James Fujii: Story writer for the Pines of Rome number in Fantasia 2000.
  • James Goldston: President of ABC News.
  • James Hong: Noteworthy Chinese actor who appeared in Walt Disney's Zorro TV series and then played Chi Fu in Mulan.
  • James Horner: Music composer who has done a few Disney films, including The Rocketeer, which gave birth to one of his signature works that has become a movie trailer mainstay.
  • James "J.R." Russell: Assistant supervisor of compositing on Hunchback.
  • James L. George: Effects animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • James Levine: The music director for Roy E. Disney's Masterpiece Fantasia 2000; he introduced the Donald Duck number in this film.
  • James Lopez: Character animator at Disney.
  • James MacDonald: Replaced Walt as the voice of Mickey Mouse.
  • James Melton: One of the editors of The Fox and the Hound and Tarzan.
  • James Pentecost: Producer of Pocahontas.
  • James Pitaro: The co-chairman of Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media, and the boss of Disney Interactive.
  • James "Shamus" Culhane: A former Fleischer animator who came to the studio after Walt was impressed by his work. His most pivotal work is the iconic "Heigh-Ho" sequence of Snow White. He would later leave Disney to work on Max and Dave Fleischer's ill-fated feature film projects, take a very brief stint at Warner Bros. , make considerably contributions to the Walter Lantz cartoon studio, and later down the road created his own TV cartoon studio.
  • James T. Hill: Produced the electronic score in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • James Thomas: One of the editors of The Muppets and its sequel.
  • James Wong Howe: The cinematographer for Fantasia.
  • James Woods: The voice of Hades from Hercules ever since the character's debut.
  • James Young Jackson: The lead animator of the Grand Councilwoman in Lilo & Stitch and human Kenai in Brother Bear.
  • Jamie Sparer Roberts: Casting manager in the Disney Revival.
  • Jan Pinkava: Screenwriter for Ratatouille.
  • Jane King: Weekday mornings business reporter for San Francisco's ABC station.
  • Janice Marinelli: President of Disney/ABC domestic television and Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment (AKA, Walt Disney Home Video).
  • Jared Stein: Contributed additional story material for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Jason Anastas: A CGI animation trainee on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Jason Brodkey: The producer of the Pixar/Inside Out short Riley's First Date?
  • Jason Hudak: The editor for the Pixar short The Blue Umbrella.
  • Jason Segel: One of the actor's biggest jobs was playing the lead human character of Disney's The Muppets; he also was the lead writer of the film alongside Nicholas Stoller and an executive producer; this film revived the viability of the Muppets franchise.
  • Jasper Blystone: Assistant director on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Jay Jackson: Disney Renaissance animator who worked on Tarzan.
  • Jay N. Davis: One of the animators of the Leviathan in Atlantis: The Lost Empire and on the CGI crowd people in Hunchback.
  • Jay Rasulo: Originally the head of the Disney theme parks, he swapped jobs with Tom Staggs in 2009 and became the CFO. When Staggs took the President's position, Rasulo retired, but he is still advising the company.
  • Jay Rifkin: Record producer for the soundtrack of The Lion King.
  • Jayne Parker: Executive vice president and chief human resources officer for The Walt Disney Company.
  • Jean-Christophe Poulan: The layout artist for the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get A Horse! and the animated classic Tarzan.
  • Jean-Francois Camilleri: The executive vice president and general manager of the Disneynature film banner.
  • Jean Luc Florinda: Production manager on Tarzan.
  • Jean-Pierre Quenet: One of the producers of Ducktales The Movie Treasure Of The Lost Lamp, which had a key plot point recycled into the Walt Disney Classic Aladdin.
  • Jeanne Mosure: A key member of Disney Publishing Group.
  • Jeff Bennett: Voice actor who has lent voices to Disney on a few occasions, such as Brooklyn in Gargoyles.
  • Jeff Dickson: Layout supervisor on Brother Bear.
  • Jeff Draheim: The editor of Frozen.
  • Jeff Dutton: Artistic coordinator for Mulan and Lilo & Stitch.
  • Jeff Patch: An assistant director on The Rescuers.
  • Jeff R. Ranjo: Story artist for The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Jeff Sellinger: The senior vice president of the learning department at Disney Publishing Worldwide.
  • Jeffrey Friedman: Associate editor on Never Cry Wolf
  • Jeffrey Katzenberg: Became the studio head after Michael Eisner was named CEO. Had a hand in every animated film from The Black Cauldron (which he inherited from Ron Miller) to Hercules (which was released after he left; Fantasia 2000 started production during his tenure, but he hated the idea of that film and never took part in it). Was known for his massive ego, which didn't mix well with Eisner's own massive ego; following the accidental death of Frank Wells, he quit (or was fired from) Disney in 1994 and set up DreamWorks Animation, which became Disney's chief animation rival in the 2000s.
  • Jeffrey L. Varab: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Jeffrey M. Howard: Screenwriter for Planes.
  • Jeffrey Price: One of the two screenwriters for Who Framed Roger Rabbit and a movie called Trenchcoat.
  • Jeffrey Rochlis: A former Sega employee who was tapped by Katzenberg to help with Imagineering. He was a major mind in Euro Disney (a.k.a. Disneyland Paris), but was canned prior to the park opening; he sued Disney for the termination, but lost his suit.
  • Jeffrey Stepakoff: Provided additional screenplay material for Tarzan.
  • Jennifer Christine Vera: Production designer for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Jennifer Connelly: The longtime actress played Jenny in The Rocketeer, one of her early roles, and it led to a relationship with star Billy Campbell, though they eventually called it off.
  • Jennifer Lee: Co-director of Frozen.
  • Jennifer Phillips: Administrative assistant on Hunchback.
  • Jennifer Shull: Casting director for Never Cry Wolf.
  • Jenny Stein: An assistant editor on Never Cry Wolf.
  • Jeph Loeb: Executive vice president of Marvel Television.
  • Jeremy Milton: Editor of Planes
  • Jerry Bruckheimer: Film producer who helms the Pirates Of The Caribbean movies and several other movies.
  • Jerry Goldsmith: Composed the score for Mulan.
  • Jerry Livingston: One of the music composers for Cinderella.
  • Jessica Ambinder-Rojas: One of the editors of Fantasia 2000 and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Jessica Willey: Reporter at Houston's ABC network.
  • Jim Coleman: Background painter during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Jim Cox: One of the animation screenplay writers for The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Jim Cummings: Prolific voice actor who is the current voice of villain Pete, and also the voice of Darkwing Duck and a few other characters.
  • Jim Flamberg: One of the producers of the Toy Story soundtrack.
  • Jim Handley: One of the writers for Fantasia.
  • Jim Henson: The creator of The Muppets; he was all set to sell his studio to Disney when he died; this left the deal in limbo until 2004.
  • Jim Jimirro: The first boss of Walt Disney Home Video.
  • Jim Kallett: The editor of the Pixar short classic Geri's Game.
  • Jim Koford: One of the editors of The Fox and the Hound.
  • Jim Martin: Helped with visual development on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Jim Meltin: One of the editors of Robin Hood.
  • Jim Morris: President of Pixar.
  • Jim Reardon: One of the story writers for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Jim Varney: The Ernest actor voiced Slinky Dog in Toy Stories 1 & 2, and did provide voice work as "Cookie" Farnsworth in Atlantis The Lost Empire, but he died months before the film hit theaters; Atlantis was his final role.
  • Jimmy Kimmel: The host of his self-titled talk show on ABC and previously the co-host of Win Ben Steins Money, which aired on Comedy Central but was produced by Disney's Valleycrest Productions, which also produced Who Wants to be a Millionaire.
  • Jodi Benson: The voice actress for Ariel The Little Mermaid.
  • Joanna Johnston: Costume designer for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Joe Flynn: The actor's final role was as The Dragon henchman Mr. Snoops in The Rescuers; he had died three years prior to the movie hitting theaters.
  • Joe Grant: Character designer and storyman at Disney during the early years of the Studios. He worked on such films as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Fantasia, Saludos Amigos, Make Mine Music, and Alice in Wonderland. He returned to working at the Studio to work on the visual development on Beauty and the Beast and was a story adviser on Pocahontas; he continued to be a part of the studio until his death in 2005 at the age of 97.
  • Joe Hale: Animator who had worked with Walt Disney for a long time, and remained on past Walt's death. He was the producer of The Black Cauldron, and the movie's bombing and his nonchalant attitude about it to new boss Jeffrey Katzenberg, who had commented on Disney's luck of late note , led to Katzenberg firing Hale and ending both his long tenure at Disney Animation and his career; he promptly retired.
  • Joe Jiuliano: A major camera operator at Disney Animation.
  • Joe Johnston: A director who works often with Disney. He helmed Honey, I Shrunk The Kids, The Rocketeer, Hidalgo, and Captain America: The First Avenger.
  • Joe Quesada: Primary editor at Marvel Comics.
  • Joe Ranft: An animator at Disney; he moved to Pixar in 1995 and worked there until he died in a car crash in 2005.
  • Joe Rinaldi: Major animation and writing force at Disney during Walt's life.
  • Joe Roth: Replaced Jeffrey Katzenberg as the studio head in 1994. He left the position in 1999 and founded Revolution Studios and then Roth Films, the latter of which has made movies with Disney, notably the live-action remakes in the Disney Animated Canon.
  • Joe Stahley: Animator who was a background painter on the Toccata and Fugue number in Fantasia.
  • Joe Whyte: Voice actor who provided additional voice work on most of the 2000's Disney films.
  • Joel Siegel: The film critic on ABC's Good Morning America until his death in 2007.
  • Joey Buttitta: News reporter for the ABC-affiliated KEYT-TV station for Santa Barbara who, along with co-worker and girlfriend Kelsey Gerckens, won The Amazing Race 27.
  • John Alvin: Poster designer who has done a few Disney movie posters.
  • John Armstrong: Artistic animator on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • John Blackburn: The CEO of Avalanche Software, which is owned by Disney; they are the ones behind Disney Infinity.
  • John Boyega: African-British-Nigerian actor who earned a Star-Making Role as FN-2187, Finn, in The Force Awakens.
  • John Bryson: Board member who was part of the overthrow of Eisner.
  • John C. Reiley: Actor who plays Wreck-It Ralph and who was in Guardians of the Galaxy.
  • John Candy: Comedian who was in Splash and The Rescuers Down Under, and was part of the basis for the Bing Bong character in Inside Out. He passed away in 1994.
  • John Canemaker: Independent animator who has provided commentary on several Disney DVD releases.
  • John Carnochan: Editor on several Disney Animated Classics in the early 90's, and followed Katzenberg to DreamWorks afterwards.
  • John Debney: The music director for The Emperor's New Groove.
  • John Fiedler: Veteran of 12 Angry Men who was the main voice of Piglet in everything featuring Winnie The Pooh until his death in 2005. Also lent voices to The Fox And The Hound and The Emperor's New Groove.
  • John Goodman: Actor who has appeared in the Disney Animated Classic The Emperors New Groove and Pixar's Animated Classics Monsters Inc and its prequel Monsters University.
  • John Hench: Started in the Disney Story Department and later painted backgrounds for "The Nutcracker Suite" segment of Fantasia. He also worked on Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland.
  • John Henry Brooks: Senior manager of software on Lilo & Stitch.
  • John J. Pepper: Succeeded George Mitchell as company chairman, and remained in the position until CEO Bob Iger took it over in 2012.
  • John K. Carr: Associate editor of Hunchback.
  • John Kahrs: The director of the Disney Mini Classic Paperman.
  • John Lasseter: Got his start as an animator for Disney. He got terminated in 1983 for pushing computer animation (his last work up to that point, The Brave Little Toaster got released under "Hyperion Pictures"), and joined Steve Jobs at Pixar after George Lucas was forced to sell it. Pixar made an animation deal with Disney after the people who fired Lasseter got terminated themselves the following year, and this led to Toy Story. The relationship became strained with Eisner at the helm and his personal problems finding their way into Pixar's world, but after his exit, Bob Iger purchased the studio and tapped Lasseter as the Chief Creative Officer; he remains in this position to this day.
  • John Leatherbarrow: Animation camera supervisor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • John Lee Hancock: Director who helmed three Disney Studios projects: The Rookie, the 2004 version of The Alamo, and Saving Mr. Banks.
  • John Houston: One of the first assistant directors for Never Cry Wolf.
  • John Hurst: Animator on human Kenai in Brother Bear.
  • John Musker: Began his career at Disney as an animator on such films as The Small One, The Fox and the Hound and The Black Cauldron. He co-directed with Ron Clements The Great Mouse Detective, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, Hercules, Treasure Planet, The Princess and the Frog, and their next movie and first 3D feature, Moana.
  • John Norton: Provided additional story material for The Emperor's New Groove.
  • John P. Miller: One of the men on the "Baby Weems" segment in The Reluctant Dragon.
  • John Pomeroy: A close associate of Don Bluth who departed his studio when Bluth's fortunes went downhill, and was the lead animator of Milo for Atlantis The Lost Empire, John Smith for Pocahontas, and the Firebird for Fantasia 2000.
  • John Ratzenberger: Provided voices for Pixar ever since their first film. He's considered the studio's "lucky charm".
  • John Reed: Animator on many of Walt Disney's Cartoon Classics''.
  • John Ripa: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; one of his characters is baby Tarzan.
  • John S. Chen: Board member at Disney.
  • John Sanford: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • John Sibley: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • John Skipper: President of ESPN.
  • John Thomas: Special effects man on Never Cry Wolf.
  • John Turitzin: Executive vice president of Marvel Entertainment.
  • John Walker: Producer who produced The Incredibles and Tomorrowland and had a special thanks credit in Brave; he was originally attached to The Good Dinosaur before leaving for the live-action project.
  • John White: Did black-and-white processing on Lilo & Stitch.
  • John Williams: Composes the music for Lucasfilm productions.
  • Johnny Depp: Major actor who is well known for playing Captain Jack Sparrow in the Pirates Of The Caribbean movies, a character that, with Depp's likeness, soon found its way into the original classic ride in the Disney Theme Parks; he also played The Mad Hatter in Tim Burton's version of Alice In Wonderland.
  • Johnny Mercer: Wrote the The Villain Sucks Song from Robin Hood known as "The Phony King Of England".
  • Jon Brion: The composer for the Pixar short The Blue Umbrella.
  • Jon Snoddy: Head of Disney Imagineering.
  • Jonas Rivera: The producer of Pixar's Masterpiece Inside Out.
  • Jonathon Freeman: The voice of Jafar in Aladdin. He voices the character in almost all of his appearances and played Jafar on the Broadway adaptation of the film.
  • Jonathon Roberts: Disney screenwriter worked on The Lion King, James and the Giant Peach, The Hunchback Of Notre Dame, and Monsters. Inc.
  • Jordan Roberts: One of the screenwriters for Big Hero 6.
  • Jorgen Klubien: Animation writer who did The Lion King, Cars, Frankenweenie, and The Nightmare Before Christmas.
  • Jory Prum: A key member of Pixar.
  • Joseph F. Gilland: Visual Effects supervisor for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Joseph Sabo: One of the screenwriters for Pinnochio.
  • Josh Cooley: One of the screenwriters for Inside Out and the director of the followup short Riley's First Date.
  • Josh Meador: Special Effects man at Disney during Walt's life.
  • Joss Whedon: The director of Disney/Marvel's Avengers movies; previously, he had contributed crucial story material to Pixar's Grand Premiere Classic, Toy Story, and the Walt Disney Classic, Atlantis The Lost Empire.
  • Juanjo Guarnido: One of Helga Sinclair's animators on Atlantis.
  • Judge Whitaker: Animator on a lot of cartoon classics.
  • Judith Estrin: Board member at Disney.
  • Judy Kuhn: The singing voice of Pocahontas.
  • Julianne Hough: One of the judges on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Julie Nathanson: The current voice of Belle from Beauty and the Beast, replacing Paige O'Hara.
  • Julio Macat: Cinematographer for Winnie-the-Pooh.
  • Julius L. Aguimatang: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Julius Svendson: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Juliet Aires: Story consultant on Tarzan.
  • Julietta Novis: Soloist at the end of Fantasia.
  • June Foray: Voiced Walt's take on the Witch Hazel character, also voiced Lucifer the Cat in Cinderella and lent a voice to Mulan.
    K 
  • Kamehameha Schools Children's Chorus: The school organization who performed the Hawaiian choir singing in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Kara Lord: Production coordinator on video reference and dialogue recording on Hunchback.
  • Karen Comella: Supervisor of color models on Hunchback.
  • Karen Dufilho: The producer of the Pixar mini classic Geri's Game.
  • Karen Keller: Layout artist on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Karey Kirkpatrick: One of the animation screenwriters for The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Karl Holz: President of the Disney Cruise Line.
  • Katherine Ringgold: The editor of the Pixar short Presto.
  • Katherine Sarafian: Pixar employee who produced their short Lifted.
  • Kathie Lee Gifford: Was Regis Philbin's co-host on the Live morning show (which was distributed by Buena Vista Television) until 2000.
  • Kathleen Battle: Sung a soprano vocal at the end of the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Kathleen Fogarty-Bennett: Supervising music editor for Hunchback.
  • Kathleen Gavin: Associate producer on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Kathleen Kennedy: Longtime associate of Steven Spielberg and Amblin, which she co-founded, she became part of Lucasfilm and was made the president of the studio and the brand manager and executive producer of Star Wars when Disney purchased Lucasfilm.
  • Kathy Schoeppner: Provided digital touch-ups to the backgrounds of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Kathy Zielinski: Animator for the Disney Animated Canon; she was the supervising animator for the notorious Judge Claude Frollo, the Big Bad of the Walt Disney Classic The Hunchbackof Notre Dame; this character has more screentime than the other Disney villains.
  • Katie Hooten: Post-production coordinator on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Katie Marzuilo: The Saturday morning anchor of San Francisco's ABC station.
  • Katie McCall: Former anchor at ABC 13 in Houston. She transferred to another station.
  • Kay Nielsen: Sketch artist, storyman, and designer. Nielsen created designs for "The Night on Bald Mountain" segment in Fantasia. During the 1940s, he worked on concept designs for an early version of The Little Mermaid and "Ride of the Valkyries". In the mid-1980s, his sketches were brought out of the Disney Archives to inspire the animators who worked on the 1989 The Little Mermaid, and he ended up getting a posthumous "visual development" credit.
  • Keith Holden: Assistant animation editor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Keith David: Actor who voiced Big Good Goliath in Gargoyles and Big Bad Dr. Facilier in The Princess and the Frog.
  • Keith Giglio: Story consultant on Tarzan.
  • Kelly Asbury: Storyboard artist on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Kelly M. Feeg: Story production supervisor for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Kelly Ripa: Replaced Kathie Lee Gifford as Regis Philbin's co-host on Live.
  • Kelly Wightman: Story artist for The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Kelsey Gerckens: News reporter for the ABC-affiliated KEYT-TV station for Santa Barbara who, along with co-worker and boyfriend Joey Buttitta, won The Amazing Race 27.
  • Kelsey Mann: One of the story writers for Pixar's The Good Dinosaur and the director and writer of the Monsters Inc. short Party Central.
  • Ken Anderson: Art director on Snow White, designed Shere Khan and Elliot, and production designer on Sleeping Beauty, 101 Dalmatians and The Aristocats.
  • Ken Bunt: President of the Disney Music Group, which includes Walt Disney Records. Hollywood Records, and Disney Music Publishing.
  • Ken Curtis: Voiced one of the vulture henchmen in Robin Hood.
  • Ken Duncan: Animator of the Disney Renaissance; he animated Jane Porter in Tarzan, which included a very difficult continuous scene when it was improvised by Minnie Driver.
  • Ken O'Brien: Animator on features from Snow White to Sleeping Beauty.
  • Ken O'Connor: Layout artist on thirteen features and a hundred shorts. Features including Snow White, Fantasia and Lady and the Tramp. After a short retirement, O'Connor returned to Disney to help develop shows such as World of Motion and Universe of Energy at EPCOT, and the film Back to Neverland for the Animation Tour at the Disney/ MGM Studios in Orlando, Florida.
  • Ken Penders: The now infamous Sonic the Hedgehog comic book writer wrote for several Disney Adventures comics in the 1990's.
  • Ken Potrock: Vice president of the Disney Vacation Club.
  • Ken Ralston: Visual effects supervisor for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Ken Stuart Duncan: The supervising animator for Jane Porter in Tarzan.
  • Kendra Haaland: Associate producer of Hercules and Mulan.
  • Kent Hammerstrom: Animator who worked with Ron Husband on Djali the Goat in Hunchback.
  • Kent Melton: A character sculptor on Tarzan.
  • Kevin A. Mayer: Senior vice president, general counsel, and secretary for the Walt Disney Company as a whole.
  • Kevin Deters: Animator at Disney who dealt with a few shorts including The Ballad Of Nessie and How To Hook Up Your Home Theaters.
  • Kevin Feige: The president of Marvel Studios.
  • Kevin Lima: Directed Tarzan and Enchanted, along with a few Disneytoon movies such as A Goofy Movie.
  • Kevin Michael Richardson: Well-versed and Badass Baritone voice actor who voiced Captain Gantu, The Dragon/Big Bad of Lilo & Stitch, and also provided voices for other Disney programs such as voicing a bear doctor in one of the Mickey Mouse (2013) cartoons. He also replaced Samuel E. Wright as Sebastian The Crab for the Kingdom Hearts series, the one time someone other that Wright has voiced that character to date (the first game ironically came out only a few months after Lilo & Stitch hit theaters and about the time it hit DVD; Stitch himself would appear in Kingdom Hearts II.
  • Kevin Munroe: The producer of Strange Magic.
  • Kevin Nolting: Editor of Inside Out.
  • Kevin Paul Sheedy: The 3D effects technical director on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Kevin Reher: Casting director at Pixar.
  • Kevin Yasuda: Story writer for the opening number of Fantasia 2000, Beethoven's Symphony No. 5.
  • Kiran Bhakta Joshi: Supervisor of computer graphics imagery on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Kirk Bodyfelt: Assistant artistic coordinator on Atlantis: The Lost Empire and primary artistic coordinator on Brother Bear.
  • Kirk Douglas: The famed actor played Ned Land in Walt Disney's Studio Classic Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, which is one of his more noteworthy roles in the 50's, which included him performing a song called "Whale of a Tale"; this song was featured in the Disney Sing-Along video series.
  • Kirk Hansen: Story writer for the live-action scenes of Fantasia 2000.
  • Kirk Wise: Received his first feature-directing credit on the Academy Award-winning Beauty and the Beast. and in 1996 re-teamed with Don Hahn and Gary Trousdale on The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and has contributed to the following films, The Great Mouse Detective, Oliver & Company and Atlantis The Lost Empire.
  • Klay Hall: The director of Disneytoon Studios' Planes.
  • Kristen Anderson and Robert Lopez: Wife-and-husband composer duo who made the music of Winnie-the-Pooh and Frozen, the former of which had Kristen voice Kanga (her husband Robert is also one of the main minds behind Avenue Q and The Book of Mormon, the latter of which was his first association with Josh Gad, who was in Frozen. Their next project is Disney's Bob The Musical.
  • Kristin Sze: Weekday morning anchor at the San Francisco branch of ABC News.
  • Kristina Reed: An alumni of DreamWorks Animation who transferred to Disney and became the co-producer of Big Hero 6 and the producer of the short films Paperman and Feast.
  • Kuana Torres Kahele: Hawaiian musician who voiced the volcano Uku in Pixar's Mini Classic Lava.
  • Kurt Russell: Actor who appeared in several Disney Studio Classics and voiced adult Copper in The Fox and the Hound.
  • Kurt Zisa: Contest winner who earned the honor of having a Bonus Boss from the original Kingdom Hearts named after him; said boss is a contender for That One Boss, immortalizing Zisa's name.
  • Kyle Balda: A key member of Pixar.
  • Kyle Laughlin: Senior vice president of Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media Labs.
    L 
  • Lane Merrifield: The founder of Club Penguin; he resigned in 2012 after clashing with Disney.
  • Larry Bell: The weekday anchor at KGO-TV, an ABC station in San Francisco.
  • Larry Clemmons: Story animator at Disney; two of his works are Robin Hood and The Rescuers, and he's one of the screenwriters for The Reluctant Dragon..
  • Larry Morey: Animator who was one of the sequence directors on Walt Disney's Signature Classic, Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs and later was one of the music directors for The Reluctant Dragon..
  • Laurel Ladevich: The producer of the Monsters Inc. short Party Central.
  • Lauren MacMullan: The director of the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get A Horse!.
  • Laurene Powell Jobs: The wife of Steve Jobs, she inherited his fortune and holdings in Disney when he passed away; this currently makes her the largest shareholder in Disney.
  • Laurie Main: Actor who replaced Sebastian Cabot as the Narrator of the Winnie The Pooh series and lent a voice to other Disney projects.
  • Lawrence Kasdan: A major player in Disney's continuation of the Star Wars franchise through the Sequel Trilogy; his previous work with Disney was 1999's Mumford, a film he directed.
  • Lea Salonga: The singing voice of Jasmine and Mulan.
  • Lebo M: African folk music composer who arranged the Swahili chants in The Lion King.
  • Lee Blair: The husband of Mary Blair and the younger brother of Preston Blair, he was an artist at Disney.
  • Lee Unkrich: The director of Toy Story 2 & 3, Finding Nemo (he was co-director with Stanton), and Monsters Inc (which he co-directed with Pete Docter).
  • Leigh Harline: One of the music composers for Snow White.
  • Len Goodman: One of the judges on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Leonard Maltin: Film historian who has talked a lot about Disney and Star Wars, and hosts the Treasures From The Disney Vault specials on Turner Classic Movies with Ben Mankiewicz. He's also the creator of the Walt Disney Treasures DVD video series prior to that.
  • Leonard Nimoy: The Star Trek alumni voiced the King in Atlantis The Lost Empire and was the first voice of Master Xehanort, the Big Bad of the Kingdom Hearts series (not the original game, though).
  • Leopold Stokowski: The conductor for Walt Disney's Masterpiece Fantasia. He was also one of the major directors, and composed a full-orchestra version of Johan Sebastian Bach's classic Toccata and Fugue in D Minor to open the program. He also appears after the classic Sorcerer's Apprentice sequence, shaking hands with Mickey Mouse.
  • Leroy Cross: Key assistant animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Lesley Addario: Assistant production manager of special effects on Hunchback.
  • Leslie Denison: Actor who provided deeper voices for Donald Duck than Clarence Nash on cartoons such as Donald's Double Trouble, where he voiced a second Donald. Also voiced the judge in The Adventures Of Ichabod And Mr. Toad.
  • Leslie Ferraro: The president of Disney Consumer Products.
  • Leslie Moes: Post-production supervisor on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Leslie Sykes: A major anchor at the Los Angeles branch of ABC News, which is a primary base for the network company.
  • Lewis M. Allen: One of the Hollywood producer's later projects was Never Cry Wolf, the first film released under the Walt Disney Pictures banner (but without the iconic Cinderella's Castle logo; that didn't come until after the Management shift that let Eisner, Katzenberg, and Wells into Disney, and it premiered with The Black Cauldron.
  • Linda Larkin: The voice of Jasmine from Aladdin ever since that franchise started.
  • Linda Woolverton: One of Disney's most prolific screenwriters from the Disney Renaissance onward.
  • Lisa Donovan: Actress who co-founded Maker Studios.
  • Lisa Keene: Animator involved with the Disney Renaissance.
  • Lisa Linder: The editor for 2011's Winnie-the-Pooh.
  • Lisa M. Poole: Associate producer of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Lisa M. Smith: Production manager of Mulan.
  • Lisa McCormick: Assistant editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Lloyd Braun: Boss of ABC for the late 90's and early 2000's, when the network was really struggling; this struggle earned Braun the title of "worst executive of the year" in 2001 from the San Francisco News. Braun DID pitch Lost and Desperate Housewives, but they were too little, too late to save his ABC career or Michael Eisner's Disney career when the problems hit their boiling point in 2004.
  • Lois Freeman-Fox: One of the editors of Fantasia 2000.
  • Loni Beckner Black: Assistant production manager of animation and editorial on Hunchback.
  • Lorelay Bove: Art director at Disney Animation.
  • Lori Korngiebel: Post production supervisor of Lilo & Stitch for its California operations (a lot of it was done at the Florida studio prior to Disney shutting their doors.)
  • Lorna Cook: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Louis D'Esposito: The co-president of Marvel Studios.
  • Lucille La Verne: Actress who had her final and most iconic film role as The Queen note /Evil Witch in Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs.
  • Lyle Underkoffler: The vice president of the digital angle of Disney Publishing Group.
  • Lylle Breier: Senior vice president of global marketing partnerships and strategic alliances, promotions, synergy and special effects at the Walt Disney Studios.
  • Lyndsey Collins: The producer of Finding Dory.
  • Lynell K. Bright: Conducted the Hawaiian school choir for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Lynwen Brennan: The executive vice president and general manager of Lucasfilm.
    M 
  • M. Night Shyamalan: Director who helmed The Sixth Sense, which initially made him a legendary director in Hollywood. After Signs, his directing endeavors began turning him into a late-night punch line, prompting Disney to sever ties with him shortly after Bob Iger and John Lasseter took over the company and before Shyamalan's career hit bottom with the attempted live-action adaptation of Nickelodeon/Michael DiMartino/Bryan Konietzko's Avatar The Last Airbender in 2010.
  • M. T. Carney: Marketing executive who created the campaign for John Carter. When that movie bombed, she was asked to resign.
  • Mack Brown: Longtime and successful University of Texas Longhorns college football coach who retired after the 2013 season and joined ABC/ESPN as a sports commentator.
  • Mack David: One of the music composers for Cinderella.
  • Maggie Brown: Assistant supervisor of animation on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Mandy Moore: Pop star who voiced the Kingdom Hearts version of Final Fantasy VII's Aerith Gainsborough in the premiere installment of that series; 8 years later, she began voicing Rapunzel in Tangled.
  • Mannheim Steamroller: Tech music group who have recorded albums with Disney.
  • Marc Brown: A major anchor at the Los Angeles branch of ABC News, which is a primary base for the network company.
  • Marc E. Smith: A co-writer on Frozen Fever.
  • Marc Greenberg: The producer of the Pixar short The Blue Umbrella.
  • Marc Okrand: Developed the Atlantean language in the Walt Disney Classic Atlantis The Lost Empire.
  • Marc Smith: One of Kerchak's animators in Tarzan.
  • Marcello Vignali: Helped with visual development on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Marco Allard: One of Helga Sinclair's animators on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Marcus Hobbs: Supervisor of look development and lighting on Atlantis: The Lost Empire
  • Mark A. Hester: One of the editors for the Walt Disney Classic Aladdin.
  • Mark Andrews: Pixar employee who directed Brave after Brenda Chapman.
  • Mark Curtis: The political analyst for ABC's San Francisco station.
  • Mark Dindal: Animator who was part of the Disney Renaissance; he's also the director of The Emperors New Groove.
  • Mark Dornfeld: Title opticals supervisor on Hunchback.
  • Mark Eades: Imagineer from 1982 to 1993; now freelance writer for OC Register.
  • Mark Elliot: Announcer on Walt Disney Home Video.
  • Mark Green: Music editor on Hunchback.
  • Mark Hamill: The prolific voice actor is reprising his famous role as Luke Skywalker in the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy.
  • Mark Henn: Animated Mickey Mouse in Mickey's Christmas Carol and worked on Oliver and the Artful Dodger in Oliver & Company. In 1989 he moved to Florida to help establish the feature animation studio there. He animated Ariel in The Little Mermaid, Belle in Beauty and the Beast, and young Simba in The Lion King
  • Mark Kausler: Did animation for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Mark Keali'i Ho'omalu: A major music player in Lilo & Stitch, providing the Hawaiian choir arrangements.
  • Mark Kennedy: Head of story on Tangled Ever After.
  • Mark Koetsier: One of Rourke's animators on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Mark Isham: The composer's first major work was on Never Cry Wolf; he also worked on Once Upon a Time.
  • Mark Mancina: The composer of the Disneynature logo jingle, along with a handful of songs for Disney related to Lebo M and Phil Collins.
  • Mark Myer: Supervising animator of visual effects on Tarzan.
  • Mark Mueller: The composer of the theme songs to Ducktales and Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers.
  • Mark Nielsen: The producer of the Pixar/Inside Out short Riley's First Date?
  • Mark Parker: Board member at Disney and CEO of Nike.
  • Mark W. Gilicinski: Manager of technology on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Mark Walton: Provided additional story on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Mark Watters: Music composer for the Mickey Mouse Mini Masterpiece Get A Horse!, which opened Frozen.
  • Mark Zoradi: Longtime Disney executive who left the studio in 2009. He temporarily worked for DreamWorks Animation before moving on to helm the Cinemark movie theater chain.
  • Marlon West: Provided additional visual effects on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Marshall Lee Toomey: Clean-Up supervisor on Tarzan.
  • Martin Erskine: A music conductor/arranger at Disney.
  • Marty Katz: The longtime Hollywood executive worked at Disney for 8 years as the Senior Vice President of Motion Picture and Television Production, and founded his production company there. After his relationship with Disney ended, Katz moved his company to Santa Monica.
  • Marty Sklar: A long-serving Imagineer and executive.
  • Marvin Miller: Narrated Sleeping Beauty.
  • Marvin Woodward: One of the animators on The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Marvin Zindler: A major anchor on the Houston, Texas branch of ABC News. He was noteworthy for several projects, including the city's "Clean Kitchen" award and doing multiple international stories; one of these big stories led to the events that inspired The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and ZZ Top's "La Grange", which made him well-known in the ABC community well prior to his death in 2007.
  • Mary Blair. The wife of Disney artist Lee Blair, her work first got Walt's attention during the South America tour that begat Saludos Amigos and The Three Caballeros. Her unique, colorful designs can be seen on The Three Caballeros, Make Mine Music, Song of the South, Melody Time, Cinderella, Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan. Also designed the "It's a Small, Small World" ride.
  • Mary Blee: Assistant editor on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Mary Costa: The voice of Princess Aurora in Sleeping Beauty.
  • Mary Green: Assistant to the associate producer of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Mary Hildalgo: Casting director on Tarzan.
  • Mary V. Buck: Casting manager for The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Maryann McLeod: Production coordinator of CGI on Hunchback.
  • Masato Nakamura: The frontman of Dreams Come True and the composer of the music for the first two Sonic The Hedgehog games, which has worked on a few Asian Disney projects including Tokyo Disneyland.
  • Matt Codd: One of the production designers on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Matthew Jacobs: Provided the original story ideas for what became the Walt Disney Classic The Emperors New Groove.
  • Matthew Jon Beck: Associate casting manager on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Matthew O'Callaghan: Directing animator on The Little Mermaid.
  • Matthew Wilder: The director of songs for Mulan.
  • Maureen Donley: Associate producer of The Little Mermaid.
  • Maurice Hunt: Art director on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Maurice Noble: Animator who worked with Walt during the Golden Years.
  • Mauro Maressa: Visual effects artist at Disney Animation; this person worked on Hunchback.
  • Meg Crofton: President of Disney Theme Park's U.S. and France operations.
  • Meg Lefauve: One of the screenwriters for Inside Out.
  • Meg Whitman: Disney executive who now runs Hewlett-Packard, which provides the computers for Disney's theme parks and the technology for Katzenberg's DreamWorks Animation.
  • Mel Leven: A major Disney composer; he wrote the famous The Villain Sucks Song "Cruella De Vil" in 101 Dalmatians.
  • Melvin Shaw: Titles designer for The Rescuers.
  • Meredith Roberts: Senior vice president and general manager of Disneytoon Studios.
  • Meredith Layne: Casting assistant on Hunchback.
  • Meredith Salenger: Played the title role in The Journey of Natty Gann.
  • Meredith Viera: The host and later executive producer of the syndicated version of Disney/ABC's Who Wants To Be A Millionaire until 2013.
  • Merrill De Maris: Disney comic strip writer who was also part of the writing team of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.
  • Michael A. Shantzis: Pixar employee who worked with the CAPS system on several Disney Renaissance films.
  • Michael Arndt: Screenwriter for Toy Story 3 and Star Wars: The Force Awakens who also contributed extra story material to Brave and Inside Out.
  • Michael Benet: Animator on human Kenai in Brother Bear.
  • Michael Bolton: Warbler who sung over the ending credits of Hercules and provided an adaptation of Cinderella's "A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes" as the closing number to Simply Mad About The Mouse.
  • Michael Cedeno: Character animator on The Fox And The Hound and Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Michael Colglazier: The current president of the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California.
  • Michael Davies: The showrunner and executive producer of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? for its first decade.
  • Michael E. Polakow: Provided additional editorial services on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Michael Eisner: Previously the president of Paramount, he became the first "outside" (aka non-Disney) CEO of the studio in 1984 and is partly responsible for turning its fortunes around in the late 1980s/early 1990s and making it into the multimedia empire it is today. He was ultimately forced out of his job in 2005 by disgruntled shareholders after he spent over half a decade attempting to take a more hands-on approach in the studio's creative process amongst other issues.
  • Michael Fong: A supervising technical director on Pixar projects such as Riley's First Date?
  • Michael Galeota: Former Disney Channel star who played Nick Lighter in The Jersey; he died in 2016, and cause of death has yet to be determined.
  • Michael Gelman: A producer on ABC's Live With Regis.
  • Michael Giacchino: Composer for a multitude of Pixar films.
  • Michael Giaimo: Art director for Frozen Fever.
  • Michael Graves: Architect who designed the Swan & Dolphin hotels in Disney World.
  • Michael Humphries: Art director for the Piano Concerto No. 2 number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Michael Kaschalk: 3D EFX supervising animator on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Michael Kelly: Editor of Mulan and Lilo & Stitch.
  • Michael Kenji Tomizawa: Japanese-American Post-production engineer of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Michael Lynton: Past business executive at Disney Consumer Products and a major force behind the founding of the Disney Publishing Group.
  • Michael Moore: The notorious documentary maker released one of his most famous films, Fahrenheit911, which took direct aim at the George W. Bush administration over the 9/11 terrorist attacks, under Miramax, which Disney was required to distribute. In addition to the political waves it caused, which earned Moore disdain from Bush's father George Sr., it ignited controversy at Disney when CEO Michael Eisner did NOT want to release this film, and it led to the eventual end of the partnership between Disney and the Weinsteins; Disney replaced them with the live-action DreamWorks, which Katzenberg is barely a part of, for the duration of the Walt Disney Diamond Editions video line of the primary Disney Animated Classics. Moore has not been affiliated with Disney in any way since this movie (they also released an earlier film called The Big One.)
  • Michael Ovitz: The boss of the Creative Arts Agency and best friend of Eisner at the time Eisner chose to put him in Wells's President position over Jeffrey Katzenberg. Ovitz and Eisner regretted the move immediately, coming into severe ego conflict that was arguably much worse than what would have happened had Eisner went along with giving the position to Katzenberg as expected at the time. A year and a half later, Ovitz was given a "no-fault" termination that saw his friendship with Eisner devolve into a bitter feud and lawsuit against him that was settled in 2006 as well as the ruination of his career. Bonus points for Ovitz being fired without a meeting with Eisner (Eisner told Katzenberg personally that the studio chief would be leaving the company.) The President's position would remain vacant for 4 years until Bob Iger was promoted into it, and HE succeeded Eisner as CEO of Disney.
  • Michael Peraza. Jr.: Layout artist on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Michael Phillips: Film critic who co-hosted the At The Movies program from Disney for its final season.
  • Michael Rosenthal: An assistant editor on Never Cry Wolf.
  • Michael Starobin: Arranged the songs and score of the Walt Disney Classic The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Michael Surrey: Disney Renaissance animator; he worked on Tarzan and Hunchback and animated Rourke in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Michael White: Major player in Disney Consumer Products and Disney Interactive.
  • Michele Mazzano: Assistant production manager of visual effects on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Michelle Tuzee: A major anchor at the Los Angeles branch of ABC News, which is a primary base for the network company.
  • Miguel Ferrer: Played the Big Bad in the Disney studio film Blank Check and the animated masterpiece Mulan, and then the Vice President in Iron Man 3.
  • Mike D'Isa: Second animator for Mrs. Packard and Mr. Harcourt in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Mike Gabriel: Major force behind The Rescuers Down Under and a regular animator and art director at Disney.
  • Mike Golic: Co-host of Mike And Mike on ESPN Radio.
  • Mike Greenberg: Major anchor at ESPN.
  • Mike Mignola: The Hellboy creator lent his distinctive artistic technique to the Walt Disney Cult Classic Atlantis The Lost Empire.
  • Mike "Moe" Merell: The supervising animator for the Leviathan in Atlantis: The Lost Empire and one of the animators for the computer-generated crowds in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Miley Cyrus: Played Hannah Montana for the Disney Channel.
  • Milt Banta: One of the story writers for Sleeping Beauty.
  • Milt Gross: Helped storyboard for The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad.
  • Milt Neil: Animator who worked on The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Mindy Kaling: Actress who voiced Taffyta Muttonfudge in Wreck-It Ralph and Disgust in Inside Out.
  • Minnie Driver: British actress and OXFAM ambassador who voiced Jane Porter in Tarzan; she improvised a lot of her scenes, one of which was a major job for animator Ken Duncan.
  • Mira Nikolic: One of the two CGI technical directors on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Miriam Margoyles: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Monica C. Lozano: Board member at Disney.
  • Monica Evans: Voiced Maid Marian in Robin Hood
  • Monica Lago-Kaytis: Associate producer of Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Mychael and Jeff Danna: Composer brothers who scored Pixar's The Good Dinosaur; Mychael also scored its opening act short Sanjay's Super Team.
    N 
  • Nancy Adams: Sung the "Love" song during Robin Hood and Maid Marians walk through Sherwood Forest.
  • Nancy Dubuc: The CEO of A&E network, which is a collaboration between Disney/ABC and Hearst Corporation.
  • Nannette Miranda: The bureau chief of the Sacramento ABC station, which is connected to L.A.
  • Naoko Takeuchi: The creator of Sailor Moon, which was distributed by DiC in the United States for a time in coordination with Disney. Disney attempted to purchase the franchise, but Takeuchi rebuffed them.
  • Naomi Goldberg: Dance choreographer on Hunchback.
  • Napua Greig: Actress and singer who voiced the volcano Lele in the Pixar Mini Classic Lava.
  • Natalie Franscioni-Karp: Background supervisor on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Natalie Kalmus: The color director of the second half of the premiere hybrid Classic The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Natalie Lyon: Casting manager at Pixar.
  • Natasha Barrett: Anchor at Houston's ABC News branch.
  • Nathan Greno: Disney Animation employee who co-directed Tangled and Gigantic.
  • Nicholas Stoller: One of the co-writers of The Muppets and Muppets Most Wanted.
  • Nick Fletcher: Animation editor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Nick Ingman: Conducted the choir in Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Nick van Dyk: Executive who assisted with the acquisitions of Pixar, Marvel, and Lucasfilm, now at Activision Blizzard.
  • Nicole Mitchell: One of the story writers for the short Feast.
  • Nicole Paradis Grindle: The producer of the Pixar short Sanjay's Super Team.
  • Nik Raineri: Lead animator for Roger Rabbit on Who Framed Roger Rabbit, animator Ursula from The Little Mermaid, animator of Jafar from Aladdin, and supervising animator of Wilbur from The Rescuers Down Under, Lumiere from Beauty and the Beast, Meeko from Pocahontas, Hades from Hercules, and Kuzco from The Emperors New Groove.
  • Nina Jacobson: Script developer at Disney from 1998 to 2006.
  • Nino Carbe: A background painter for Toccata and Fugue in Fantasia.
  • Nitin Chawla: Vice president of Playmation.
  • Noni White: One of the screenwriters for Tarzan and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Norm Ferguson: One of Disney's most loved animators, known for his excellent personality animation, as well as his contributions to the character of Pluto and his subsequent short subject series. Noteworthy work of his includes the famous flypaper scene from "Playful Pluto", the Witch from Snow White and Honest John and Gideon from Pinocchio. Directing animator on Snow White and Peter Pan.
    O 
  • Odin Benitez: Supervising sound editor and designer for Frozen Fever.
  • Oliver Wallace: Music director on a multitude of Disney projects and cartoons.
  • Oscar Issac: Plays Poe Dameron in the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy.
  • Oskar Fischinger: An abstract animator who briefly joined Disney and did work on the "Tocata and Fugue in D Minor" segment of Fantasia.
  • Oren Aviv: A past marketing chief of the studio.
  • Oren C. Smith: Board member at Disney.
  • Osnat Shurer: Pixar short producer who transferred to Disney Animation and is producing the 56th Disney Animated Classic, Moana.
  • Otto Englander: Head of story direction on Dumbo.
    P 
  • Paige O'Hara: The voice of Belle from Beauty and the Beast for the first 20 years of that franchise's existence. She was replaced in 2011 by Julie Nathanson.
  • Pam Coats: Producer of Mulan.
  • Pam Manes Darley: Assistant artistic coordinator for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Pam Ziegenhagen: One of the editors for The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Pamela L. Travers: The author of the original Mary Poppins novel series, she was actually approached by Walt Disney very early on for adapting the premiere novel, but resisted for decades until financial pressures got her to cave in. This led to the development of the movie, and while everyone else was impressed, it made an opposite impression on her because she HATED animation (the standing ovation the movie received did not help her feelings), and she barred Disney from adapting the rest of the book series, although this mandate may have been relaxed with a sequel being announced in 2015. Her dilemma with the movie and her life events leading to it and the original novels is detailed in Saving Mr. Banks, the first movie to feature an actor (Tom Hanks) playing Walt.
  • Pamela Mann-Francis: Script supervisor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Pat Buttram: Western actor and longtime comrade of The Duke, John Wayne; Buttram provided voices for every Dark Age Disney Animated Classic made between Walt's death and the Eisner/Wells/Katzenberg management takeover in 1984 (apart from The Many Adventures Of Winnie The Pooh) and had a cameo in Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Pat Carroll: The voice actress of Ursula in The Little Mermaid, she voices the character in every one of her appearances.
  • Pat O'Malley: A common voice actor for some of Walt's films.
  • Pat Ventura: One of the story developers for the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Patricia Hicks: Associate producer on the Walt Disney Classic, The Emperors New Groove, and the production manager on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Patricia Lopez: Reporter at the Houston ABC station.
  • Patrick J Voetberg: An assistant editor on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Patrick Lin: Cinematographer for Inside Out.
  • Patrick Moran: Executive Vice President of ABC Studios.
  • Patrick Osborne: The director of the Disney short Feast.
  • Patrick Pacheco: The writer of the Waking Sleeping Beauty documentary.
  • Patrick Stewart: The Shakespeare/Star Trek actor had been VERY eager to get into some of the Disney Renaissance movies, first Beauty & The Beast as The Beast, then Aladdin as Jafar, and finally the Gargoyles television series as Goliath, but scheduling conflicts prevented him from taking these roles and becoming a part of Disney's world until Chicken Little in 2005, which was made after Stewart's run with the Star Trek franchise ended.
  • Patrick Warburton: Voiced Kronk in The Emperors New Groove, and played the flight attendant in Disney California Adventures's Soarin' Over California IMAX/Smell-O-Vision attraction.
  • Patsy Bouge: Post production supervisor on Tarzan.
  • Patsy de Lord: Animation production manager on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Patti Conklin: Assistant to producer Don Hahn on Hunchback.
  • Paul Bogaev: Provided additional musical arrangements for the "Trashin' the Camp" part of Tarzan.
  • Paul and Gaetan Brizzi: French twins who were two of the directors of Fantasia 2000.
  • Paul Chandler Carrera: An assistant editor on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Paul Ekman: Psychologist, emotion research expert, and founder of the Paul Ekman social group, he was a consultant for the Emotions of Inside Out.
  • Paul Felix: Production designer for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Paul Frees: Voice actor who is in Donald in Mathmagic Land and The Haunted Mansion.
  • Paul Kashuk Jr: Assistant artistic coordinator on Brother Bear.
  • Paul Lee: President of the ABC Entertainment Group.
  • Paul Marbury: The main camera operator for the Walt Disney Studio Classic Never Cry Wolf.
  • Paul Pressler: The former boss of The Disney Store, he was put in charge of Disneyland in 1996 to help with the construction of what became Disney's Californian Adventure as well as address the lack of parkgoers in recent years (the original idea was for a new Epcot called Westcot, but this was abandoned after Wells and Katzenberg's runs at the company ended). He wound up cutting maintenance and attractions, mostly focusing on shopping. He became boss of the entire theme park division in 2000, but his failed attempt to take this concept further and Californian Adventure hitting an instant Dork Age the minute it opened, along with problems with Eisner, convinced him to pull the plug on his Disney job and never look back; he joined The Gap, and Pressler was succeeded by Jay Rasulo and eventually Tom Staggs, who revitalized the parks, with Staggs becoming president in 2015. Paul Pressler's tenure and the results of it was one of the factors in Eisner leaving the company himself.
  • Paul Rudish: Television animator who is the executive producer of the critically, popularly and Emmy/Annie acclaimed new series of Mickey Mouse cartoons.
  • Paul S.D. Lanum: Assistant production manager of clean-up on Hunchback.
  • Paul Satterfield: One of the writers for Fantasia.
  • Paul Smith: The creator of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? and one of the executive producers of the American version for its first decade. Also the name of a different man who was one of the music composers for Snow White.
  • Paul Weatherwax: The editor of The Reluctant Dragon.
  • Perce Pearce: Animator who was one of the sequence directors on Walt Disney's Signature Classic, Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs.
  • Pete Anthony: Conducted the score of Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Pete Docter: One of the MVPs at Pixar, he's worked on a lot of their movies and is the man behind their 2015 hit Inside Out. He also co-directed Monsters. Inc and Up.
  • Peter Del Vecho: Producer of Frozen.
  • Peter DeMund: Visual Effects supervisor on Tarzan.
  • Peter Diamond: Stunt arranger on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Peter Howitt: Set decorator on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Peter Jennings: A major personality at ABC until his death.
  • Peter Lonsdale: Associate editor on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Peter Montgomery: The creator of the Mickey's Fun Songs video trilogy; these were folded into the main Disney Sing-Along Songs series.
  • Peter Nye: Pixar employee who worked with the CAPS system on several Disney Renaissance films.
  • Peter S. Seaman: One of the two screenwriters for Who Framed Roger Rabbit and a movie called Trenchcoat.
  • Peter Schneider: Originally a co-worker of Menken and Ashman, he was brought in by Roy E. Disney and Jeffrey Katzenberg to help head up animation. He got tangled up in an infamous fake memo that was sent to Katzenberg and then Jeopardy, but was otherwise effective. He became the studio head in 2000, replacing Joe Roth, but his own budding problems with Eisner convinced him to resign.
  • Peter Sohn: Pixar employee who directed The Good Dinosaur.
  • Peyton Reed: The eventual director of Ant-Man.
  • Phil Collins: Musician/singer and Genesis frontman who composed music for Tarzan and Brother Bear.
  • Phil Dike: One of the story developers for the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor number in Fantasia.
  • Phil Harris: Voice actor who played Baloo in The Jungle Book, and did a few Dark Age Disney movies.
  • Phil Johnston: One of the story writers for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Phil Lofaro: Associate producer of The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Phil Nibbelink: Animator on The Fox And The Hound and Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Philadelphia Orchestra: The orchestra led by Leopold Stokowski in Fantasia; when the film hit video in 1991 under the Walt Disney Classics heading, the orchestra sued Disney for half the profits; the case was dismissed with a settlement in 1994.
  • Philip LaZebnik: One of the screenwriters for Mulan.
  • Philip S. Boyd: One of the Clean-Up supervisors for Lilo & Stitch and Brother Bear.
  • Philippe Gas: The general manager of the upcoming Shanghai Disney Resort.
  • Phillip Young: Animator on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Philo Barnhart: Character designer on The Little Mermaid.
  • Pinto Colvig: Storyman at Disney, and the original voice of Goofy and Pluto. He co-directed Mickey's Amateurs.
  • Pixote Hunt: Animator who was one of the directors of Fantasia 2000.
  • Pres Antonio Romanillos: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; one of the characters he animated is Shan-Yu, the Big Bad of Mulan.
  • Preston Blair: A animator for Disney, later famous for the animation he did for the girl from Tex Avery's "Red Hot Riding Hood".
  • Priscilla John: The U.K. casting director for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
    Q 
  • Quentin Tarantino: The eccentric director of several Miramax classics that were distributed by Disney, including Pulp Fiction and the Kill Bill movies.
    R 
  • Rachel Field: Children's novelist who wrote the English lyrics for the closing "Ave Maria" number of Fantasia.
  • Randy and Jason Sklar: Comedians who hosted the Cheap Seats show on ESPN Classic in the mid 2000's.
  • Raffaello Vecchione: Provided character sculptures for The Emperor's New Groove and Lilo & Stitch.
  • Raj Murari: A co-senior vice president of group publishers at Disney Publishing Group.
  • Ralph Eggleston: The production designer for Inside Out.
  • Ralph Grierson: Played the piano for the Rhapsody in Blue number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Ralph Hulett: Background painter on Robin Hood.
  • Ralph J. Guggenheim: Executive at Pixar.
  • Ralph Wright: A story animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Randy Cartwright: Animator who has worked with Disney on-and-off.
  • Randy Fullmer: Producer of The Emperors New Groove and artistic coordinator of The Hunchback Of Notre Dame..
  • Randy Haycock: Animator from the Disney Renaissance; he animated Clayton, the Big Bad of Tarzan.
  • Randy Newman: Composer for a multitude of Pixar movies as well as The Princess And The Frog.
  • Randy Parker: Digital production manager of Brother Bear.
  • Randy Thornton: Producer of the Disneyland soundtrack.
  • Rasoul Azadani: Layout artist at Disney Animation.
  • Ray Bolger: Actor who played the Big Bad of Babes In Toyland.
  • Ray Chew: The band leader on Dancing with the Stars on ABC.
  • Ray Watson: Disney executive who is partially responsible for Michael Eisner coming to Disney.
  • Raymond S. Persi: One of the story writers for the short Feast.
  • Raymond Singer: One of the screenwriters for Mulan.
  • Rebecca Cline: Director of the Walt Disney Archives.
  • Regina Belle: Performed "A Whole New World" for the closing credits of Aladdin with Peabo Bryson.
  • Regina Conroy: Disney Animation short film producer; one of her works is The Ballad Of Nessie.
  • Regis Philbin: A major personality at ABC, he chaired the morning talk show "Live with Regis and Kathie Lee/Kelly" and hosted the ABC version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, which temporarily got ABC out of the hole and ushered in a new generation of programming.
  • Ren Klyce: Sound designer for Inside Out.
  • Renato dos Anjos: Animation supervisor for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Renu Thomas: The newly promoted Executive Vice President of media operations, engineering and IT at Disney/ABC.
  • Reuben Cannon & Associates: The U.S. casting directors for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Rian Johnson: The director of Star Wars Episode VIII, the second installment in the Star Wars Sequel Trilogy, which is being made for release in 2017.
  • Ric Sluiter: Art director of Mulan.
  • Ricardo Delgado: One of the production designers on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Rich Franks: Disney executive who was sent out the door alongside Jeffrey Katzenberg.
  • Rich Moore: Animator and Rough Draft Studios partner who directed Wreck-It Ralph and Zootopia.
  • Rich Ross: Succeeded Dick Cook as studio chief, he oversaw a few big-budget tentpoles, but a few too many tentpole bombings, which culminated in John Carter, got him fired and replaced by Alan Horn; the failure of The Lone Ranger added an extra nail to that coffin.
  • Richard Creedon: One of the story writers for Snow White.
  • Richard Fleischer: A director who helmed a multitude of Disney films, the most notable being Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. He's the son of Fleischer studio founder Max Fleischer, who was a good rival of Disney's for the 1930's.
  • Richard Hollander: The producer of the Pixar short Presto.
  • Richard Kind: Actor who has been in several Pixar films including both Cars movies and Inside Out.
  • Richard Rich: An animator who helmed The Fox and the Hound, his next film was The Black Cauldron. That movie's massive bombing and his headbutting with Peter Schneider led to his termination and having to start his own studio. He fell out of relevance after The King and I flopped and earned an anti-animation mandate from the Rodgers and Hammerstein estate.
  • Richard Roeper: A stretch, he's a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, but he succeeded Gene Siskel as Roger Ebert's critic partner in the At The Movies program, which was distributed by Disney.
  • Richard Sebast: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Rick Ace: Pixar employee who worked with the CAPS system on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Rick Hoppe: Clean-Up supervisor on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Rick Moranis: Played Wayne Szalinski the inventor in the Honey, I Shrunk the Kids movie trilogy; the third one, which was released Direct-to-Video, was his last live-action role due to his desire to be a father to his children after his wife died, and as a result, his only film work past that so far has been in voice-acting, including another Disney project, Brother Bear.
  • Rick Reinert: His animation firm helped make the fourth and final main Winnie The Pooh short, Winnie The Pooh And A Day For Eeyore (this short has a brand new cast and was made past The Many Adventures' theatrical and VHS release, but is included in the Winnie The Pooh's Storybook Classics series that make up the individual shorts along with the Walt Disney Mini Classics line prior to that.)
  • Riders In The Sky: The country western folk singers performed the "Woody's Roundup" song and several additional add-ons, including a "You've Got a Friend In Me" remix, for Pixar's Toy Story 2, which propelled them to the national spotlight and earned them a Grammy; these songs have become part of their classic playlist.
  • Riley Thompson: One of the animators on The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Rita Hsiao: One of the screenwriters for Mulan.
  • Rob Bekuhrs: Digital animation supervisor for Lilo & Stitch.
  • Rob Cavallo: Co-produced the "You'll Be In My Heart" song from Tarzan.
  • Rob Dressel: Layout supervisor for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Rob Minkoff: Began his career in the Studios as an inbetweener on The Black Cauldron. He helped design the character of Basil in The Great Mouse Detective and Ursula in The Little Mermaid. He is associated with the character Roger Rabbit as the director of "Tummy Trouble" and "Roller Coaster Rabbit" and co-producer of "Trail Mix-up". He directed The Lion King with Roger Allers.
  • Robb Pratt: One of Kerchak's animators in Tarzan.
  • Robh Ruppel: Art director of Brother Bear.
  • Robbie Boyd: Assistant music editor on Tarzan.
  • Robby Benson: The voice of The Beast ever since the character premiered.
  • Robert A.M. Stern: The designer of several Disney World hotels, most notably the Yacht and Beach Club; these were Eisner's favorite hotels due to their location and design, and got Stern on the board of directors.
  • Robert Benchley: Writer who was the star of The Reluctant Dragon (this was one of his last roles before his death 4 years later).
  • Robert Bryan: Provided additional animation for the character of Tuke in Brother Bear.
  • Robert Carlyle: British actor who plays Rumpelstiltskin in Once Upon a Time.
  • Robert Cormack: A major art director in Fantasia, dealing with the Toccata and Fugue and Nutcracker Suite numbers.
  • Robert Crawford: Wrote the U.S. Air Force/United Nations jingle in The Rescuers.
  • Robert D. San Souci: Children's book author who provided the original concept for the Disney Animated Classic Mulan and was a consultant on the film; he died from a head injury in 2014.
  • Robert E. Stanton: Background supervisor for Mulan and Lilo & Stitch.
  • Robert Falco: Production software TD on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Robert Gibbs: One of the story developers for the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Robert H. Bagley: Video post production coordinator on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Robert Kraft: A major record producer for Walt Disney Records.
  • Robert L. Baird: One of the screenwriters for Big Hero 6.
  • Robert Lence: Storyboard artist on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Robert M. Brewer Jr.: One of the editors of Sleeping Beauty.
  • Robert Matschullat: Board member at Disney.
  • Robert Rosenblum: Supervisor of production software on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Robert S. Garber: An associate producer on Mulan.
  • Robert Steinbrecher: One of the two production managers for Walt Disney Picture's first classic, Never Cry Wolf.
  • Robert Stevenson: Director of several Disney Live-Action Classics, the most notable being Mary Poppins.
  • Robert Ty Stanton: Art director for the Disney short John Henry.
  • Robert Walker: Layout supervisor for Mulan.
  • Robert Watts: Lucasfilm producer who was one of the producers of Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Robert Zemeckis: The director of Who Framed Roger Rabbit and the boss of Image Movers Digital, which made the the 2009 adaptation of A Christmas Carol. Their next film, Mars Needs Moms, however, tanked heavily and ended the partnership between Disney and Zemeckis prematurely.
  • Roberts Gannaway: The director and lead writer of Planes: Fire & Rescue.
  • Robin Williams: Actor and comedian who appeared in a lot of Disney films in the 80's and 90's until a feud over Bicentennial Man ended it. He's most famous for The Genie, which lead to an earlier feud when Disney overpromoted the character; this was a contract breach that helped end Jeffrey Katzenberg's 10-year long run at the company.
  • Rod Taylor: Narrated 101 Dalmatians as dog Pongo.
  • Roger Allers: Animator who co-directed The Lion King with Rob Minkoff.
  • Roger Broggie: The original Imagineer, Broggie helped make special effects and model trains prior to Disneyland's conception. Most notably, he and Wathel Rogers invented the audio-animatronic.
  • Roger Cain: Backup production designer for Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Roger Ebert: A stretch; the famed critic worked for the Chicago Sun-Times, but his review show with Gene Siskel and then Richard Roeper was distributed by Disney.
  • Roger Miller: Folk singer who narrated Robin Hood as Alan-a-Dale.
  • Ron Clements: Assistant and animator on Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too, The Rescuers, Pete's Dragon, The Fox and the Hound, and The Black Cauldron. He, along with John Musker, directed The Great Mouse Detective, The Little Mermaid, and Aladdin. Their next movie is Moana.
  • Ron Husband: Animator who has worked on several Disney Classics.
  • Ron Jones: The music composer for Ducktales.
  • Ron Logan: The first president of the reborn Disney Theatrical Group, which was revived by Peter Schneider and Thomas Schumacher with Roy Disney and Jeffrey Katzenberg supervising; their first play back was the stage adaptation of Beauty and the Beast.
  • Ron Meurin: Story developer for the Piano Concerto No. 2 number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Ron Schneider: Played the Dreamfinder at EPCOT's Journey Into Imagination.
  • Ronald L. Iden: Senior vice president of global security at Disney.
  • Ronnie del Carmen: Co-director and one of the story writers for Inside Out.
  • Ronnie Screwvala: Executive at UTV Software Communications.
  • Roy Conli: Producer of several Disney Animated Classics such as Big Hero 6.
  • Roy M. Brewer Jr.: One of the editors of 101 Dalmatians.
  • Roy Naisbitt: Layout artist on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Ruben Aquino: Animator who worked on Ursula in The Little Mermaid, he sadly got laid off in 2013 alongside Ranieri.
  • Ruben Procopio: Clean-Up supervisor on Mulan.
  • Rune Brandt Bennicke: Major character designer on Brother Bearl he animated Tug & Koda's mother in this film.
  • Russ Edmonds: The supervising animator for a lot of characters from the 2D Disney Animated Classics; one of them is Phoebus from The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Russell Hall: Supervising animator on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Russi Taylor: The voice of Minnie Mouse, and the wife of Mickey Mouse voice Wayne Allwine until his death in 2009.
  • Ruth Lambert: Casting director for Mulan and Tarzan.
  • Ryan Lissack: The Chief Technology Officer of Maker Studios.
  • Ryan McCartan: Current star on the Disney Channel.
    S 
  • Saaschka Unseld: The director and writer of the Pixar short The Blue Umbrella.
  • Salvador DalÝ: Alright, this is a stretch, as he didn't actually work for Disney so much as he did a collaboration with Walt on his animation project "Destino"—which wasn't finished until 2003.
  • Sam Armstrong: Storyman and background artist from 1934 to 1941, director of Fantasia.
  • Sam Graham: One of the storymen for The Little Mermaid.
  • Sam Levine: Contributed additional story material for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Sam Recinos: Effects assistant on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Sammy Fain: Wrote the Oscar-nominated "Someone's Waiting For You" from The Rescuers.
  • Samuel E. Wright: The voice of Sebastian The Crab from the animated classic The Little Mermaid. The Ensemble Darkhorse status of the character, who sung the two songs in the movie that were nominated for Oscars, which they won, led to him recording a record as Sebastian for Disney, and he continues to voice the character (the Kingdom Hearts series are the only appearance of Sebastian in any media period (including the original film, of course) where Wright didn't voice him (Kevin Michael Richardson, who also played the Big Bad of Lilo & Stitch, which was released a few months prior to the first game hitting store shelves, replaced Samuel E. Wright for that series).
  • Sandro Lucio Cleuzo: Character animator at Disney.
  • Sanford "Sandy" Litvack: A former Disney executive who was a competitor to Jeffrey Katzenberg and then Michael Ovitz for the president's position at Disney. He earned an acting chief operation officer job after Ovitz's acrimonious departure and became a co-vice chairman in 1999, but he was forced out of the company in 2000.
  • Sanjay Patel: The director of the Pixar short Sanjay's Super Team, which came from Patel's childhood.
  • Scot Stafford: Composed the music for Pixar's short Presto.
  • Scott Kersavage: Visual Effects supervisor for Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Scott Maitland: One of the first assistant directors for Never Cry Wolf.
  • Scott Weinger: Actor who is the voice of Aladdin from the movie on to the present.
  • Sean Bailey: The current president of production at Walt Disney Pictures.
  • Sebastian Sabot: Provided voices for several Disney Animated Classics, including Bagheera in The Jungle Book.
  • Sergio Pablos: Disney Renaissance animator; he worked on Tarzan.
  • Sergio Quintana: Freelance reporter for ABC stations in California.
  • Shane Morris: One of the writers of the Disney Classic Frozen.
  • Shannon: Stein: Avid assistant editor of Brother Bear.
  • Sharon Morrill: Former key cast member of Disneytoon Studios.
  • Shawn Keller: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Shelby Flint: Sung the songs in The Rescuers.
  • The Sherman Brothers: Richard and Robert Sherman, composers of several Disney songs from the 1960s and early '70s, including those featured in Mary Poppins, The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, and the Disney Theme Parks ride "It's a Small World."
  • Sherri Stoner: Actress was a live-action reference for Ariel The Little Mermaid.
  • Sheryl Sandberg: Current board member at Disney.
  • Shinji Hashimoto: The man who came up with the original concept for Kingdom Hearts.
  • Shirley Pierce: Screenwriter who dealt with the Disney short John Henry.
  • Sid Bass: Became the majority stockholder of Disney in the 80's and was directly responsible for Eisner's rise. The 9/11 attacks forced him to sell out.
  • Siddharth Roy Kapur: The CEO of Disney subsidary UTV Software Communications.
  • Simon Wells: Supervising animator on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Skarpi Hedinsson: The chief technology officer at Disney/ABC Television.
  • Sonia Azad: Former anchor at the Houston branch of ABC News, now a public relations worker at Disney World.
  • Sonserae Leese: Texture map painter on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Spencer Christian: Forcaster for weekday evenings at ABC's KGO-TV station in San Francisco.
  • Stan Green: Key assistant animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Stan Lee: The founder of Marvel Comics and Studios, he makes cameos in every Marvel film and is an executive producer on them.
  • Stan Spohn: One of the background painters for The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Stanley Gold: Friend of Roy E. Disney and Disney executive who coordinated the "Save Disney" campaigns with him.
  • Stephane Sainte-Foi: Major Disney animator; animated big sister Nani in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Stephen A. Rotter: Award winner who was one of the editors on Enchanted.
  • Stephen Anderson: Director of Meet the Robinsons and story supervisor of Brother Bear.
  • Stephen L. Meek: First assistant editor of Lilo & Stitch.
  • Stephen Schaffer: Primary editor of The Good Dinosaur.
  • Stephen Schwartz: Lyricist who worked with Alan Menken on Pocahontas, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Enchanted.
  • Stephen Scott: Art director on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Sterling Holloway: One of Disney's most prolific voice actors. He worked with Disney starting in the early 40's and provided voices for many of Disney's characters, including The Cheshire Cat and Kaa, but he's most well known for being the original voice of Winnie The Pooh.
  • Steve Bloom: The editor of Pixar's short La Luna.
  • Steve Bornstein: Ex-CEO of ESPN, now at Activision.
  • Steve Burke: Joined Disney in 1992 and helped with the development of The Disney Store prior to the Euro Disney project. After getting put on ABC, he resigned and moved to the Comcast cable company, which attempted to take over the Walt Disney Company in 2004 but failed, instead merging with Universal; Burke took over the doddering NBC in 2011 and is their current CEO.
  • Steve Gray: Composed "Great Ovation", and the first four seconds of this tune was used as the Feature Presentation jingle from 1989 to 1999 (except on zoom-in Feature Presentation jingles) amongst other home video bumpers.
  • Steve Hickner: Animation production coordinator on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Steve Hulett: Story animator on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Steve Jobs: The boss of Pixar and Apple Computers; he purchased the firm from George Lucas in the 80's, and hired John Lasseter to run it alongside Ed Catmull. They eventually made a landmark deal with Disney and created Toy Story, and following Jobs and Lasseter's feud with Disney boss Michael Eisner and his rivals, were indirectly partially responsible for Eisner's exit from the company; Disney purchased Pixar afterwards and put Lasseter back in charge of animation and creativity and making Jobs the largest shareholder in the company until Jobs's death in 2011.
  • Steve Kempster: One of the score recorders and mixers on Tarzan.
  • Steve Levitan: The co-creator of one of ABC's modern classics, Modern Family.
  • Steve Martin: The accomplished actor had actually gotten his start on Disney's Jungle Cruise; he also introduced the second number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Steve Starkey: Assistant producer on Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • Steve Whitmere: The voice and puppeteer of Kermit the Frog, Beaker, Statler and others in the Muppet films done by Disney.
  • Steven Chorney: Designed the poster for Who Framed Roger Rabbit amongst other Disney designs.
  • Steven Keller: Disney animation employee; one of his jobs was producing the Walt Disney Mini Classic John Henry.
  • Steven Spielberg: While Spielberg has mostly associated himself with rival Universal (he got his start there in the 70's, during Disney's Dark Age), he has worked as the executive producer of one of Disney's landmark films, Who Framed Roger Rabbit. He's also a good friend of George Lucas and directed the Indiana Jones movies (which started at Paramount while that studio employed Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg, who took over Disney right after the second Indiana Jones movie hit theaters). Friends with studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg, the two formed DreamWorks in 1994 after Katzenberg walked out of Disney, broke up somewhat 10 years later, and the live-action DreamWorks and Spielberg would enter a 7-year distribution deal with Disney note  which will end with The BFG, which Spielberg is set to direct (no word on whether or not Spielberg would helm any future Indiana Jones movies if rumors of a reboot with Chris Pratt turn out to be true, meaning he may not be done with Disney yet).
  • Steven Tyler: The frontman for the legendary rock/metal band Aerosmith, whose soundtracks are used by Disney in Disney World and on Disney Infinity and Inside Out.
  • Stevie Wermers: Animator at Disney who worked on a few features and directed the Goofy short How To Hook Up Your Home Theater.
  • Sting: Member of The Police who was contracted by Disney to compose music for an animated classic called Empire of the Sun. When this film hit troubled waters and prompted Michael Eisner to threaten a shutdown to the film's directors' faces, it got one of the most noteworthy retoolings in Disney's history, sending a good chunk of its crew down the valley to other projects and dropping almost all of Sting's work except for two songs, though he remained part of what became the Walt Disney Classic The Emperors New Groove.
  • Stuart "Stu" Bloomberg: Major force at ABC during the late 90's, but this was when the network was slumping. In 2001, he got hailed by a San Francisco columnist as the "worst executive of the year" when Millionaire's strength started to really ebb and sent ABC back into the hole, prompting Disney to fire him only days after he signed an expensive contract with them (which they had to eat). ABC's severe slump became one of the factors in Eisner following Bloomberg out the door a few years later.
  • Stuart Buchanan: Disney animation staff member who voiced the Huntsman in Snow White, as well as Goofy on the Mickey Mouse radio show.
  • Sue Bea Montgomery: Manager of post production on The Emperor's New Groove and Lilo & Stitch.
  • Sue Nichols: Helped with visual development on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Susan Arnold: Board member at Disney.
  • Susan Bradley: Titles designer of Hunchback.
  • Susan Edelman: Casting manager on The Rescuers Down Under.
  • Susan Harris: The creator of Disney/Touchstone's classic show The Golden Girls starring Betty White, Bea Arthur and Estelle Getty.
  • Susan Hegarty: The speech and dialect coach for the actors speaking Atlantean (Cree Summer, Leonard Nimoy, Michael J. Fox) in the Disney classic Atlantis The Lost Empire.
  • Susan McKinsey Goldberg: Art director for the Rhapsody in Blue number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Susan O'Day: Chief Information Officer of Disney.
  • Susan Wawer: Assistant to the producers of The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Sussane Blakeslee: Voice actress who plays Maleficent and Lady Tremaine in the Kingdom Hearts series.
  • Sylvia Mattinson: Key assistant animator on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Sylvia Roemer: Animator during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
    T 
  • T. Daniel Hofstedt: Animator who was part of the Disney Renaissance; one of the characters he animated was The Emperor, the Big Good of Mulan.
  • Tab Murphy: Writer who wrote several Disney Renaissance films such as The Hunchback Of Notre Dame.
  • Tad Stones: Creator of Darkwing Duck and Show Runner on shows like Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers, and the Aladdin and Hercules series. Went on to direct two animated Hellboy DTV movies.
  • Tamara Boutcher: Major animator at Disney.
  • Tania Steele: Former vice president and spokesperson of Walt Disney Home Video.
  • Tasso Lappas: Supervising software developer on Tarzan.
  • Ted Berman: One of the co-directors of The Black Cauldron. He had retired from Disney prior to the 1984 management shift, and the film's failure ensured he would stay retired.
  • Ted Kierscey: Effects animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Ted Sears: A key member of Walt's team who was involved with writing.
  • Teddy Newton: A key member of Pixar who directed their Mini Classic Day And Night.
  • Theodore Anthony Lee Ty: Animated Captain Gantu, the Inspector Javert, primary Big Bad and Final Boss in Lilo & Stitch.
  • Terence "Terry" McGovern: The voice of Launchpad McQuack in Ducktales and its spinoff, Darkwing Duck.* Terry Gilkyson: Composer of several songs on projects during Walt's life and Reithermann's tenure.
  • Terry Naughton: One of the story developers for the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Thelma Witmer: Background artist on a multitude of Walt Disney's Cartoon Classics.
  • Theresa Wiseman: One of Jane Porter's father's animators in Tarzan.
  • Thom Enriquez: Directing animator for The Prince And The Pauper.
  • Thomas Cardone: Co-art director on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Thomas Hahn: Pixar employee who worked with the CAPS system on several Disney Renaissance films.
  • Thomas Newman: Cousin of Randy Newman and the composer for Andrew Stanton's Pixar films.
  • Thomas R. Bryant: Provided additional editorial services on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Thomas Schumacher: Musical director at Disney Animation. He transferred to their Broadway productions in the 2000's.
  • Thornton "T.Hee" Hee: Worked for Disney as a caricaturist, stylist, director, and storyman. He co-directed the "Dance of the Hours" segment of Fantasia, directed the Honest John and Gideon sequence in Pinocchio, and worked on story in Make Mine Music.
  • Thurl Ravenscroft: Voice actor who took part in a lot of Disney films such as 101 Dalmatians and Mary Poppins.
  • Tiffany Thornton: Former Disney star.
  • Tim Allen: The voice of Buzz Lightyear in the Toy Story series and the lead in The Santa Clause movies. Also the name of a Disney Animator.
  • Tim Burton: Hired to be part of the concept staff on The Black Cauldron; the experience led to him bolting from Disney before the 1984 management shift. He also made two short films at Disney, Vincent and Frankenweenie, and has directed films for Disney since the early 90's; a live-action version of Dumbo is his current project.
  • Tim Conway: Actor who co-starred with Don Knotts in several Dark Age Disney films.
  • Tim Hodge: Animator during the Disney Renaissance.
  • Tim Mertens: Editor of Wreck-It Ralph.
  • Tim Rice: Associate of Andrew Lloyd Webber who finished up Howard Ashman's work on Aladdin with Alan Menken when Ashman died in pre-production and then became the lyricist for Elton John's songs in The Lion King.
  • Tim Suhrstedt: The cinematographer for Fantasia 2000.
  • Timothy Dalton: One of the James Bond actor's most noteworthy roles past his tenure and outside that franchise was as Neville Sinclair, the Big Bad of The Rocketeer.
  • Toby Bluth: The late brother of Don Bluth, who worked on a handful of Disney Theme Park attractions and a few Disneytoon productions such as Mickey, Donald & Goofy: The Three Musketeers.
  • Tod C. Marsden: Production manager on The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Tod Cooper: Music production supervisor for The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Todd Boekelheide: Music producer and supervisor on Never Cry Wolf.
  • Todd Kurosawa: One of the story developers for the Pomp & Circumstance number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Todd Lieberman: Co-worker of David Hoberman who co-produced The Muppets with him.
  • Todd Scopio: Manager of traditional animation software on Lilo & Stitch.
  • Tom Acosta: One of the editors of Robin Hood.
  • Tom Adair: Composed the songs for Sleeping Beauty.
  • Tom Bancroft: Animator during the Disney Renaissance; one of the characters he animated is Mushu from Mulan.
  • Tom Bergeron: The current host of ABC's Dancing with the Stars and Americas Funniest Home Videos.
  • Tom Brevoort: Executive editor and senior vice president of publishing at Marvel Worldwide.
  • Tom Codrick: One of the art directors on The Sorcerer's Apprentice from Fantasia.
  • Tom Cohen: VP of production at Marvel.
  • Tom Ferriter: Key assistant animator on The Fox And The Hound.
  • Tom Finan: Editor of Hercules and The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Tom Gately: Lead animator of Tanana in Brother Bear.
  • Tom Hanks: Acclaimed actor who has done a lot of movies with Disney such as Splash and the Toy Story series, Hanks is also the first actor to play Walt himself, in 2013's Saving Mr. Banks.
  • Tom Hiddleston: British actor who plays Loki, a primary Big Bad in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Tom Hush: A supervising visual effects animator on Hunchback.
  • Tom Koch: Anchor at the Houston ABC station.
  • Tom Lay: Layout animator during Reithermann's tenure.
  • Tom MacDougall: The music supervisor for Wreck-It Ralph and the music production manager on Tarzan.
  • Tom Myers: A key member of Pixar.
  • Tom Shannon: Assistant head of layout on Atlantis: The Lost Empire.
  • Tom Sito: An animator at Disney.
  • Tom Staggs: Was hired by Disney in 1990, he became the Chief Financial Officer in the mid 2000's, before swapping his job for the theme park side of things; after a long time, he took the President and Chief Operating Officer position after Iger left it vacant following Eisner's ouster (Iger had taken the position originally after Frank Wells died and after Jeffrey Katzenberg and Michael Ovitz couldn't claim it.)
  • Tom Wilhite: Was the studio head until the 1984 management shift. He had to give up his position to Jeffrey Katzenberg.
  • Tom Wolber: The president of Disneyland Paris, aka, Euro Disney.
  • Tommy Sands: Singer who appeared in Babes In Toyland.
  • Tommy Tallarico: Music composer, video game critic/host and cousin of Steven Tyler who composed the music for the Virgin Interactive Disney games in the early 90's.
  • Tone Thyne: Assistant production manager of editorial and story on Hunchback.
  • Tony Anselmo: The current voice of Donald Duck, having been so since 1985, and even before that, animating the duck in Mickey's Christmas Carol and then in The Prince and the Pauper.
  • Tony Bancroft: One of the co-directors of Mulan.
  • Tony Cipriano: A character sculptor on Tarzan.
  • Tony Fucile: The supervising animator for Esmeralda in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Tony L. Marino: Storywriter for Disney; one of his works is Mickey's Christmas Carol.
  • Tony Matthews: Assistant production manager of CGI on Hunchback.
  • Tony Poriazis: Assistant supervisor of digital film printing and opticals on Tarzan.
  • Tony Stanley: Lead animator of Rutt the moose in Brother Bear.
  • Tony To: President of production and development at Lucasfilm.
  • Tracy Balthazor-Flynn: The producer of Disneytoon's classic Planes.
  • Trish Keating: One of the costumers for Never Cry Wolf in 1983.
  • Tyrus Wong: Chinese painter who did the backgrounds for Bambi.
    U 
  • Ugo D'Orsi: One of the animators on The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Uma Thurman: Actress who worked with Quentin Tarantino on Pulp Fiction and the Kill Bill films, all of which were originally distributed by Disney.
    V 
  • Valerie Flueger: The post-production coordinator for The Emperor's New Groove.
  • Vance Gerry: One of the great Disney artists, working on a number of Disney Animated Classics.
  • Vera Pacheco: Clean-Up supervisor on The Emperor's New Groove and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Verna Felton: Voice actress on a number of Disney Classics, including Dumbo, Cinderella, Alice In Wonderland, and Sleeping Beauty.
  • Vicki Case: Administrative manager on production on Tarzan.
  • Vicki Dummer: Executive vice president of Times Square Studios, which manages ABC's daytime shows except for Live with Kelly (Ripa).
  • Victoria Strouse: One of the story writers for Finding Dory.
  • Vin Diesel: Highly paid actor who is the voice of Groot in Guardians of the Galaxy; despite the character's limited dialogue, it's one of Diesel's favorite roles.
  • Vincent Price: The famed horror actor voiced Big Bad Ratigan in The Great Mouse Detective, a role he considered to be his favorite.
  • Vladimir "Bill" Tytla: One of Disney's most skilled animators, doing the animation for Grumpy in Snow White, Chernabog in Fantasia, and Stromboli in Pinocchio. Left Disney in the early 40's to work at other studios like Famous Studios and Terrytoons after he became part of the infamous Disney strike, and he regretted never working with Disney again for the rest of his life.
  • Vivian Hillgrove Gilliam: Dialogue editor on Never Cry Wolf.
    W 
  • Walker Stewart: Associate producer on Never Cry Wolf.
  • Wally Boag: Disneyland performer who was attached to the character of Tigger in Winnie The Pooh And The Blustery Day, but got replaced by Paul Winchell.
  • Walt Kelly: While most known for his Pogo newspaper comics, he got his start working at Disney.
  • Walt Stanchfield: Was part of Disney's masterclasses for years. Much of his advice is included in the Disney book series "Drawn to Life".
  • Walter Afanasieff: Recording arranger who was part of the production of the signature songs that Peabo Bryson sung for Beauty And The Beast and Aladdin.
  • Walter Sheets: Provided orchestrations for Robin Hood.
  • Wanda Mull: One of the two production managers for Walt Disney Picture's first classic, Never Cry Wolf.
  • Warren Spector: The boss of Junction Point Studios and the man behind the Epic Mickey games; the second one, sadly, got Junction Point shut down and led to Spector being fired.
  • Wathel Rogers: Co-created the Audio Animatronic with Roger Broggie.
  • Wayne Allwine: Became the voice of Mickey Mouse in 1983, and held the role up until his death in 2009. His wife was Russi Taylor, Minnie Mouse's voice actress.
  • Wayne Dolcefino: Former investigative reporter for the Houston ABC station, now an employee of the city.
  • Wayne Dyer: The star of the Pixar Mini Classic Day & Night.
  • Wayne Freedman: Major reporter for ABC's San Francisco station.
  • Wayne Knight: Actor who appeared in Hercules, Tarzan and Toy Story 2.
  • Webb Smith: Storyman, he is credited with coming up with the idea of storyboards.
  • Wes Craven: The director of the classic Scream trilogy, which was originally distributed by the Walt Disney company in the 1990's after Jeffrey Katzenberg had made a deal with production company Miramax Films/Dimension Films, who made these movies.
  • Wilfred Jackson: Animator who is one of the co-directors of Lady And The Tramp.
  • Will Finn: Supervising animator for Cogsworth on Beauty and the Beast, Iago on Aladdin and Laverne on The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Co-director on Home on the Range.
  • Will Ryan: Voiced Pete as the Ghost of Christmas Future in Mickey's Christmas Carol and in Ducktales.
  • Wilbert Plijnaar: Animator who was a storyman on How To Hook Up Your Home Theater cartoon.
  • William Cottrell: Animator who was one of the sequence directors on Walt Disney's Signature Classic, Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs.
  • William Garity: Inventor and technician who created the multiplane camera and the stereo system "Fantasound" at Disney.
  • William Perkins: One of the art directors for the Pines of Rome number in Fantasia 2000.
  • William Reeves: One of the original members of Pixar who produced Luxo Jr. alongside Lasseter and assisted with their films up to Ratatouille.
  • Wink Martindale: Game show host who helmed Debt, which was produced by Disney's Buena Vista TV unit.
  • Winston Hibler: Story supervisor for Winnie The Pooh And The Blustery Day.
  • Winton Hoch: Director of photography on the color sequences in The Reluctant Dragon.
    X 
  • Xavier "X" Atencio: Inbetweener and assistant animator on Fantasia. He also wrote the scripts for the original Pirates of the Caribbean and The Haunted Mansion attractions, as well as writing Yo Ho, Yo Ho, a Pirate's Life for Me and Grim Grinning Ghosts.
  • Xiangyuan Jie: Background stylist for Brother Bear.
    Y 
  • Yale Gracey: Layout artist on a lot of Walt Disney's Cartoon Classics.
  • Yefim Bronfman: Played the piano for the Piano Concerto No. 2 number in Fantasia 2000.
  • Ynon Kreiz: Co-chairman and CEO of Maker Studios.
  • Yoko Shimomura: Japanese music composer, she is the person responsible for the music of Kingdom Hearts.
  • Yoshimichi Tamura: The supervising animator for Helga Sinclair in Atlantis The Lost Empire.
    Z 
  • Zack Schwartz: One of the art directors of The Sorcerer's Apprentice in Fantasia.
  • Zachary Levi: Actor who played Flynn Rider/Eugene Fitzherbert in Tangled and Tangled Ever After, and appeared in Thor: The Dark World.
  • Zenia B. Mucha: Executive vice president and chief communications officer at Disney.
  • Zoe Caldwell: The voice of the Grand Councilwoman in Lilo & Stitch.