Creator / Lois Duncan

A prolific young adult writer, well known for her suspense novels. Several of her novels, Hotel for Dogs, I Know What You Did Last Summer, Killing Mr. Griffin, Summer of Fear and Stranger with My Face, have been adapted to film or television, with I Know What You Did Last Summer probably being the best known.

Having been a writer since The '50s, her style has changed much over the years, with some of her earlier books possibly being even a little bit sexist in tone.

Her works include:


Works by Lois Duncan with their own trope pages include:

Other works by Lois Duncan contain examples of:

  • The Ageless: In Locked in Time, Lisette and her children have eternal youth but not eternal life.
  • Bathroom Stall of Overheard Insults: In Lois Duncan's Don't Look Behind You, April/Valerie ducks out of the movie the kids are seeing and visits the bathroom. While she's in there, two girls from the group come in gossiping about her, take the stalls on either side of the one she's in, and continue to talk. Despite the theater only showing one movie and having one set of restrooms, and despite a stall being occupied when they come in right after they saw April/Valerie leave the single theater, it never occurs to them that they might want to be discreet.
  • Burn the Witch!: Averted in Gallows Hill, which accurately depicts hanging as the form of execution favored at the Salem Witch Trials.
  • Grand Theft Me: In Stranger With My Face, identical twin sisters Laurie and Lia are separated in infancy when Laurie is adopted and Lia is not. Lia learns astral projection and uses it to visit Laurie when the girls are seventeen, and teaches Laurie to do it too — in order to trick Laurie into this trope.
  • Heroic B.S.O.D.: One of the young protagonists in Ransom goes into one of these after failing to Save the Villain, imagining that he can still see the villain's screaming face. (An unusual reaction for a thriller hero, perhaps, but after all, this is just a high school kid who's never even seen someone die before.)
  • My Grandson Myself: In Locked in Time, Lisette Berge occasionally explains that the reason older people seem to know her is that she looks exactly like her mother, who was also named Lisette Berge. Lisette's stepdaughter Nora, however, realizes that this can't be the case because "Berge" was supposed to have been Lisette's name from her first marriage, so her mother would have had a different one.
  • Not Growing Up Sucks: Josie in Locked in Time has to live forever as a preteen.
  • Not Himself: In Stranger With My Face, protagonist Laurie's body is stolen by her identical Separated at Birth twin, Lia. The only people who notice that anything's amiss are her adoptive little sister, who spots that Laurie is acting out of character, and Laurie's boyfriend, who knows the whole story and suspects that Lia might have done exactly what she did.
  • Reincarnation: Gallows Hill is of the "past events play out in the present" subtype, but with a strong emphasis on Screw Destiny—the protagonist was one of the girls whose accusations kicked off the Salem witch trials, and she has no intention of repeating the slaughter.
  • Screw Destiny: Gallows Hill looks at this by way of Reincarnation, as the events of the Salem witch trials play out again in the present, but one of the girls whose accusations started the trial refuses to play her part. This time around, she manages to redeem herself and keep everyone alive.
  • Separated at Birth: In Stranger with My Face the main character was adopted at birth, but her parents decided not to take her twin sister because they could sense her evil. The other twin grows up to come and ruin the heroine's life, using, of all things, astral projection.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Creator/LoisDuncan?from=Main.LoisDuncan