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Comic Strip: FoxTrot
aka: Foxtrot
Just a hint of the kind of rivalry and one-ups that are typical of the Fox family.

A comic strip begun in 1988. It centers on the Fox family, a reasonably average 3-child household. Most of the humor comes from the characters or commentary on pop culture, occasionally both at once.

The characters are known for their quirkiness. Peter starves himself for three days before each Thanksgiving and is an overall Big Eater to the extreme. Paige has an imaginary boyfriend named Pierre who factors heavily into her dream life (the strips involving him usually repeat the phrase "Ooh, Pierre!" a lot and end with a panel outside the dream, where Paige is sleeping and Jason has Quincy (a pet iguana) pressed to her lips or the like). Jason plays Dungeons & Dragons with his Black Best Friend Marcus, but their battles are usually against fictitious versions of Paige. Andy, the health-conscious mom tries to sneak tofu into their diet on a regular basis (and doesn't like the thermostat set above freezing). Roger, the techno-fossil dad should never be allowed to plan vacations. Ever. And Jason occasionally draws a comic book called Slug-Man, whose nemesis is the evil Paige-o-Tron. Written and drawn by a genuine nerd, which makes for a lot of in-jokes with Jason's video games, comic books and general geekery.

At the end of 2006, the strip changed to be Sunday Strip-only.

You can find it here.


Contains examples of:

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    A-B 
  • 419 Scam:
    Andy: Oh, look. A Nigerian widow is offering to give me $10 million if I send her $500 for paperwork.
    Roger: Andy, Andy, Andy, just delete the the e-mail. It's a total rip-off.
    Andy: (sarcastic) Gosh, you think so?
    Roger: Yup. I'm getting $20 million from a Ugandan for $350.
    Andy: This is where you say "Just kidding"...
  • Aborted Arc: A two-week 1995 storyline had Paige getting the role of Cleopatra in the school's Antony And Cleopatra play, (with Morton playing Antony, of course). The story ended before the play started, with Roger loudly pointing out Paige's name in the play program to everyone else in the audience. After that strip, the story suddenly ended without any resolution — the main "hook" of the arc being that Paige was apprehensive about playing Cleopatra with Morton Goldthwait as Antony, and it could've been resolved but wasn't.
  • Accidental Aiming Skills: Peter throws a baseball at an apparently far-off tin can sitting on a fence post. In the final panel, we see that he was actually aiming for Roger's much closer glove.
  • The Ace: Grandma.
    • Grandma also ends up deconstructing The Ace a bit in her first appearance when she learns that her Monty Oum levels of awesome had given Andy resentment and a desire to prove herself since the seventh grade.
  • Acid Reflux Nightmare: Andy's food; It's literal Nightmare Fuel.
    • One of the final series of daily strips had Peter and Paige eating tons of gingerbread cookies, resulting in a dream sequence where they became such cookies.
  • Acting Unnatural: Paige and Nicole shoplift a CD. Nicole tells Paige to act naturally. Paige holds her breath. Nicole tells Paige that acting naturally includes breathing. Paige immediately starts loudly panting as Nicole Face Palms and adds "Quietly".
  • Adult Fear: Paige has never been the best babysitter when watching Katie for Ms. O'Dell, but this Trope truly came into play when she dozed off while watching her and Katie started playing with scissors. (Fortunately, Paige woke up before a disaster happened. The fact that Ms. O'Dell still hires her after that is unbelievable.)
  • Affair Hair: Andy thinks she finds one on Roger's jacket during an uncharacteristic fit of jealousy.
  • Affectionate Parody: Of The Boondocks when Jason attempts to fill in for Aaron Mcgruder, despite knowing nothing about "African American Culture" or "Politics".
  • Afraid of Needles: Roger, in a story arc that ran after 9/11, decides to give blood despite being afraid of needles.
  • All-Cheering All the Time: When Paige was trying out for cheerleading, she started using cheers all the time; including giving a (correct) answer to a question on The Scarlet Letter in English class.
    • And when Paige was on the JJV (junior junior varsity) cheer squad, she was sent to cheer at events like chess matches and debates.
  • All Just a Dream: Several strips have the characters dreaming an absurd situation (Jason giving Andy the keys to a fancy car and vacation tickets because she raised his allowance to $15,000 a week — then cut to The Reveal that he's whispering into her ear to manipulate her dream).
  • Aluminum Christmas Trees: A strip from the early '90s has Jason sending a suggestion to Disney about a planned theme park in Virginia. Disney really did have plans to do this at the time.
  • Always Someone Better: Eileen is this to Jason. She seems to trump him at everything (schoolwork, video games, you name it), much to his rage, and his attempts to one-up her always end in disaster. The fact that she has a crush on him only makes it worse.
    • This is sometimes taken to ridiculous extremes. In one strip, Jason found a four leaf clover right before class started, and then gloated to Eileen how it would help him get the highest grade on the math test... And then Eileen found a five leaf clover. In the last panel of the strip, Andy is yelling at Jason because he apparently flunked the test because he missed it, because he was spending the whole time searching for a clover with more leaves.
  • Amusing Injuries: Whenever Paige beats Jason up, he has broken glasses.
  • Analogy Backfire: Peter once used The Metamorphosis as an example to Jason, who had been transformed into a girl (It Was All Just A Dream), commenting on how well things had worked out for Gregor Samsa. Jason says that Gregor starved to death, abandoned by his family. Peter then admits he had never read past the first page of the book, as usual.
  • Animated Actors: Some strips use this premise for Rule of Funny. In one Sunday strip, Peter lights up the grill in Roger-style fashion; in the last panel, Roger walks in, script in hand, and says he was supposed to do that. A scorched Peter says "Happy Father's Day, Dad."
  • Animated Adaptation: This post on the strip's website has drafts for two episodes of one that never got off the ground.
  • Annoying Younger Sibling: Jason to Peter and Paige.
  • Apathetic Teacher: The kids' teachers tend to fall into this mode occasionally.
  • April Fools' Plot: On one April Fools' Day, FoxTrot featured the same punchline as Get Fuzzy and Pearls Before Swine, where one character uses a Ouija board to spell out a message to kick the other character in the shins.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking:
    Andy: Jason, I told you two weeks ago that I didn't want Mortal Karnage II coming into this house. You have no one to blame but yourself.
    Jason: But...but...
    Andy: You're too young for this sort of thing. I mean, look at what it teaches: that human disembowelment is entertainment...that "winners" decapitate their enemies...that carnage is spelled with a "K"...
    Andy: The sad part is, that's the least of my concerns.
    • Attempted in this strip:
      Peter: So, Dad, I was thinking maybe I'd join the Marines.
      Roger: That's nice.
      Peter: And become a vegan.
      Roger: That's nice.
      Peter: And start dating married women.
      Roger: That's nice.
      Peter: And have "666" tattooed on my forehead.
      Roger: That's nice.
      Peter: And stay out an hour past my curfew tonight.
      Roger: Think again, mister.
  • Art Evolution: The art was a lot looser and more detailed in its first couple years. Partway through 1990, it started becoming flatter and more geometric (eyes became circles instead of ovals, Jason's hair strands became equally spaced, the lettering became mono-spaced, etc.) but still had a high attention to detail. Most of the detail was simplified in the latter half of the decade.
  • Asian and Nerdy: Eugene and Phoebe Wu, a brother-sister team whom Jason and Marcus first met in a late-1990s Story Arc involving a science summer camp.
  • Asleep in Class: This happens to Paige often.
  • Author Avatar: Jason is used to project Amend's nerdy nature.
  • Axe Crazy: Paige worries that she'll become this after not only not getting grossed out by dissecting a frog for a science lab, but actually enjoying it. It doesn't help that Jason keeps telling her that.
    • Peter becomes this (with an actual axe!) when Jason and Marcus try to shoot Paige in the face with a bunch of darts with glue on them, but miss and hit Peter instead. At one point while chasing them, he asks if they've ever seen The Shining.
  • Backwards-Firing Gun: Used with a squirt gun in one strip.
  • Bad Boss: JP Pembrook, Roger's boss, who does things like giving himself a giant pay raise while the company's in the red, insisting that the employees make themselves look bad on photo day so he'll look better by comparison, and at one point had Roger be the clown at his son's birthday party — though to be fair, Roger had actually listed "Bozo services" in the qualifications section of his resume (albeit as a joke), and at the end of the arc Pembrook thanks him for a job well done (and begs him not to sue).
  • Batter Up: Peter and Andy in two separate arcs hinted at wanting to bludgeon Roger with one of his golf clubs (or in the case of the latter strip, his newly bought, expensive golf club) when irritated about having to golf with him in torrential rain and in fury about Roger buying a new golf club, respectively.
    • Peter wanted to do it another time too, after Roger only offered to pay him five cents a hole after a particularly grueling job as a caddy.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: After Andy expresses joy at seeing The Passion of the Christ become a success, she says that she wishes that more of the "copycats" in Hollywood would do more religious-themed movies. She then sees a trailer for Alien vs. Predator vs. Jesus.
    • Also, Roger's rants about either gaining a lot of money in regards to developing a website or the excessive costs of christmas cards were the reason why Jason decided to do money-making schemes relating to these things.
  • Bedsheet Ghost: Peter does this and gets an appropriately horrified reaction from his mother, but only because he has cut holes in her new Ralph Lauren sheets.
  • Bedsheet Ladder: Jason places a ladder constructed of tied together handkerchiefs in Quincy's cage, along with a book on lock picking and a few paperclips and hair clips, in an attempt to create plausible deniability when turns the iguana loose in Paige's sleepover.
  • Bedtime Brainwashing: There's one where Jason tries to convince his mother to increase his allowance by getting her to dream of all the ridiculously expensive stuff he's buying for her.
  • Beef Gate: A strip featured Jason trying to fight his way through one of these, only to have his sister discover that if you don't attack, it will let you pass by in peace. "The biggest, most dangerous monster in the whole game, and you're not supposed to take him on?"
  • Berserk Button: Peter punches a guy in the nose for making a tasteless joke about Denise (and gets in trouble for it, naturally).
    • Before Peter went out on his first date with Denise, he was telling one of his friends that he had a date that night, and when his friend jokingly suggested that "she has to be ugly as sin or blind as a bat," Peter crams his entire binder into his mouth.
  • The B Grade: Jason reacts in this manner to A++ grades, as he usually does far better.
  • The Big Easy: After Hurricane Katrina, Andy and Roger recall their honeymoon in New Orleans, showing that they had a much wilder youth than the staid middle-aged couple we see.
  • Big Eater: Peter and Roger are this to extremes, especially when it comes to Thanksgiving ("Plate 559 and feeling fine.") Paige applies when it comes to candy, once managing to eat the insides of a solid chocolate Easter rabbit while leaving the exterior untouched (except for the bottom).
    • A little known fact is that Roger was originally the only Big Eater, but Peter only got into it around the mid-1990's:
    Andy: Well, I'm full.
    Jason: I'm extra full.
    Peter: I'm teetering somewhere between full and sick.
    Roger: So who's ready for some PIE?!
  • Bilingual Bonus: In one arc, Roger is given a cigar branded Aroma del Baño ("Smell of the Bathroom").
  • Bill... Bill... Junk... Bill...: One strip had Paige sorting through the mail, discarding it as nothing but junk except for the last item. The Reveal was that the "junk" was in fact personal letters while the last item was a shopping catalog.
    • In another comic, she sorts through the mail to find letters for herself, gets disappointed that they're all for her parents, and hands the stack to her mother, musing "You grown-ups have it so nice." Andy's reply? "They're called 'bills', Paige."
    • Another strip had Roger and Andy sorting through the mail, commenting: "Junk....junk....junk" until Andy finds a letter which reads "Pay Jason Fox two million dollars in small bills".
    Roger (rolling eyes): Junk...
  • Black Best Friend: Jason's friend Marcus.
  • Blah Blah Blah: Inverted. Paige complains that the day has been boring, and it's just been one "blah" event after another. Cue Peter walking up to hear her actually say "blah blah blah" out of the legitimate context she had been using.
    • This strip was possibly Amend lampshading, as early strips involved Paige's phone conversations literally written as "Blah blah blah blah blah."
  • Bland-Name Product: Occurs quite frequently. Sometimes just a background gag, other times part of the strip's plot. Often times they're mashups of existing names (Doomathon, Riviablo, Zeldakong 64, and the latest one, World of Warquest), inversions (Illustrated Sports), or just outright parodies (Self magazine becomes Myself). Oddly, it uses real products almost as often as fake ones. Amend originally intended to avert this trope so that the humor was more grounded in existing culture, but after seeing products like "Chocolate Frosted Sugar Bombs" in Calvin and Hobbes he concluded that it was just funnier to mash up existing products into silly names.
  • Bowties Are Cool:
    Andy: You wore a bow tie to school?
    Jason: It's common knowledge that people with bow ties appear smarter. Since I already score perfect on all my tests, The only hope I have of improving my grades this year is to boost my "intangibles". I also wore an Albert Einstein mask, until the nose got dented during dodgeball.
    Andy: Jason, I have a meeting with your teacher next week...
    Jason: Actually, she wants to have it sooner, if possible.
  • Brainless Beauty:
    Paige: Nicole, look! Bobby Whitmeyer must've transferred into our history class! He's the hunkiest hunk in the school! He is sooo hot! Sooo babe-like! Sooo to die for!
    Nicole: ...Sooo stupid...
    Paige: Oh, like brains really matter.
    Bobby: Oops — I'm in the wrong room.
    Nicole: In this case they do.
    Paige: AAAA! Come back!
  • Bread, Eggs, Milk, Squick: A family-friendly example from a 1998 strip:
    Paige: After-school sports...Play rehearsals...Upcoming shoe sales...Movie schedules...Phone numbers...E-mail adresses...Cute boys without girlfriends...Anything I need to keep track of, I write in my planner.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: The first strip broke the fourth wall, with the cartoonist yelling at Jason, who was hauling in one of the strip's panels. Since then, the strip hasn't really broken the fourth wall at all, but it has come very close at times:
    • In one of the first Sunday strips, that very strip's splash panel is shown on a newspaper that Roger is reading.
    • Early in the strip's run, the "F" in the strip's splash panel logo featured Quincy resting on it, having already taken a bite out of the "F." In one strip, Peter was blowing on a barbecue grill in the splash panel, and the smoke was drifting in the direction of the logo, resulting in the Quincy on the logo coughing.
    • In one arc, Peter and Jason discuss what would happen if a cartoonist got sick — would he draw stick figures, try to Photoshop the strip, etc.? — and their suggestions are reflected in the final panel.
    • Another example of this is a discussion between Andy and Roger talking about Dilbert, the innovations it came up with, and the fact that people might try to rip it or other successful comics off. Just guess what the last panels tended to be.
    • The last set of dailies consisted of Andy and Roger discussing what would happen if a cartoonist stopped doing dailies, asking how he would thank his fans, etc. This trope even gets lampshaded at one point when Roger suggests that the cartoonist would straight-up thank his fans for their support, and Andy responds, "And break the fourth wall? Not likely."
    • In another arc, Andy was having trouble motivating herself to write her column. In the last strip of the arc, she finally finishes at around midnight, and Roger muses about what might happen if a cartoonist just didn't feel like drawing. Cue the lights turning off.
    • In the aforementioned cookie-nightmare arc, Peter points out that he has it on authority that they'll be back to normal in the next strip. He calls it a "doughus ex machina."
    • The 'ink outage' arc shatters the fourth wall, jumping all the way to Medium Awareness (see below).
  • Breakout Character: Jason, to the point where he appears in nearly every strip to deliver the punchline.
  • Briar Patching: Jason tries this after accidentally crashing the family car, but makes the mistake of listing a punishment he would not like (losing computer time), as a lenient one.
  • Bucket Booby-Trap: Jason has tried this on Paige several times. It never works.
  • Bucket Helmet: One arc had Jason fashioning a make-believe virtual reality helmet out of a bucket.
  • Bullying a Dragon: Peter has often dog-sat for a tiny little dog name Fauntleroy. Despite being only the size of a rat, it not only attacks Peter over and over, but also threatens much bigger dogs.
  • Butt Monkey: The whole family each get these moments, but it's mostly Peter.

    C-D 
  • Call Back: The first vacation arc began Roger excitedly asking the family where they are going, and them unenthusiastically responding that it's Uncle Ralph's cabin, where they've gone camping at for the past 10 years. When Roger asks how they knew, one of them says, "Dad, you're blocking the TV." A year later, a gag repeats the first three panels word-for-word, but the fourth panel has the dad shouting "HAWAII!" and one of the kids saying "Dad, you're blocking the T—WHAT?!?"
    • One early strip has Paige finding her old teddy bear "Grizzly Pooh" in the attic and remembering how she used to use it to harass Jason (the implication being that this is the reason he harasses her nowadays). Almost two decades later, we get a strip where Paige pulls Grizzly Pooh out of the attic again, once more realizing that she put him away because of Jason (though this time it's due to his G.I. Jim spring-loaded stuffed bear traps).
  • Card-Carrying Villain: In-universe, Jason portrays Paige(-O-Tron) in Jason's "Slug-man" comics as the most horrible character possible.
  • Catapult Nightmare: Paige experiences a standard "falling" dream. Midway through, she realizes that it's a dream, and concludes that she'll wake up before hitting the ground. Sure, enough, she does. The last panel has her realizing she was right... as she falls out of bed.
  • Catch-22 Dilemma: A strip where Jason asks Roger if he can hang out with his friend Marcus, and Roger answers "I'm okay with it if your mom is." Then when Jason asks Andy, she says "I'm okay with it if your father is." The comic ends with Jason reading a book on formal logic, trying to figure out whether they actually gave him permission or not. The next comic had Paige asking a similar question and getting the same answers... and she simply interprets that as an okay.
  • Character Blog: Jason has an account on Gocomics, thought it's likely a fan.
    • One strip had Elieen ranting about a girl named Mandy Berwick and that she thinks she's so cool and popular, and then says "Zero matches on Google!". Someone then made this webpage for her.
  • Characterization Marches On: If you read the early comic strips you'd notice that Jason actually seems to act the way a normal kid would about school — that is, not wanting to go. But later on? He loves school. Roger Fox, too, also was shown as being good at chess and wasn't Too Dumb to Live. Of course, the chess part was flanderized within a couple years.
    • An early strip has Jason and Peter playing Dungeons & Dragons, something Peter would never do under normal circumstances.
    • Andy Fox was pretty much flanderized into a Moral Guardian / Granola Girl taken Up to Eleven.
    • A minor one, but Jason's teacher, Ms. O'Malley, was very nice and supportive of Jason's overachieving on his assignments in her first appearances (much to his displeasure). About a year later, she had grown sick of it, with no reason given.
  • Chocolate-Frosted Sugar Bombs: During one shopping trip, Andy asked Jason to pick out one cereal whose first ingredient wasn't sugar. Jason found one cereal whose last ingredient was sugar... because sugar was its only ingredient.
  • Christmas Creep: One comic that ran in November was about a character complaining about how the decorations came out earlier every year, and stores begin pushing holiday merchandise. The punchline was that she was complaining about Valentine's Day decorations, despite it not even being December yet.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Denise suddenly disappeared from the strip in the mid-2000s, although Peter never broke up with her. Oddly, strips after Denise's disappearance show Peter attempting to impress other girls.
    • Virtually all of the supporting cast disappeared from the strip regularly when the strip moved to Sundays. Marcus is the only character outside of the Fox family to appear on a regular basis nowadays.
      • This has begun to reverse itself slightly as of this writing (Sept. 2014), though it still only takes the form of handful of appearances, a far cry from when the show as a daily. After Marcus, Eileen is probably the non-Fox character that has appeared the most, having made several appearances since her reappearance in 2011 (her last appearance prior to this was 2008). Peter's best friend Steve, Paige's admirer Morton, her best friend Nicole, her science teacher Dr. Ting, Jason's teacher Miss O'Malley, and Peter's coach have all shown up in 2014.
    • The iFruit, for a long time. It made a brief appearance again in October 2011, in a strip that paid Homage to Apple founder Steve Jobs, who had recently passed away. Jason took it out of storage in the basement, looked at it sadly, and then turned it on. Andy came up behind him and told him he couldn't turn back the clock, and Jason replied, "I know. Just let me pretend."
  • Cluster F-Bomb: Played with and ultimately subverted: When Jason decided to take over The Boondocks while Aaron McGruder was focusing on making the animated adaptation, one of his ideas was, after hearing that the strip references "N-words", to use several of them. However, Jason doesn't actually know what the N-word actually means, so it shows a lot of N-words, but neither of them are the N-word.
  • Comically Missing the Point:
    • Paige goes to see The Return of the King just because Orlando Bloom is in it, and wishes they would stop wasting time with that "filler stuff about a ring."
    • In one strip, Andy rants about how almost all of that day's comics mention golf in some way, asking "what kind of group mind-rot is at work here?!" She shows the paper to Roger, who remarks, "No kidding! Seven strips don't even mention golf!"
    • Another strip has Peter and Roger watching the Super Bowl, with the rest of the family only ducking in for the commercials.
    Peter: You're supposed to be caring about the GAME!
    Roger: Welcome to Super Ad Sunday, son.
    Peter: What's this here?
    Peter: Um, shouldn't this be a little more realistic?
    Jason: You try painting Vulcan ears with a number two brush.
    • One story arc has Roger buying a mobile phone that isn't "mobile" by any definition of the word: it's almost as large as he is, weighs a ton due to its stainless steel construction, and has to be plugged into a standard electrical outlet to function (though it does come with 12 cigarette lighter adapters if you're on the go).
  • Comically Small Bribe: Roger tips the paperboy with a nickel and then wonders why the paper always ends up on the roof or in the rosebushes.
    • Similarly, Peter Fox, while making a real complex order at a coffee shop, pays him $4.97, to which Peter pays $5.00 and tells him to keep the change. He also admits to Jason that he realizes he was being annoying, which was why he tipped him. Cue the three pennies flying towards his head.
  • Comic-Book Time: Jason, Paige and Peter have been 10, 14 and 16, respectively, for two decades. One early strip featured Roger panicking over his 45th birthday, but later strips have stalled his age at 45 and Andy's at 42.
    • Interestingly, if Peter and Paige had aged from the start of the strip, they'd be almost the same age as their parents by now. Which means Roger and Andy are now part of the generation to which Peter and Paige originally belonged—a phenomenon observed in the comics themselves. One Halloween comic in the 80s had Roger attempt to impersonate Darth Vader, and he mispronounces "Obi-Wan Kenobi" and does the Vulcan salute. Fast forward to 2005, when Revenge of the Sith was released in theaters, Roger tells Jason that he used to have a Darth Vader helmet like the one Jason has back when The Empire Strikes Back came out.
    Roger: *eyeroll* "Search your feelings. You know it to be true."
    Jason: Noooooo!
    • Lampshaded in this post 9/11 strip.
      • And again in the July 25, 2010 strip, when Jason says he's been waiting for Starcraft 2 for 11 years. Andy points out that he's only 10. He replies that he started in the womb.
    • One comic has Peter feeling old because it's 1990 because, as he puts it, "When I was a kid, 1990 was this year way off in the future. Heck, when I was a kid, 1980 was this year way off in the future!" (The joke being that all of the monologue is coming from off-panel until the last panel, when it's revealed that it's Peter talking, not Roger.) Of course, twenty years have passed since that strip was published...
    • It was played with in a strip about the comic's twentieth anniversary where Jason complains that Paige stole his hairpiece again.
    • An odd example happens in an arc where Roger decides to do the Christmas cards himself to surprise Andy. In one strip he finds and prints out a Christmas letter he found on the computer, the gag being that it's hilariously outdated ("Peter stopped using diapers this year..."). However, the fact that it's on the computer suggests that they've had one since Peter was at least a toddler, while this particular strip was printed in the early 2000s, which would date the old letter to the mid 1980s.
  • Compressed Vice: This is Andy's third most prominent character trait (after being a Granola Girl and overprotective mother); past story arcs have seen her becoming obsessed with Titanic and "Bitty Babies" among other things. This actually played to Jason's advantage when they bought an iFruit, since Andy willingly bought the peripherals because of their cute designs ("Banana-orange CD-ROM burners! Aren't they adorable?!")
  • Confusing Multiple Negatives: Paige tricks Peter into driving her to the mall by adding several "not"s to her statement ("Do you not want to take me to the mall?" "Yes." "Do you not not want to take me to the mall?" "No.") She outsmarts him by skipping from four to six "not"s.
  • Contemplating Your Hands: Andy does this (off-panel) while strung out on allergy medication.
  • Content Warnings: A 1997 strip featured the then-recently introduced TV ratings system in the US and lampshaded the Forbidden Fruit affect this has with kids. Jason is shown flipping through the channels and continuing to change each time he came across something labeled TV-PG and TV-14, until he yells, "Is there nothing for a kid to watch when his parents aren't home?" Then he comes across a program rated TV-MA, and says, "Finally."
  • Continuity Nod: "Take our ill-fated attempt at sledding with a drag chute last winter..."
    • "You've swiped my winning Monopoly strategy!"
    • When Jason gets some school supplies he doesn't like from Andy, he asks her if she's still mad about the car he crashed.
    • Early 1999 storyline featured Jason getting frustrated because he couldn't get past the Red Orb Guardian in a video game he's been playing. Paige managed to get past it by NOT attacking him. Few months later, when Andy's mom came to visit for Thanksgiving, Jason asks her if she wants see "his" trick of getting past the Red Orb Guardian.
  • Convenience Store Gift Shopping: A running joke is that Roger and the kids routinely buy Andy useless or inappropriate gifts.
    • Once, for Mother's Day, Roger planned to get her a "Three Stooges" DVD collection, to which Peter objected — but only because he thought it would make his gift of flowers look lame in comparison.
      • On a related note, the kids often give her flowers plucked from her garden.
    • Valentine's Day was usually the worst use of the trope: Roger once gave her a new extension cord, and later a heart-shaped pancake spatula (The latter gift also resulted in Andy not feeding Roger any breakfast, more specifically the pancakes made from the spatula). He once gave her a normal spatula for Valentine's Day, prompting her to ask Roger to consider why none of their children have birthdays in November.
    • Played with in one strip, where he ended up giving Paige, Peter, Andy, and Jason a football, earrings, an electronic voltometer and a pink Backsync Boys sweater respectively because he was tired and mixed up the gift tags.
      • Played with in another strip: Although not technically gifts, Roger ended up giving Peter and Jason Beavis and Butthead stockings even when they never asked for them. Peter and Jason themselves liked the stockings, Andy and Paige did not. When trying to reason with his wife, Andy suggests that she's going to demonstrate her rage in ways he wouldn't want to repeat.
      Jason: [Holding stocking] Wow! I can't believe dad got me a Beavis stocking!
      Peter: [Holding stocking] I can't believe dad got me a Butthead one!
      Peter and Jason: Hnnhuhhunnhuuhnnhunnmmhuuhnnhhnuhnmmm...
      Paige: [covering her ears] They can't believe it?!!??!
      Roger: The lady at the store said they were all they rage.
      Andy: Let me show you rage.
    • Subverted in a strip where Roger mentions that he was planning on giving Andy fluffed earphones for Christmas (even though she wanted a necklace) specifically because she would need them (she was telling Roger the gifts he'll have to give the kids, and they all have to do with loud noise as something in common).
    • Completely averted in this strip.
    • In an earlier strip, Paige and Andy were shopping for bookbags (Paige evidently did not want to go shopping for them). When Andy finds one with The Little Mermaid on it, Paige is practically openly suggesting she get it for Jason, although Andy seemed to know better, causing Paige to curse that she's no fun. It's not made clear as to whether Paige wanted the backpack for herself or whether she did genuinely intend to give Jason the backpack, although solely to humilate him, but what is made clear is that it wouldn't have benefitted or fit Jason in either case.
      • Something similar happened in another strip where Paige went Christmas shopping for various clothing that supposedly were her family, although they were actually intended to be for herself (for one thing, all the items that they have in common are that they are girls' items, and one of the shoes, Andy notes, matches Paige's shoe size).
    • Roger once gave Jason Four Solid Metal Gears and a Walk the Line CD in previous Christmases, apparently because Roger did not understand what Jason meant by Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots or even "Cash".
    • Another rather unpleasant example was when Andy went back-to-school shopping and bought Jason stuff with Barney & Friends pictures on them, believing he'd like them because he liked dinosaurs. Even Roger realized Barney was not the type of dinosaur he'd like.
  • Converse with the Unconscious: Subverted in an early arc where Jason falls off the roof and is taken to the hospital:
    Peter: Jason?... Jason I'm really, really, really sorry.
    Jason: ...I heard that.
    Peter: You're supposed to be asleep!
  • Cool Old Lady: Andy's mother. She seems to excel at everything; among other things, she's such a great cook that Martha Stewart herself is trying to buy one of her recipes, she can match Jason in math skills, shares Paige's love for modern fashion, is just as knowledgeable in sports as Peter, and an article in The New York Times says she's "perfect". Unfortunately, Andy herself has "issues" with her due to feeling inadequate when she's around; her worst case of being a Lethal Chef came from trying to outdo her on Thanksgving. (And as fate would have it, her mother told her that she had gone through the same thing with ''her'' mother.)
  • Cordon Bleugh Chef: Andy's the most competent cook of the family, but she often tries to make vegetarian health food for the others, at which point sanity and skill go out the window. ("She makes a mean, if not downright cruel, tofu casserole.") By which we mean she's taken fruit salad - which does qualify as healthy under normal circumstances - and warped it into something unrecognizable. She does manage to get it right at least once:
    Peter: Mm-mmm. Great pizza, Mom.
    Andy: I'm glad you like it. Bet you can't even tell I made it with nonfat cheese, low-sodium tomato sauce, and meatless tofu pepperoni slices.
    Peter: GAACK!
    Andy: Nice try, Olivier.
  • The Cracker: Jason. Well, rather, he tries to be one, but never actually benefits, and often causes disasters by accident (in one strip, he "killed off the Internet" with a "dinky little program" he had come up with).
  • Crossword Puzzle: Jason has composed several for the sole purpose of insulting Paige.
  • Cut a Slice, Take the Rest: Peter does this with a pizza.
    • Roger, meanwhile, will pour one cup of coffee...for Andy, while he drinks the rest of the pot.
  • Cut Lex Luthor a Check: Jason has been guilty of this through the entire run of the strip. He has come up with several ludicrous schemes to make money, (including thousand-dollar snow dinosaurs, which, you know, would melt come Spring) despite the fact that he has effortlessly built machines and coded programs that could have made him millions had he simply sold them. He once tried to form a one-man corporation, but all he had to show investors was "a dinky little program I wrote for fun." Unfortunately for him and them, the Darth Jason virus did not "kill off interest," it "killed off the Internet." Possibly justified in that, while "book smart" at times, Jason is still a child and thus doesn't always have the best common sense.
    • That, and the fact that, because he is a child, he often puts more effort into frivolities. If the thought ever occurs to him to make money off of the things he produces, it's only so he can buy materials needed to cause greater mischief. For instance, he once caused a computer virus pandemic with a virus called the "I Don't Love You Eileen Jacobson Virus" simply to goad Eileen, which not only caused a crisis but apparently made it obvious who had created it.
  • Cuteness Overload: Andy is prone to this. She goes into fits about Beanie Buddies, and issues squeals of delight on seeing Peter Jackson and - thinking he is a fantasy creature from The Lord of the Rings - wants to know if they make plushies of him.
  • Damned By a Fool's Praise: Paige finds a pair of retro pants and squees over them to Peter, until Roger walks by and mentions he used to have a pair just like that and suggests they should go around dressed the same. Paige's next line to Peter is, "Want some pants?"
  • A Day in Her Apron: Everyone except Andy is a horrible cook, so any attempt to fill in for her in the kitchen ends badly. "Cool! The coffee's on fire!"
    • Peter is shown on occasion to be a perfectly capable cook so long as he's cooking only for himself and no one else.
    • The kids can make cookies. That seems to be all they can make though. And occasionally, Roger will grill something tasty.
  • Dead TV Remote Gag: The batteries are dead and there are no replacements, so Peter wails about how he'll have to watch the same channel all night, at least until his Mom comes in to tell him his bedtime is in ten minutes. "THAT LONG?!"
  • Deep-Immersion Gaming: Jason, of course. Sometimes Peter as well.
  • Delegation Relay: Andy asks Peter to take the garbage. Peter says that Paige owes him a favour so that Andy should ask her. Paige says that Jason owes her a favour so Andy should ask him. Jason says that Peter owes him a favour so Andy should ask him. Andy asks Peter (again) who then willingly takes out the garbage.
  • Denied Food as Punishment: Andy did this to Roger after he was accused of ruining the computer. It turns out that Jason and Paige had done so by spilling a can of pop on it.
    • A Sunday strip had something similar: Andy fed everyone except Roger pancakes, all after giving an extended question along the lines "Would you like some pancakes made from the heart-shaped spatula that your father gave me for Valentine's Day?" as a message that she did not like Roger's gift.
    Andy: Jason, would you like some pancakes made using the spatula your father gave me as my Valentine's Day gift?
    Jason: Sure.
    Andy: Paige, would you like some pancakes made using the spatula your father gave me as my Valentine's Day gift?
    Paige: Ok.
    Andy: Peter, would you like some pancakes made using the spatula your father gave me as my Valentine's Day gift?
    Peter: Yes, please.
    Jason: I'm noticing mom's not offering you any pancakes.
    Roger: I'm noticing that, too.
    Andy: Jason, would you like seconds?
  • Did Not Get the Girl: Happens quite frequently with Peter before he meets Denise.
  • Disabled Love Interest: Denise, who is blind, is a longer-term girlfriend than most of these, although she has disappeared without explanation.
  • Disembodied Eyebrows: Present since the earliest years.
  • Disney Owns This Trope: Jason tried to copyright 1 and 0 so that any song released on the Internet would be pirating his work.
  • Distinguished Gentleman's Pipe: When Jason became a millionaire (by converting all his cash into Turkish lira), he started wandering around in a smoking jacket and puffing on a bubble pipe.
  • Disturbing Statistic: Andy tells Roger one in order to keep him up all night (specifically, that one in five men can expect to get prostate cancer), thereby keeping him from snoring.
  • D.I.Y. Disaster: Roger does this quite often, most of the time because he took a rhetorical question seriously. In one of the later daily storylines, he tries making his own wine, doing things like stomping grapes with Desenex on his feet, and resorting to melting down grape Popsicles to increase the overall amount. In the end, the only compliment he can get out of Andy is that pouring it down the drain made their garbage disposal run better than ever.
  • Dodgy Toupee: There was a weeklong story involving Roger getting himself a bad toupee. His wife Andy is less than pleased:
    Roger: Andy, I can't believe you don't like my hair piece.
    Andy: Did I say I didn't like it?
    Roger: No.
    Andy: Then don't put words in my mouth.
    Roger: Fine. *Silence* Andy, I can't believe you think my toupee looks like roadkill.
    Andy: "Unkempt roadkill."
  • Does This Make Me Look Fat?: In one strip, Andy asked Roger if he thought she could lose some weight and asked him to be honest. He said "Maybe a pound or two" and she collapsed in tears, claiming she had wanted him to be honest, not brutal.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: One arc has Eileen inviting Jason over to play video games with her, but their dialogue at first makes it seem like something else is going on. This starts in the first strip...
    Eileen: Hey, Jason, wanna come over to my house after school?
    Jason: Eileen, get real. You're a girl. I'm a boy. What could we possibly do together that'd be any fun?
    Eileen: (Whispers into Jason's ear)
    Jason: (Suddenly ecstatic) OH MY!
    Eileen: See you after school.
    • ...and continues in the second strip until the punchline.
    Jason: We both know why I'm here, Eileen. I'm a young man with a young man's urges, and you've got what I need. Now enough chit chat. Let's get to the sofa.
    Jason: Finally! A Gamestation 2 controller in my grasp!
    Eileen: Ready to get it on?
  • A Dog Ate My Homework: Or, in this case, an iguana.
  • Dogged Nice Guy: Deconstructed when Paige spends some time worrying about Morton asking her to the dance like he always does, where she will have to turn him down, like she always does. Then she finds out that he asked someone else, and instantly gets upset that he didn't even try. When she finally brings herself to confront him, she says she's offended that he forgot about her, and he says he didn't ask because he remembered.
    Paige: Morton, you're killing my ego.
    Morton: Egos heal.
  • Door Stopper: Jason's Christmas lists. He often indexes them, and even the index often qualifies as a Door Stopper.
    • He once gave Andy his Christmas list in a single envelope, to her surprise. He said it was to save trees. Turned out it was just on floppies.
  • Don't Explain the Joke: Roger's attempt to cheer the kids up during another Horrible Camping Trip with his bad jokes makes it worse in this strip.
  • Double Standard: A very mild, but still noticeable, example. Roger does a lot of dumb things and usually gets not only called on them, but called an idiot too. Andy does almost as many dumb things, but is only called on it about half as often, and usually comes out of it with everything but her pride unscathed. This may have something to do with Roger's near-bulletproof ego; the man continues golfing and playing chess when every member of the family but the iguana has demonstrated higher proficiency than him. One of the few times Andy apologized, for complaining about a vacation the kids enjoyed, she almost immediately after changed the subject to what Roger now owes her.
  • Double Standard: Abuse, Female on Male: Paige beats up Jason regularly and occasionally threatens Peter. Andy has been known to hurt Roger when he does something worse than usual. The worst violence we've seen go the other way is Jason shooting Paige with his nerf guns. Always Played for Laughs.
  • Do Wrong, Right: After Peter gets caught speeding, Andy scolds him, but Roger is more interested in how the car handled.
  • Dream Sequence: Sometimes Andy's terrifying cooking would spark off a pop-culture or literature reference, allowing Amend to pastiche anything from The Polar Express to The Nutcracker to A Christmas Carol. Everyone but Andy eventually visited one of these Elseworlds, which were generally populated by the other family members.
  • Drill Sergeant Nasty: Miss Rockbottom in the coach version of this. Morton serves as one in camp.
  • Drunk with Power: Happens to Peter every time he's in a position of authority, as Andy eventually comes to realize. This almost proved lethal to him in one week long arc when he was made manager of the football team, and the players quickly started to hate him. He himself said that if they weren't venting it on the field, he be dead. (The coach, however, couldn't have been happier; the venting had actually caused them to win three games straight.)
  • Duck Season, Rabbit Season: Peter attempts this in one strip:
    Peter: I think we should rent Austin Powers.
    Jason: I think we should rent Alien: Resurrection.
    Peter: Austin!
    Jason: Alien!
    Peter: Austin!
    Jason: Alien!
    Peter: Alien! So, now you're supposed to say...
    Jason: Ah good, we agree.
    Peter: Dang, that trick always worked for Bugs Bunny.
    • Peter seems to get the last laugh, however. In the final panel, Jason seems to be having a tough time convincing the cashier that he's 18. (Alien: Resurrection is rated R.)
  • Dug Too Deep: One of Jason's ideas for "How Disney could improve its movies" went like this:
    Dwarves: We dig-dig-dig and dig-dig-dig and mine the whole day through...
    Grumpy: Balrog!

    E-F 
  • Early Installment Weirdness: The first few years of the strip look downright bizarre: looser, more sketchy artwork; more reality-based humor and interaction; a somewhat lesser emphasis on "nerd" humor and pop-culture references; and many other minute details that just don't correspond to the way FoxTrot was even in the mid-90s.
  • E = MC Hammer: Perhaps one of the notable aversions. A Running Gag involves Jason using far more complicated mathematical methods on his school tests — and of course, all the advanced math is 100% accurate. It was done to such an extent that the teacher was actually able to recognize his work even when he hadn't actually written his name on there.
  • Egopolis: Jason names everything he creates after himself.
  • Embarrassingly Painful Sunburn: This has happened to Paige a few times. One strip subverted it: Paige woke up in shock to find her skin beet red, but the last panel reveals that Jason had actually painted her while she slept.
    • Perhaps reversed as a Painfully Embarrassing Sunburn, another time Paige grabs a bottle of sunblock and applies it while wearing very dark sunglasses. Whe she is told she left her sunblock in the kitchen, she realizes she slathered herself in mustard.
  • End of Series Awareness: The characters are aware of when Bill Amend decides to switch the strip to Sundays-only.
  • Epic Fail: Jason. When his schemes fail, they fail big. As he puts it, "Why can't my successes ever be as spectacular as my failures?"
    • Roger is even worse. To give one example of how bad he can fail, Jason once programed a computer chess game so that he had a king and fifteen queens and the computer had a king and fifteen pawns; the computer beat him.
  • Everyone Has Standards: In one strip, Jason, disgusted with his mom and dad kissing each other, has a T-Rex ignoring a Triceratops and other potential prey, even a sleeping Brachiosaurus due to disgust at witnessing Roger and Andy kissing, and also even begs for some Velociraptors to put him out of his misery.
  • Exact Words: A frequent source of humor.
    [Peter is doing the dishes]
    Peter: It's unbelievable how much homework I have to do tonight! I can't remember the last time I had this many things due! I don't know what all my teachers were thinking!
    Andy: In the case, Sweetie, why don't I do the dishes?
    [Later on]
    Jason: I thought you had no homework...
    Peter: It's all in how you say it.
    • At one point, Jason is complaining about no one selling the Jpad and it beating the competition of the iPad. Jason then claims that the Jpad would literally smash the iPad. Andy remarks that he misused the word "literally"... until she turns it around and discovers a rock taped on the back of the Jpad.
    • Andy is just as bad, as this strip proves. (In fact, even using the Exact Words argument, she's wrong; lima beans and peas are almost always classified as legumes, not fruits.)
  • Explaining the Soap: Peter gets this reaction (eyes glazing over and repeating "uh-huh") when Paige explains the plot of her favorite soap opera to him, but Paige had exactly the same reaction when Jason explained the premise of Highlander: The Series to her.
  • Exploding Closet: Any time Jason cleans his room.
  • Eye Scream: In one strip, Peter flicks a paper football and winds up lodging it in Paige's eye.
  • The Faceless: Roger's boss, JP Pembrook (originally RT).
  • Faux Horrific: Jason decides to dress up as an iMac for Halloween. When asked why an iMac is scary, he responds, "I HAVE NO FLOPPY DRIVE!" in a scary voice.
    • Also:
      Jason: ...And it's said that if you listen, you can still hear the sound of his beating heart!
      Paige: Lame.
      Jason: ...and there, dangling from the car door's handle, was a bloody metal claw!
      Paige: Yawn.
      Jason: ...it wasn't until they got home that they learned the McCoy Lodge had burned down 25 years ago!
      Paige: Face it, Jason. You can't scare me.
      Jason: ...and when she opened the closet, all the clothes were polyester!
      Paige: AAAA!!!!
      Jason: I just needed to warm up.
      Paige: Tell me it's not true! Tell me it's not true!
  • Filth: Parodied:
    • Peter finds Jason drooling over a centerfold. Of a computer. ("Hey: this video card looks airbrushed!")
    • Andy and Roger once catch him drooling over old National Geographics, and Roger believes it is due to pictures of topless women, when it turns out to be the Apollo 11 issue.
    • Played straight in a 1989 story where Peter receives a swimsuit issue of Sports Illustrated. Peter insists I Read It for the Articles, and Andy suggests that she cut out the swimsuit women, causing Peter to reply "And read it out of context?" Eventually, she just takes it from Peter and burns it (to Roger's horror).
    • Peter puts up a new calendar and spends all afternoon in his room with it. Andy hears about this and approves, saying she also likes to plan things things out. Jason then corrects her, he's just looking at the bikini models for each month.
    Andy: I wish your father would talk to that boy...
    Jason: It'd be pretty easy, he's up there with Peter.
  • Fire-Breathing Diner: Peter spent an entire week having to live down his girlfriend Denise's April Fools' Day joke: a chocolate rabbit filled with hot sauce, which he of course ate in two bites before his mouth was set aflame.
    • Also used in a different comic: Jason is shown adding three full bottles of hot sauce to his tacos. He ends up breathing fire into Andy's face, while remarking how great Novocaine was. (He had paid a visit to the dentist earlier.)
      • In another strip, Jason and Peter are playing a Name That Tune-style game with their tacos ("I can eat this taco with eight squirts of hot sauce." "Eat that taco."), resulting in Peter spraying flames from off-panel.
  • Flat Character: Lampshaded on the back cover of Assorted FoxTrot, which mimics a "Nutrition Content" panel. Ingredients include the various leads and "several artificial characters added for flavor."
  • Flipping the Bird: Peter, watching the catcher's signals in baseball:
    Peter: Two fingers? Shake him off. Three fingers? Shake him off. Two fingers? Shake him off again. Three fingers? Shake him off again. One finger?... Hey, same to you, pal!
  • Food Slap: In an arc centered on Roger attending his college reunion, one strip opens with a woman confirming that he's Roger Fox, from the Delta Theta fraternity, at which point she says "After all these years, I can't believe I found you!" ...And then promptly throws her drink in his face, calling him a pig. And as this is happening, another woman walks up, asking "Roger Fox?"
  • Foreign Sounding Gibberish: Averted. In one strip, Peter accidentally places a phone call to Japan by playing Led Zeppelin with the tones. The symbols shown in the phone's voice bubble are the Japanese characters for "moshi moshi", which is the "hello" phrase commonly used on the phone in that language.
  • Four-Fingered Hands: Played straight.
  • Fourth Wall Portrait: In one strip, three paintings of a bowl of fruit are shown, then one painting in the strip's standard style. In the fifth panel, Andy looks at a bowl of fruit and remarks that Paige's drawings are getting "more and more realistic."
  • Free Prize at the Bottom: Jason comes across this trope on occasion.
  • Funny Answering Machine: Several times, each courtesy of Jason:
    • One 1989 strip had him singing "A Million Bottles of Beer" over the answering machine.
    • "To reach Paige, press 666." This led to a fire-and-brimstone message from their preacher.
    • Another time, he offered a separate number for boys calling to date Paige. It was the number of the insane asylum.
    • Yet another time, he brought the machine up to the shower to record Roger singing in the shower:
    Roger: You did this HOW many weeks ago?!
    • Paige has also done so, usually in the context of begging for a date to prom.
  • Funny Background Event: Quite often. The fog might slowly rise in a picture of San Francisco; letters might change on a sign; et cetera. Another common one was Amend sneaking a caricature of himself and a funny headline onto a newspaper being read by a character.
  • Fun with Acronyms: On two occasions, Jason asked Paige and Peter if they wanted a PB&J sandwich. Paige's sandwich was full of margarine (Jason had said it stood for peanut butter and jelly, but he left out a comma) and Peter's was full of jalapeños.
    • Paige also gets excited that the cafeteria is serving steak, which she explained is written in all-capital letters. Turns out that the lunch ladies are serving "squid tentacles, eggplant, and ketchup".

    G-H 
  • Gag Penis: Peter's entire baseball team is standing before the coach with huge bulges in their pants. The coach Face Palms and says, "Boys, I thought I told you to let the store tell you what cup size you need."
  • Gamer Chick: Eileen becomes this in a few story arcs but never seems to retain it otherwise. There were also a few strips where Paige, oddly enough, gave off this vibe.
  • Gender Bender: Jason attempts to have a Franz Kafka-inspired dream after Peter tells him about The Metamorphosis. However, instead of turning into a bug, Jason wakes up as a miniature Paige. The next two weeks of strips are filled with him experiencing various horrors like shopping with "Big Paige" and Marcus falling in love with him, but when he reaches the point where he actually likes the Backstreet Boys, he finally wakes up, remarking that it's true that you can't die in your dreams.
  • Get Rich Quick Scheme: Roger falls for a get-rich-quick scheme in an infomercial. He pays $200 for a pamphlet supposedly containing information on how to become a millionaire, but it amounts to telling him to invent a product, sell it for $200 and sucker 5,000 people into buying it.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: This page.
  • Ghost Pirate: Jason attempts to invoke this trope at the end of his stint of pretending to be a Pirate in order to irritate Paige, but Paige is Genre Savvy enough to realise what is coming next.
  • Gigantic Gulp:
    • Peter drank a giant-sized "thirty-two-ple" espresso when he needed to cram.
    • In another strip, Jason discovers that Fun-Fun Mountain sells 128-ounce Slurpees.
    • Another strip has Roger filling up a giant coffee mug:
    Andy: Roger, the kids brought you that mug as a joke.
    Roger: I think you just can't stand to see me so happy.
  • Girl in a Box: In one strip, Jason and Marcus hide in Peter's backpack because they don't find fifth grade challenging enough.
  • Girls Have Cooties: Jason, quite frequently, sometimes taking it Up to Eleven, such as when he goes out for ice cream with Eileen and her parents. When she tries some of his sundae, he screams because the spoon touched her lips, and therefore, she has infected his entire sundae with lip cooties, and if he eats it, he'll die. However, as time went on, he got better, eventually admitting he liked Eileen.
    • Marcus had this too, but never quite to the same extent as Jason, and there were always subtle hints that he started liking girls while Jason was still afraid of cooties.
  • Grammar Nazi: Andy, especially in early strips, being an English major and an occasional writer. Peter and Paige often forget that asking her for help with an English paper is a bad idea.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Despite being a Big Eater, Peter never seems to gain weight, and not for lack of trying. He often complains about the fact that he's thin as a rail despite the amount he eats. This has made both his parents envious, usually Roger, but Andy too, who once wore earplugs when he weighed himself and insisted he lock the door to the bathroom while he did so. After he made a Dagwood Sandwich and huge chocolate shake in order to gain weight for the swimsuit season (and Andy dumped the shake over his head) he mused, "Nobody ever feels sorry for the skinny."
  • Gretzky Has the Ball: Played with, and sort of the Trope Namer.
    Jason: Joe Montana fades back to pass. He sees Jerry Rice open in the end zone!
    Peter: Wrong team.
    Jason: He sees Derrick Thomas open in the end zone!
    Peter: Wrong position.
    Jason: He sees Wayne Gretzky open in the end zone!
    Peter: Wrong sport. Moron.
    Peter: (picks up a piece of computer equipment) So is this a modem or a hard drive?
    • In another comic, Jason predicts that the Orioles will win the Super Bowl, then asks "Which team has Charles Barkley?"
    • Peter has to take Jason to a basketball game. Jason is angry at first over having to watch a bunch of eight-foot-tall geeks kicking balls through goalposts for two hours, then asks which guy is the quarterback.
    • Andy once asked what inning was it during a football game.
  • Grilling Pyrotechnics: A Running Gag with Roger.
    • At least one strip had Jason sabotaging Roger's attempt to grill hot dogs by having his toys, while reenacting Saving Private Ryan, melt a soldier on the grill.
    • One strip also says that days when Roger is grilling on summer vacation are the closest thing to an exception to the usual rule of Jason having to go outside to get fresh air (namely because Roger's attempts at grilling result in the destruction of fresh air).
  • Groin Attack: Occurs to Peter when trying to slide across the hood of his car, Dukes Of Hazzard style. His underwear snags on the wiper blade, causing this trope.
  • Grounded Forever: Peter has been grounded for intervals of decades, centuries, or life. It never seems to stick of course. (Of course, in one two week arc where he was grounded for only two weeks, Andy reduced it to one, because having him stay in the house was proving to be a cruel punishment for the rest of the family, he was so annoying.)
  • Halfway Plot Switch: A few arcs had these:
    • An arc had Roger attending an out-of-state business meeting, then returning home to find Jason needs stitches due to a Hot Wheels incident. After two days devoted to Jason and his stitches, Roger quits work to spend more time with his family. He then gets conned into buying a $199.99 booklet on making money (which turns out to be worthless) and then tries to make money selling stocks on the internet. After losing $3,000 in the second hour, he sells the family computer and they buy an iFruit.
    • A 1995 arc began with Roger entering Jason in a chess contest. Thereafter, Jason wins $50 in the contest, taunts his siblings with it, then eventually spends it on 5,000 gumballs, which he eats in one weekend, then he gets a cavity, eventually ending up with him going to the dentist.
  • Headphones Equal Isolation: In one strip, Andy appears to be scolding Peter, but her dialogue is represented as tiny squiggles. In the last panel, she yanks off his (previously unseen) headphones and screams, "AND TAKE OFF THIS STUPID WALKMAN!"
    • Also, the kids give Andy a Walkman and then proceed to ask her questions like "Tell me if it's not all right for me to blow off my homework tonight" while she is plugged in.
  • Hate Fic/Revenge Fic: In-Universe, basically every single on of Jason's creative endeavors is one of these towards Paige, turning her into a horrible monster or having everyone in the world treat her with the same terror and revulsion he feels towards her. The sole exception in the strip's entire run seems to be his How the Grinch Stole Christmas! parody, which focused on Andy instead and had Paige as one of the victims of her Grinchy ways alongside Peter and Jason.
  • Heads Tails Edge: Peter, trying to decide on a prom date when caught in a Love Triangle among Denise and a new character named Mindy. (She's eventually set up with Peter's friend Steve, and then never heard of again.)
    Peter: It doesn't count. It landed on a crumb.
  • Heart Symbol: In one strip, Morton texts Paige, asking her to simplify "2i < 6u". Think about it.
  • Helium Speech: In one strip, Jason imagines himself floating to the ceiling after inhaling helium, then expresses his disappointment (in curly letters) that it only makes his voice funny.
  • Helping Granny Cross the Street: Conversed and parodied in an arc where Andy bans Peter from playing violent video games and instead gives him a game called Nice City (as opposed to Vice City). At one point he scores points for helping an old lady across the street.
    • Though he had difficulties with this game, as his video game instincts told him to beat up the old ladies before one of his siblings pointed out the problem with that.
  • Her Code Name Was Mary Sue: Trope Namer, inspired by Roger's novel-writing Story Arc "His Code Name Was the Fox," which portrayed him as a Gary Stu in a bad Tuxedo and Martini spy novel that he wrote. Also an example of Stylistic Suck.
    • Also Bill Amend himself. Newspapers read by the characters frequently feature such headlines as "Cartoonist Jams With Springsteen" or "Cartoonist Invited To Speak At U.N."
    • Jason's "Slug-Man" comics are an inversion of the trope, as they are mainly designed to make Paige(-o-Tron) into as horrible a figure as possible.
    • Another example from Jason came when the remastered Star Wars movies came out in the late 90s. Jason sent a letter to Lucasfilm, asking them to edit him into the film — as a Villain Sue counterpart to Luke who ends up converting to the dark side.
  • Hide And No Seek: Usually used by Peter or Paige to get Jason out of the way.
  • Hitler Ate Sugar: Done by Andy, believe it or not. When Peter's baseball team loses a bet with the soccer team and has to shave his head (see Humiliating Wager, below), Andy sobs that he "looks like a skinhead" and that "people will think you're a Nazi!" (Peter's reply is that nobody calls Michael Jordan a Nazi, probably not the best comparison.)
  • Hollywood New England: One strip had Peter and Jason deciding to adopt an exaggerated Boston accent while eating clam chowder, with Peter even saying "pahk the cah in the Hahvahd Yahd" in the throwaway panels. They stop upon threat of violence from Paige.
  • Horrible Camping Trip: Roger at one point takes them on one of these to a place called Skeeter Falls.
    • Roger's annual camping trip is a Running Gag for the strip; though the locations may differ, the results are the same.
    • Subverted once when the family's next Horrible Camping Trip was instead a trip to Fun-Fun Island (Although the parents weren't too happy).
    • And subverted again in an early arc where they go to Hawaii.
    • Zig-zagged in the Caribbean resort arc, as most of the family enjoyed it even though the place turned out to be every possible kind of fake and cheap: It was actually housed in a giant building with an artificial beach hundreds of miles from any ocean, the staff all had fake Jamaican accents, the "steel drums" were a synthesizer (whose player accidentally hits the button for bagpipes instead), and the "limbo suite" is so named because of its low ceiling. (Roger had taken the "How low can you go" sales pitch to mean it was a low rate.) Andy was the only one dissatisfied with the trip.
    • Roger turns out to have a Freudian Excuse, as revealed in this strip.
  • How the Character Stole Christmas: Jason wrote a pastiche of How the Grinch Stole Christmas! with his mom as the title character. It ends up being an inversion of the original story, where she replaces lavish gifts with "useful" items such as novels, health food and clothing. She then retracts after the "kids down in Kidville" complain.
  • Human Popsicle: Comically invoked in one strip where Jason manages to spray water from a supersoaker his dad got him for Christmas at him when he was shoveling the driveway, causing Andy, who is frozen with him, to go "'Don't give him a super-soaker for christmas' I said. 'But he really wants one.' You said."
    • And in another where Peter is practicing baseball in the backyard during winter. He used heat lamps to keep the backyard snow-free, but then knocked a foul ball off one and ended up frozen.
  • Humiliating Wager: Peter has to shave his head after the baseball team loses a bet with the soccer team about who could eat the most burgers at White Castle.
  • Hummer Dinger: One storyline had a storyline where Roger went to a "Humbler" dealership. Said vehicle turns out to be comically huge, have a gas mileage of 25 meters per gallon, and is hinted to be so heavy that it affects the orbit of the Sun.
  • Hypocrite: Andy has a terrible addiction to candy and regularly eats all of it during Halloween and Easter. And she wonders why her kids say bad things about her tofu and eggplant casserole.
    • She also regularly condemns her children playing violent videogames, but spent an entire early arc being addicted to one of Jason's games.
  • Hypocritical Humor: In one series of strips, Peter gets in trouble for punching out another student; when Denise finds out, she chews him out for acting like he's in a Clint Eastwood movie or something. When she learns that Peter punched the guy for insulting her, she says "And you just punched him in the nose?!" and Peter, rolling his eyes, responds "Look, Clint, I..."
    • Roger is like this in a very early Sunday strip. He wakes the kids up for church, and they're upset, wanting to go back to sleep. Roger scolds them, telling them, "Someday you'll realize that some things are more improtant than sleep!" What does he do when they get to church? He falls asleep.

    I-J 
  • I Can Explain: Happens at least twice when Peter confesses to a transgression that he erroneously believes Andy already knows about:
    • In the aforementioned Berserk Button plot mentioned above, Peter is told a call will be made to his parents:
      Peter (worried): Hi.
      Andy: Peter, the school called me today.
      Peter: Look, I know what you're going to say. Fighting is wrong. I know that. It was a momentary lapse. It won't happen again. I'll have to serve detention, but Mr. Krimpshaw says he may not put it on my permanent record. I'm sorry, I'm sorry, I'm sorry. I was an idiot, all right?!
      Andy: They called to say someone found your wallet.
      Peter (thinking): "Was" nothing.
      Andy: Now, then. What's all this about a fight?...
    • In a one-off strip, Andy tells Peter she was cleaning under his bed and found something. Peter rapidly stammers that he only has those magazines for the articles... until Andy reveals that she was talking about his old baseball glove, which she then produces.
      Andy: Now, what's this about magazines?
      Peter: (tugging at his collar) You mean my Scientific American collection?
  • Idea Bulb: Parodied in one strip where Jason takes every bulb in the house and uses them to make a mobile of light bulbs over his desk, saying that it "enhances my aura of creative genius."
    • In another strip, Paige is struggling with her essay on Thomas Edison when one of these flashes above her head. It turned out to be Roger who's holding a literal bulb up because he wants to impress her with all his Edison knowledge.
  • I Did What I Had to Do: In an Imagine Spot, Paige tells a frog that she's dissecting that she's dissecting him For Science!, then is grabbed by a larger frog, who tells her the same thing. Arguably deconstructed, since it shows that it's easier to make rationalizations like that when you don't end up paying the price.
  • If It Tastes Bad, It Must Be Good for You: Andy is such a health food nut, and even some real life equivalents would find her dishes to be Nausea Fuel. (Beet and Cheese Subs, Curry Loaf, Corn on the Cob in a Hot Dog Bun, Lima Bean pizza?) Often played for kicks though, due to the Rule of Funny. This was almost the Trope Namer for this very trope as one strip calls it "The irony of health food."
  • If You Die, I Call Your Stuff: Occurs in one arc where Jason "coaches" Peter on football in 95-degree heat: "You know, it occurs to me that if you die, I'll get your stereo." "OK, OK, I'll pay you two dollars! Just cool it with these push-up drills!"
  • I Just Want to Be Special: Played for Laughs with Jason and his constant desire for superpowers, such as standing out under a full moon after being nipped on the finger by a chihuahua in case it was a baby werewolf.
  • I'll Take Two Beers Too: Peter and Denise at a fast food restaurant. Peter orders "two burgers, two large fries, two chocolate shakes", Denise objects, saying she wanted a vanilla shake, and Peter says he hasn't started ordering for her yet.
  • Imagine the Audience Naked: Turns out not to be useful advice to give to Paige. "Yowza! It's like a Chippendales show!"
  • Incendiary Exponent: Basically any time Roger (and in some cases, Peter) attempts to light the grill for a barbecue.
  • Informed Attribute: Jason and Peter are supposed to be skinny, and Roger is supposed to be overweight, but all three appear to be roughly the same build as all the other characters.
    • It's slightly more noticeable when their shirts are off. Some of it could be chalked up to Peter's baggy sweatshirt.
  • Innocent Swearing: In one episode, Paige watches Jerzy Spaniel while babysitting. Of course, the kid hears the word and starts repeating it. In the epilogue, Paige reports that the mother said kids always hear bad words and repeat them, but if you don't use them often or attach special significance to them, they'll eventually drop it. Then they discussed watching Jerzy Spaniel while babysitting...
  • Instant A.I., Just Add Water: The iFruit can speak, fantasize about sexy video game characters, demand hugs, and taunt those who refuse to play games against it. It also has, at times, a rather disturbing ability to deny user control and even control its own environment, changing not only its own wallpaper, but the wallpaper in the computer room.
    • One comic also featured a digital camera that supposedly had some sort of AI to guarantee decent pictures. When Roger tried to use it, it asked to be handed to someone who knows what he's doing, and retracted all the buttons.
    • Various other talking, seemingly intelligent electronic devices: A electronic chess set in the early days, a computer at Roger's workplace ("Can I get you some coffee? ...Oh wait, I don't have arms."), and a Tamagrouchy, a sentient (and aptly-named) knockoff of a Tamagotchi that Roger got Paige for cheap at the height of the real thing's popularity.
  • Insufferable Genius: Eugene Wu, mostly because he's an arrogant Jerkass who feels the need to rub his intelligence in everyone's faces. His sister Phoebe is smarter, but she's actually nice and well-adjusted. Jason has moments of this as well.
  • Insult Misfire: Jason tries to farm gold in a video game and sell it on eBay:
    Peter: I guess there's an idiot born every minute.
    Jason: Don't call my future customers idiots.
    Peter: I wasn't referring to your customers.
    • In one strip, Peter goes to a Fast Food Restaurant, only to end up screamed at by the order-taker about how there are no more Bitty Babies as well as insulted. Peter then tries to tell the order-taker that he was only there to get a cheeseburger, to which the order taker reopens the channel and apologizes, explaining that it's been a rough week.
  • Intercontinuity Crossover: In-Universe example: One strip had a TV Christmas special playing called "Rudolph's The Lord of the Rings Christmas" where, just as the title implied, has Hermie, Rudolph, and Clarence being dispatched by the Elf enforcer to Rivendell to meet up with Elrond for a council (presumably the same one Elrond held regarding the One Ring). When it cut to a commercial break, Peter shouted "Hey Jason, they used your idea!"
  • The Internet Is for Porn: From the series of strips where they start using Compunet:
    Jason: Ms. October sure has big hooters.
    Marcus: I wonder if that affects download time.
  • Intimidating Revenue Service: Every April, without fail, Roger waits until the last minute to file his tax returns by himself (or try to) and it turns into a nightmare for him. He never learns, apparently. Without a doubt, his worst attempt was the time he tried to use the computer to do them; a bad idea for someone who has a hard time simply figuring out how to use a mouse.
    • He actually tried it twice. To be fair, the first time would have worked... had Jason not deleted the file (due to its size) to make space for a Moon Rover simulator. He didn't know that the file was related to taxes, but randomly deleting files doesn't make it that much better.
  • Invisible Parents: Denise's parents, who only appear in one arc and never on-screen.
  • iProduct: The iFruit, of course. Also parodied in one arc where Jason tries to one-up the iPod by making a jPod.
  • I Read It for the Articles:
    Andy: Peter, I found something interesting under your mattress.
    Peter: Mom, I only read those magazines for the articles! I swear!
    Andy: I meant this baseball mitt.
    Peter: Oh. That's how you break it in.
    Andy: Now, about those magazines...
    Peter: (makes an Oh, Crap face) You mean my Scientific American collection?
    • And again when Peter claims he bought the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition for an article on marlin fishing off Bora Bora. Andy offers to cut it out of the magazine for him. Peter's response: "And read it out of context?"
  • Ironic Echo: Practically every other punchline.
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks: In-universe example. Jason worries about the good public reception of the Lord of the Rings movies. Although he is only concerned that enjoying Tolkien's trilogy will make it (gasp!) mainstream to be a nerd, therefore depriving people like himself of their "special" status.
    • Also, a very early story arc had him upset when his mom bought him a Batman lunchbox from the 1989 film, because the movie had already been out for a few months and he didn't want to be seen as a bandwagon-jumper.
    • In a very early week-long arc, Jason was obsessed about The Simpsons, but in the last strip, thought that "the fad was passé" because Paige liked it. (This was when the show was on opposite Murder, She Wrote by the way. It seemed Jason, like everyone else at the time who thought it was just a fad, was way off.)
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks: Played with in-universe. Jason was tired of waiting for the sequel to Myst to come out, so he created his own sequel. He showed his brother his game, "Here's the observatory and here's the library..." and Peter said, "Wait, these are all the same levels of the first game. What makes this different?" The computer then beeped and said, "Warning, velociraptor approaching." Jason replied, "You have to solve the puzzles a little faster now."
  • Jerk Ass: Jason, throughout the comic strips regular storylines, could be downright unlikeable.
    • Every member of the family has its moments, actually, with Paige and Andy also being downright nasty a few times.
  • Just Here For Orlando Bloom: In-Universe. Paige's reason for seeing The Return of the King.
  • Just Like Making Love: Used in an early strip, with Roger getting glared at by his wife after trying to lecture his son... on the fine art of lighting a fire.
  • Just One More Level: In one arc, Jason tries to convince his mom that she will like Doomathon II after playing it. Although she is apprehensive at first, she quickly falls victim to this trope.

    K-L 
  • Kissing In A Tree: Jason's classmates sing this to him after Eileen gets Jason's love note and thinks it was for her.
  • Klatchian Coffee: Any of Peter's coffee based drinks.
    • Also, in one strip, Roger tells Jason to make the coffee strong. He makes it so strong, Roger can't let go of the ceiling.
  • Know Your Vines: Jason and Marcus get sent on a night hike through poison ivy as part of an Escalating War of pranks with the girls. They compound the folly by deciding to use the leaves as camouflage.
  • Lampshade Hanging crossing over into Better Than a Bare Bulb territory: Plenty of it. For instance, in one of the aforementioned Elseworld trips, Paige finds herself transported into a pastiche of The Nutcracker, then asks if anyone could imagine such a trick being attempted in a comic strip.
    • Also notice how many of the tropes listed here are shown to have lampshaded examples.
  • Lampshade Wearing: Parodied. Upon seeing that his parents are snoozing on the sofa on New Year's Eve, Jason prompts them to whoop it up. They do so by donning lampshades, then falling right back asleep.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: Andy and Roger did this back in 2006 during the final 6 daily strips; they sit at the table while casually discussing an article about a cartoonist announcing that he'll now only do Sunday strips instead of doing 7 a week, as he'd previously been doing.
  • Lethal Chef: Everybody's had trouble in the kitchen at some point or another. Paige's approach to cleaning turkey is sticking it in the oven and putting it on "clean", and she once used Diet Pepsi in making Christmas cookies because she couldn't find the baking soda; Roger has trouble with scrambled eggs; Peter has tried defrosting frozen orange juice with a frying pan; Jason has managed to set coffee on fire somehow... Andy usually averts this (albeit with other cooking issues), but even she burned a Thanksgiving dinner when trying to outdo her mom.
    • Peter has been shown several times to be a perfectly competent cook as long as he's making food for himself and no one else.
  • Let's Have Another Baby: Andy goes through a mid-life crisis of sorts and suggests this. Roger immediately tries to talk her out of it... only to start to recant when she suggests getting a Ferrari instead.
  • Lipstick and Load Montage: Done in a Sunday strip that apparently shows Paige putting on her make-up getting ready to go out. The last panel reveals it to actually be a grounded Peter trying to sneak out of the house disguised as Paige.
  • Logic Bomb: In one strip, Paige asks both parents if Nicole can stay over, and each tells her to ask the other, with her concluding that it's okay for Nicole to come over. Jason got the same answers from asking both parents, but instead consulted logic books.
  • Long List: Peter, after discovering that all of his clothes smell like Paige's perfumes:
    Peter: You want to explain why my jean jacket smells like Giorgio perfume?
    Paige: Beats me.
    Peter: Or why my red sweater smells like Coco? Or why my pink shirt smells like Opium? Or why my blue t-shirt smells like Liz Claiborne?
    Paige: Peter, will you calm down?!
    Peter: Or why my scarf smells like Obsession? Or why my sweats smell like Lauren? Or why my green windbreaker smells like Colors? Or why my favorite sweatshirt smells like... like...
    Jason: White Linen? [beat] ...What? It was just a lucky guess. Really. Honest. Crud.
    • Also taken quite literally in a few strips, such as Jason writing his Christmas lists, Jason comically forgetting to specify essay length with several piles of presumed essay pages, and annual strips of Roger having several Tax-returns to fill out (with one even making a pun out of the 1040 form and his having 1,040 forms to fill out.).
  • Long-Lost Uncle Aesop: Andy's unnamed mother, although appearing more than most examples of this trope, hasn't appeared in the strip since 1999.
  • Look Behind You: Paige managed to trick an ice cream vendor at the Zoo this way in order to distract him long enough to have her ice cream cone be given a huge amount of swirls. He says afterwards that she pulled the same trick on him the previous summer.
  • Loophole Abuse: The kids try this all the time.
    • Peter combines this trope with Cut a Slice, Take the Rest and Exact Words in one strip. He tells Andy that he and Jason only had "one slice each" at the pizza parlor before dinner, which translated to one pizza cut in half (coincidentally, on a night when Andy happened to be making "curry loaf" for dinner). Afterwards, Peter tells Jason "The Book of Peter, verse 1: Know thy loopholes."
      • Paige does a similar one: her mother says she can only have one scoop of ice cream before dinner, so she jams a spoon into the ice cream tub and pulls out its entire contents as a single cylindrical "scoop."
      "One scoop. You're my witness."
      • The above-mentioned ice-cream gag was also recycled in a later strip, except it used Jason and Halloween candy, and his tactics involved keeping his bag of Halloween candy next to the radiator so it would all fuse together into "one piece."
    • Another common gag has Peter getting permission to eat "the last" of some snack food item, and proceeding to eat through several boxes in order to get to the "last" one.
    • The kids buy Andy a Walkman, and while Andy is listening to it and is oblivious to what's going on around her...
      Peter: Tell me if it's not okay for me to blow off homework tonight.
      Paige: (pointing to catalog) Tell me if it's not okay for me to order this sweater on your credit card.
      Jason: Tell me if it's not okay for me to eat this box of Ho-Ho's before dinner.
    • Jason tries it a lot, but doesn't always succeed, as when he argues that "just a sec" can also refer to a parsec. (He was playing a racing game.)
      Jason: So far I've only driven 46 miles out of the 19.2 trillion you approved.
    • Paige tried this as well:
      Paige: Mom, can you read my book report?
      Andy: I'd be happy to, Paige.
      Book Report: Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms is about zgwqolm and epxmhjdkav. The central character is Dgejhgp and the main themes are yqmnezxprb and tthja nwvkjd.
      Paige: (holds up a pen) Feel free to fix any typos, by the way.
      Andy: Nice try.
    • Peter's three-page book report on The Great Gatsby:
      Page 1: The Great Gatsby
      Page 2: is about a guy
      Page 3: named Gatsby.
      Peter: They never specified font size.
  • Lots of Luggage: In one strip, Roger laughs at the amount of gear Jason and Peter are bringing on the trip, saying that if they brought much more there wouldn't be room for them in the car. Obvious to the reader is the fact that that's exactly what they're trying to achieve (Fox family camping trips never end well), and in fact most of their luggage is filled with styrofoam.
    Peter: Out of curiosity, how much more?
    Jason: I'm running low on duffel bags.
  • Loud of War: In one strip, Paige is annoyed at the sounds of Jason making sweet talk to Quincy in the next room, and eventually yells at him. The last panel shows that Jason has been using a megaphone pointed at her room the whole time.
  • Love Letter Lunacy: Peter (in one of his more Jerkass moments) leaves notes in Paige's locker, pretending to be a secret admirer.
    • In another series of strips, Jason writes his mother a particularly mushy Mother's Day note, hoping to butter her up before asking for a new computer. Unfortunately, he hides it in his math book, and both he and Eileen accidentally take each other's math books home...
    • There was a Sunday Strip where Jason and Roger's Valentine's Day cards got swapped by mistake. Andy ended up getting one with a bunch of juvenile Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue variations ("Roses are red, daffodils gold; you might look better if you scraped off that mold."), with Roger beaming the whole time, unaware of the switch. The last panel shows Paige reading from the other Valentine, which is appropriately sappy ("Your kisses sweet, like angel's song"), as Jason mutters "Uh oh..." and we hear Roger shouting in pain in the background.

    M-N 
  • Making a Spectacle of Yourself: In one strip, Peter buys a pair of sunglasses with one square lens and one triangular one simply for the sake of having a pair that no one else will borrow.
  • Man in a Bikini: When Peter and Paige have to clean the basement during spring break, Peter complains that MTV says he should be cavorting with girls in bikinis instead of cleaning. Andy retaliates by sending Jason down in a bikini, telling Peter to squint.
  • Man Made House Flood: Roger once invoked this trope while filling in for Andy (see Walking Techbane). Jason and Marcus also did the same by stapling paper bats to the water heater.
  • Masochist's Meal: There are a number of strips involving Peter accepting dares to put a ridiculous amount of Tabasco sauce on his Mexican food (and suffering the consequences).
  • Medium Awareness: Occasionally the characters will refer to the fact that they're in a comic strip. Notably, the week-long arc caused by an ink outage.
    Jason: I called Funky Winkerbean. He said the ink's out over the entire grid.
    • Incidentally, that arc ran shortly after the Northeast Blackout of 2003.
    • Don't forget this strip!.
    • The 20th anniversary strip from 2008 combined medium awareness with a lampshading of Comic-Book Time. Roger spends most of the strip trying to convince Andy that a 20th anniversary means they're still young, especially compared to other cartoon families like the Bumsteads and Pattersons who've been around a lot longer. In the last panel, a balding Jason comes in complaining that Paige stole his hairpiece.
  • Meet Your Early Installment Weirdness: The strip's 25th anniversary special involved Peter looking over photos of panels from the comic's first year and commenting on how odd the early character designs were.
    "The box says 25 years ago, which is weird because I'm only 16."
  • Mega Meal Challenge: The first time Jason and Eileen go on a date (not that Jason would ever call it that), she convinces him to order a ridiculously huge bowl of ice cream bigger than his head.
  • Men Can't Keep House: When Andy leaves the house for a week, Roger somehow manages to flood the house about waist-deep in water after attempting to use the dishwasher.
  • Merchandise-Driven: Parodied in one arc in which Jason creates a comic strip for his school newspaper (which is never shown on screen, and eventually gets pulled due to censorship)
    Jason: Feast your eyes on the world's next multi-bijillonaire!
    Andy: Oh?
    Jason: My school is starting a monthly newspaper and I volunteered to do a comic strip.
    Andy: Jason, "volunteering" means you're doing it for free.
    Jason: I'm only doing the strip for free.
    Andy: Well, what else is there?
    Jason: A little thing called 'merchandising'. Ever hear of Garfield?
    Andy: You know, just for once I'd like to be able to attend a PTA meeting...
  • Millennium Bug: Referenced a few times in the run-up to the big day; the actual strip for January 1, 2000 has the strip itself being affected, with Peter and Jason reverting to period clothing, Peter's soda turning into a milk bottle, and Jason reading an article on "what those Wright brothers are up to".
  • Monkeys on a Typewriter: Peter reasons that, if monkeys can randomly write Hamlet, surely he can use a random number generator to write a book report about Hamlet. When Paige laughs at the gibberish on one page, Peter comments that was his attempt at the essay.
  • Moral Myopia: Denise does not find violence an acceptable way to solve problems... except when someone has insulted her.
    • Lampshaded when she chews Peter out, saying "This is Real Life, not a Clint Eastwood movie!"; when he says he punched the guy for insulting her, she responds "And you JUST punched him?!", prompting Peter to roll his eyes and say "Look, Clint..."
  • Mountain of Food: In the arc in which Jason is Scrooge and Peter the Spirit of Christmas Present, Peter explains the conspicuous lack of a mountain of food as having had a light lunch.
  • Mouthful of Pi: Paige is doing a geometry problem and asks jason what pi is. Jason starts reciting. The last panel shows him still reciting at dinner time, with Paige asking Andy how it's her fault.
    • Another strip has Jason and Marcus playing football, being unable to hike the ball since they decided to hike it on pi.
  • Mundane Ghost Story: Jason does to this Paige. After his conventional ghost stories fail to scare her, he tells her one that ends with "...and when she opened the closet, all the clothes were polyester!".
  • Mushroom Samba: One story arc has Andy taking decongestants, and the side effects are comparable to those of hallucinogenic drugs. One of the kids offscreen asks Andy if she could take out the Pink Floyd out of the music player, and Andy wonders who wrote squiggly lines on her hand.
  • Must Have Caffeine: Roger seems incapable of getting through a day without coffee, considering the man attempted to drink the answering machine one morning. Andy occasionally suffers from the same problem, and Peter consumes ludicrous amounts of caffeine when studying.
    • One strip has Roger and Andy waking up and trying to give each other a good morning kiss, except they're so groggy that they kiss everything except each others' lips ("You're kissing my chin." "You're kissing my pillow.") At the point where Roger is planting one on Andy's elbow, she suggests they keep a pot of coffee in the bedroom.
  • My Sister Is Off-Limits!: In one week of strips, Peter is not happy when Paige says that Peter's best friend Steve is cute.
  • Mystery Meat: Any strip set in the school cafeteria.
  • Names to Run Away From Really Fast: In the series of strips where Peter serves as assistant coach to the football team, he makes the brilliant decision to tell a player named "Rhinoski" that his athletic cup is too big.
    • In another strip, where he's the water boy, he makes another dumb move, trying to order around another huge, hulking football player - who we can see this time, who's about twice his size - named "Ogreski". The last panel shows the coach asking the referee for a time out due to a medical emergency.
    • In yet another, Peter comes home from a baseball game beat up and dirty because he tried to help himself to another player's sunflower seeds: "I swear, 'Raging Bull' Truckowski has got to learn to share!"
  • National Geographic Nudity: Referenced in a Sunday strip where Roger assumes Jason to be reading old National Geographics for this, when he's really after the Apollo 11 issue.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: Paige enjoys a band called The Backsync Boys. Like the Brand X example, also averted about half the time.
    • This may be meant as a Take That against such bands in general. There was this exchange between Andy and Jason in a strip shortly after a Christmas arc.
    Andy: Jason, I asked you to take out the trash. Paige's new Backsync Boys CD is not trash!
    (Pauses, looks at the CD)
    Andy: Technically...
    Jason: If I may quote a recent review...
    • A strip featured spoofs on a number of popular Webcomics, with Jason's comment that all his work "felt kinda derivative."
  • No Indoor Voice: Paige. As Peter put it, she just likes to yell.
  • Noodle Incident: One is created in this strip:
    Peter: [after an incredibly lame pun by Jason in the style of Pearls Before Swine] Remind me to start hiding your Pearls Before Swine books.
    Jason: You still haven't returned my Calvin and Hobbes books after the Noodle Incident, by the way.
  • Not Allowed to Grow Up: The kids are always attending the same school in the same grades every year. Lampshaded in a strip shortly after 9/11 when Roger goes to donate blood and Jason asks if he's suddenly stumbled into For Better or for Worse; Andy reassures him that he can stay ten years old.
    • There is precisely one character in the strip who has aged. Katie O'Dell, the little girl Paige babysits, was six months old in her first appearance, but later aged up to two years and froze there.
  • Not Helping Your Case: In one story arc, Paige accidentally reveals that she's been regularly seeing R-rated movies despite being underage. While her mother frets in horror at how much sex and nudity her daughter has been exposed to, Paige quickly adds "Some were just the violent kind, though."
  • Not Listening to Me, Are You?: One strip had Peter make all sorts of strange statements, which Roger basically ignores giving the "yeah", "uh-huh", and "that's nice" responses because he's reading the paper... right up until he says he's staying an hour past curfew, and he promptly shoots down his request. Peter comments that one day he's going to get past his dad's filter. Meanwhile, Jason is telling Roger his intent to change his name to a semicolon, with the same initial responses.

    O-P 
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: Roger does this with Andy occasionally and gets away with it. When she gives him a chore to do (such as: load and run a dishwasher) that he really doesn't want to do, he messes it up as badly as possible so she will never ask him to do it again. He also acts dumb and clueless when Andy drags him to a workout session so she will be too embarrassed to take him back.
  • Obnoxious In-Laws: Inverted: Andy herself dreads her mother's visits because the whole family absolutely adores her mother, and Andy feels pushed to the sides.
  • Old Shame: An in-universe example would be Roger hiding his college diploma in the attic, because his name was spelled Orger Fox on it.
  • One Dialogue, Two Conversations: In one strip Andy asked Roger what he thought of her new haircut. Roger thought she was asking about the new brand of beer he was drinking and replied that it didn't have much body and he hoped she hadn't paid a lot of money for it. He then wondered why she ran off crying.
  • One-Two Punchline: Very common.
  • Only Six Faces: The characters' faces are almost all alike, with only hair styles and accessories to differentiate. Andy's hair style even changed early on to make her look less like Paige.
  • Opaque Nerd Glasses: Present on both Jason and Morton and most of the other one time or recurring characters who wear them.
    • Weirdly enough, Paige's Biology teacher, Dr. Ting, has drawn eyes that can always be seen through the glasses lenses.
  • Out-of-Character Moment:
    • The 1990 story where Jason tries to fix Paige's sweater after Quincy chews on it. Usually, he tells Quincy "good boy" when he does that.
    • In one arc, Paige actually attends a Halloween party held by Morton, because she doesn't want to be rude.
    • Also, in another arc (conveniently one of the last daily strip arcs), Jason was apparently falling behind his studies because of his playing video games. The fact that he even has to take finals is itself out of character as Jason is actually more likely to not have any finals (usually taking them way back in September). Never mind the fact that he's usually portrayed as being so smart that he doesn't need to study.
    • Jason downloading a swimsuit calendar and happily noting how big Miss October's "hooters" are. Normally, Jason's attitude is that Girls Have Cooties regardless of whether said girls are his peers, teenagers, or adults. A similar Out-of-Character Moment also had Jason attempting to make a snowman modelled after Lara Croft from Tomb Raider, despite his earlier fear of her for being a girl.
  • Overly Long Gag: One Sunday Strip had Jason pacing for NINETY-SIX PANELS.
    • A strip has Jason and Marcus establishing the ground rules for their snowball fight, which lasts so long all the snow melts by the time they're finished.
  • Pac Man Fever: Averted. Even in the early days, any references to gaming were completely accurate. It should come as no surprise that Amend is a nerd.
  • Painting the Medium: Done so much it's a Running Gag.
  • Paranoia Gambit: Being the target of a "Jason Vow of Vengeance" causes Peter to completely freak out and spend the day subjecting himself to ever-nastier hiding places (winding up grounded in the process). That is Jason's vengeance.
  • Patriotic Fervor: In a parody of the "freedom fries" debacle, Paige insists on her French homework being called "Freedom homework."
  • Picture Day: A frequent source of humor. One of the best has Peter ending up with his face covered in mud while retrieving his trademark baseball cap, so that he can have it on for his picture.
  • Pie in the Face: Paige threatens to do this to Peter for insulting her pies.
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: References to Andy's job as a newspaper columnist were gradually dropped over time. Several mid-1990s strips reference her work without actually showing her working. Possibly lampshaded when she spends an entire arc after the kids go back to school in September unable to motivate herself to write, only to spring into action once Roger asks if she wants to play chess.
  • Playing Pictionary: In one strip, Roger and Andy are playing Pictionary. He keeps shouting out obviously incorrect answers as the drawing progresses (including "It's a snowstorm!" before she's even drawn anything), culminating in "It's a Christmas tree in a cereal bowl next to a snake!" and "What's with these 'B', 'O', 'A', and 'T' symbols? Are they Pictionary shorthand?"
  • Poisoned Chalice Switcheroo: A variation with salt in milk, between Jason and Peter with multiple switches and some alleged fake switches, culminating in the line "We're trying to figure out which of us should be throwing up right now." Turned out Paige had somehow gotten the salt.
  • Polar Bears and Penguins: Averted in a December 2004 Story Arc where Roger dreams that he's the lead character in The Polar Express:
    Conductor: Well, here we are! The North Pole!
    Roger: Are those penguins over there?
    Conductor: Yeah. Why?
    Roger: Don't penguins live at the South Pole?
    Conductor: Stupid Mapquest.
    Roger: So should we turn around or keep going?
  • Popcultural Osmosis Failure: In one strip, Jason is musing about winter and makes references to The Empire Strikes Back, The Abyss and Terminator 2; none of which mean anything to his father. Roger then remarks on how one particular cloud looks like Trigger.
  • Potty Emergency: Two similar strips dealt with this. The first one was an early strip where Roger drank a whole pot of coffee before work, saying his boss was holding one of his notoriously boring meetings and that there was "nothing more embarrassing than falling asleep during Pembrose's endless sermons". In the last panel, he's at the meeting, excusing himself for his third bathroom break in the past hour, and clearly looks very embarrassed.
    • The second time was when Peter drank an entire pot of coffee, claiming he had a killer math test, and though a whole pot would get his brain functioning like a "super-fast calculation machine". In the last panel, he's in class, sweating heavily, thinking to himself, "If the boy's bathroom is a thousand feet away and I run at a rate of a hundred feet per second..."
  • Power Fantasy: Peter gets these whenever he is left in charge of his younger siblings, including fantasies of being an all-powerful god.
  • Prank Date: Peter's aforementioned Love Letter Lunacy.
  • Precedent Excuse: In one time, Andy grounds Peter for a week after finding out that he saw the R-rated Kill Bill Volume 2. Peter protests that she didn't get upset when he saw the first Kill Bill movie. Andy responds that she hadn't known that he saw the first movie, and that he is now grounded for two weeks.
    • Another example: Andy is going through the bills, horrified by the heating bill, the telephone bill, the cable bill... Then Paige walks in in a bikini, telling her that she's got her friends on a conference call if they can go to some TV-sponsored event. The next panel has Peter, Paige and Jason in heavy winter clothes watching the rabbit ear antenna'd TV, with Jason holding up a telegraph telling Paige shes has a message as Peter angrily demands to know what Paige told their mom.
  • Precision F-Strike: Peter, when Jason vows vengeance on him for breaking a model. Peter's response? "Crap." Counts, as it's one of the few times that sort of response is used.
    • Played with another time, where Andy chastised Jason for using the word "crap." After he said "but it's a dice game," Andy told him "that's craps." His response fell into Loophole Abuse territory: "Craps. The stupid Simpsons is a rerun."
  • Predatory Business: Referenced:
    Andy: I wish that Coffeebucks hadn't opened up down the street.
    Roger: Why? You think it'll hurt the Mom & Pop coffee shops?
    Andy: Because it's on the route Peter takes to come home.
    Roger: I wondered why his teeth were chattering all the way through dinner.
  • Present Peeking: Jason Fox once started ripping into his presents on Christmas Eve, explaining that as it was technically Christmas Day for American troops stationed in Afghanistan, he was opening them at the same time they were. Roger retaliates by calling to have his son shipped off to Afghanistan.
  • Product Placement: Parodied:
    Paige: I hate the way the American Idol judges have those Coca-Cola cups right in front of them.
    Peter: It's called product placement, Paige.
    Paige: Well, it's tacky.
    Peter: Get used to it. Altoids® brand mint?
    Paige: Mmm! Thanks! They're So Curiously Strong!
  • Product Promotion Parade: Spoofed when Jason drew a Slug-Man comic strip where every panel was an advertisement for a Slug-Man vehicle, toy, or play set.
    • Another strip has Jason playing with his Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles toys in front of Andy, having them complain about how they have nothing to do, and they would have lots to do if they had the various accessories.
  • Properly Paranoid: One Sunday strip has Paige and Jason taking an Autumn walk when a leaf flies right into Paige's eye. She angrily accuses Jason of planning the whole thing out; when he calls her out on "extreme paranoia", he spreads his hands, revealing calculations written on his palms, proving her right.
  • Put Off Their Food: A strip where Jason ties the ends of his spaghetti noodles together so he can eat them all in one long, unending slurp ends with Andy adding spaghetti to the list of things she can no longer make for dinner.
    • Another time, Paige had just dissected a frog in Bio class and she thought it was really cool. She tells her family about the intestines and they stare in horror at the spaghetti they're eating.

    Q-S 
  • Quote Mine: One strip had Jason recording Paige talking on the phone: "Mr. Vivona says we have to cut three articles from a newspaper for social studies class every day this week, and the only pair of scissors I have are totally dull." He then gets on the computer and edits it so she's saying "I cut social studies class every day this week. Mr. Vivona is totally dull."
  • Rain Dance: Jason and Marcus do a snow dance. Paige joins them in the hope that school might be canceled if it works.
  • Rank Inflation: Jason's report card usually consists of A+++ grades or higher.
    • Which leads to some Fridge Logic: Jason's specialty is math and science. He just happens to be an expert in all his other subjects as well? That goes against the strips with him in P.E. class...
  • Reality Ensues: Peter gets in trouble for punching a student who insulted Denise's blindness.
  • Reality Is Unrealistic: In-universe: Jason finds the taste of real watermelon strange because it doesn't taste like his watermelon gum.
  • Real Money Trade: In one arc, Jason decided to spend his summer vacation being a gold farmer on World of Warcraft. It turned out not to be as easy as he thought.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Averted. Roger plans on giving one to Pembrook calling him out on how he's taking a raise instead of a pay cut while people lose their jobs, but he never does anything beyond rehearsing it.
  • Recruiters Always Lie: Averted. Peter tells how a Marine recruiter adressed his class and told them all about the early morning starts, the gruelling physical training, etc. Paige asks how that was supposed to entice people to enlist. Peter responds that the recruiter had then held up a college algebra text for comparison.
  • Red Shirt: Parodied in one strip:
    Jason: I decorated my gingerbread men in little Star Trek uniforms.
    Paige: Good lord, could you be a bigger geek? (Jason eats a cookie) Why are they all wearing red shirts?
  • Retconning the Wiki: In a great show of self-fulfilling prophecy, the comic strip mentions Jason vandalizing the Wikipedia article for "Warthog" by replacing the image with a picture of his sister Paige. This prompted some FoxTrot readers to go onto Wikipedia and replace the image with a picture of Paige.
  • Revenge: For the entire run of the strip, Jason's favorite weapon while antagonizing Paige has been a suction-dart gun. In a 2012 strip, however, Paige got even and then some. When he tried it, she quickly pulled out a bow with suction-tipped arrows, and he ran screaming. In the last panel, Jason told Peter, "I don't like the effect The Hunger Games has had on our sister."
  • Reverse Cerebus Syndrome: Although it was always a gag-a-day strip, FoxTrot was more realistic in the earlier years and had the occasional Very Special Episode-type plot and overreaching story arcs that sometimes lasted as long as two months, counting the Sunday strips. More serious subjects were often present, such as Paige and Jason finding a hypodermic needle on the beach, Peter trying to quit chewing tobacco, et cetera. In the late '90s, the humor style became more off-the-wall and any trace of seriousness disappeared, with occasional exceptions such as the strips which followed 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina.
  • Reverse Psychology Backfire: Used often. For instance, in one strip, Jason begs Andy not to buy a new computer and she doesn't. In another, Andy "supports" Roger's decision to quit his job, and he goes with it instead of seeing the reverse psychology.
    • In the first example, he sullenly says, "Reverse psychology must have been invented by a parent." Well, duh...
  • Rhetorical Question Blunder: Andy asks Roger if he's going to quit his job out of his guilt over not being there when Jason was injured. Roger says "Now there's a thought." For extra points, he actually does it.
  • Ridiculous Exchange Rates: Jason adds up all his pocket money and announces that he's a millionaire in Turkish lira.
  • Ridiculous Procrastinator: Peter and Paige often become this before exam time or when homework is due.
    • Their parents aren't any better. Roger wrote his entire senior thesis in one night, and Andy put off sending Christmas cards so long that when she finally got around to it the family photo showed Jason in diapers.
  • Right on Queue: A Sunday strip had the majority of the strip devoted to a ridiculously long airline check-in queue, with the final panel having Andy remark that she thinks she has forgotten the tickets.
  • Ring... Ring... CRUNCH: Peter does it in a Sunday strip when the alarm clock interrupts a dream about making out with swimsuit models.
  • Rise of Zitboy: Paige panics over zits often enough. There was once a week long story of her trying to cover one up by wearing antlers to match her "red nose".
  • Road Sign Reversal: Jason and Marcus strike out into the wilds of suburbia in search of adventure (wearing pith helmets, no less). Along their way they encounter the streets of "Maple" and "Oak;" Maple Street is lined with oak trees and Oak Street is lined with maples. Helpfully, they decide to switch the street signs around to correct the error, but wind up attracting the attention of the police in the process.
  • Rocks Fall, Everyone Dies:
    Peter: As your elf touches the gold doorknob, 45,000 volts shoot through his body. Your elf is now charcoal. What does your wizard do?
    Jason: He calls the Dungeon Master a jerk.
    • The first and only time that Jason talked Paige into playing Dungeons & Dragons, he literally invoked this trope about 5 seconds into the adventure:
    Jason: You are standing at the entrance to a cave. A sign reads, "Welcome to Jason Caverns." What do you do?
    Paige: We enter the cave.
    Jason: Suddenly there's an earthquake and the ceiling collapses! Your entire party is killed! Ha ha ha ha ha!
    Paige: (examining a miniature) Where's a real sword when you need one?
  • Roses Are Red, Violets Are Blue: Jason writes a lot of poems of this sort. None are complimentary.
  • Rube Goldberg Device: Jason has frequently designed them: one to illuminate a halo over his head to convince Santa Claus that Jason was behaving; and another to light the grill.
  • Rule of Funny: Pretty much what this strip has run on ever since it abandoned the Very Special Episode plot lines. That point of abandonment is also when the Lampshade Hanging and Medium Awareness got turned Up to Eleven.
    • This is obviously impossible to do, but still hilarious.
  • Run for the Border: Some of the strips, most notably the one where Jason learned that copyrighting the I-Don't-Like-You-Eileen-Jacobson Computer Virus, had this when he asked how long it would take to skateboard to Mexico.
    • Also a rare domestic example in the Roger Housesitting arc where, after flooding the house (namely due to incompetence on Roger's part involving the Dishwasher), and turning it into a swamp as a result of trying to drain the water, he mentions that they need to flee the border before Andy gets home.
  • Running Gag:
    • Roger applying several bottles of lighter fluid to the barbecue, then the fire blowing it into his face (it originally was Peter who started this gag).
    • Another gag involves Jason wearing a large overcoat and putting Quincy on his head to impersonate someone.
    • Several Christmas Story Arcs had a pastiche of some famous Christmas work, usually by way of a dream: Jason once dreamed that he was Ebenezer Scrooge in a spoof of A Christmas Carol, Paige in The Nutcracker, Roger in The Polar Express, and a How the Grinch Stole Christmas! parody penned by Jason. Similar dream pastiches have occurred at other times, as well.
  • Rushed Inverted Reading: Peter and Steve are discussing a fight Peter had gotten into when the principal appears behind them. Peter hurriedly pretends to be talking about an algebra problem but is holding his textbook upside down.
  • Sadist Teacher: Paige's biology teacher, Dr. Ting, assigns 46 chapters' worth of reading. During a time when everyone in town is suffering the effects of a flash flood. And after the power goes out, Paige has to read her chapters by the light of birthday candles and Jason's glow-in-the-dark toys. And then it turns out that Dr. Ting lost the test files on the computer, because his power also went out.
    • Dr. Ting is usually more of a Stern Teacher. He's moody, but he always tries to be fair. A more straightforward example of this trope is Paige's unseen math teacher, who seems to enjoy trying to psyche out his students. He once dressed up as the Grim Reaper for a math final, and he makes math test where the students are being asked to calculate how many percents of a student body that will flunk a given math test.
      • Then again, Dr. Ting once showed disappointment that Paige's lab reports were improving, claiming they were a source of entertainment for him.
      • In yet another strip, Dr. Ting gives Paige a bad grade on a report where she jokingly claimed cellular division included a "Smileyphase". What makes it more striking is the fact that, immediately beforehand, he says everything else with her report was fine.
  • Satchel Switcheroo: Jason mixes up his maths text book with Eileen. As a result, Eileen ends up finding an incredibly sappy love poem Jason had intended for his mother, and thinks it is for her.
  • Saw "Star Wars" Twenty-Seven Times: In one story arc, Andy sees Titanic and gets addicted to it, seeing it again way too many times and practically lets it take over her life. Roger gets concerned once she says that she went all the way to the multiplex just to watch it twice in a row.
    • Another strip actually did it with Star Wars. Peter is working at a movie theater when The Phantom Menace comes out. A patron in a costume asks him for tickets. Peter asks him which showing, and names off the times, and the patron asks for one for each showing.
    • Another strip has Jason camping out (on his computer server) to get tickets to see Attack of the Clones.
    Jason: You're looking at a boy with eight tickets to Star Wars!
    Peter: Congratulations. Who's going with you?
    Jason: My friend, Marcus.
    Peter: Who else?
    Jason: Who else?
    Peter: (rolling his eyes) Start over.
    Jason: You're looking at a boy with two tickets to four consecutive showings of Star Wars!
  • Saw It in a Movie Once: After Jason and Paige spill cola onto Andy's keyboard, Paige urges Jason to fix it. Oddly, despite being the nerd that he is, his only expertise in the matter consists of a MacGyver episode in which MacGyver hooked a computer up to a bicycle. Or maybe it was a minivan.
  • Scare 'Em Straight: Something of an after-the-fact reinforcement. Paige and Nicole debate about stealing a music CD, and even put it in Paige's purse. They reconsider, and put it back. Upon leaving the store, a mall cop stops them and tells them that he saw them put it back, and was really glad. Especially since he also saw them put it in the purse. The two girls nearly have heart attacks at how close they came to being arrested.
  • Scary Flashlight Face: Jason managed to get himself and Peter lost on a camping trip by doing this ("playing 'Mister Specter Face'", as Peter calls it) until the battery ran out.
  • Sdrawkcab Alias: At one point, Jason meets someone on Warquest named "Sgt. Neelie." It's Eileen Jacobson.
  • See-Thru Specs: Played with in one strip where Jason orders X-ray glasses from a comic book and uses them in front of Peter to say that he can see Paige's leopard print underwear (which she isn't actually wearing):
    Peter: Those things don't really work, do they?
    Jason: I think they work extremely well.
    • To clarify, he annoyed her into protesting, loudly, that she wasn't wearing leopard print underwear—and Andy, overhearing this, assumed that Paige had something to hide.
  • Separate Scene Storytelling: Just about every time someone tries to make a story, we see it this way.
  • Sheathe Your Sword: One story arc has Paige get past an extremely difficult boss in a video game that Jason had been trying to beat for a month simply by walking past him.
  • Schmuck Bait: In one strip, Jason and Marcus found Paige's diary. When they turned to the last page, this was the entry:
    Diary: Dear Diary, Today I'm leaving this diary where Jason and Marcus can find it so I can punch their lights out when I catch them reading it.
  • She Is Not My Girlfriend: Jason's reaction after the Love Letter Lunacy arc mentioned above. Of course, by the end of the story arc, the Will They or Won't They? has started resulting in this being a recurring theme.
  • Shoddy Knockoff: The aforementioned "Tamagrouchy" arc, where said toy belittles Paige. Until Jason reprograms it to demand that she pay him money.
  • Shout-Out: The strip often makes reference to other newspaper comics, including Lampshade Hanging FoxTrot's perpetually-stuck-at-the-same-age style versus For Better or for Worse and its realtime progression.
    • A few comics have featured background portraits with characters from other cartoons, such as Calvin And Hobbes, Dilbert, etc.
    • Various Peanuts characters, including Charlie Brown, Linus, Lucy, and Snoopy, have actually made cameo appearances in the strip.
    • One particular one has Jason and Marcus creating an identical snow sculpture of a snowman with a hole in his chest and a cannon right next to it to one in a Calvin and Hobbes strip - then creating sculptures of Calvin and Hobbes goofing around with the cannonball. "See, this way it's an homage, not a ripoff."
    • Jason and Marcus often go to a store called Calvin's Hobbies
    • There were also several references to several movies and TV shows in FoxTrot, namely The Matrix and Star Wars. In one strip, Jason also started paraphrasing Frasier Crane on Frasier (namely something about Le Fou Cheval restaurant switching to an all-domestic cheese list all while he is hosting a soiree at the restaurant to impress the membership chair of the chamber music board).
    • One strip has Jason and Marcus acting out the famous 'quarter pounder' exchange from Pulp Fiction.
      • The 'quarter pounder' exchange was later referenced in another strip in an arc involving Jason attempting to take over Michael Eisner's position as CEO. Andy claims that Jason isn't even old enough to see some Disney films, with Peter thinking that he'll have them tamed down. Cut to Timon and Pumbaa, in the roles of Vincent Vega and Jules Winnefeld, respectively, holding guns with Timon stating "You know what they call a Water Buffalo with Cheese in the Pridelands?" and Pumbaa, who even went as far as to wear Winnefeld's afro, replying "They don't call it a Water Buffalo with Cheese?".
    • In one strip, part of it is in a first-person perspective with an Aperture Science Handheld Portal Device. The person asks Paige, who is sitting at the computer, if they can get on to play Portal 2. She promptly tells the person to go away. A portal is shot above and below her as she then falls through. It then goes into a third-person perspective as you see Jason pointing a poorly made portal gun at Paige.
    • A brutal, oafish football player is named Ogrynski.
    • One Halloween strip has Marcus dressed as Mega Man X, while Eileen was Elastigirl, Phoebe was Hobbes, Eugene was Spock and Jason was Jabba the Hutt (although Jason's costume was part of the joke).
    • Shout outs to Monty Python have appeared at least twice:
      • In one strip Paige and Peter sport heads as swollen as Mr. Creosote's belly after cramming for math tests, with Jason offering them a "waffer theen" math formula.
      • In another, Jason drew a flip-book of his sister being crushed by a 16 ton weight.
    • Jason and Marcus once used toy soldiers to re-enact a scene from Saving Private Ryan (specifically the rallying scene to rescue him, although the beginning of the strip was a direct reference to when Miller first learns of his orders to retrieve Private Ryan). Jason's version either dealt with retrieving Ryan from a grill after he ended up melting before Roger used the grill.
    • Another referenced Pearls Before Swine and its crazy rhyming here.
    • The April 1st 2012 strip brought us A Game of Thrones, if sponsored by Hasbro.
  • Shown Their Work: Any gag revolving around physical equations is bound to include a real equation, as Amend was a physics major. Gags about computer programming often involve accurate programming code, such as a gag where Roger asks for "java" and is given sheets with Java code on them.
    • A beautiful example was the time Jason correctly calculated the area of a rectangle by evaluating an integral.
    • Jason tried to use accurate C++ code to get out of Writing Lines on the chalkboard at least twice; once by making the program to print the lines out and tape them up, and again by writing the code directly on the board. Neither attempt worked.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: Peter and Paige are rather average teenagers, while their little brother Jason is a nerdy Child Prodigy.
  • Singing in the Shower: One strip had Roger singing "Burning Love" in the shower, and an annoyed Andy meaningfully tells one of the kids about the valve marked "cold water shutoff."
    • Something similar happened in another strip, this time with Roger singing "Love Machine." Jason ends up exacting revenge by pulling up the answering machine all the way up the stairs (which was also partially Roger's fault, as Jason pointed out that Roger was the one who decided to buy the model that had a cord long enough to reach the shower) while recording the new voice messaging system, and then having Roger unknowingly sing the song while showering, with it going on without Roger noticing for at least two weeks, if not more.
    • Another strip has Peter singing "Heartbreak Hotel", with the rest of the family gathering outside the door to complain:
      Roger: You mean "Earache Hotel".
      Andy: I'd say "Headache Hotel".
      Paige: "Shampoo-Bottle-Stuffed-Down-His-Stupid-Throat Hotel!"
      Jason: Too many syllables, paige.
  • Sleep Cute: Parodied in a 1989 strip (and an obvious non-shipping example): During a long plane trip, Paige falls asleep on Jason's head. Luckily, this quickly stirs the both of them awake and causes them to scream in terror.
  • Smart People Know Latin: Jason says that his new year's resolution is to speak entirely in Latin. He recites common-knowledge Latin phrases such as "a priori" and "quid pro quo", just to annoy Paige.
  • Smart People Play Chess: Inverted, as clueless dad Roger is the only one in the family that enjoys chess. Jason, the smartest of the family, only plays when Roger ropes him into a game and wins in three moves.
    • In another strip, Jason actually beat him in one move (something that would be impossible in Real Life).
  • Snarky Inanimate Object: The iFruit.
  • Snipe Hunt: Paige and Peter try this on Jason, though he's Genre Savvy enough to see through it, but still agrees to do it, with enthusiasm: "Cool. Can we wait until it gets a little darker out?"
    • Another incident has Jason refusing to go along with it...and then teaming up with Peter to try it on their dad.
  • Snowball Fight: One mini-arc had Roger agreeing to one with Jason, and apparently coming back with brain damage:
    Andy: How was the snowball fight?
    Roger: Snowball fight?
    Andy: The one you just had out back?
    Roger: Out back?
    Andy: With Jason?
    Roger: With Jason?
    Andy: Roger, how many fingers am I holding up?
    Roger: Holding up?
    • In another strip, Roger ends up returns home from work only to be pelted by the kids with enough snowballs to transform him into a snowman, with Andy misconstruing it as the kids stealing Roger's favorite hat and putting it on one of their Snowmen.
    • In another strip, despite the forecast predicting light flurries, Jason managed to garner enough snow to pelt Roger with snow when he returned home, leading the latter to think they had heavier flurries than predicted.
  • Snowlems: Or snow dinosaurs in this case. In one strip Jason and Marcus make a demonic snowlem based on Paige.
  • Solar-Powered Magnifying Glass: One strip has Jason seemingly roasting ticks with a magnifying glass and them eating them to gross Paige out. It turns out they were really just raisins.
  • Solomon Divorce: Often threatened by Andy and used as a way to get out of camping (either far away, or in one case, camping in the backyard).
  • Some Dexterity Required: Parodied in an arc where Peter and Jason buy a Fighting Game: "Here's a fold-out chart showing how to kick..."
  • Souvenir Land: Trope Namer (part of the amusement park Fun-Fun Universe).
  • Spanner in the Works: Jason finds it impossible to beat one guardian monster in a video game, as it instantly squashes his character every time he tries. Paige, who almost never plays video games, takes the controller and gets by the guardian by simply walking around him.
  • Sphere Eyes: Most of the characters have these.
    • It was even parodied in one strip where Paige cuts ping-pong balls in half and puts them over her eyes to give the impression that she's not falling asleep in class.
  • Spit Take: Roger does one in an early strip. While Andy makes a cake for Quincy's birthday party (yes, Quincy's), Roger asks how you make a cake for an iguana, while licking some batter off his finger:
    Andy: I threw some mealworms in the batter.
    Roger: PPBSPT!
    Andy: I was kidding!
  • Spoiled Brat: Jason is likely the only child in existence who thinks it's is a good thing to be this. In one strip, he tells Andy that since the Bible says "Spare the rod, spoil the child", and that she and Roger have never spanked him with a rod, they should spoil him more than they have, at which point he starts asking for more allowance and privledges. Andy's response: "Maybe I've just been saving the rod for the right time." It shut him up.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Jason became this - most of his appearances in the later strip(s) before it went sunday-only was were merely to show off Amend's knowledge of physics and computer code.
  • Spring Cleaning Fever: Andy is prone to fits of this and dragoons the family into helping her. Also, in one storyline, Roger, Jason, Peter, and Paige Fox have to rush to clean up the house (with Peter improvising a leafblower as a means to clean up) before Andy comes home at 4 PM. Justified, as Roger had earlier flooded the house by his attempt at running the dishwasher, leaving an immensely big swamp of soggy clutter that, had Andy came home to find it, she'd go ballistic on them and especially Roger.
  • Spy Fiction: Roger attempts to write a novel. The novel he chose was a James Bond expy. It is as bad as one would expect.
  • Spy Speak: To thwart Jason and Marcus' eavesdropping, Peter and Denise engage in this. "The red flag flaps not at night." "In Paris, the cafés are many."
  • Stab The Salad: One Sunday strip set things up like a scene from a horror movie, making it look like someone was being stabbed to death. It turned out to be Roger doing a poor job of slicing up a turkey.
    • Something similar happens later on: One strip sets up an apocalyptic event that causes all the mass of the Earth to be focused on a certain point (specifically Midwestern United States), causing the Earth to wobble around trajectory and then end up colliding with the moon before the narrator asks what could have destroyed Earth. It then cuts to Peter having his 38th slice of turkey, to which Peter makes very clear that he isn't even close to being finished with Thanksgiving Dinner, to Andy's disgust, while Jason muses about how this event would surpass even Independence Day as being fodder for a movie.
  • Stag Party: Roger mentioned one in one strip, where he went to the Playboy Mansion without Andy's knowledge for his bachelor's party.
  • Stealth Pun: The characters occasionally make reference to watching Bill O'Reilly and Sean Hannity on TV. It takes a while to realize the joke — The Fox family is watching Fox News!
  • Sticky Situation: A week long story featured Paige and Jason having their faces glued together by experimental bubblegum.
  • Straight Man and Wise Guy: Peter and Jason.
  • Stylistic Self-Parody: Occurs in this strip. Funnily, Amend's editor didn't get the joke.
  • Stylistic Suck: The aforementioned "His Code Name Was the Fox" story. One week of strips consists of hiliariously-bad quotes and over-the-top scenes, plus his wife's reaction to the same (for instance, a Big "NO!" when the character is faced with a Wire Dilemma involving 173 wires and cuts the right one). It's even funnier when one realizes that his wife is (ostensibly) a professional writer.
  • Subliminal Advertising: Played with in one comic where Jason's selling flip books for $25 each and somehow gets Paige and Peter to buy them because of one of the frames in the book saying "Buy me."
    Paige: It's lame, but I'll take it.
    Jason: Most excellent.
    Peter: Can I pay you again for this one?
    • Another comic has Jason offering Andy all kinds of expensive presents like a sports car and diamond necklace, saying it was all possible because she raised his allowance to $25,000 a week. The last panel shows he's whispering this to a sleeping Andy, while Roger says "Honey, wake up, he's doing it again."
  • Suicide as Comedy: One Christmas strip has everyone receiving badly mismatched gifts (Peter gets diamond earrings, Paige gets a football, Andy gets a digital voltometer, and Jason gets an "I (heart) the Backsynch Boys" sweater); as Roger apologizes ("It was late and I was tired!"), Andy yells for Jason to get his head out of the oven.
  • Summer Campy: The Camp Bohrmore arc.
  • Sunday Strip: Nothing but, since 2007.
    • The Sunday strips originally ran in the regular half-page Sunday comic format until 1999, when Amend changed to a third-page format.
  • Suntan Stencil: When Paige fell asleep while sunbaking, Jason went looking for the magnetic letters from the refrigerator to spell out a message on her back, but his mother stopped him.
  • Sweet Tooth: Paige, especially when ice cream is involved. (In one strip, she bought an ice cream truck's entire inventory, and in this one a sundae nearly as big as she was.)
  • Symbol Swearing: Parodied in one strip, overlapping with Medium Awareness:
    Peter: Ow! I stubbed my toe! Ampersand! Asterisk! Dollar Sign! Pound Sign! Asterisk! Asterisk! [beat] Comic strip swearing leaves something to be desired.

    T-U 
  • Take That:
    • In Jason's Slug-Man comics, the titular character's recurring nemesis "Paige-O-Tron." Also, in "The Final Confrontation 3", at the end of the en masse anthology, a thief being electrocuted in the background by the Slug-Mobile's security system is wearing a purple and white hat with an A on it, just like Peter.
    • Jason also drew a week's worth of standalone strips attacking Paige. She countered by drawing a week's worth that attacked him, mostly recycling the same gags.
    • After deciding that he wanted to become Gary Larson's successor for The Far Side, Jason drew a week's worth of Far Side strips, all of which also attacked Paige (also lampshading The Far Side's obsession with cows).
    • And there are plenty more where these came from. In General, any time Jason ever works on any sort of creative work for any reason, an avatar of Paige will be a villain, victim, and/or monster.
    • Paige herself has done this. In one notable arc, she writes a horror story that culminates in Jason being decapitated by axe-wielding ghosts. In another, he's depicted as an ugly troll who gets eaten by wild boars.
    • In the How the Grinch Stole Christmas! parody, Jason actually changes things up a bit: Paige is portrayed in a basically positive manner, and Andy is made into the villain. The idea seems to be that Jason was too upset and preoccupied over the terrible presents Andy got everyone to bother with Paige, his usual target of choice.
    • Amend himself has used the strip as a Take That on the entire newspaper comic industry. In one story, Roger is forced to confront the fact that the comic strip he loved as a kid, Captain Goofball, has lost all its appeal over the years, and is no longer funny. It's basically the author's way of commenting on the way that there are so many comics in the newspapers these days which were once funny, once had a lot of appeal, but are now tired and boring.
    • He made another Take That to the medium itself, specifically how some newspapers run comic strips extremely small so that they can cram as many as possible onto the page:
      Andy: This says a cartoonist in Mississippi got a group of school kids together to help him make the world's largest comic strip. It was 135×47 feet. (beat) 6×2 inches probably would've been big enough.
      Roger: I can't tell… is this Ziggy or a comma?
    • Amend, being a Mac user and supporter, as done numerous Take Thats to Microsoft and Bill Gates over the years.
    • Amend also has a few favorite pop cultural targets, most notably Richard Simmons, *NSYNC, and Survivor.
    • In one strip, Jason is working on creating an animated film called Finding Hemo. When Peter calls him out for doing "a total ripoff of Pixar", Jason asks what's wrong with that and Peter replies, "That's DreamWorks' turf."
  • Taps: Jason and Marcus once planned to build a space shuttle, and wrote a computer program to model how particular designs might work out. The first time they use it, the disaster it depicts is so horrible that the program actually starts playing Taps at them.
  • The Talk: Andy and Paige go through this while the male members of the family were out on a Horrible Camping Trip.
    Paige: Mother, please we talked about all this three years ago.
    Andy: That was just the basic overview. We're ready for the Birds and the Bees Lesson #2.
    Paige: I do watch network television, you know.
    Andy: ...Good point. We'd better skip to Lesson #40.
    • Afterwards, Andy points out how she didn't enjoy having the talk with her mother either and swore that she would never make her teenage daughter sit through it. What changed her mind? She now has a teenage daughter.
    • Subverted in one week-long arc where Peter actually tries to read Moby-Dick and write a report on it the morning before school on the day it's due. Andy tells Roger she wishes he'd stop having talks with him. Apparently, Roger once told him how he wrote his entire college thesis in one night.
  • Talking in Bed: Roger and Andy do this frequently.
  • Talking in Your Sleep: Roger ends up doing this when he's having a dream where Andy gives him a huge amount of fattening food (22 ounce steak with both Bearnaise sauce and Hollandaise, a fully loaded baked potato, corn on the cob that's dripping with butter, deep-fried onion rings with extra salt, a big slab of barbecued ribs, and having the entire pecan pie for desert). Even worse, the entire family hears him mumbling the dream with his face in the tofu slaw, causing Jason to speculate that Roger falls asleep during dinner on purpose.
  • Tattooed Crook:
    Andy: What are you doing??
    Jason: Drawing tattoos all over my body with a sharpie.
    Andy: What on earth for?
    Jason: This way, if I get sent to prison, the other inmates will think I have an escape plan, like the guy in Prison Break, and will be nice to me.
    Andy (head in her hands): Is there something I should know about?
    Jason: The CIA's computers are public property! Am I wrong?!
    (the doorbell rings)
  • That Came Out Wrong: Paige, rehearsing for a play: "My defecation does begin to make a better life. 'Tis paltry to be Caesar... Oops, I mean 'desolation.'"
    • Her cheerleading stint. "Send 'em home losers in their loser pus!... I mean, bus."
    • Also the part where Paige, when complaining to her biology teacher about her textbook, stated that it "should have more intelligent design", causing her teacher to tell her to sit down.
    • Said in those exact words by Roger Fox when, while telling Andy off for having Jason play Video Games all week so he would miss specials about the Super Bowl before Super Bowl Sunday, basically calls football his one true love of his life.
    • And again when he said that he was only using a plastic surgery software on a picture of her for fun: "I don't want some drop-dead gorgeous, hot-bodied wife!... (beat) ...I'm not helping myself, am I?"
    • In one strip, Peter is complaining about being stuck on the bench for all of baseball season. Andy, trying to console him, says "Peter, Nothing is ever a sure thing. Sometimes life throws us curveballs." His response? "This isn't helping, Mom."
  • That One Boss: In-universe example. One story arc has Jason stuck on a boss in a video game he's been trying to get past for a month. Paige ends up getting past the boss by simply walking past it.
  • That Cloud Looks Like: Parodied in this strip, where the clouds literally do look like Jason's uncannily specific descriptions.
  • There Are No Girls on the Internet: Peter found a girl who claimed to be a supermodel with the same interests as his, and assumed it to his brother, playing a prank. Cut to the model's apartment, as Peter types "and after I beat you to a pulp..." The model, with framed covers behind her, is calling the police.
  • Tied Up on the Phone: at one point Paige is on the phone, wandering about the house. In the final panel, the perspective widens and we see that she's ensnared every member of the house in the phone cord.
  • Title Drop: Inverted; as with many Newspaper Comics, most of the anthologies are named after throwaway lines of dialogue contained therein.
  • Tomato in the Mirror: When Andy was once doped up on allergy medication, she was calling Roger with news that she was getting over her doped up state. The final panel then has Peter trying to yell to Andy offscreen that Jason's setting the fence on fire, to which Andy responds by hushing Peter and telling him that she's talking with his mother.
  • Tongue on the Flagpole: Peter gets his tongue stuck to a flagpole off-screen. Jason tells Andy to get the camera instead so he can upload it to YouTube.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Jason is mostly a genius, and yet after all these years he has yet to realize that if he messes with Paige, she's going to beat him senseless. Of course, he may just consider it Worth It. In the same vein, his "get rich quick" schemes usually result in him being grounded or otherwise punished (Andy once said that his stunts currently have his allowance being withheld until his freshman year in college.) Marcus gets this to a lesser extent, but it's not as obvious since we only ever see him at the Fox household or at school, and thus never see the kind of stuff he does to his five own sisters or what kind of retribution he suffers.
    • Hopefully subverted in this strip.
  • Tooth Strip: Parodied. Roger tries a whitening toothpaste which erases all the lines between his teeth.
  • Totally Radical: Usually averted. The cartoonist usually tries to keep the pop culture references and slang current, though there are sometimes lags due to the publishing schedule, and the translation is sometimes imperfect. When the comic did a strip referencing "All your base are belong to us," some fans on the Internet griped that the fad had passed a few months ago and that Jason didn't say the phrase exactly right.
    • This trope was once lampshaded in a Painting the Medium manner in one cartoon where Jason tells Peter that he read an article that a cartoonist has been chronically late with his submissions, so he was threatened with various fines if he continued to be late. Peter then questions how long this cartoonist has been late, to which Jason states that the article doesn't mention how long. Then Paige walks in and asks "Hey guys, did you hear about Watergate?"
  • Trade Snark: Jason has been known to pepper his creations with far more ®, ™ and © symbols than necessary.
  • [Trope Name]: This strip, along with Rule of Three.
  • Trope Overdosed
  • Tropes For Dummies: Roger tries to buy an actual For Dummies book, but can't bring himself to pronounce the name and admit himself a "dummy", instead asking for a book for "college-educated professionals who majored in the humanities before computers existed."
  • The Trouble With Tickets: In one arc, Roger gets a parking ticket. Andy wants to pay the fine, but he wants to do a Perry Mason impression.
  • TV Genius: Jason all the way. He's smart enough to write a computer virus that destroyed the Internet, but he does incredibly stupid things like try to convince the dentist to leave the X-ray machine on to give him super powers.
  • Twerp Sweating:
    • Denise's father does this to Peter when he arrives to take her out for their first date.
    • Peter, himself, did this justifiably, it turned out to one of Paige's prom dates.
  • Tyrant Takes the Helm: One early arc had Roger and Andy leaving Peter in charge while they went on vacation for a few days. Peter immediately goes Drunk with Power, ordering Paige and Jason to do everything he wanted — and when they rebelled, he locked both of them in the basement. Unfortunately for him, their parents returned sooner than he expected...
  • Ultimate Job Security: You'd think Mrs. O'Dell would know better than to hire Paige as a babysitter by now, but the worst punishment Paige receives is having to pay for Katie's outfit, which she destroyed using scissors.
    • She seems to have just barely prevented another disaster in this strip. Of course, you could probably blame Peter more for this one.)
  • Ultra Super Death Gore Fest Chainsawer 3000: "Doomathon 2000", "Duke Quakem," and others.
    • Ultra Super Happy Cute Baby Fest Farmer 3000: Andy joined a group called MAGG (Mothers Against Gory Games) and vowing to only allow MAGG approved games in their house. The storyline revolved around Peter playing a game called "Nice City" and later complained about the other games Andy had given him, which included "Pacifist Man", "Resident Good" and "Eternal Lightness." It's also hinted in the ending that she only joined up with them in order to have an excuse to get the kids off video games.
  • Unexpectedly Obscure Answer: Jason comes up with a quiz show called I Want to Be a Millionaire, which he talks his dad into playing. He starts off by switching to math questions after Roger says that he was an English major, and the first question is "What is the 8,346th digit of pi?" The trick being that every time Roger gets a question wrong, he has to pay Jason that amount.
  • Unexpectedly Realistic Gameplay: Jason once spent a week trying to defeat the Red Orb Guardian. Paige instantly bypasses it by... bypassing it. Jason declares just walking past a menacing, powerful boss to win to be "counterintuitive," to which Paige asks him how many nanoseconds a day he spends in the real world. (See also Lord British Postulate.)
  • Unfortunate Implications: In-universe, Roger tells Andy about Jason's ambitious project about creating a robot that can obey his every command (including his chores and annoying his sister, among other things), and also told Andy that he suggested to Jason that "if he added in some lipstick, [Jason]'d have the perfect wife." to Andy's face as she scowls upon hearing this. She doesn't take it well.
    • Another in-universe example is where Roger returns from the store and buys hygeine products for his family. He gives Paige a huge container of pimple cream (he went to a warehouse club to get them), causing Paige to react with emotional distress at the unintended implication that she was extremely prone to breaking out with acne, causing Andy to inform him never to buy hygene products from the club ever again. He didn't take the clue, as he also gives her anti-graying formula that's of a similar size, although we never see Andy's reaction. It's actually easier to list the in-universe ones than the YMMV ones in this strip.
    • Also, Roger mentions to Peter that he loves spring weather and reminisces that he and his friends often went in the noontime to relax near the lake. Peter then asks if that meant that Roger skipped his classes, with Roger being rendered speechless. It then cuts to Peter mentioning that Roger told him (in what was implied to be saving face for his earlier implication) that in Roger's day, good weather was on weekends.
  • Unsound Effect: "Crank" and "uncrank" to indicate a thermostat being turned up, then down, the latter perhaps a more egregious example than the former.
  • Useful Book:
    • Paige asks to borrow one of Andy's favorite books. Andy is excited and happy until Paige returns with the book two seconds later, explaining that she just needed it to kill a spider.
    • A similar comic had her remarking on Paige borrowing a bunch of books like the encyclopedia set and dictionary; it turns out she was just changing a light bulb.

    V-Z 
  • Vandalism Backfire: Jason and Marcus are at science camp and get into a prank war with Jason's sort-of girlfriend Eileen and her new friend Phoebe. The boys decide to win the war by sabotaging the girls' science project but get lost in the dark cabin where the projects are and end up sabotaging their own project. Then, to add insult to injury, it turns out the the girls' project is one of the top two—with Phoebe's brother Eugene (the most obnoxious kid at camp) having the other one. Jason and Marcus are forced to cast the deciding votes that give Eileen and Phoebe the win.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: Referenced in the aforementioned Spanner in the Works arc. After Paige defeats the monster, Jason begs her to tell him the secret:
    Paige: If you must know, I walked right by him.
    Jason: Well, of course you did, once he was dead!
    • After he gets what Paige is saying, Jason muses, "So you're not supposed to attack the unstoppable killing machine of death? How counterintuitive."
  • Viewers Are Geniuses: This strip is a treasure trove of nerd humor, to the point that they collected an entire book of such jokes titled Math, Science, and Unix Underpants.
  • The Voice: The strip has a few, including Miss Grinchley (Jason's original teacher) and Denise's parents.
    • Miss Grinchley had one, and only one, physical appearance.
  • Walking Techbane: Roger has proven completely incapable of operating a computer since the strip's first year. This is a man who once got completely wrapped up in dot-matrix printer paper; who crushed 3½ inch diskettes trying to put them in; who thought "backing up the computer" meant pushing it off the desk. He has destroyed various other forms of electronic equipment as well, and even managed to flood the house using the dishwasher.
    • Other than Roger, there was also one other instance where a character ended up ruining important equipment: When Jason was ordering tickets for Attack of the Clones, Jason and Marcus had to wait a long time (to the extent that Jason even had to use a lawn chair to wait out the loading time, and communicate with Marcus via the computer). Eventually, he did get the tickets, and speculated that the reason for the insanely long amount of time it took to download the tickets was because the theater's server was swamped. Jason was right, but not in the way he would have thought, as it immediately cut to the sink with a computer server in the sink with running water, with the head of the theater shouting to Johnston "I asked for you to wash the butter server!", thus meaning that the server was literally "swamped."
  • Watch Out for That Tree!: "We need to find softer trees."
  • What Are Records?: Word for word, from Jason.
  • What Did You Expect When You Named It ____?: Jason submitted an idea to James Cameron for Titanic II about a ship named 'Titanic II', complete with a "They thought it couldn't go wrong again..." narration.
  • What's a Henway?: Paige, trying to weasel her way out of a Macbeth report:
    Paige: What's Macbeth about?
    Andy: It's about 100 pages. Now get going.
    • Another example:
      Jason: Man... this is one cold house.
      Paige: Tell me about it.
      Jason: Well, let's see... It's got two stories, it's white with green trim, it's got four bedrooms...
    • And another:
      Peter: Hey Paige — if the kitchen's in the house and Diana's in the kitchen, what's in Diana?
      Paige: I dunno. What?
      Peter: A state.
    • A newer one:
    Paige: What's on the TV?
    Jason: The VCR... a couple of magazines... dad's bowling trophy... probably a thin layer of dust, too.
  • What the Hell, Hero?
    • Denise gives one to Peter after he punches someone, saying that he shouldn't think violence is an acceptable solution to problems. Subverted when he mentions that his victim had insulted her, and she says "And you JUST punched him in the nose?"
    • Andy gives one to Jason and Paige for not coming forward about breaking the computer when she punished their father.
    • Jason gets one from his own reflection while looking himself in the mirror, with his reflection telling him that his money will do more good helping hurricane victims than buying comics.
  • Wheel o' Feet: Parodied in one strip where Jason ties a pair of wheels with a spiral design around his waist and stomps on bottles of dry ice during gym class so that he appears to be running faster than he is.
  • Where the Hell Is Springfield?: There is evidence that the Fox family lives in a town called Hillsdale (such as a Hillsdale Mall in a 1988 strip, the letter H on the high school team's uniforms), but beyond a street address in the first strip, no real specifics have been given for their place of residence.
    • Also, since the "A" on Peter's hat is a direct reference to Amherst College, in Amherst, Massachusetts, the confusion is only greater. The same college's iconic chapel frequently appears in the background during Roger's college reunions, leading to a nice Shout-Out.
    • Several hints dropped seem to indicate they live in the Chicago area, such as Andy going to, and returning from, a Chicago Bulls game in the same night. Also, Roger mentioned he was born in Chicago at one point.
    • The cartoonist often jumbles around their location to confuse the readers. An example is one strip where Jason states that "the [Comic-Con] in San Diego is too far away" but a strip the next year has him getting ready to go to Comic-Con as though he lives there.
    • In one strip, Jason celebrates the new year at 8 am, remarking that's "it's midnight in New Guinea". This would place the Fox family in the Mountain Time Zone.
  • Whip It Good: Peter and Jason wield whips (with varying degrees of success) while emulating Young Indiana Jones.
  • Who's on First?: Jason and Marcus do one relating to How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, complete with a reference to the Trope Namer:
    Marcus: Who are they?
    Jason: Yes.
    Marcus: I mean the people.
    Jason: Who.
    Marcus: The ones standing in a circle singing that "Fahoo" song!
    Jason: They're Who.
    Marcus: What are you asking me for?!
    Jason: Abbott and Costello meet the Grinch.
    Paige: Who?
  • Who Would Be Stupid Enough: Jason asked every member of his family if they wanted to have a snowball fight with him. They each reply "Do I look like an idiot?"... until he gets to Roger, who says "Let me get my coat" before Jason can even finish the question.
  • William Telling: Roger asks Jason what sport he has taken up and Jason tells him to put an apple on his head and he'll demonstrate. Roger, wisely, flees.
    • Inverted in one strip where Jason has an arrow tied to his head, and Marcus tries to shoot apples through a bow at it. He says that way, they're only being kinda stupid.
  • Women Are Wiser: Andy, although she's frequently Not So Above It All. In fact, this eventually Flanderized to the point where she's just about as insane as the rest of the family and only thinks she's the sensible one. (And very much averted with Paige.)
  • Won't Take "Yes" for an Answer:
    • Peter's first attempt to ask Denise out.
    • Also occurs in a 1990 strip where, even after Peter places an ad in the school paper, Paige is unable to find a date for her or Nicole. A set of twins finally says yes to both of them, but Paige rescinds their offer even after spending most of the past two weeks' worth of strips complaining about her inability to find a date. Apparently, this resistance was either because they insist on having someone ask them out instead of the other way around or because the twins were totally dorky (we never actually see them, but their response to being asked out was "Golly, gosh dang, gee whiz, yes!").
  • Worst News Judgment Ever: Andy is watching the OJ Simpson trials. Suddenly, breaking news: aliens have landed and are now addressing the UN! Amazing! Now back to the OJ Simpson trials.
  • Writer's Block Montage: Occurs with Roger in the aforementioned Her Code Name Was Mary Sue story arc.
  • Writing Lines: Jason has been subjected to this on a regular basis, to the point of doing them a day in advance so he wouldn't have to miss a doctor's appointment by staying late.
  • Written Roar: "AAAA!" is the preferred method of screaming in this strip.
    • Likewise, "WAAAA!" (sometimes with a ~ at the end) is the preferred method of crying/sobbing in this strip.
  • Written Sound Effect: "Pbbspt!" is Amend's favorite onomatopoeia for Spit Takes.
  • Wrong Genre Savvy: Jason in the Red Orb Guardian strips.
    • Actually, this Trope defines Jason to a T. He seems to believe that the laws of fantasy apply to reality more often than not, but relying on them usually only get him in trouble or gets him hurt (or both). For example, when he tries to imitate Spider-Man and builds a web-shooter, he wonders why he only succeeds in getting himself tangled in it. He plays Dungeons & Dragons with Marcus, and after his characters are slaying orc armies, he wonders why the rulebook doesn't say his mother trumps them when she tells them to stop so she can set the table. Quite literally, there are dozens of examples.
    • One memorable time: While playing his online video game (it's a lot like World of Warcraft) he had his hulking orc character make a threatening challenge to a character using a scantily-clad, female, elf character, but then asked her not to touch him, as he "didn't know if this armor protected him from cooties". (As you might expect, that caused her to take her gloves off, and he started wondering whether or not he should retreat.)
    • After so many years, he seems to have finally gotten this hint in this strip. (Kryptonite? yeah, sure.)
    • Or maybe not. In a strip after that, Andy told him she didn't want him watching Game of Thrones because he was too young for, causing Jason to talk to her in the same derogatory way the male characters in the show do to women. Andy quickly made him regret it by calling their cable provider and canceling HBO.
  • Yet Another Christmas Carol: A two-week storyline has Jason having a dream involving the cast as the characters of A Christmas Carol (thanks to Andy's garlic, green pepper and tofu chili, 'the meal of a thousand nightmares'). Paige is Christmas Past, and shows him how happy she was before he came along; Peter was Christmas Present and, after making the standard "Present/Presents" mistake, eats the mountain of food; Quincy is Christmas Yet To Come, and shows Jason his grave (which freaks him out, since he died the day before The Phantom Menace came out.
  • You Are Grounded: Happens several times to Peter. In fact, in one series, Andy grounded him for seeing Kill Bill 2, then grounded him for another week after figuring out he saw the first Kill Bill movie the year before. Andy eventually had released Peter from being grounded, although only because trying to ground him for two weeks actually proved to be cruel and unusual torture for the rest of the family.
  • You Do NOT Want to Know: This is Roger's answer when Andy asks just how zoned out she was with her allergy medication's side effects. It's also shown to send her into a Mushroom Samba (one of the kids offscreen asks Andy if she could take the Pink Floyd out of the music player, and Andy wonders who wrote squiggly lines on her hand).
  • You Make Me Sic: Done frequently by Andy. She tries to justify it by being an English major who appreciates the value of the language, but judging from Peter's response of "You're coming through real clear", it doesn't work.
    • Roger, of all people, chews out a co-worker for turning in a typo-filled paper. Said co-worker blames it on his computer's lack of a spell checker.
      • Worth mentioning is that this isn't Roger complaining about a few misspelled words- the co-worker had the spelling skills of a three year old. Even the simplest words are mangled, the punchline being that computerized spellchecking was so commonplace that the co-worker believed the lack of it was a perfectly acceptable excuse for the abysmal quality.
  • Your Mom: In one strip, Jason and Marcus exchange "your momma" lines as a means of trash-talking before a test. This exchange led to the title of one of the compilations, Your Momma Thinks Square Roots Are Vegetables.


Gone with the WindUsefulNotes/New OrleansA Confederacy of Dunces
Flash GordonPrint Long-RunnersFrank And Ernest
Pierre TombalThe NinetiesDilbert
The Fosdyke SagaNewspaper ComicsFrank And Ernest
Unusual EuphemismImageSource/Comic StripsAchievements in Ignorance

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