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Characters: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Arthur Dent

"I seem to be having tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle."
Played in the radio and TV series by Simon Jones; in the film by Martin Freeman

  • Achievements in Ignorance: How he managed to fly. You have to invoke this intentionally but Arthur stumbled across the technique by accident.
  • Action Survivor: Has survived many crazy science fiction adventures.
  • Badass Long Robe: His Pajama Clad Hero getup does include a long dressing gown.
  • Butt Monkey: Nothing ever goes his way.
  • Catch Phrase:
    Arthur: So this is it. We're all going to die.
  • The Comically Serious
    "Now, I am the first to appreciate a joke," said Arthur and then had to wait for the others to stop laughing.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Clearest and strongest in the original radio drama, where his sarcasm actually makes him famous among the bird people of bird people of Brontitall. In other versions this side of him is usually downplayed quite a bit, but he still occasionally gets in a few sarcasms.
    Ford: How would you react if I said I'm not from Guildford after all, but from a small planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse?
    Arthur: I don't know. Why, do you think it's the sort of thing you're likely to say?
  • Genre Savvy: Arthur always suspects the worst will happen, fitting considering he's a character in a very cynical series.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: With Ford. Even if they don't always act like the best of friends, Arthur is very happy to see Ford at the beginning of Life the Universe and Everything.
  • Iconic Item: His dressing gown and his towel.
  • No Respect Guy: He saves the Heart of Gold from missiles, but Zaphod brushes this off immediately when Arthur tells him "don't mention it."
  • Pajama Clad Hero: Despite his dressing gown being iconic, Douglas Adams himself didn't realise that Arthur would logically still be wearing it after leaving Earth until the TV series was made, meaning that Arthur's pajama clad status was not mentioned in the radio series or the first two books.
  • Screams Like a Little Girl: Not very often, but lets out unusually high shrieks at times in the radio series.
  • Unfazed Everyman: The former Trope Namer.
  • Unknown Rival: Agrajag, a reincarnating being who Arthur has unknowingly killed many, many times over. Agrajag is understandably annoyed.

Ford Prefect

"Hey, you sass that hoopy Ford Prefect? There's a frood who really knows where his towel is."
Radio: Geoffrey McGivern; TV: David Dixon; Film: Mos Def

  • Bearer of Bad News: When you tell everyone you meet that the world is going to end in a few minutes, you are indeed a bearer of bad news.
  • Cheshire Cat Grin: Smiles "a little too broadly, giving people the unnerving impression he was about to go for their neck."
  • Creepy Blue Eyes: In the TV series. The actor tried using purple contacts but they were just gilding the lily of his already creepily intense eyes. (In And Another Thing... it's revealed that Ford finds it relaxing to not blink and can go for eight minutes without doing so — he's timed it and wonders if it's a new record.)
  • Deadpan Snarker: Actual verbal irony is not a concept they have on his planet, but he still manages to be a smart-ass without it.
  • The Hedonist: All he wants from life is to drink copious amounts of alcohol and dance with girls.
  • Herald: Sends Arthur on an adventure, but far from a traditional example and in no way a mentor to the protagonist.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: With Arthur. Of all the humans to save from Earth's untimely destruction, Ford chooses his best mate in the hopes that they can bum around the galaxy together and have a laugh.
  • Human Alien: Despite presumably being the same species as Zaphod (they're semi-cousins) Ford doesn't have any extra appendages and looks perfectly human, give or take a disturbing smile.
  • Last of His Kind: To some minor degree, according to a footnote, but he doesn't seem to let it get him down.
  • No Name Given: "Ford Prefect" is an alias used on Earth due to Ford believing that cars were the dominant life form on the planet. His real name was only pronounceable in an obscure and extinct Betelgeusian tongue, and Ford's inability to pronounce it caused his father to die of shame. His schoolmates called him 'Ix', which meant "boy who is unable to satisfactorily explain what a Hrung is, or why it should collapse on Betelgeuse Seven", the cause of his original language's extinction.
  • Race Lift: Appears to be, or is described as, white in all versions but the film, where he is black.
  • Sarcasm-Blind: They don't have sarcasm in Betelgeuse. He eventually learns sarcasm in And Another Thing..., to Arthur's pride.

Zaphod Beeblebrox

“If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.”
Radio and TV: Mark Wing-Davey; Film: Sam Rockwell

  • Amnesiac Dissonance: He erased some inconvenient memories so he could become President, resulting in a new persona who finds he's not really on-board with his past self's machinations.
  • Bizarre Alien Biology: Two heads and thee arms. Depending on the version of the story, they're either natural for his species of Zaphod added them himself for a multitude of reasons.
  • The Fool: Mostly because many of his apparently random impulses are actually related to memories he erased from his mind years ago. He'd rather not think about it too hard.
  • Genius Ditz: He's a hedonistic, self-absorbed thrill seeker but he has moments of brilliance. His past self was much smarter, given the master plan he cooked up to meet and confront the ruler of the universe.
  • The Hedonist: Just like Ford.
  • Inferiority Superiority Complex: He claims to be insecure, but he's possibly just doing it for the attention.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: In more than one way. He is a jerk, but is a nice guy at heart. Also, his ship is called The Heart of Gold.
  • Large Ham: Especially the Sam Rockwell Zaphod.
  • The Load: In the movie, he spends the latter half of somewhere between this, The Millstone, and vaguely useful, because he's missing one of his heads. Ford actually has to drag him around in one or two scenes. Also, when they're getting shot at, he apparently thinks it's a dance party. Fortunately, Vogon soldiers make even the Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy look good by comparison.
  • Multiple Head Case: Subverted in most adaptations (where there's no distinction between the two heads), pretty much played straight in the movie, and zigzagged in the sixth novel, where the second head has a distinct personality after being removed and attached to the Heart of Gold.
    • In the film, Zaphod's second head often sports a Slasher Smile while making serious threats, like promising to pull Arthur's spleen through his mouth.
  • My Own Grampa: Apparently there was "an accident with a contraceptive and a time machine."
  • Obfuscating Stupidity: Also quite capable of actual stupidity. Telling the difference is tricky.
  • Screwy Squirrel: He is a complete scoundrel, will almost screw anything over for personal gain, and far from a role model. Practically the reason why he is the president of the galaxy in the first place, actually.
  • That Man Is Dead: In the back story he lobotomised himself to keep his plans secret even from himself. However, turns out that the 'new him' hates the old one and actively works against those plans.

Tricia MacMillan/Trillian Astra

"It was either this or the dole queue again on Monday."
Radio: Susan Sheridan; TV: Sandra Dickinson; Film: Zooey Deschanel

  • Ambiguously Brown: In the books, where she's "darkish", with black hair and brown eyes and a "vaguely Arabic" appearance when she wears a headscarf, although her actual ethnicity is never mentioned.
  • Brainy Brunette: Originally an astrophysicist and mathematician.
  • Married to the Job: As a reporter in Mostly Harmless.
  • My Biological Clock Is Ticking: At the time she had Random.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: "Trillian" is just a "spacy" nickname Zaphod gave her based on her real name, Tricia McMillan.
  • Parental Neglect: Her Married to the Job lifestyle means she is a pretty neglectful mother towards Random.
  • Promoted to Love Interest: In the film, she's Arthur's love interest. In every other version, Arthur tried unsuccessfully to flirt with her at a party before the events of the story and that was that.
  • Race Lift: Described as "vaguely Arabic" in the first book, implying she has South Asian ancestry. Played by white actresses in both the TV series and the film.
  • The Smurfette Principle: The only female character of note until Fenchurch and Random came along in the fourth and fifth books, respectively.
  • Women Are Wiser: She gives the impression of having her act together even when she doesn't. She's easily the most sensible and mature person aboard the Heart of Gold.

Marvin "the Paranoid Android"

"Life. Don't talk to be about life."
Radio: Stephen Moore; TV: voiced by Stephen Moore, body of David Learner; Film: voiced by Alan Rickman, body of Warwick Davis

  • Catch Phrase: "I think you ought to know I'm feeling very depressed", "Life? Don't talk to me about life." some of the first two lines he says when introduced in every continuity of H2H2. There's also his "Here I am, brain the size of a planet..." speeches.
  • The Chew Toy: He literally gets treated like crap (or makes himself believe he is, at times) by almost everything in the entire universe. The fact that he is several times older than the universe itself in the later books doesn't help much, either.
  • The Constant: And he's not happy about it.
  • Deadpan Snarker: You'd be snarky too if you hated everyone and everything. Unlike most examples of the trope however, Marvin gets no pleasure from his sarcasm.
  • The Drag-Along: Being depressed at all times, he has to be dragged along by the other characters.
  • The Eeyore: Alive and not happy about it.
  • Eye Lights Out: His death at the end of So Long and Thanks for all the Fish, after he sees God's final message to His creation.
  • Flawed Prototype: Marvin was the unsuccessful prototype for the emotion chip. Everything else that has it is irrepressibly cheerful all the time— including Eddie, a ship AI who will cheerfully tell you you're about to be vaporized by nuclear missiles, and even the individual doors which all thank you for passing through them. Marvin hates them all.
  • Image Song: He had four such songs sung by Stephen Moore, his actor from the original radio and TV series.
  • Insufferable Genius: Well, he does have a brain the size of a planet...
  • Mundane Utility: Marvin has a brain the size of a planet, and he's only assigned simple household tasks.
  • Personality Chip: As stated above: A flawed prototype.
  • Ridiculously Human Robot: Subverted. While humanoid, his emotion chip is supposed to emulate real emotions. Unfortunately, it does that too well, and only with depression.
  • Robot Buddy: Under certain definitions of the word "buddy". The marketing division of the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation was probably referring to a different robot when it advertised "Your Plastic Pal Who's Fun To Be With!"
  • Sliding Scale of Robot Intelligence: Easily of Deus Est Machina levels intelligence, but it's never put to full use.
    • At one point he is put in charge of all the computing for a robotic army and fleet that can take on the whole galaxy at once, and is still so under-challenged that he composes little poems to keep himself occupied.
  • Super-Powered Robot Meter Maids
  • Time Abyss: Oh so very, very much. In one instance he stays in one spot from approximately 1980 until the end of the universe. By the end of the series he is, by virtue of Time Travel, six times older than the universe itself! He is then brought back to life again because numerous characters that lived when he was created were still alive, and that went against the Lifetime Insurance Policy of Sirius Cybernetics Corporation.
    "The first ten million years were the worst. And the second ten million, they were the worst, too. The third ten million I didn't enjoy at all. After that, I went into a bit of a decline."

Slartibartfast

"Hang the sense of it all and keep yourself busy."
Radio: Richard Vernon (first and second series), Richard Griffiths (fourth, fifth, and sixth); TV: Richard Vernon; Film: Bill Nighy

  • Expy: Of the Doctor in Life the Universe and Everything due to the book being an adaptation of a rejected Doctor Who serial by Douglas Adams, Doctor Who and the Krikkitmen. Both the Doctor and Slartibartfast are very old human-looking aliens who travel through space and time righting wrongs in a weird looking spaceship (a police box for the former, an Italian bistro for the latter). Ford and Arthur even act as companion stand-ins.
  • Human Alien
  • Mr. Exposition: In both the first and third books, he gives out plot relevant information on galactic history and technology.
  • No Name Given: Subverted. It's not important.
  • Wizard Classic: In the TV series, he looks a lot like Gandalf. While not an actual wizard, he looks and acts the part.

Vogons

"Bloody apathetic planet, I've no sympathy."

Wowbagger the Infinitely Prolonged

Radio: Toby Longworth

  • The Cameo He shows up at the end of a Douglas Adams short story, The Private Life of Genghis Khan, and insults Khan to his face, therefore indirectly causing the Mongol's massacres.
  • Death Seeker: He would like nothing better than to finally die. He envies the dead and dying.
  • Embarrassing First Name: As is revealed in And Another Thing, his first name is Bowerick. He stopped using it because people were calling him Bow-Wowbagger.
  • Jerkass
  • Noodle Implements: How Wowbagger became immortal involves a rubber band, a boxed lunch, and a high-powered particle accelerator. People who have attempted to recreate the circumstances that made him immortal have failed, looking very stupid (or very dead) in the process. Or both.
  • Who Wants to Live Forever?: Best shown by the fact that he has watched every movie ever made at least thirty thousand times. He's utterly bored, leading to his impossible goal of personally insulting every living creature in all of time and space.

Fenchurch

Random Dent

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy ("The Book")

Radio: Peter Jones (first and second series), William Franklyn (third, fourth, and fifth); TV: Peter Jones; Film: Stephen Fry


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