Characters: Spider-Man Trilogy

The cast of the Spider-Man film trilogy directed by Sam Raimi.

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Main Characters

    Peter Parker / Spider-Man 

Peter Parker / Spider-Man

Played by: Tobey Maguire

"Whatever life has in store for me, I'll never forget these words: With great power comes great responsibility. This is my gift, my curse. Who am I? I'm Spider-Man."

The main character. Bitten by a genetically altered spider, he gains spider-based powers and after unwittingly causing his uncle's death, uses them to protect the city of New York as Spider-Man.
  • Adaptation Personality Change: Generally in-and-out-of costume, this Peter is a good deal more serious and intense, especially since Sam Raimi toned down his Motor Mouth tendencies. That said, it does hew closer to the original Stan Lee/Steve Ditko stories.
  • Adorkable: Like his comic book counterpart.
  • All Webbed Up: His webshooters are organic this time.
  • Alliterative Name: Peter Parker.
  • Animal-Themed Superbeing: Gee, I wonder what Animal Motif does Spider-Man have?
  • Arachnid Appearance and Attire: This is Spider-Man we're talking about. No further reason is needed to explain why he is the first entry for comic book section in this trope.
  • The Atoner: Uncle Ben's death motivates him to use his powers for good.
  • Badass: He's Spider-Man, after all.
  • Badass Bookworm: Doesn't appear as much as in the comics, but it's there.
  • Brilliant but Lazy: A subversion, despite being the Trope Namer. His perceived laziness is actually because he's fighting crime as Spider-Man.
  • Building Swing: As is expected from your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man.
  • Butt Monkey: Crap usually happens to him. This is painfully worse in the second film.
  • Chronic Hero Syndrome: Even after losing his powers and trying to live a normal life, he still storms into a burning building to save lives.
  • Classical Anti-Hero: Just like the Classic Comic Spidey.
  • Comes Great Responsibility: Taught to him by his uncle.
  • Dork Knight: Though he seems a lot less dorky as Spider-Man than as Peter Parker.
  • Genius Bruiser: He is the top science student in high school. In college, he can't do anything much in the first half of second film. For the second half of the second film and the entire third film, it's clearly shown he is Dr. Connors' top student.
  • The Hero: Obviously, he is the main hero of the story.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: He wanted Mary Jane since he was six years old.
  • Hero with Bad Publicity: For the most part averted, in contrast to the comic books. Jameson still gives him hard time, but the public loves him.
  • Heroic Spirit: Shown best in the second film, where he does everything in his power to save civilians in a speeding train about to crash.
  • How Do I Shot Web?: Shoots his first web accidentally in a high school cafeteria, resulting in a fight with Flash. Later, he tries to use it to web-swing, but it doesn't end well.
  • Literally Loving Thy Neighbor: With MJ.
  • Lovable Nerd: As always.
  • Nice Guy: Though the alien suit makes him not-so-nice in the third film.
  • Oblivious to Love: Has no idea that Betty, Ursula and Gwen are attracted to him until the symbiote bonds with him.
  • Only Friend: Harry Osborn was his only friend since grade school.
  • Ordinary High-School Student: He graduates from high school during the first film, and attends university for the rest of the films.
  • The Paragon: Best summed up by Aunt May in Spider-Man 2:
    May: Too few characters out there, flying around like that, saving old girls like me. And Lord knows, kids like Henry need a hero. Courageous, self-sacrificing people. Setting examples for all of us. Everybody loves a hero. People line up for them, cheer them, scream their names. And years later, they'll tell how they stood in the rain for hours just to get a glimpse of the one who taught them how to hold on a second longer. I believe there's a hero in all of us, that keeps us honest, gives us strength, makes us noble, and finally allows us to die with pride, even though sometimes we have to be steady and give up the thing we want the most. Even our dreams.
  • Refusal of the Call: Peter refused to stop the robber; this indirectly led to Uncle Ben's death.
  • Single-Target Sexuality: Mary Jane is the only person he truly loved.
  • Spider-Sense: Able to detect any possible danger surrounding him. Shown in the first film, but only implied in the sequels.
  • Super Strength: Enough to stop a train (with a little help from his webs)!
  • Super Reflexes: An effect of his mutation.
  • Unlucky Everydude: Especially in the second film.
  • Wall Crawl: Thanks to small hairs on his fingertips.
  • You Fight Like a Cow: Throws battle taunts once or twice in each film; in other words significantly less than in the comics.
    • However, this is somewhat justified by the fact that Spidey is known to shut up when things get serious, which is a large amount of both the second and third film. It can also be argued that this was done to keep the tension of situations rather than lose it when Spidey makes a joke, which is one of the most nebulous complaints of The Amazing Spider-Man franchise.

    Mary Jane Watson 

Mary Jane Watson

Played by: Kirsten Dunst

"Go get them, Tiger."

Peter's Love Interest.
  • Abusive Parents: Her father is not a model parent.
  • Adaptation Personality Change: Since she's a Composite Character of herself and Peter's other girlfriends, this Mary Jane lacks some of her original personality, namely in that she's far more sober and reserved. The original Mary Jane in the original and Ultimate comics was known for being very witty and charming, and generally eases up Peter when he gets too serious.
  • Big Bra to Fill: Mary Jane is one of the curviest non-superheroic females in the entire Marvel Universe. Kirsten Dunst doesn't quite have the body that Mary Jane in the comics does (but few Real Life people do).
    • Maybe not quite, but anyone who saw that scene in the rain knows Dunst is far from flat-chested. She's closer to her character's comic book proportions than just about any other Hollywood actress would be.
  • Composite Character: She has some traces of Gwen Stacy, flat-out stated by Word of God to be the case. Her lively but pained character is based on Comics!MJ, but her Girl Next Door exterior is Comics!Gwen.
    • Mary Jane also has a strong basis in Liz Allan. Like Allan, MJ in the movies is a classmate and longtime crush of Peter's who is much higher on the social latter and dates Flash Thompson (although MJ did briefly date Flash as well; it didn't last long). The actual similarities MJ has with her comics counterpart are her red hair, her being Peter's neighbor, her coming from an abusive household, her brief relationship with Harry, her vivaciousness in her school days masking her insecurity and pain, and her aspirations to be an actress.
  • Damsel out of Distress: While she does ultimately have to be saved from falling by Peter (with aid from Harry), she actually gets out of danger repeatedly during the climax of Spider-Man 3 (dodging falling bricks, jumping out of a falling truck, swinging on a web to avoid said truck crushing her and hanging on for a good while), and even saves Peter from Venom at one point by dropping a cement brick on his head.
  • Distressed Damsel: Ends up getting kidnapped by villains in every film.
  • Girl Next Door: Referred to as such by Peter. Provides the page image.
  • Fiery Redhead: Mary Jane is one of most famous examples of this trope.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: She is The Hero's One True Love and is a redhead.
  • Literally Loving Thy Neighbor: With Peter.

    Harry Osborn / New Goblin 

Harry Osborn / New Goblin

Played by: James Franco

Spider-Man will pay. I swear on my father's grave Spider-Man will pay.

Peter's best friend.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He gets impaled by his own glider while saving Peter in the third movie.
  • Hidden Depths: Deep down, he always resented Peter for being his father's favorite and "stealing" Mary Jane.
  • Legacy Character: Takes his father's equipment and becomes the New Goblin.
  • Parental Neglect: By his father.
  • Redemption Equals Death: Figuratively took a bullet meant for Peter and was able to make amends to his estranged friends before succumbing to his wounds.
  • Took a Level in Badass: As the New Goblin in the third film.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: By the second film, he's rude towards a lot of people who aren't Peter and MJ, at one point reacting poorly when a man tries to congratulate him for something.
    • Though he was briefly a jerkass towards MJ in the first movie when he called Norman a "psycho" because she overheard him insulting her. Later in the second movie, he started to become a jerkass towards Peter after getting drunk and yells out his resentments towards Peter.
  • Turn Out Like His Father: By the third movie. His butler even compares them in the second movie.
    Harry: Good night, Bernard.
    Bernard: Your father only obsessed over his work.
    Harry: (irritated) Good night, Bernard.
  • Two Guys and a Girl: Peter, Harry and Mary Jane.
  • "Well Done, Son!" Guy: Always wanted his father's approval.
  • You Killed My Father: He believes Spider-Man murdered his father. Until his butler revealed the truth.

Antagonists

    Dennis Carradine 

Dennis Carradine

Played by: Michael Papajohn

The carjacker who murdered Uncle Ben. Or so it seems.

    Dr. Norman Osborn / Green Goblin 

Dr. Norman Osborn / Green Goblin

Played by: Willem Dafoe

Harry's father.

    Dr. Otto Octavius / Doctor Octopus / "Doc Ock" 

Dr. Otto Octavius / Doctor Octopus / "Doc Ock"

Played by: Alfred Molina

A scientist whose nuclear fusion reaction experiment goes horribly wrong.
  • Adaptational Heroism: He is a more traditional Tragic Villain than his comic counterpart.
  • A.I. Is a Crapshoot: He is Genre Savvy enough to know that this is a very real possibility with the radically advanced AI in his tentacles and that having said AI connected directly to his own brain could have some very dangerous consequences. Unfortunately, the failsafe he installs to protect himself gets fried when his experiment doesn't go as planned and the influence of the tentacles quickly leads directly to his inevitable Face-Heel Turn.
  • Alliterative Name: Otto Octavius.
  • Anti-Villain: Woobie Anti-Villain. A genuinely good man and husband wishing to use his intelligence for the good of mankind who turns into a monster because of his failed experiment and tries to replicate it despite endangering half of New York.
  • Badass Longcoat: Wears one to hide his tentacles.
  • Big Bad: He is the main antagonist of the second film, though his metal arms are actually manipulating him.
  • Combat Tentacles: Well he is called "Dr. Octopus." And the four metal arms look like tentacles.
  • Conspicuous Trenchcoat: Only way to hide his tentacles, although he only hides them during the bank scene.
  • Cybernetics Eat Your Soul: The tentacles manipulate him to re-build his fusion reactor and continue his experiments, no matter the cost.
  • Evil Hand: The tentacles have an advanced AI. So advanced that Octavius added an inhibitor chip on them to protect his higher brain functions. The chip gets destroyed in the accident and, with their newfound freedom, the tentacles enter Octavius' mind and manipulate him into rebuilding his fusion reactor.
  • Freak Lab Accident: Became Doc Ock after his experiment demonstration failed horribly.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: He destroys his fusion reactor to save New York and drowns with it.
  • Ignored Epiphany: Initially admits his fusion reaction was a failure, but goes immediately to self-denial and starts rebuilding his machine.
  • Morally Ambiguous Doctorate: After the accident.
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous: He has four metal arms permanently attached to him.
  • No Shirt, Long Jacket: Can't wear a shirt due to the way the tentacles are strapped on him.
  • Nice Guy: Before the accident.
  • Redemption Equals Death: "I will not die a monster!"
  • Reluctant Mad Scientist: It was the tentacles that were making the decisions, not him.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: He wanted to use his intelligence for the good of mankind and hoped to do this with his fusion reactor. Unfortunately, the fusion experiment fails horribly, resulting in his wife's death and the tentacles fusing permanently to his body. Manipulated by the tentacles, he goes back to rebuilding the fusion reactor and doesn't care about the danger it brings to the city.
  • Tragic Villain: The man is not and doesn't want to be evil, but his tentacles completely took over him until the end of the second film.

    Edward "Eddie" Brock, Jr. / Venom 

Edward "Eddie" Brock, Jr. / Venom

Played by: Topher Grace

Peter's photographer rival, who later bonds with an alien symbiote Peter gets rid of.
  • Adaptational Villainy: Comic book Venom had some traits of being an Anti-Hero; he would try to protect innocents and stop other criminals when not seeking Spider-Man. Here, Eddie fully admits to Peter that he enjoys being a villain. Even before the merge, Eddie was a self-centered jerk who felt the world was centered around him.
  • Big Bad: The Venom symbiote is this in the third film, with Brock/Venom as the Final Boss.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: With Sandman in the third film.
  • Blond Guys Are Evil: He is a Jerkass even before the merge.
  • Comic Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: Even after bonding to the symbiote, Eddie isn't called "Venom" except in the end credits.
  • Composite Character: This version of Eddie is a mixture of the mainstream and Ultimate Venoms, with a touch of the animated series thrown in for good measure. This version even has some elements of Venom's offspring, Carnage, such as having bonded with the symbiote so completely that he refers to himself with singular pronouns rather than the plural pronouns that comic Venom does and being a completely psychotic villain with no redeeming qualities as opposed to comic Venom who, outside of his innate hatred of Spider-Man, is a classic Noble Demon-style Anti-Villain.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: Wants Peter to die for exposing him and stealing his girl (who never had any interest in him whatsoever).
  • Evil Counterpart: To Peter. He is a reporter like him, but tries to earn his money through framing rather than decent work. He tries to get a girl, but through imposing himself on her. He gets Spidey-esque powers, but chooses to become a villain rather than a hero, etc., etc.
  • Fangs Are Evil: After bonding to the symbiote, he has fangs even with his mask retracted.
  • Freudian Excuse: Averted. All the bad things that happened to him are completely his own fault and deserved, and him becoming a supervillain rather than making up for his faults shows just how much of a self-centered jerk he is.
  • From Nobody to Nightmare: Goes from being a disgraced jerk of a photographer to a legitimate threat to Spider-Man simply by virtue of being in the right place at the right time.
  • It's All About Me: His purpose in the film is to show someone (unlike Peter, MJ, and Harry) whose descent into selfish behavior is irreversible and who can't forgive others for their selfishness toward him.
  • Jerkass: He's as douchey as Peter is nice.
  • Lightning Bruiser: Faster and stronger than Spider-Man thanks to the symbiote.
  • More Teeth than the Osmond Family: Eddie has the classic gaping maw full of fangs, but unlike most other versions, the symbiote's mask acts as lips so they're not visible when his mouth is closed.
  • Never My Fault: True to his comic self, he blames Peter/Spider-Man for his shortcomings rather than take responsibility.
  • Paparazzi: Harasses Spider-Man trying to take pictures of him to win the Bugle's contest, and when Spider-Man smashes his camera out of frustration, Eddie photoshops a fake image to incriminate him in a bank robbery.
  • Rival Turned Evil: Started of as The Rival of Peter in the Daily Bugle and ended as his Evil Counterpart and Arch-Enemy.
  • Stalker with a Crush: After Gwen rejects him. This is much emphasized in the original script.
  • Tainted Veins: When he retracts his mask, tendrils of the symbiote remain stuck to his face and neck, thus giving him this appearance. In addition, the silvery webbing motif the symbiote manifested when bonded to Spider-Man becomes distorted and vein-like when bonded to Eddie.

     Flint Marko / Sandman 

Flint Marko / Sandman

  • Accidental Murder: He didn't intentionally killed Ben Parker.
  • Adaptational Heroism: Downplayed. Comic book Sandman is a crook for selfish reasons, although he is one of the more noble villains in Spidey's Rogues Gallery.
  • Anti-Villain: Well-Intentioned Anti-Villain. He only wanted to get money to pay for his daughter's medical treatment.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: With Venom in Spider-Man 3.
  • Dishing Out Dirt: Thanks to the particle accelerator incident, he becomes a being composed entirely of sand.
  • Elemental Shape Shifter: Sandman can become sand and change his shape so he can fit through small gaps or become a sand giant.
  • Kick the Dog: Yes, he is a tragic character and he wants to help his daughter, but him willingly teaming up with Venom to kill at least a few dozen cops and brutally beating Peter to near-death was still not justified.
  • Mighty Glacier: His speed is greatly reduced while in his "sand giant" mode.
  • One-Winged Angel: His "sand giant" form.
  • Redemption Earns Life: Ultimately, Peter was able to forgive him and Flint is obviously contented to know that.
  • Tragic Villain: Even more than Norman and Octavius; Marko is the victim of other people's science rather than his own.
  • Two First Names: Marko is commonly used as a first name.
  • Villain Teamup: With Venom.
  • Voluntary Shapeshifting: Can change into a sandstorm or a 50-foot tall monstrosity after absorbing enough sand.
  • You Killed My Father: Turns out he was the man who shot Uncle Ben. It's later revealed to have been an accident.

Supporting characters

    May Parker 

May Parker

Played by: Rosemary Harris

"Revenge is like a poison. Before you know it, it has turned you into something ugly."

Peter's aunt.

    Ben Parker 

Ben Parker

Played by: Cliff Robertson

"With great power comes great responsibility. Remember that, Pete. Remember that."

Peter's uncle.

    Dr. Curt Connors 

Dr. Curt Connors

Played by: Dylan Baker

Peter's college physics professor.

    J. Jonah Jameson 

J. Jonah Jameson

Played by: J. K. Simmons

"Who is Spider-Man? He's a criminal, that's who he is."

Peter's boss at the Daily Bugle. Cantankerous and loud, his first dedication is to his money. And he doesn't like Spider-Man.
  • Alliterative Name: Three names, all begin with Js.
  • Bad Boss: Is constantly seen yelling and berating his employees.
  • Butt Monkey: Bad things tend to happen to him a lot.
  • Grumpy Old Man: To the freaking core!
  • Hey, You!: This is practically how he calls people.
  • Hidden Heart of Gold: Despite being a Jerkass most of the time, he is still a good person deep down.
    • Perhaps one of the most notable examples would have to be him immediately lying to the Green Goblin to protect Peter's identity in the first film, even while the Goblin chokes him.
  • Inspector Javert: Firmly believes that Spidey is evil.

    Joseph "Robbie" Robertson 

Joseph "Robbie" Robertson

Played by: Bill Nunn

A longtime employee at the Daily Bugle.

    Elizabeth "Betty" Brant 

Elizabeth "Betty" Brant

Played by: Elizabeth Banks

"Welcome to the Bugle."

Jameson's secretary at the Daily Bugle.
  • '20s Bob Haircut: Her signature hairstyle.
  • Alliterative Name: Betty Brant.
  • All Love Is Unrequited: Obviously has a crush on Peter, who is head-over-heels for Mary Jane.
  • Demoted to Extra: None of characterizations from the comics made it into the trilogy with the exception of being Peter's potential love interest, and even that isn't as prominent compared to the source material.
  • Girl Friday: To Jameson.
  • Sexy Secretary: To the point that both Peter and Eddie hit on her as much as they can in the third film.
  • Woman in Black: Is fond of wearing black outfits.

    Gwen Stacy 

Gwen Stacy

Peter's classmate and the apple of Eddie's eye.

    Ursula Ditkovich 

Ursula Ditkovich

Played by: Mageina Tovah

An unassuming girl next door who is the daughter of Peter's landlord.

Alternative Title(s):

Spider Man 1, Spider Man 3, Spider Man 2