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Characters: Hitman

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    The Games 

Agent 47

  • Anti-Hero: A firm Nominal Hero. If 47's targets weren't all evil, and if it wasn't for his handful of Morality Pets, 47 would have no heroic features at all. But in Hitman 2 and Absolution he become a type 4
    • Character Development: Absolution is the first time in-story where 47's motivations are altruistic. He still gets paid for his altruism, though.
      • Apart from Hitman 2, where his goal is to save Father Vittorio, though he goes back to a life of contract killing when he realises that he can't find peace.
  • Anti-Villain
  • Asexuality
  • The Atoner: In Hitman 2. It doesn't last long.
    • Somewhat in Absolution as well. Diana points out that Victoria is very much like him (both were bred to be super assassins by unscrupulous individual) but Victoria hasn't really gone through the Training from Hell or programmed as heavily or been forced to kill. She has a chance to leave the life behind and be normal. 47's goal is ensuring that she had the choice he never really had.
  • Badass
    • Badass Baritone: Provided by David Bateson.
    • Badass in a Nice Suit: One of the first things 47 ever saw of the world outside the asylum was a store that sold expensive business-suits. Needless to say, it influenced his taste in clothes quite a bit. He's rarely seen without his suit.
    • Badass Grandpa: Could, theoretically, count as this. By the time of Absolution he's already 48 years (he was born in '64 and the game was released in 2012), which makes him pretty old for a videogame protagonist. The Badass part is undeniable though.
    • Bald of Awesome/Bald of Evil
    • Super Soldier: Could be seen as this, since he was genetically engineered specifically to go beyond the limits of human physical abilities and intelligence.
  • Being Evil Sucks: One possible interpretation, implied in both Absolution and Silent Assassin. Given his desire to save Victoria it can well be argued that he only does killing because at this point it's all he knows how to do.
  • The Chessmaster: If you play stealthy and make people's deaths look like accidents.
  • Cloning Blues: Averted. He doesn't seem too bothered about it, even when his clones try to kill him.
    • He does however tell Father Vittorio in Silent Assassin that he feels he "does not belong in this world" and worries that he has no soul because of it.
  • Cold Sniper
  • Combat Pragmatist: Willing and able to use pretty much anything in a fight, from marble busts and bricks to pianos and electrified fences. His unarmed combat style is best described as "brutally efficient", as expected of a combination of Krav Maga, Jiu-Jitsu and Escrima.
  • Consummate Professional: Generally portrayed as this, particularly if the Silent Assassin rank is achieved.
  • The Dreaded: Few people have heard of him, but those who do know of him as someone who can kill you before you even know something is wrong. By Absolution, he's gained a reputation as the Hitman.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: When he learns of what happened to Victoria in Absolution he states "I can no longer be a part of this." and from then he goes to great lengths to protect her.
    • Up until Diana, he has successfully disposed of every single one of his marks, regardless of the client's motive; crime lords, rival assassins, drug smugglers, crown witnesses, black sheep and disappointments, etc. It is unknown what 47's exact standards are, since so far there had been only one contract which violated them and he still carried it out (to an extent).
  • Guns Akimbo: The Silverballers. Of course, if the game is played right 47 almost never actually uses them except at the end of Blood Money.
  • Had Five Fathers and Self-Made Orphan: Strictly non-romantic example, as he was cloned using the genetic material of five different men who formulated the whole project and left to Ort-Meyer to make. He is then fooled by one of his fathers to kill the other four so he wouldn't have to share the fruits of his work and 47 then kills him in revenge.
  • Hitman with a Heart: A characteristic of 47 is a reluctance to kill or abandon certain innocents but, once the trigger is pulled, a total absence of remorse afterwards. He claims that it leaves another body to hide and also calls it unprofessional.
  • Holy Hitman: Following Codename 47, he found God and shed his world possessions. His salary from that game was donated entirely to the Catholic church.
  • Iconic Item: The Silverballers and fibre wire. To a lesser extent, the W2000 rifle (when packed into a suitcase).
  • Icy Blue Eyes: Used to highlight his cold, professional personality.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: Is described as a peerless marksman only inhibited by any mechanical flaws with the weapon he's firing. Notably, it Hitman 2, he's able to kill two targets at once with a Sniper Rifle.
  • Ink-Suit Actor: His appearance is based off of his voice actor, David Bateson.
  • I Work Alone: Not counting Agent Smith's rare appearances, where he's usually the Distressed Dude with some useful info regarding the target.
  • Man in White: In the final mission of Blood Money.
  • Morality Pet: Lei Ling, Father Vittorio, a few animals he keeps and Victoria.
  • Mix-and-Match Man: Created from the DNA of 5 of the world's top criminals.
  • Noble Demon
  • Not Distracted by the Sexy
  • Not Good with People: Animals, especially small ones, such as birds and rabbits, seems to be one of the only things 47 display any true fondness towards. But just as with anything else in his life, he will kill any pet he has in his possession without hesitation (although in these cases not without regret), if they pose a liability to him.
  • One-Man Army
  • Only in It for the Money: So much so that, when Diana warns him that the Franchise are coming to kill them both, he still demands to be paid before he'll take the fight to them.
  • Pragmatic Villainy: Prefers not to kill people other than his target unless necessary. His main reasons being that it is very unprofessional to do so and attracts unwanted attention.
  • Professional Killer
  • Punch Clock Villain: Don't take it personally if he kills you; it's just business.
  • Save the Day, Turn Away: In the second game.
  • Scannable Man
  • Sharp-Dressed Man: The one luxury he allows himself is a nicely cut suit.
  • Shoot the Dog: When forced to kill civilians to preserve his identity.
  • Super Soldier: Essentially what he is.
  • The Stoic: 47 is very unflappable. Even when he's wounded.
    • Not So Stoic: However; Diana's betrayal in Blood Money makes him visibly angry, to the point where he shouts "Bitch!" at her, which marks the only time he ever has been verbally aggressive on-screen. He also clearly expresses regret when he kills his pet canary because of a false alarm.
    • Made even more apparent in the cutscene before Terminus, when contemplating what the ICA did to Victoria, he flat out states, "I can no longer be part of this." To those who've played all the games, it's almost a Wham Line.
    • When The Saints track him to his motel and blast his room with an RPG, his eyes widen.
  • Themed Aliases: Many of the aliases he takes on (Tobias Rieper, Metzger, Krupps, Dr. Cropes) are death related.
  • Unusual Eyebrows: Not unusual on their own, but 47's large, jet black eyebrows stick out on 47's otherwise pale, hairless head.
  • You Are Number 47
  • Welcome Back, Traitor: After spending most of Absolution as a rogue agent, it's implied in Diana's letter that 47 will be welcomed back into the Agency now that he's helped to expose Travis' corruption.

Diana Burnwood

Agent Smith

Doctor Otto Ort-Meyer

Sergei Zavorotko

Inspector Fournier

  • Big Bad: The closest thing that Contracts has to one.
    • Non-Action Big Bad: He goes down as easily as any beat cop, in fact the goal is to take him out without a fight since he's surrounded by SWAT. This is notable because the series usually has the Big Bad be a lot tougher than the basic Mooks if you try to take them in a straight fight.
  • Death by Secret Identity: Is killed by 47 to ensure his identity is protected. In fact, Contracts starts out with Fournier trying to kill 47 after discovering him. But he would then be killed by the end of the game.
  • Dirty Cop
  • French Jerk

Alexander Leland Cayne

Mark Parchezzi III

  • Cloning Blues: As averted as 47.
  • Cool Shades
  • The Dragon
  • Evil Albino
  • Evil Counterpart: He works for The Franchise, which plants him firmly in evil territory, no matter the position you feel 47 himself takes.
  • "Hero" of Another Story: You constantly see reports of his own exploits running parallel to 47's in the newspaper articles in Blood Money. A conversation between a nurse and a doctor in the Flatline mission also implies he was recently involved in a mission at the rehab clinic 47 was currently at.
  • Made of Iron: Although not as tough as the super villains from the earlier games, he's still the hardiest enemy in Blood Money. He can take about 10-12 standard pistol shots to the chest before falling, compared to only a couple shots for everybody else.
  • The Rival
  • Smug Snake

Blake Dexter

Benjamin Travis

  • Artificial Limbs: He has a prosthetic arm.
  • Big Bad: Shares this role with Dexter.
  • Cutscene Boss
  • Evil Cripple: He has a prosthetic arm.
  • Fat Bastard
  • Non-Action Big Bad
  • Properly Paranoid: Travis is initially portrayed as insanely paranoid for having his men seize control of a public cemetary and dig up Diana Burnwood's corpse just to make sure that she's really dead; even his aide goes so far as to openly ridicule him for it. However, the final scene reveals that Diana is somehow still alive.
  • Red Right Hand: Has a prosthetic arm which he mostly uses as a cigarette holder.
  • Revealing Coverup: His attempts to prevent the less radical elements of the ICA from learning about Victoria- coupled with the measures taken to ensure that Diana really is dead- ultimately start drawing attention from them, especially once they cause 47 to go rogue. By the final level, Jade warns Travis that Agency higher-ups are starting to ask questions.

Victoria

Birdie

  • Chronic Backstabbing Disorder: Gives 47 information he needs before selling him out to Dexter and the ICA. When Dexter humiliates him, he sells him out to 47.
  • Karma Houdini: During the game he sells out anybody as long as theirs a reward or his life is threatened, 47 included. He survives the game and is last seen in The Stinger offering the police of Chicago information about 47.
  • Mission Control: During the first Chicago missions.
  • Non-Action Guy: When he finds out Wade's men are coming for him he completely freaks out.
  • Only Known by His Nickname
  • Punny Name: His nickname is Birdie and he's an information broker. (As in, a little birdie told ya.)
  • The Rat
  • Wild Card

Edward Wade

Sanchez

  • Big Eater
  • Blood Knight/Worthy Opponent: When 47 tells him "You know I can't let you live" during their cage match, he just smiles and keeps fighting.
  • The Brute: Incredibly huge, rarely speaks, brutalizes whomever Dexter says to.
  • Cutscene Boss
  • The Dragon: To Dexter.
  • Jack Bauer Interrogation Technique: 47 performs one on him should they fight in the ring.
  • Nice Hat: Is usually seen wearing a cowboy hat.
  • Super Soldier: He was genetically augmented by Dexter Industries as a child for enhanced strength. However, the resulting gigantism was an unintended side-effect that made him entirely unsuitable as a supersoldier (it's impossible for him to blend in a crowd, and in a straight firefight he's a huge target), so Dexter just keeps him around as a bodyguard.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: Seems to embody this trope, but when you're 7'6" and 440lb, you can sort of getaway with it. However, if you masquerade as The Patriot and fight him in Fight Night, it becomes pretty clear that against an expert hand-to-hand combatant, his strength doesn't count for much.
  • The Worf Effect: His role in Absolution seems partly to show how massively strong he is by incapacitating 47 in Terminus, then showcasing just how badass 47 is later on when he fights him one-on-one and curb stomps him. Alternatively, you can just drop the lighting gantry on him.

Layla Stockton

  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: Her personal weapon is a golden SIG Sauer P226 with wood grips.
  • The Dragon: To Dexter.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: She is horrified when Dexter kills an innocent young maid in cold blood to frame 47.
    "You fucking animal!"
  • Mushroom Samba: One of the many ways to kill her is to poison her sushi, resulting in hallucinogenic side-effects as the toxin takes effect; long story short, Layla jumps from a balcony while giggling at visions of ladybugs flying above her head.
  • Only Sane Woman: Unlike Dexter she realizes how stupid it is to murder a maid, blame an unconscious 47 for it and setting a whole hotel on fire instead of just killing him.
  • Trophy Girlfriend: As Dexter sums it up: “Your job is to shut up, do what I say and look good”.
  • The Vamp: If confronted in the panic room a cut scene plays in which she tries to seduce 47. Then she pulls out a gun and tries to to shoot him.

Lenny Dexter

    The Comic 

Tommy Monaghan

  • Badass: Any regular human who manages to get the drop on Batman, even temporarily, is a badass by default. He also puked curry on Batman's boots and got away with it.
  • Fighting Irish
  • Hitman with a Heart: Tommy only kills people whom he regards as "deserving it" (ie. Mafia dons, super-criminals etc), although other characters do point out the stupidity of this from time to time.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: The fact that he has X-Ray vision and telepathy and helps a lot, but even before he gained powers, Tommy was pretty handy with guns. This is probably due to his stint in the Marines.
  • Military Superhero: Although calling Tommy a superhero is a bit of a stretch, he served in the Marines.
  • Nineties Anti-Hero: Tommy is both a straight example of this trope, as well as a subversion of it. He has all of the hallmarks of one, but he also has a depth of character and humanity that is unusual among his peers.
  • Semper Fi
  • Tall, Dark and Snarky: Tommy is very cynical, world-weary, and always has a sarcastic quip in hand, usually of the Gallows Humor variety.
  • Unscrupulous Hero: Don't be fooled: Tommy is a stone cold, unrepentant killer, but all of the people he kills are the types that would do much worse to other people who didn't deserve it.

Natt "The Hat" Walls

Sean Noonan

Ringo Chen

Deborah Tiegel

Hacken

Pat Noonan

Sixpack

Bueno Excelente

The Defenestrator

Dogwelder

Friendly Fire

Jean de Baton-Baton

Flemgem

Shakes

Sister Concepta

Wendy

Baytor

Maggie Lorenzo

Kathryn McAllister

Etrigan

Moe and Joe Dubelz

  • Conjoined Twins
  • Overlord Jr.: Are described as being much more evil than their father.
  • You Killed My Father: Moe thinks that Tommy killed his mob boss father Robert Dubelz. Joe would probably agree, but he got killed very quickly in the series. Tommy was planning to kill the senior Dubelz, but an alien parasite beat him to the job.

The Mawzir

Nite-Fist

  • Reality Ensues: Despite the obvious allusion to Nightwing, Nite-Fist gets blown away fairly quickly when he faces well organized armed gangsters instead of the usual lowlives he's used to dealing with.
  • Sociopathic Hero

Johnny Navarone

Agent Truman

Doctor Jackson

"Mens Room Louie" Feretti

Isabella Ferretti

Benito Gallo

  • Bad Boss: After a Mook refused to run directly into a fire fight where he would surely get killed within ten seconds, Benito threatens to slit his throat right then and there if he doesn't. The Mook did in fact die within ten seconds.
  • Badass Grandpa: Was apparently responsible for assassinating a Flying Brick superhero named Colonel Glory back in The Eighties.
  • Incest Subtext: Between him and his niece Isabella.
  • Knife Nut:

The Many-Angled Ones

  • Eldritch Abomination: No relation to the Marvel Universe characters of the same name. Though not nearly as famous, they pretty much serve the same purpose as their Marvel counterparts.


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