* Champion Hal Shear was in dire straits in his eighth game, against Adrienne. Down $500$200 and with no Fast Forward category available, his only hope was to spin three Jokers, which would give him a chance at an instant win. Luckily, he was wearing a rather loud "lucky suit". He gave it a quick rub, pulled the handle, and ''got'' his three Jokers. After nearly fainting from shock, Creator/JackBarry explained how astronomical the odds would be of someone both ''needing'' and ''getting'' three Jokers. Hal proceeded to get a very simple question right and won his game. A bit of a DownerEnding for Adrienne, though...
%%* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udMeOLWr9DQ&t=3m56 This clip]] shows a rare case in "How Low Will You Go?". While the contestant could have up to seven more clues to answer a question, [[spoiler:she asks for NO more clues and still gets it right]]!
* 1983: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpCdSWjMJTA Barry sadly sends off Joe Dunn]] as an undefeated champ by showing his accomplishments, including $66,200 in cash and prizes. This was also when the CBS limit on game show winnings was raised to $50,000 from the previous $35,000 (while the show itself was syndicated, it ran on some CBS stations and hence was subject to network rules), with a charity of the player's choice receiving what went over that. This was 21 years before Ken Jennings on ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', and was a big deal as Dunn had been a regular champ and hadn't yet played in a Tournament.
* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdF4iKeA5X4&t=14s Byron Wilson]], who came back from a $400$0 deficit by answering '''ten''' $50 Fast Forward questions in a row.
* Frank Dillon, who won the first two Tournaments, in 1977 and '78 (worth $50,000 and $100,000 in cash and prizes, respectively)...[[DownerEnding and narrowly lost the $250,000 Tournament in 1979 due to an unlucky spin]]. [[HeartwarmingMoments He also donated most of his cash winnings to various charities.]]
* Rob Griffin winning the 1980 Tournament of Champions, earning $500,000 for himself and the March of Dimes ($250,000 for the March of Dimes, and $25,000/year for 10 years for Rob). The entire Tournament is a Moment of Awesome in itself, as the total prize purse was '''''$1,000,000'''''[[note]](Sixteen champions competed, with half of the all prize money being awarded to charity. Those eliminated in the preliminary rounds received $7,500 {$7,500 to charity}, Quarterfinalists received $12,500 {$12,500 to charity}, Semifinalists received $20,000 {$20,000 to charity}, and the tournament runner-up received $100,000 {$100,000 to charity, $10,000/year for 10 years for the player})[[/note]].
* From the 1990 version, the five times the Joker Jackpot was hit (for $8,500, $9,500, $17,500, $10,500, and the highest jackpot, $36,000).