Awesome / Academy Award

  • From 1970, Fred Astaire does an epic impromptu dance bit. Even at 71 years old, he still had some awesome moves.
  • From 1992: Jack Palance doing one armed pushups after winning Best Supporting Actor for City Slickers. Did we also mention he was 73 years old at the time? See for yourself. Also counts as a Crowning Moment of Funny.
  • From 1997: Cuba Gooding Jr.'s speech. The orchestra tried to play him off the stage, but it only ended making his speech sound all the more epic. By the end the crowd was roaring with approval and many gave him a standing ovation.
  • From 2003: Adrien Brody not only winning Best Actor for ''ThePianist'' (becoming the youngest actor to do so, at age 29), but halting the playing of the wrap-up music, to the rapturous applause of the audience, and getting two standing ovations.
  • From 2007: Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, and Steven Spielberg presenting their old pal Martin Scorsese with the Best Director Oscar for The Departed (after he was snubbed so many times before). The standing ovation lasts nearly a full minute. Look and behold.
  • From 2010: Kathryn Bigelow becoming the first woman ever to win the Best Director Oscar.
    • Even better, among those she beat was her ex-husband James Cameron, who actually took defeat very well, even joining in on the standing ovation she received.
  • From 2013: Daniel Day-Lewis winning Best Actor for the third time, for Lincoln. Which, in case you don't know, is a record for an actor. Behold.
  • From 2014:
    • Steve McQueen became the first black producer to win an Oscar for 12 Years a Slave which won for Best Picture. After giving his speech, he jumped with joy onstage while the cast and crew cheered.
    • Also, Lupita Nyong'o became one of the few actresses to win an Oscar for her film debut.
    • From that same year, Gravity completely destroying the Sci Fi Ghetto, winning 7 Oscars out of its 10 nominations, including a well deserved Best Director win for Alfonso Cuaron (who also won for Best Film Editing earlier that night).
  • From 2015:
    • Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski, whose Ida won Best Foreign Language Film, refusing to cut his acceptance speech short and outlasting the inevitable "play-off" music.
    • John Legend and Common, having won Best Original Song for their Selma tune "Glory", making pointed reference to civil rights struggles past and present during their acceptance speeches. Made especially effective by the controversial scarcity of non-white Oscar nominees that year.
    • Graham Moore's acceptance speech after winning Best Adapted Screenplay for The Imitation Game:
      Graham Moore: So, in this brief time here, what I want to use it to do is to say this: When I was 16 years old, I tried to kill myself because I felt weird and I felt different and I felt like I did not belong. And now I'm standing here and, so, I would like for this moment to be for that kid out there who feels like she's weird or she's different or she doesn't fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. You do. Stay weird. Stay different. And then when it's your turn and you are standing on this stage, please pass the same message to the next person who comes along. Thank you so much.
    • The "Everything is Awesome" performance.
    • Lady Gaga's phenomenal take on The Sound of Music doubled with an appearance by Julie Andrews to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the film.
    • Big Hero 6's win for Best Animated Film. Not only was it the first superhero-themed film (though still with hints of Oscar Bait) to win any non-technical Oscars since The Dark Knight in 2008, but it was also the first film based on a Marvel Comics property to win an Oscar of any kind, plus it was up against How to Train Your Dragon 2 (which won the Golden Globe and swept the Annie Awards prior to the Oscar ceremony) and proved for Disney that Frozen (their first film to win a Best Animated Film Oscar without Pixar's involvement) wasn't a fluke.
  • From 2016: