Authors Saving Throw / Live-Action Films


  • Cinderella (2015) makes a few alterations in response to criticisms of Disney's original film (Each human is a Flat Character, the search was poorly executed, the stepmother got away, etc.) . For example, Ella and the Prince have more of a personality now, he has an actual name, he and Ella meet each other well before the ball, the Prince's hidden presence in the search party ensures that Cinderella is found, and Lady Tremaine and her daughters are actually punished in the end.
  • In The Divergent Series: Insurgent, Tris had her hair cut into a pixie cut, changed from the chin-length haircut of the booksnote , prompting complaints. So The Divergent Series: Allegiant has her hair back at chin-length.
  • Marvel Cinematic Universe:
    • Iron Man:
    • The Avengers:
    • Avengers: Age of Ultron:
      • The film was criticized over opening the movie with Tony back in the Iron Man armor with no explanation, even though Iron Man 3 ended with Tony destroying his suits and vowing to spend more time with Pepper. This is explicitly referenced in Captain America: Civil War, with Tony saying that he was unable to remain retired after the events of Iron Man 3 because of his Chronic Hero Syndrome. More significantly, it's revealed that Pepper broke up with him because of his inability to keep his promise to her.
      • Fans disliked the slimmer and more streamlined suit War Machine wore. His new armor in Civil War is essentially an amalgamation of the two previous War Machines, combining the more advanced look of the Age of Ultron suit with the bulkier and more heavily armed look of the Iron Man 2 suit.
    • Thor:
      • Though the first movie was well-received (although not quite as acclaimed as Marvel's films usually are), both it and its sequel were criticized over the amount of time spent on Earth, as well as the human characters like Jane getting more focus and screen time than most of the Asgardians. Additionally, Jane's romance with Thor proved to be divisive, with many people thinking it was very rushed and hard to believe. One of the first details released about Thor: Ragnarok was that very little of the movie would take place on Earth, and that Jane and her buddies were being Put on a Bus.
      • It's a common joke that Thor is one of the least interesting characters in his own movies, often being overshadowed by Loki or the other Avengers during team-ups. Director Taika Waititi has said that a lot of effort went into making sure Thor has an interesting arc in Ragnarok, and that he actually gets to be the badass his fans know he can be.
    • Captain America: Civil War:
      • Kevin Feige's statements as soon as the movie was announced that the movie would not revolve around the subject of unmasking and secret identities, which marks a significant point of divergence from the original Civil War comics, as most heroes in this verse don't actually have a secret identity to begin with. And the preview released at D23 seems designed specifically to assuage several of the fan concerns seen under the Broken Base page:
      • Captain America is clearly the central figure throughout, alleviating fears that the movie would be a Cap film in name only and that he would be overshadowed by all the other superheroes. At the same time the others do appear to be more than just glorified cameos.
      • Bucky will be a prominent figure in the plot, for those worried that he would be Demoted to Extra again and that the movie was going to pull a 180 on the previous film's Sequel Hook.
      • Iron Man has a clear and more understandable stance here developed from his experiences in Age of Ultron, suggesting that he'll avoid the situation in the comics where he was a Strawman Political with a Jerkass Ball.
      • The first trailer went further to please anyone concerned about source material, as it indicates that the main source of conflict has been changed from opposing political views (which would require a big Conflict Ball to make them take up action against one-another), and more about what to do with Bucky (who is a wanted man due to the crimes committed by the Winter Soldier), and Cap willing to go against the law to protect him, which gives both sides much more grounds to stand on.note 
      • The first trailer also eased many of the worries that this was a Captain America film In-Name-Only. Prior to this, it had become commonplace for fans to dub the movie "Avengers 2.5", and there were rumors that it was effectively an Avengers movie. The Russo brothers even mentioned that the trailer's strong emphasis on Cap and his supporting characters was meant to convey that no, this is not another Avengers sequel.
      • Marketing example. There was a lot of outcry over the lack of merchandise for Black Widow and Scarlet Witch in Age of Ultron, to the point that it got coverage on mainstream news outlets and even Clark Gregg and Mark Ruffalo criticized Marvel over it. The big announcement for Civil War licensing made sure to mention that characters like Black Panther, War Machine, Black Widow, and Scarlet Witch would be heavily featured in the marketing and merchandise, seemingly going out of its way to highlight the fact that the female and minority heroes wouldn't be left out this time around.
      • Though his Badass Longcoat in Age of Ultron was better received than his Ultimates inspired initial look, Hawkeye's costume choices still got criticism for not being like his comic look, which was made worse when Jeremy Renner confirmed he wouldn't wear a mask and appeared somewhat reluctant about the idea. This quickly died down when his look for the film was unveiled, showing a new costume with a stronger purple coloring that greatly resembles his comic outfit, but with the MCU's aesthetics. Fan response has been rather positive as a result.
      • Likewise, a number of fans disliked the War Machine Mark II armor from Age of Ultron since they felt the slimmer, more streamlined suit was a poor fit for a character known for his bulky armor and insane amount of firepower. The new Mark III armor has gone over well with fans since it once again sports a bulkier, more heavily armed design closer to the one Rhodey wore in Iron Man 2.
      • There is very little romance in the movie, and Natasha still acts like a professional despite Bruce's departure. The Black Widow/Banner romance was one of the most polarizing and heavily criticized aspects of Age of Ultron. The relationship is only hinted at in a few lines of dialogue, and Steve and Sharon have a Big Damn Kiss in the midst of the movie far from main events.
      • In Iron Man 3, Tony destroyed all of his suits and vowed to quit the superhero business. Then in Age of Ultron he was back to being Iron Man as if it never happened, which a lot of viewers accused Marvel of engaging in Canon Discontinuity. In this film Tony not only explicitly acknowledges his backtracking, but reveals that the broken promise severely damaged, if not outright destroyed, his relationship with Pepper.
      • Scarlet Witch's "Sokovian" accent is heavily toned down compared to her previous appearance in Age of Ultron, likely in response to criticisms that it was too over-the-top and Narmy. Some viewers have praised the fact that her voice sounds like an actual person this time around.
      • Wanda is made an outcast and called a public menace for causing the deaths of several aid workers, in response to viewers who saw Wanda as a Karma Houdini in Age Of Ultron who was allowed to join the team despite essentially being the mastermind of the villain's plot. The deaths are also accidental on Wanda's part and she is shown to feel genuinely guilty afterwards, due to viewers saying Wanda's lack of remorse for the deaths she caused in Age Of Ultron made her harder to root for.
      • Phase 2 was criticized for straining to justify Superman Stays out of Gotham. The situation at the film's end will likely make all of Phase 3's cases of this much easier to swallow than the first two could get.
    • A recurring complaint in MCU films is that the villains tend to be Flat Characters. The writers of Doctor Strange took this to heart, and while the film's villain Kaecilius remained fairly one-dimensional, he was revealed to be a pawn for The Man Behind the Man, Dormammu, and focus was instead placed on Mordo with the goal of making him a more nuanced villain in future films. Likewise, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 has won over fans with its layered depiction of Ego the Living Planet and, to a lesser extent, the Sovereign, treating them as more fleshed-out, if still evil, characters.
  • DC Extended Universe:
    • One major criticism of Man of Steel was that Superman doesn't even try to protect civilians during his fight with Zod or lure him out of Metropolis, so that some untold number die in the city-destroying battle. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice quickly establishes this as the main genesis of Batman's fury at him, showing us Bruce Wayne's attempts to save helpless civilians in the middle of the disaster. Furthermore, during the climax we're repeatedly told that the areas of the battle is deserted...somehow, despite taking place over two major cities.
    • Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice ended up being savaged by critics for a number of reasons, with the most consistent complaints being that it was too dark and too convoluted. The follow-up, Justice League, is said to be Lighter and Softer and much more straightforward, playing to Zack Snyder's strengths as an action director. This was enforced by a sizzle reel DC released to promote the film, which showed much more humor than Dawn of Justice, as well as the Justice League members being likable and heroic rather than angsty and vicious. WB has been so adamant on enforcing the view that Justice League will be a course correction that they actually gave journalists an unprecedented tour of the set just to show off how different it'd be from Dawn of Justice.
    • Wonder Woman answers a lot of complaints about the DCEU. Considering it's much better reception among critics and strong 2nd weekend, it would appear to have worked.
      • After people complained about Superman and Batman using lethal force, Wonder Woman mostly pulls her punches despite being in an actual war (and being the only member of the DC Trinity that's often excused from the no-kill rule due to her background). She doesn't explicitly stab or slash people with her sword until the final act, especially when she's enraged by Steve's death. Instead she throws punches and kicks and uses her shield and lasso, and only chops rifles in half.
      • After the previous two films got a ton of complaints for trying to rush the setting's development until they consisted of little more than a bunch of character introductions with little plot holding them together, this film focuses entirely on Wonder Woman herself, with the framing story notably not contriving an actual appearance from Bruce despite his sizable role in it.
      • Wonder Woman has actual emotions other than brooding and rage, and her costume has brighter colors now. After criticism of the previous movies for muted colors, Themyscira is a colorful island paradise. A common complaint about Man of Steel was that the film spent too much time on Clark being conflicted over whether to help people; Diana immediately decides to help mankind because it the right thing to do.
      • The film's treatment of Chief may be a response to the Native American character Slipknot from Suicide Squad. Alongside a sympathetic backstory, Chief is portrayed as an honorable smuggler in comparison to Slipknot being an unpleasant asshole that existed solely to die.
  • Sikh groups and a number of fans in general criticized Star Trek Into Darkness for Whitewashing Khan by casting a white Brit to play him. The prequel comic (published months after the movie was released) attempted to try and fix this a bit by explaining that Admiral Marcus subjected Khan to Magic Plastic Surgery to hide his identity, but he was still an Indian Sikh by birth.
  • Jurassic World:
    • A major complaint of the third movie was how the T. rex was rather easily beaten by the Spinosaurus in a rather blatant example of The Worf Effect. This movie firmly re-establishes the T. rex as the dominant dinosaur. This film has the T. rex smash through a Spinosaurus skeleton on display on her way to confront the I. rex. Despite the I. rex being built up as more dangerous, intelligent, powerful, and sadistic, it's Rexie who ultimately comes out on top. Sure the I. rex kicks her ass at first, but unlike the Spinosaurus, the Indominus has properly established as essentially a Super Velociraptor rex. So the beatdown made sense. Plus, it allowed for the Velociraptors and T. rex team up to take down the I. rex.
    • Hasbro took some heat when the toys were first minted and sold in stores because the box descriptions used male pronouns despite the film making clear that the dinosaurs are still being bred to all be female. They didn't take long to correct the mistake on future printings.
  • Several examples in X-Men: Days of Future Past and X-Men: Apocalypse:
    • Magneto's helmet, while still recolored red from its natural silver color, is a lot darker and a lot less goofy-looking than what he wore at the end of First Class. It applies to the rest of his costume too. Given that everyone laughed their asses off at his costume back then, it's pretty obvious why the change was made.
    • After how poorly X-Men: The Last Stand and X-Men Origins: Wolverine were received by fans and critics alike, the end of Days of Future Past thankfully retconned them out of existence. Previously, Origins itself was subject to a retcon courtesy of The Wolverine, altering all but a few details.
    • X-Men and X2: X-Men United were much better received, but for ages people have complained about how Wolverine tended to steal the spotlight from the other X-Men, most notably the actual team leader Cyclops. Though he's a major player in this film, he certainly doesn't hog the spotlight nearly as much, as much of the ensemble (Professor X and Mystique especially) get a greater degree of screentime. The events of those films may have still happened but only in Broad Strokes, as the Cosmic Retcon more or less leaves the revised future a blank slate. This has given the other X-Men their chance to shine in future films, including Cyclops as his death in The Last Stand was undone.
    • Since the very first movie, fans have complained about the X-Men only wearing black leather uniforms instead of colorful costumes like in the comics. At the end of X-Men: Apocalypse, the X-Men finally don their colorful uniforms from the comics.
    • Psylocke wears her most familiar and long-lived comics outfit from the outset, looking as if she's stepped right off the page — the most comic-accurate character in any X-movie. This is also a saving throw compared to the X3 version (a Brotherhood member with camouflage powers, it was a surprise to learn that she was intended to be Psylocke).
  • The Purge is a horror/thriller which details a suburban American family's struggle to survive the titular event, which is basically an annual government-sanctioned crime spree, purportedly to give the people a chance to act out their violent urges and keep crime down. The result is a home invasion flick with a flimsy Hand Wave explaining away why the family can't just call the cops. After a year of various people snarking at the idea, the sequel, The Purge: Anarchy, attempts to remedy things by revealing that the Purge is simply a scheme by the corrupt ruling oligarchy to terrorise and murder working-class people for fun and profit. The vast majority of citizens hide from the Purge rather than participate in it, so state-sanctioned death squads roam around massacring people to keep up the statistics, and of course, the rich and powerful are completely safe from the Purge and its consequences. The sequel follows a Working Class Anti-Hero protagonist protecting a bunch of people caught up in the Purge and way in over their heads from government death squads. This simultaneously addresses the first film's copious Fridge Logic while tying it all up with a nice political satire and anti-establishment message.

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