Asshole Victim: Film


  • The Alien series:
    • Carter Burke in Aliens. He willingly sells out an entire unit of Space Marines so that he can bring back the xenomorphs for Weyland-Yutani to study and mass produce.
    • Most of the characters in Alien³ are convicted murderers and rapists. Some even try to rape Ripley at one point, and Golic is straight-up Ax-Crazy. It therefore becomes hard to root for a lot of them when the Alien kills them.
    • Dr. Mason Wren in Alien: Resurrection. He cloned Ripley in the first place and brought the Aliens back, he tries to kill Call, and leaves the others for dead so he can hijack their ship and still deliver the Aliens to Earth. His death is particularly karmic.
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street:
  • Assassins: It's strongly implied that Rath only went after bad guys while he was working as an assassin. Of the two targets we see him (try to) kill, one was another assassin who took all the messy jobs that Rath refused to take, and another a corrupt billionaire who supplied South American death squads.
  • Kirby in Bait 3D. He's the robber responsible for killing the women at the start, and tries to use another of the survivors as bait. Doyle attacks Kirby in turn and uses him as bait instead.
  • In Batman Returns, there was Max Shrek, a Corrupt Corporate Executive who tried to kill his secretary by shoving her off a building, and later tried to take over the city by recalling the mayoral election and supporting the Penguin in a bid to become mayor, which almost caused a disaster. (And that's just what's known about.) It's unlikely that anyone felt the least bit sorry for him at the end of the movie when an electricity-enhanced kiss from Selena reduced him to a charred corpse.
  • Black Christmas (2006) has Mrs Lenz and her lover. Mrs Lenz hated her husband and her son, and teamed up with her lover to kill her husband. Realizing that Billy was a witness, they locked him in the attic and kept him there for 15 years. When Billy was 12, his mother raped him to impregnate herself. After Billy's escape, they are his first two kills.
  • In the film Black Cloud, the main character assaults his girlfriend's former boyfriend Eddie after he insults her. Eddie got the girl pregnant and apparently made no effort to make any contact with her or his son for close to four years. Not exactly the nicest person.
  • Harry Prebblie in The Blue Gardenia tries to rape Norah, and is promptly killed just not by her.
  • This is the premise of The Boondock Saints. They kill gangsters who couldn't be touched by the police.
  • In Bride of Chucky, most of Chucky and Tiffany's victims fit this trope. Needle Nose Norton gets paid extra money to follow Jesse and Jade (since Jade's uncle, Warren Kincaid, who is chief of police, hates Jesse and wants to keep him and Jade apart) under the pretense of suspecting them of drunk driving. Warren plants marijuana in Jesse's van to frame him for drug possession. And the couple who rob Jesse and Jade are killed by Tiffany with mirror shards.
  • The first victim of Bubba Ho Tep is an old woman who steals another nursing home resident's packages from home and swipes the glasses off a woman in an iron lung... while said woman is awake. On the commentary, Don Coscarelli discusses this trope.
  • The murder victim in the movie Bully, which is based on a real homicide of a teen who bullied and abused his best friend, his best friend's girlfriend and all of his associates.
  • Byzantium: Ruthven deserves his death many times over.
  • This was the reason that nobody found any sympathy for the documentary crew in Cannibal Holocaust. One of their crimes involved burning down a village for no reason other than to shoot a scene. One critic actually noted "The film crew more than deserved their deaths."
  • Dr. David Drumlin deserved to get it in the neck for EVERYTHING he does to screw over Ellie Arroway in Contact.
  • Creepshow, being the troperiffic delight that it is, has lots of fun with this. We've got Nathan (emotionally abusive, murderous father), Bedelia (his insane, drunk-driving, parricidal daughter), Richard (psychotic, murderous Leslie Nielsen), Billie (emotionally abusive, nagging Adrienne Barbeau), and Upson Pratt (Corrupt Corporate Executive). In the final scene of the Framing Story, the boy who was reading the comic is torturing his abusive, hypocritical dad with a voodoo doll. The EC horror comics it's influenced by are just chock-full of Asshole Victims and Karmic Deaths.
  • Dance Me Outside: Clarence Gaskill. He's a Jerkass, a violent drunk, and a murderer. Not only that, He only spends a year in jail for murdering Little Margaret.
  • In the cop drama Dark Blue, Detective Eldon Perry frames a bunch of known hoodlums for another crime to quickly solve a case on his superior Jack Van Meter's orders. He convinces his partner Bobby to kill an escaping suspect by pointing out that no one will miss the guy anyway, but Bobby is visibly shaken by the act as he points out that this still doesn't make it right.
  • The CIA agent from the beginning of The Dark Knight Rises, whose plane is crashed by Bane... "with no survivors!"
  • Das Finstere Tal: The villagers actually thank Greider for killing the Brenners. Given that the Brenners are inbred, sadistic rapists who terrorize the villagers on a regular basis, this is unsurprising.
  • All the bikers in the original Dawn of the Dead. Particularly that one guy who decides that it's a perfect time to check his blood pressure.
  • It's not a murder-mystery, but Steve in the remake of Dawn of the Dead (2004) more than qualifies. When he finally gets zombified and then shot in the head you're likely to cheer. Also somewhat applies CJ, who's a bit of a jerk at first but does start to lighten up towards the end, and gets to die in a Heroic Sacrifice when he blows himself up to destroy a bunch of zombies so that everyone else can get away.
  • Dead Silence. As soon as he first appears, everyone knows that Det. Jim Lipton will get what's coming to him by the end.
  • Miles Kennefik, who was killed by Frank Costello, according to Captain George Ellerby from The Departed. He said that they are not going to solve the case of the "missing scumbag".
  • In Dogma, Loki visits a boardroom of Corrupt Corporate Executives, lists their individual sins (idolatry, adultery, statutory rape, intolerance, etc.), then kills them. He did spare the only one who didn't have any sins. Although she did forget to say GOD BLESS YOU!!
  • In Dogville, the viewer actually feels relieved when mobsters kill the whole goddamn population of the titular town, including the children. They're just that awful.
  • Mr. Dietrichson in Double Indemnity, for the sake of making Neff a Sympathetic Murderer.
  • The black comedy Drowning Mona. Bette Milder played Mona, a woman so universally despised that when she was killed, no one cared about her death (beyond wondering who had finally done the deed) and only her son and husband showed up at her funeral (and they weren't too broken up about it). This made the jobs of the investigators much more difficult, because practically EVERYONE in town had a reason for wanting to kill Mona, making everyone a suspect.
  • The titular character in El Esqueleto de la Sra. Morales (Skeleton of Mrs. Morales) suffers a severe case of assholism. To wit: Exploiting a malformation of hers for sympathy, feigning to ba a victim of domestic violence, attempting to poison her husband's pet owl and breaking his newly bought camera.
  • Carlyle and Delacourt in Elysium. The former was picked by Max for exactly that reason.
  • Scotty, in The Evil Dead (1981). As well as the two rednecks in Evil Dead 2.
  • In the 2009 comedy film ExTerminators, a few women working for the ABC Pest Control company secretly engage in exterminating various types of abusive husbands and boyfriends. Their last victim before the film ended was an IRS agent with a really shady past history that was investigating the pest control company.
  • Eye For An Eye is about a mother who hears her daughter raped and murdered by a grocery deliverer while talking to her on the cell phone, who gets off on a technicality, and decides to kill him.
  • Everyone in Falling Down. Bill Foster may be a bit crazy, but compared to the rest of LA, he's an absolute saint. Also functions as a subversion, as everyone Foster attacks is definetly this, from the point of view of a frustrated, laid-off white collar worker, but from an objective point of view, none of them were actually doing anything wrong, possibly aside from the neo-nazi store owner.
  • The mission director in Gattaca was ... not universally liked, making the movie an example of reason number three.
  • Gosford Park. Though the victim as we see him is portrayed relatively sympathetically, seeming to be a fairly nice old duffer with a horrible harpy of a wife (she tears chunks out of him at dinner in front of all their friends), his past is not so clear and when he is murdered it turns out everyone had a motive. Though in fact all the people with real, personal motives are ignored as they are only the servants.
  • Very deliberately invoked in the 2008 nature horror film, Grizzly Park. The 8 characters forced into community service in Grizzly Park as rehabilitation for their misdemeanors are deliberately set up to be as obnoxious, apathetic and unsympathetic as possible, each appearing to get a Karmic Death from the bear trying to kill them. In the end it's revealed the bear belonged to the park ranger who trained it to kill any members of the group. The ranger lets the last survivor live, believing she has made a Heel Realization and learned from her previous mistakes. Nope, he later overhears her (unaware that the ranger was part of the plot) calling her friend telling her she had manipulated him and planned to kill him later — prompting her to be mauled by the bear towards the end of the movie.
  • John Strode and Barry Simms in Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, and a quite number of people in Rob Zombie's Halloween (2007) and Halloween II (2009).
  • Michael Horrigan's death at the climax of Halo: Nightfall—being eaten by feral Lekgolo worms—is particularly deserved, considering he'd been an inexcusable jerkass to the ONI team's Sedran companions, then topped that by in succession, using one of their prisoners as bait for the Lekgolo, turning on his CO Jameson Locke and leaving him to die, then using his fellow traitor Greg Ramos as bait for the Lekgolo, and finally gunning down the other prisoner to stop him leaving him behind.
  • Both used and deconstructed in the film Heathers — most of the victims are (or seem to be) Asshole Victims but then through the heroine's eyes we see how their deaths affect their loved ones, and see her realize that being an asshole isn't worth killing someone over.
  • Hellraiser:
    • In Hellraiser: Inferno, Detective Joseph Thorne's snitch Bernie is strongly implied to be a pedophile and becomes the third of the Engineer killer's victims.
      • Joseph Thorne is damned, not murdered, but it's hard to feel bad for an adulterer who frames good cops, deals and uses drugs, steals from the evidence room, shows no concern for victims, assaults suspects, hides evidence in investigations, lies to his family, ignores his aged parents, and is kinda a smug jerk after winning at chess.
    • Happens in Hellraiser: Hellseeker, where it's revealed that Kirsty killed her sleazy husband Trevor, who had planned on murdering her for her money; Trevor's best friend, who was in on the plan; and three women Trevor actually videotaped himself cheating on Kirsty with (the women were all also in relationships).
  • Captain Wade Hunnicutt (Robert Mitchum) in Home From The Hill gets a rather lethal taste of Laser-Guided Karma when, after years of womanizing, he is killed by the father of a local girl whom the father, in light of Wade's reputation, believes that Wade fathered a child with. Turns out it was actually Wade's son Theron who knocked the girl up — so ironically Wade himself gets killed for something he didn't actually do.
  • Hood of Horror: the whole film revolves around making people pay for their crimes against man by grotesque brutal death and then hell.
  • Horrible Bosses has this as the reason the three protagonists are attempting to murder their respective employers. Two of the bosses are dealt with in other ways and survive thus being subversions, but Colin Farrel's character does get killed (albeit not in the way the trio were considering killing him), which makes him an example of this trope.
  • Everyone in Hostel spends most of the movie doing everything they can to make you hate them, even after they know their friends are being kidnapped and killed. Paxton could be a Jerk with a Heart of Gold, as he risks his life to save complete strangers. Josh is also always kind to everyone.
  • In 2008's The Incredible Hulk, Bruce Banner is harassed by some greasy co-workers because he stopped them from sexually harassing a female co-worker. When he's on the run from Blonsky and General Ross he's cornered by them and beaten up a bit. What ensues may be the most satisfying moment in a Marvel movie: he Hulks out and throws them through walls to their death.
  • Patrick and Belch in Stephen King's It.
  • There are a few examples in the Jurassic Park films.
    • Jurassic Park:
      A huge tyrannosaurus ate our lawyer
      Well, I suppose that proves
      They're really not all bad
      .
      • Nedry, who drives the whole plot, is about as unappealing a character as he could possibly be without doing intentional murder. And Wayne Knight plays all his slovenly abrasiveness with Newman-esque glee.
    • In The Lost World: Jurassic Park:
      • Peter Stormare's character (Dieter) Kicks The Compsognathus. Then a mob of them eat him.
      • Smug Snake Peter Ludlow has the bright idea to travel to the island they bred the dinosaurs on and go on a safari so they can bring them back to the mainland and proceeds to have absolutely no common sense while doing it. This little decision manages to play a distinct part in the deaths in the movie, including his own. The Designated Heroes coming in also played Spanner in the Works; their actions playing a much more significant part in the movie's deaths. Ludlow then lets desperation override common sense and decides on bringing the T. rex to the mainland after the main characters release all of the considerably less dangerous herbivores he had intended in capturing..
    • Jurassic World
      • Vic Hoskins. It's hard to feel sorry for him after his foolish and nefarious schemes to engineer weaponized dinosaurs fails, and he gets torn apart by a Velociraptor he tries to control.
  • Kill Bill:
    • The orderly/pimp Buck and his customer, who is paying for access to the comatose patients.
    • Budd, during a moment of contemplation states that all the members of the Deadly Viper Assassination Squad are this.
      "That woman deserves her revenge, and we deserve to die. Then again, so does she."
      • Oddly enough, although Elle is likely far more evil than the others, the Bride lets her live, showing Cruel Mercy. (Although it's doubtful she lived very long after the encounter; the Bride snatches out her second eye — she lost the first after angering Pai Mei, who Elle later murdered — and then leaves her to die in the desert, screaming in a blinded panic.
  • Discussed in Kill List. Jay is very insistent that all the people on the titular list are bad people that deserve their deaths. But while there's ample evidence of this for the librarian, you have to take his word for it on the others, raising the possibility that it's just him trying to rationalise the killings.
  • Kingsman: The Secret Service:
    • The congregation of the church where Valentine tests the small scale version of his device to make sure it works are extremely anti-Semitic, racist, sexist and homophobic so it's hard to feel that sorry for them when they all go berserk and get slaughtered by each other and Harry (who's also affected by the device but retains his lethal skills and so kills many himself). The world leaders who get their heads blown up after Merlin activates their implants also qualify, as having implicitly agreed to be willing participants in a genocide.
    • The Swedish Prime Minister's death by head explosion likewise garners little sympathy given he turns on his Princess and country to buy into Valentine's plan, handwaving it by claiming to be a republican anyway.
  • Every victim in Kiss of the Tarantula, with the possible exception of Nancy (because it wasn't clear how much she knew about her friends' harassment of Susan).
  • Lampshaded in M. Night Shyamalan's Lady in the Water. When a Straw Critic character runs into a monster, instead of running he starts a long monologue on this trope in which an "unlikable" character flees the monster, shuts the door behind him at the last second, and learns a valuable lesson. He is then torn to death by the monster.
  • Law Abiding Citizen has quite a few for one movie:
    • Clarance Darby. During a home invasion robbery, he stabbed Clyde even after he was subdued, raped and killed his wife even after she was subdued, and killed (and possibly raped) their daughter, who was no threat to him, all For the Evulz. He lied in court and said it was his partner Ames (when really Ames just thought it was going to be a robbery and no one would be seriously hurt or killed, and actually tried to stop him), getting Ames executed.
    • Clyde's unnamed cellmate, who threatens to kill him if he does not share his food with him.
    • Darby's Amoral Attorney.
    • The judge who agreed to Darby's plea bargain.
  • The downright homicidal bullies in Let the Right One In, both in the original and the remake. Their ultimatum at the end was this: Owen had to hold his breath for 3 minutes, and be rewarded with a cut across the cheek. Fail, and he loses an eye. You'll be glad when Eli arrives to kill them all.
  • Everyone who is killed in The Little Girl Who Lived Down the Lane. Except Gordon.
  • In the original movie of Little Shop of Horrors, the dentist is practising without a licence. Seymour kills him with the drill (and is then forced to operate on a young Jack Nicholson. In the second film, based on the play, even though the dentist's character and the context he appears in are somewhat different, the dentist is still the first of many characters to buy it.
  • Lockjaw's protagonists may have stepped over the boundary. The incident that triggers the plot is them running over someone. The major difference between these teens and the teens from I Know What You Did Last Summer? They never noticed they hit anyone and when pointed out that they did, they believe they hit an animal and moved on. Kiiiiinda makes one of the protagonist's What the Hell, Hero? speech towards the villain of the film stupid considering they were the ones that caused him to do it in the first place.
  • Most of the victims in Madhouse (1974) — a proto-slasher movie set in a BBC studio — don't really deserve to die. However, it's hard to feel sorry for the actress who plays Vincent Price's assistant, or for his insane stalker, or for her completely insane parents.
    As they say in horror movies, you will come to a bad end.
  • Towards the end of The Mad Magician, The Great Rinaldi meets a fiery demise when he gets trapped in the furnace used for one of his rival Don Gallico's illusions. Bonus points because instant karma caught him in the act of attempting to plagiarize said illusion.
  • A non-lethal example in Man of Steel. After a bully sexually harasses a waitress in a bar and (tries to) gets violent when asked politely to leave, Clark takes out his truck. The damage is scary, but it's hard to feel sorry for the guy.
  • Every single character in the horror movie Marcus (2006) except Brooke(who's not an asshole) and Marcus(who's not a victim).
  • Men In Black
    • The opening scene where Kay ends up killing the alien "Mikey" had to be re-shot when the producers realized audiences were feeling bad for Mikey.
    • Just before he is killed by the Bug, Edgar is revealed to be a spousal emotional abuser (and possibly a physical abuser too).
    Edgar: I go out, I work my butt off for a living, all I want is to come home to a nice clean house with a nice fat steak on the table, but instead I get this. It looks like poison. Don't you take that away, I'm eating that, damn it! It IS poison, isn't it? I swear to God I would not be surprised if it was, the way you skulk around here like a dog that's been hit too much or ain't been hit enough, I can't make up my mind. You're useless, Beatrice. The only thing that pulls its weight around here is my goddamn truck!
    (Spaceship crashes into the truck; Edgar proceeds to walk out to investigate)
    Edgar: ...Figures.
    (Edgar walks to the crash site)
    Beatrice: What the heck is it, Edgar?
    (Edgar turns around quickly)
    Edgar: Get your big butt back in that house!
  • Men In Black II: after Serleena assumes human form in the sequel, she is attacked by a man with a knife and swallows him whole, then proceeds to spit him out and steal his clothes when she realizes that she gained an immense gut as a result of eating him.
  • And again in Men in Black 3. Seems to be a recurring pattern. The villains would first kill someone who honestly deserved it, then follow through with someone who DOESN'T. This villain did it faster than the others.
  • The death of Mrs. Carmody in The Mist is probably the only joyous moment in the entire film, being as she very nearly got the protagonist's little boy killed. Also everyone in the supermarket could possibly count, if they also eventually succumb to the mist creatures.
  • This trope is exaggerated with the victim in Murder on the Orient Express. It turns out that he was everybody's victim. In case you didn't know that already.
  • Leroy in Mystery Team.
  • Arthur Tressler and Thaddeus Bradley in Now You See Me.
  • A recent updated version of the Oliver Twist story called Twist featured the character of Dodger finally snapping, and shooting Bill. By that point in the movie, Bill had either seriously injured or murdered about three-quarters of the cast. In short, he really had it coming.
  • Hannibal Chau in Pacific Rim has one of the other characters sent to a public shelter in the hopes that he'll get eaten by a Kaiju. Later he gets eaten alive by a baby Kaiju. Subverted in that he survives and cuts his way out in The Stinger.
  • Pain and Gain:
    • Victor Kershaw which is part of the reason why cops don't believe his story at first (he was so unpleasant that not one person reported him missing). Ed even says that he is a "very difficult victim to like".
    • Subverted, with the later victims who are certainly sleazy, but are nowhere near the jerk levels Kershaw is.
    • It also subverted in that as the movie proceeds, Kershaw ends up far more sympathetic than Lugo.
  • In the finale of Pan's Labyrinth, Captain Vidal gets shot in the face after being told that his child would never remember him. However, since he was a Falange officer and had killed and tortured so many people, few, if any, people cried at his death.
  • In The Phantom of the Opera (2004), the Phantom's first victim, Buquet the chief stagehand, is given a few scenes of perving on the ballerinas that exist mainly so we don't lose sympathy for the Phantom when he violently throttles Buquet to death.
  • In Pink Flamingos, Connie and Raymond Marble definitely fit the bill. Granted, Divine is extremely evil herself, but considering that Connie and Raymond were running a black-market baby ring, and then using the money earned to sell drugs to school children, it's hard to feel sorry for them when they eventually suffer a very humiliating death by Divine's hand.
  • Predator
    • None of the humans in Predators are particularly nice, but Stans, a condemned murderer, takes the cake for being the most unsympathetic. Even so, he gets a pretty badass sendoff.
    • Dale, Nick, and Mark in AVPR aren't very nice, either. Dale, as the leader of the trio, gets the most vicious of the three, the alien's blood burning his face.
  • In Psycho Beach Party Rhonda spends her days being incredibly rude and insulting everybody so watching her die was rather satisfying.
  • In Queen of the Damned, the first vampire Akasha butchers a club full of remorseless, bloodthirsty vampires who tried to kill Jesse earlier. The other vampires are still shocked at her sheer carnage and delight at devouring them.
  • Reservoir Dogs: Mr. Blonde. A Psycho for Hire who kills the clerks in the diamond store, tortures Marvin Nash and attempts to set him on fire. Apparently, the audience didn't feel any sympathy for him when he gets killed by Mr. Orange, who is the real undercover cop.
  • In Return to Cabin by the Lake, Stanley kills at least two people involved with the production of the Film Within A Film who are also complete assholes (an obnoxious film director and a rude AD). It's partially karmic, but the sheer brutality of the kills (one is decapitated with a boat engine and another buried alive) is so disproportionate that it still emphasizes Stanley's murderousness.
  • Nute Gunray and the other Separatists in Revenge of the Sith, who are all killed by Anakin Skywalker, who thereby regains a little sympathy after having lost it in his raid on the Jedi temple.
  • The Ring: Thanks for killing Dr. Emma Temple, Samara.
  • The female lead character in Catherine Breillat's Romance blows up her boyfriend in a rigged gas explosion at the end. The murder is about the only happy event in the film...
  • In R.O.T.O.R., Sonya's fiance is given one scene to establish that he's a dickhead, then he's shot dead by the robot.
  • The Saw series has a lot of them:
    • The first film had Mark, a man who faked illness to receve paid leave from work, and Zep, who, though forced by Jigsaw to break into Dr. Gordon's home and hold his family hostage, is confirmed by Word of God to have enjoyed it.
    • The second film had Obi, who, according to Jigsaw, "Burned those around him with his lies, cons, and deciets", and Xavior, a drug dealer who tries to kill the other characters.
    • The third film had Troy, a repeat convict, and Danica Scott, who fled the scene and did not bother to help Jeff after his son was killed.
    • The fourth film had Ivan, a Serial Rapist, Cecil, a drug addict who threatened Jill Tuck with a knife, stole from her, and caused her to miscarry, and Rex, a family abuser.
    • The fifth film had Seth Baxter, a murderer, and five people involved in an arson.
    • The sixth film had Eddie, a loan shark, and a bunch of people involved in a corrupt healthcare system.
    • The final film had Dina, a woman who got her boyfriends to steal for her, and a group of racists that are killed for abusing others.
  • In Scanners II: The New Order, the main character kills a pair of store-robbing thugs who already killed two clerks and were either about to do the same to his girlfriend, or kidnap her/hold her hostage.
  • Scarface (1983):
  • Played for Laughs in a scene in horror movie parody Scary Movie. One of the teenagers being stalked by the masked killer is watching a movie in a crowded theater; she's being loud and obnoxious, ruining the movie for everyone else. The masked killer is then shown to be sitting in the seat next to her... but before he gets the chance, one of the other movigoers steals his knife and stabs her. He then just sits and drinks his soda while all the other audience members continue to stab her to death. When she stumbles in front of the screen and finally falls dead, they applaud.
  • Charlie in Scream4. An interesting example as he's actually one of the killers.
  • In Se7en, John Doe thinks he's doing this, though less than half of the victims really qualify as assholes. The "sloth" victim is the only one besides John Doe himself who's established as a genuinely bad person. All the others are unpleasant at worst.
  • In Serenity, The Operative's first kill in the movie was Dr. Mathias, the head scientist of the Academy, whose horrible experiments were responsible for River being driven insane.
  • In Shaun of the Dead, David is torn apart and eaten by zombies after saying "I think we can all agree, that was the right thing to do," after Shaun had to kill his own mother. He'd also been an asshole most of the movie, and at one point, even tried to shoot Shaun.
    • Apparently this trope was taken into consideration when doing that scene. Originally they had him apologize for his behavior before suffering his fate, but they decided to edit that out, albeit not for character reasons (i.e. they wanted his death to be scarier and seem more sudden). Either way, it worked; when his scene came up, audiences cheered.
    • Like most of the movie, this is probably in reference to Night of the Living Dead (1968) and in particular the dynamic between Ben and Harry; like Harry, David is right about a lot of the things that they should be doing, but that doesn't stop him from being an asshole.
  • Invoked in Shoot 'em Up, in which the hero deliberately singles out which car to steal because he'd seen its able-bodied driver park in a handicapped spot. No, he doesn't kill the guy, but he explicitly calls him a prick, establishing a similar justification for targeting his vehicle.
  • The Silence of the Lambs. Dr. Chilton, who was in charge of the facility where Hannibal Lecter was originally imprisoned. He sleazily hits on Clarice Starling and doesn't take it well when she declines him. Hannibal says that Chilton has harassed in the past and there is no reason to disbelieve him. He reveals the FBI's attempt to trick Hannibal into cooperating - not because he's offended by their dishonesty, but because he wants to cut his own deal and get publicity. At the end of the movie Lecter is seen trailing Chilton and it's made clear that he's going to kill him and eat him ("I'm having an old friend for dinner.").
  • The Cult members in Silent Hill. Very hard to feel sorry for them after you learn they tried to kill Alessa years before by burning her alive, leaving her horribly disfigured and unable to get out of her hospital bed. Also they had just killed Cybil this way.
  • Bullies in Slasher High. Jeesh, they deserved to be drowned in the toilet.
  • The guy in Snakes on a Plane who's a Jerkass that feeds a woman's dog to a snake.
  • Sorority Row probably has a record for the number of deliberately unsympathetic victims; out of all the people killed maybe one or two qualify for Jerk with a Heart of Gold status. The killer actually lampshades how horrible the murdered characters all were.
  • In the first Spiderman movie, Peter deliberately let go a burglar who has just managed to steal a handful of money. It would have been a despicable act, if it weren't for the fact that the person question that is robbed has cheated Peter out of his prize money and still expects Peter to save him.
  • Admiral Marcus from Star Trek Into Darkness gets his head crushed by John Harrison (or rather, Khan).
  • All of Travis Bickle's victims in Taxi Driver. Despite being something of a psychopath, he is sympathetic compared to them — though this may be a case of Protagonist-Centered Morality, since viewers saw what he did when not murdering people.
  • Terminator:
    • In the first film The Terminator, the Terminator's very first victim pulled a knife on him, swore at him, and generally made us feel not too sorry for him.
    • Terminator 2: Judgment Day:
      • Though he doesn't kill any of them, the terminator injures three rude and surly bikers when he first arrives in the present day, walks into their bar, and demands some clothes; he throws one of them through a window, another onto a hot stove, and stabs the third guy in the shoulder with his own knife, pinning him to the pool table.
      • The asylum attendant licks Sarah's face while she's helpless. That way we don't feel bad that her escape plan includes bashing his face in. He's even worse in the extended cut, where he and another guard also assault Sarah before forcing her medication down her throat, which makes the scene where Sarah dispatches him with extreme prejudice - while his fellow guard gets beaten up by the T-800 (Arnold's Terminator) even better.
      • Todd and Janelle, John Connor's foster parents, are portrayed as uncaring and unpleasant, respectively. When T-1000!Janelle speaks in a friendly manner to John on the phone, he says "She's never this nice". The T-1000 kills both of them.
  • All the victims in Texas Chainsaw 3D besides Kenny:
    • The Sawyer family, a family of sadistic canabalistic serial killers.
    • Ryan, who cheats on his girlfriend with his best friends girlfriend.
    • Nikki, who cheats on her boyfriend with her best friends boyfriend.
    • Darryl, a thief.
    • Mayor Burt Hartman, the corrupt mayor who tries to kill Heather just for being a Sawyer.
  • Harlan, from Thelma & Louise, tries to rape Thelma but is thwarted by Louise. Louise tells him to be more considerate of women "in the future" but he insists on being a Jerk Ass...
    Harlan: Bitch! I shoulda gone ahead and fucked her!
    Louise: What did you say?
    Harlan: I said suck my cock!
    Louise's Gun: BANG!
    • Followed later by the police investigation:
    Policeman: Who do you think did it?
    Cocktail waitress: Has anyone asked his wife? She's the one I hope did it.
  • Tremors 3: Back to Perfection has Agent Frank Statler, Agent Charlie Rusk, and Dr. Andrew Merliss, who prevent the citizens of Perfection from hunting the Graboids so that one can be captured alive for study. They're also willing to seize the property in the valley and kick out the townsfolk under "Eminent Domain" to set up a preserve. None of the three survive the film.
  • The Trouble with Harry: Everyone thinks they are responsible for his death, but they don't really care.
  • Harry Tasker (Arnold Schwarzenegger) uses this justification in True Lies. Given that he's under the influence of Truth Serum at the time, he must really believe it. And given that he fights terrorists and trigger-happy enemy agents, it sure seems like it could be true:
    Helen Tasker: Have you ever killed anyone?
    Harry: Yeah, but they were all bad.
  • Judging by the trailer, it would seem that the parody Tucker & Dale Vs. Evil takes the slasher movie approach to this trope to it's logical extreme; the 'psycho degenerate hillbillies' are actually a pair of well-meaning but not incredibly bright guys who, through various misunderstandings, are taken to be that way by a bunch of prejudiced, elitist college kids. Very gory hilarity ensues as the kids, much to the confusion and bewilderment of the two, end up accidentally killing themselves while trying to attack the 'evil killers'.
  • A somewhat failed example of this trope happened in the Vault Of Horror movie. A woman was driven to killing her husband by his OCD need to keep the house neat. However, the actor never really went over the top, and came across more as lecturing than yelling and screaming, to the point where you felt more like they needed to sit down and have a long talk, rather than him deserving to die.
  • In V for Vendetta, every named antagonist qualifies as this, with the sole exception of Dr. Delia Surridge. She's a remorseful Death Seeker who seems to anticipate that Death Equals Redemption. If her journals can be believed, she hated (or convinced herself to hate) the people she experimented on. V managed to form a connection with her, which brought her to confront her actions and apologize to her only living victim. It's no coincidence, then, that out of all the named antagonists, Dr. Surridge is the only one granted a quiet, painless death.
    "Is it too late to apologize?"
    "Never."
    "I'm so sorry."
  • In Weekend at Bernie's there was, well, Bernie himself. He was a Corrupt Corporate Executive who was planning on killing the protagonists for unknowingly discovering his scheme, but the mobsters he hired to do it double-crossed him.
  • The 2006 remake of The Wicker Man featured a hysterically funny unintentional example. "Oh no! NOT THE BEES!"
  • The two cops in Wolf Creek 2, who try to give Mick a speeding ticket even though he was going under the limit and give him an order to take his truck off the road. Special mention goes to the one officer who insulted his truck and called him ugly.
  • Dr. Hoenneger from The Wolfman (2010).
  • X-Men:
    • Mitchell Laurio in X2: X-Men United. He's a thug who's shown to enjoy beating up an old man stripped of any powers that would allow him to fight back, so no one minds too much when Mystique sets him up for a death allowing Magneto to escape.
    • X-Men: First Class:
      • The two SS escapees that Magneto killed in Argentina
      • Sebastian Shaw when he's killed by Magneto near the end. Considering in his first scene he had murdered Erik's mother right in front of the boy's eyes, it's highly doubtful anybody in the audience really feels any sympathy for him. Charles on the other hand, who was telepathically with Shaw and felt all the pain of his death, is someone to feel sorry for.
      • Most of the CIA Agents. A couple of them walk by the mutant's room, saying "I didn't know the circus was in town!" Then, seconds later, they all get dropped from the sky. One of them is even begging to live, telling Shaw where they are, only to then get killed.


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