[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/grimms_fairy_tale_classics.jpg]]

''Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics'' (グリム名作劇場, Gurimu Meisaku Gekijō) was an anime series produced by Nippon Animation. It was originally aired from 1987 to 1989 on Creator/TVAsahi. It actually consists of two separate series, the original Gurimu Meisaku Gekijō (October 1987-March 1988) and Shin (New) Gurimu Meisaku Gekijō (October 1988-March 1989).

The anime was based on the stories by Creator/TheBrothersGrimm and a number of other authors. Each story was told in a half-hour format. Some stories, like "Cinderella" and "Puss in Boots" were aired in two parts; "Snow White" was aired in four parts. Most episodes were somewhat faithful to the original stories, with various changes made to suit the half-hour episode run.

Can be seen as a SpiritualSuccessor to ''Anime/AndersenMonogatari''. It also came a year after Nippon Animation gave the Japanese literary tradition a similar treatment with ''Animated Classics of Japanese Literature'' (''Seishun Anime Zenshu'').
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!!Tropes

* AccidentalKiss: In "Snow White and Rose Red", the Bear and Snow White are playing with an apple and trying to "balance" it between her nose and his snout. The apple falls and they kinda kiss by accident, with both of them blushing.
* ActionSurvivor:
** The Princess from "The Iron Stove" is both this and an ActionGirlfriend, going through lots of risk to save her Prince from the Witch despite not being an ActionGirl.
** Lisbeth from "The Old Woman in the Woods" too. She's the SoleSurvivor of the royal caravan she was traveling with and must fend off the attacks of the WickedWitch to save her own skin, with help of a talking owl...
* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: "The Coat of Many Colors" implies that Aleia has PTSD from [[ParentalIncest her insane father's attempts to force her to marry him]].
* AdaptationalAttractiveness: While nothing is said about the specific looks of the soldier from [[Literature/TheTwelveDancingPrincesses "The worn-out Dancing Shoes"]], it ''is'' mentioned that he's ''not'' young. The Soldier from the episode featuring the tale is a young man who's a bit of an UnkemptBeauty and even has a NiceHat.
* AdaptationalBadass: The WickedStepmother from ''Literature/TheSixSwans'' has some spells at her disposal that the original did ''not'' have, like the capacity of [[SummonMagic summoning large animals]] and [[BlowYouAway create huge wind currents]]. [[KarmicDeath The last one backfires on her, however]].
* AdaptationExpansion: Sometimes, especially for short tales. "Snow White and Rose Red", for example, has the Prince's younger brother meet Rose Red a few times on his own while the main story occurs, showing that he fell in love with her on his own (plus she's a bit of a SmittenTeenageGirl to him, showing that she ''also'' likes him a lot) '''and''' that he was desperately searching for his missing big brother aka the Prince himself.
* AdaptationalHeroism:
** The boy of "Literature/GodfatherDeath". In the original story he's rather greedy and selfish and wants save the princess just so he can marry her and become the future king. Here he performs a HeroicSacrifice in order to do the right thing and to be a real doctor for the first time.
** Maria's/Beauty's sisters actually love their father and their younger sister. Unlike their original counterparts, they don't try to sabotage their sister's relationship with the Beast; while the three were grieving over their dad's death from his illness, Maria forgot that she had to return after a certain period of time, and they're scared for her safety when she tells them.
* AdaptationalJerkass:
** Happens to Rapunzel's mother. In the original fairy tale, she simply pined over the Rampion in the witch's garden, and her husband stole it out of concern for her health. In the episode, however, she essentially berates and emotionally blackmails him into satisfying her cravings, like a child throwing a tantrum.
** To a smaller degree, Elise's husband in "The Six Swans" was also a victim of this. In the original the King rebuked the mother-in-law's [[spoiler: infanticide]] accusations, and it wasn't until the ''third'' one that the mother-in-law could override his authority and get the protagonist near executed. In the episode he ''does'' desperately ask Elise what happened but doesn't openly defend her from the WickedStepmother's claims, which led some viewers to (mistakenly) believe that he ''also'' wanted her to die.
* AdaptationalKarma: In the original tale, the stepmother from "The Six Swans" simply [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse disappears from the story]] after Elise runs off into the woods. The episode based on the story, however, has her accidentally set herself on fire and get burned to death [[KarmicDeath after trying to get her executed]] [[BurnTheWitch via burning at the stake]].
* AdaptationalVillainy:
** The Huntsman in Snow White. Originally, he was unable to kill Snow White and spared her. In this version, he didn't, and he got a DisneyVillainDeath.
** The witch in "Rapunzel" as well, albeit more subtly. Here, she apparently locked Rapunzel away from the world immediately after kidnapping her, rather than when she turned twelve. In addition to giving her adopted daughter a TraumaticHaircut and casting her out into a desert after finding out about the prince's visits, she beats her into unconsciousness, and it's implied she was originally intending to ''kill'' her. Shortly before said beating, she says she wanted to keep the girl all to herself, rather than wanting to protect her from the world. Moreover, [[DestinationDefenestration she pushes the prince out of the tower with her magic]], unlike in the original stories where he jumped out or fell off on his own.
** The bird in "Hansel and Gretel" is revealed to be a familiar to the witch. At first it appears as the white bird from the original story, but later reveals its [[JustForPun true colors]] as a black imp that lured the children to the witch's house.
** The stepmother in "The Six Swans" gets some of this. Even before she turns her stepsons into swans, she summons a gigantic snake in an effort to kill her new family, and later murders her husband. When she encounters her stepdaughter Elise again, she [[CompositeCharacter takes the role of the mother-in-law from the original story]] by first bullying Elise to the point of tears... then kidnapping Elise's infant son and leaving him to die and framing his mother for it in an attempt to get her executed.
* AdaptationInducedPlotHole: In [[Literature/{{Rapunzel}} the original story]], the prince heard Rapunzel singing. Here, he hears her playing a lyre. This raises the question of how he knew it was a woman up in the tower. (Funny, in the original Rapunzel is voiced by [[Creator/MitsukoHorie a famous singer]])
* AdaptedOut:
** There is no stepsister in this version of ''Literature/BrotherAndSister''.
** Likewise there is no [[ObnoxiousInLaws jealous Mother-In-Law]] in "The Six Swans". Her role is instead handed to the witch. [[note]](The Witch's [[TheUglyGuysHotDaughter much uglier mother]] IS seen at the start, but she disappears from the story almost immediately)[[/note]] Moreover, Elise had ''[[RuleOfThree three]]'' children in the original story; she only has one here (though nothing says that she and her beloved didn't have more after the episode ended).
** The second princess from ''The Iron Stove'' doesn't exist, and the HotWitch is both the prince's "jailer" and the princess' rival in love.
** The WickedWitch from "The Magic Heart" had her daughter ''and'' her maidservant help her in her plans. The maidservant isn't featured here, and neither are three giants that wanted to attack the huntsman and protagonist.
** The third brother is gone in "The Waters of Life."
** The other '''''9''''' princesses are left out of "The Worn Out Dancing Shoes" most likely to simplify the animation process.
* AdultFear:
** Elise in "The Six Swans" has this after her stepmother arrives at her husband's court. The vile woman starts threatening her infant son, and eventually kidnaps him and leaves him for dead, making it seem like he was eaten by his mother; for worse, she's an ElectiveMute so she cannot properly defend herself... [[spoiler: Fortunately, Elise's brothers find the kiddo and rescue him; when they save their sister from being [[BurnTheWitch burned at the stake]] for the infanticide she never commited, the youngest one brings the unharmed baby back.]]
** The father in "Hansel and Gretel" returns home to find that his wife has abandoned his young children in the forest, and is very distressed over it.
** In "Brother and Sister" Rose/Sister is kidnapped and left in a cave not long after having given birth, so she cannot stop fretting over her infant son. The sort-of AstralProjection she pulls to feed the baby is probably "born" from her desire to take care of him even when she's at fatal danger.
** In "Sleeping Beauty", the Royal Couple and especially Briar Rose's OverprotectiveDad ''dread'' the day when she will fall victim to the sleeping/death curse.
* AnguishedDeclarationOfLove:
** How the Princess from "The Iron Stove" manages to debrainwash her Prince, complete with her ''jumping from a hole in a cave's ceiling'' to reach for him.
** When the King from "Brother and Sister" sees Queen Rose's (weakening) spirit, he gives her one of these.
* AscendedExtra: The Bear Prince's brother from "Snow White and Rose Red" is barely mentioned at the end of the original tale, as a sort-of afterthought to give Rose Red a boyfriend after her big sister marries the Prince. Here the younger Prince is properly seen searching for his missing brother ''and'' is [[ShipTease seen having cute interactions]] with Rose Red after she takes care of him.
* AstralProjection: In "Brother and Sister", since Rose aka the Sister/Queen is solely imprisoned by the Witch, her soul kinda "leaves" her body magically to feed the baby at the cost of [[CastFromLifespan greatly weakening her]]. The King sets out to find his wife before she withers away.
* BalancingDeathsBooks: In "Godfather Death", the young man uses what he learned from his godfather (the Death) to save the life of someone who was fated to die. Death lets him get away with it once, but when he tries it again Death takes his life instead.
* BalefulPolymorph:
** The witch from "The Six Swans" turns her royal husband's six sons into swans with cursed white capes. Their sister must make six other capes to break the curse, [[spoiler: which the swans manage to put on when they come to rescue her and bring her kidnapped son back.]]
** The prince in "Snow White and Rose Red" caught the wicked gnome stealing the castle's treasures and got turned into a bear for his trouble. He didn't recover his human form until he managed to kill the gnome.
** Rudolf in "Brother and Sister" was turned into a Deer when he drank water from a pond that was enchanted by his and Rose's evil Step-Mother.
** The prince's subjects in "The Iron Stove" were turned into mice by the HotWitch. [[spoiler: After the Witch is given a DisneyDeath, they're released.]]
** "The Old Woman in the Woods" turned a prince and his subjects into animals, with the Prince himself stuck in an owl's form, and those that trespass in the witch's neck of the forest are turned into trees. The only one who escapes this is the maid Lisbeth, and the Owl Prince first protects her and then recruits her to kill the witch.
** In "The Magic Heart", a huntsman finds a cabbage garden of two different types. One kind of cabbage turns those who eat them into donkeys, the other kind returns the donkeys to their human forms. He used these cabbages to [[TheDogBitesBack get revenge on an old witch and her daughter Lisbeth for treating him like crap]], [[spoiler: though later he uses another to return Lisbeth to her human form]].
** In "Jorinde and Joringel", a WickedWitch who ''hates'' happy couples in love turns the titular Jorinde into a bird. Her boyfriend Joringel has to rescue her.
* BarefootPoverty: Lisbeth from "The Old Woman..." is the only person in the royal caravan she works in to not wear shoes, signifying her poverty.
* BeautyEqualsGoodness: Played straight for the protagonists in most of the stories, though there are some exceptions. ie, Hans from "The Golden Goose" is a borderline {{gonk}}.
** Most especially demonstrated in "The Man of Iron," as lazy RoyalBrat Prince William first appears grotesque in Hans' magic pond, but after he TookALevelInKindness his handsome features are restored.
* BecauseDestinySaysSo: The Prince in "Briar Rose" finds himself traveling a long ways from his home with Briar Rose's song in his head. The impassable thorns split aside and allow him into the palace as he is the one to awaken Briar Rose.
* BigBrotherInstinct: Played straight, gender reversed, and inverted:
** Josephine from "Bluebeard" is the youngest ''and'' the only girl out of four siblings, so of course her brothers are very protective of her and, in the end, they rescue her from her evil husband.
** Inverted in "Snow White and Rose Red", where the Bear Prince's younger brother is the protective one and has been searching from him.
** Princess Elise from "The Six Swans" genderflips this when she puts herself through lots of suffering to save her six brothers from their WickedStepmother. [[spoiler: The boys return the favor by saving her from execution and rescuing her baby son.]]
** Rose and Rudolf from "Brother and Sister" try protecting one another from their own WickedStepmother, with Rose first trying to reason with her and then Rudolf shielding Rose from the whippings.
* TheBigDamnKiss:
** The one between Briar Rose and her Prince, [[http://usalina2014.tumblr.com/post/143124190115/grimm-masterpiece-theater-princess-briar as seen here.]]
** Lisbeth and the Prince from ''The Old Woman in the Woods'' also share a kiss after he reveals himself as her friend the Talking Owl.
** William and the Princess in "The Man of Iron," get a romantic blush and haze with their kiss.
** Aleia and Alexander glow with their first in "Coat of Many Colors."
* BishieSparkle: Elise in "The Six Swans" gets this as a highlight after the Prince lays eyes on her for the first time, and he and his men comment on her beauty.
* BlatantLies: Despite what the (English) theme song tells you, not every story "ends so happily." Although one could be forgiven for not knowing this if familiar only with the Nickelodeon cuts.
* BlushSticker: Elise has these as a little girl, but loses them when she grows into a teenager.
* {{Bowdlerise}}: Played with, for some of the episodes.
** Cinderella's stepmother and stepsisters do not end up blind and mutilated, nor does her magic tree have any connection to Cinderella's dead mother. Of course, in a subversion, [[spoiler: the stepmother has the poor tree destroyed.]]
** "Brother and Sister" also bordered on this. The witch merely kidnaps Rose aka Sister/Queen rather than killing her (though her spirit ''does'' say that her body is weakening, implying that the sort-of AstralProjection she pulls to breastfeed her son is [[CastFromLifespan taking a huge toll on her]]), and the subplot with the stepsister is omitted entirely.
** In the original "The Six Swans", [[spoiler: Elise didn't manage to fully finish the last of the shirts destined to release her brothers from the swan spell, so one of the youngest prince's arms remains a swan arm.]] This doesn't happen in the series.
** The Nickelodeon dub also went a bit further, shortening scenes where characters are beaten, making deaths cleaner, and removing instances of breastfeeding. Infamously, "The Coat Of Many Colors" had to be redubbed to omit references to incest (instead, the princess flees the destruction of her kingdom). Strangely enough, the original dub is the only version available online.
*** Some comic scenes were also cut - see {{Gasshole}}.
*** There were also some episodes skipped altogether by Nickelodeon (although they were dubbed), among them the very dark and sinister "Bluebeard."
*** The OP sequence itself wasn't immune to this, as scenes of demons dancing around a cauldron in the forest were cut. It was done so seamlessly that the average viewer watching on Nickelodeon wouldn't have even suspected. (Actually, that Saban kept the original OP animation at all is remarkable considering they typically replaced it in their anime dubs with montages of scenes from the series.) Also cut (though presumably not for potentially offensive content) in the English version is the episode introduction featuring the series mascot (the cute little pixie from the OP animation), replaced by a generic title card pasted over the introduction of the episode.
* BreakTheHaughty: This leads to CharacterDevelopment in the cases of both the main character of "King Grizzle Beard" and "The Man of Iron", respectively a spoiled and shallow princess and a RoyalBrat. They are forced to leave their castle and kingdom and learn about the hard work, the hunger and the humilty. Elena as part of her humiliation marries a commoner who turns out to be a KingIncognito whom she had previously scorned and restores her status when she comes to realize the value of what she lost. William travels to a distant land and offers his services to its King as gardener; later, he defends his new homeland without asking for anything in exchange and marries the princess of the kingdom that falls in love with him.
** Lisbeth from "The Magic Heart" helped her evil mother the Witch to trick the huntsman Frederick. When Frederick [[TheDogBitesBack turned the tables on them]], she got turned into a donkey... [[spoiler:The witch lived the rest of her life as a donkey while Frederick took pity on Lisbeth, defended her from her cruel caretaker and decided to undo the spell on her, and the two got married. It's similar to what happened in the original, only the witch died before Frederick's return.]]
* BurnTheWitch: It almost happens to [[spoiler: Elise from "The Six Swans"]] when [[spoiler: the stepmother frames her for infanticide and cannibalism.]] In fact, [[CrucifiedHeroShot she's tied up to a cross]] and ''right about to be burned alive'' when [[spoiler: her brothers pull a BigDamnHeroes ''and'' bring her son back, to repay her for breaking their curse and reveal the witch's plans.]]
* ButNowIMustGo: In a ''very'' happy version of the trope, [[spoiler: Elise's brothers in "The Six Swans" leave her and her son in the capable hands of her husband and then take off, since they need to start rebuilding the kingdom that the WickedStepmother stole from them.]]
* TheCaligula: In "The Coat of Many Colors," Aleia's father loses his mind and tries to force his daughter to marry him.
* CainAndAbel: Princes Franz and Joseph in "The Water of Life", respectively. Joseph genuinely wants to save his father, while Franz is more interested on gaining his favor to ensure he inherits the kingdom and has no qualms about framing his younger brother to do so.
* CanonForeigner:
** Klaus, Snow White's childhood friend, is a character exclusive of the series. The same can be said of the {{Noble Wol|f}}ves and of Snow White's nanny Doris.
** "Mother Holle" features a talking white rabbit that is an {{Expy}} of the ''Disney/AliceInWonderland'' character.
* CompositeCharacter:
** This series' version of "The Six Swans" gives the [[ObnoxiousInLaws evil mother-in-law's]] role in the story to the WickedStepmother.
** In "The Iron Stove", there's no second princess claiming that the prince is hers. Instead, the HotWitch is the Princess' love rival.
* DaddysGirl: Cruelly subverted in "The Coat of Many Colors": Aleia and her widowed father were very close, but then he lost his mind after an illness and [[ParentalIncest tried to get closer than they should be]]...
* DaddysLittleVillain: Lisbeth from "The Magic Heart" is a very pretty girl who helps her WickedWitch mother to mistreat a huntsman. [[spoiler: Subverted, it looks like she's an enchanted princess in this version.]]
* DamselInDistress:
** In "Brother and Sister", Queen Rose is abducted by her stepmother and taken to a foreboding mountain. When the King finds out, he and some of his guards climb the mountain and find her in a cave, alive but very weakened.
** The young princess from "The Crystal Ball", prisoner of an evil witch who drains her lifeforce every night.
** Princess Anna in "The Waters of Life" is held prisoner by a demon in the moonlight palace.
* DanceOfRomance:
** Of course it happens in ''Cinderella'' (and especially when Cindy and the Prince dance in the courtyard, after she's revealed to be the girl he fell in love with in the ball), but it's also parodied when the old King tries to rope his Queen into dancing with him.
** "The Coat of Many Colors" features three balls; the FallenPrincess Aleia manages to sneak in them and dance with Prince Alexander while wearing either of the three gowns she managed to save from the fire that destroyed her home.
* DeathByAdaptation:
** In this version of ''Snow White'', a boar knocks the huntsman off a cliff to his death.
** The mad king in "The Coat of Many Colors," the show's version of "Allerleirauh," is heavily implied to die in a fire he set by accident. In the original it's never mentioned what happened to him [[note]](Perrault's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donkeyskin own version of the tale]] has the King surviving, recovering his sanity, marrying a WidowWoman and apologizing to his daughter.)[[/note]]
** The father in "Beauty and the Beast" is implied to start the story terminally ill, and dies before the end.
** In "The Six Swans", the king is murdered by his second wife after his children disappear.
* DesperatelyLookingForAPurposeInLife: Not that hyper desperately, but the Soldier from "The Worn-Out Dancing Shoes" rose to the challenge because he had been wounded in a recent war and didn't want to stay put while he healed.
* {{Disneyfication}}: Averted for the most part, and sometimes even Inverted (a few episodes, such as "Hansel and Gretel" and "The Iron Stove", are actually [[DarkerAndEdgier darker than]] [[{{Grimmification}} their sources]]). A few straight examples exist in Cinderella (where the stepsisters don't cut off their feet) and Bearskin (where the two older sisters don't kill themselves).
* DisneyVillainDeath:
** The witch in "The Iron Stove" suffers this after getting stunned by the princess's amulet.
** The huntsman in "Snow White" gets knocked off a cliff by a boar.
* DistressedDude:
** The prince in "The Iron Stove" is first under a witch's curse, and later gets abducted by her when the Princess releases him.
** Also the prince in "The Old Woman in the Woods", whose kingdom has been cursed and his subjects turned into trees and he himself into an Owl by the witch. He must team up with the ActionSurvivor Lisbeth to defeat the witch and when he's released at the end, he and Lisbeth marry.
* DownerBeginning:
** "The Coat of Many Colors" begins with poor Aleia running away from her mad father and then barely escaping with her life from her burning castle, while her dad burns to death there.
** "Brother and Sister" starts with Rudolf and Rose being whipped by their WickedStepmother.
** "Bluebeard" has the titular character killing his second-to-last wife on screen.
* DownerEnding:
** In "The Marriage of Mrs. Fox", Mr. Fox (driven by his jealousy personified like a demon) feigns death to test his wife's fidelity. When she chooses a new handsome husband, he arises and drives them all out of home - ending alone, angry and unhappy.
** The original ending of "The Spirit in the Bottle" has the boy go back to school to become a doctor and use his magical cloth just to heal wounds. Here, he becomes greed and lazy so his cloth falls into a fire and he loses his wealth. Desperate to recover his riches, he goes back to the woods looking for the demon in the bottle to replace his cloth... only this time the demon tricks the boy into taking his place in the bottle.
* DrunkOnMilk: In ''The Town Musicians Of Bremen'', the donkey acts giddy and walks on his hind legs after eating strange flowers. The narration even says that people make some kinds of wine from certain flowers.
* DueToTheDead: In "Beauty and the Beast", Maria remembers her promise to Beast when she and her sisters are praying in front of their recently dead father's tomb, wearing black dresses and veils to signify their mourning.
* ElectiveMute: Elise in "The Six Swans" is silent for much of the story, because her brothers will be trapped as swans forever if she says even a single word while working on the shirts to break the {{curse}}. She even lampshades it when the curse is undone:
-->'''Big Prince''': "Little sister, today it has been six years ever since our promise. You saved us all!"
-->'''Elise''': "Then, I can talk. Now I can talk again!"
* ElegantClassicalMusician:
** ''Rapunzel'' has the protagonist as a skilled musician, and her signature instrument is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyre the lyre]]. The Prince actually hears her playing and [[LoveAtFirstNote falls in love with her music]], ''then'' meets up with her. [[spoiler: She keeps her lyre after [[StarCrossedLovers she and the Prince are separated]] by the Witch, and the now blinded Prince finds her after [[BookEnds he hears her play the same song that she played when they met]].]]
** Briar Rose from "Briar Rose/Sleeping Beauty" is a beautiful girl who also plays the lyre.
* EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep: The soldier character in "The Six Who Went Far" is always referred to as Hero. Also, in "King Grizzlebeard," Helena calls her husband, who is a musician, "Musician" (before [[spoiler: she learns that he is in fact King Grizzlebeard]]).
* EvilDetectingBaby: Elise's baby son in "The Six Swans" starts crying whenever the witch approaches him. Considering she would later throw him into the forest and make it look like his mother ate him, one can hardly blame him.
* EvilSoundsDeep: The witch from "Hansel and Gretel" post OneWingedAngel.
* EyelidPullTaunt: "Snow White and Rose Red" has Rose do this to the gnome after he berates her sister for cutting off part of his beard to help him.
* FallenPrincess:
** Poor, poor Aleia from "The Coat of Many Colors".
** Subverted with Helena from "King Grizzlebeard", since [[spoiler: her fall of grace is a BatmanGambit from her father and one of her suitors (the titular "King Grizzlebeard", who already had a crush on her) to teach her to be less of a RoyalBrat.]]
** A male version in "The Man of Iron": Prince William is stolen away from his kingdom, and becomes a gardener, but in the end finds life much simpler, and becomes the Prince of his new kingdom.
** Elise and her brothers in "The Six Swans" start the story as the children of a King. When the WickedStepmother kills their father and takes over their kingdom, the six princes are transformed into swans and Elise must disguise herself as a CountryMouse (though she at least managed to find a pretty decent house) to protect herself ''and'' try undoing the curse undisturbed. This lasts until a local King meets an older Elise and falls for her.
* FamilyUnfriendlyDeath:
** The stepmother from "The Six Swans" is burned do death after she accidentally sets herself on fire.
** The Queen of "Snow White" dies from being attacked by a lot of wolves.
* {{Fartillery}}: In the original cut of "Jorinde and Joringel," when Joringel picks up the cat (really the witch in disguise) by his tail, the cat farts right into his face. The English dub cut the cheese-cutting.
* FrameUp:
** In "The Six Swans", the witch kidnaps Princess Elise's son and makes it look like she ate him.
** In "The Water of Life", Franz switches the titular water from his younger brother Joseph's canteen, so when Joseph tries to give it to his father, Franz makes it seem like he was trying to kill the king.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar:
** The witch from "The Six Swans", as said below, [[GoingCommando is not wearing panties]] and it shows towards the end.
** The "Rapunzel and the Prince" thing; the writers didn't show them doing anything graphic, but managed to sneak some [[GRatedSex very suspicious scenes and details]]. One scene has them embracing few after deciding that they'll escape together someday, [[SexyDiscretionShot and there's a shot of Rapunzel's tower in a night environment... and the light on her window goes out]]. The following one has them waking up ''in the same bed'' the next morning (fully clothed, but that's probably how the animators managed to sneak this in), with the Prince acting like a sneaky lover about to be caught in his lady's bed ''and'' Rapunzel telling him to leave before the Witch comes to check on her. And as a plus, some dubs have the narrators saying that [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything the Prince would come each sunset and stay with Rapunzel all night long]], which pretty much cements them as lovers... [[spoiler: The existence of their son, a CheerfulChild who [[StrongFamilyResemblance has the Prince's features and Rapunzel's eye/hair color scheme]], [[SexEqualsLove officially confirms all of this]].]]
** "The Iron Stove" includes [[MaleGaze more than one close-up]] to the HotWitch's body, specially [[BuxomIsBetter her breasts]].
** In "Snow-White and Rose Red", Snow-White and the Bear's [[LuminescentBlush very blushy and shy reactions]] to their above-mentioned AccidentalKiss implies that [[InterspeciesRomance they may have developed mutual feelings]] ''before'' she learned [[BalefulPolymorph that he was a human under a curse.]]
* GigglingVillain: The witch from "The Iron Stove".
* GirlInTheTower: "Briar Rose" features the titular princess being locked away [[GildedCage in a luxurious tower of her palace]] to protect her from the curse.
* GirlyGirlWithATomboyStreak: Snow White from, well, ''Snow White'' is a very feminine-looking girl who is the TeamMom for the dwarves, but is first seen happily getting up trees with Klaus to get [[TrademarkFavoriteFood her beloved apples]] and being scolded by her nanny for doing such "un-ladylike" things.
* GlamorFailure: Invoked in "Hansel and Gretel". The white bird is actually the witch's imp familiar, the sugar-coated facade of the Witch's house melts away into a more traditional haunted house, a strawberry from said house turns into a toad
* GoingCommando: If one looks closely when the witch jumps near the end of "The Six Swans", they can see that she isn't wearing anything under her skirt.
* {{Gonk}}: The Princess in "The Brave Little Tailor" and the boy from "The Golden Goose".
* GoodIsDumb: Hans in "The Golden Goose", is kindness exemplified but unfortunately isn't the most intelligent man.
* GratuitousForeignLanguage: In "Briar Rose," the invitations the witches receive to the christening party are written in romanized Japanese (and to boot, in medieval-style font).
* {{Greed}}: Some examples, especially the King and his daughter in "The Six Who Went Far in the World", two jerks that start a war just to obtain more gold and [[TheScrooge pay a soldier with only three coins]]. This starts a {{Revenge}} plot with the King losing all at the end.
* {{Grimmification}}: Many episodes use this while still keeping the show appropriate for children:
** In "Hansel and Gretel", both the white bird and the witch turn into demons (and the witch's house is presented as much scarier than in the story).
** "The Iron Stove" is also darker than its source by including a conflict between the princess and the witch over the prince.
** In "The Worn-Out Dancing Shoes", the mystery men who are dancing with the princesses turn out to be monsters, and attack the princesses when the soldier reveals their secret.
** The Crystal Ball. For all that is pure and decent in the world, The Crystal Ball.
* HairOfGoldHeartOfGold: Considering what the show is based on, it should come as no surprise that this is a common trait for protagonists and love interests. i.e., there's the Princess from "The Iron Stove", Princess Briar Rose, Rapunzel [[spoiler: and her son]], Cinderella, [[spoiler: the Beast's original human form]], FallenPrincess Aleia ''and'' her boss/prospect lover Prince Alexander from "The Coat...", the poor Princess from "The Crystal Ball"...
* HarpOfFemininity: Rapunzel and Briar Rose play these. Well, technically these are lyres, but the effect remains.
* TheHedgeOfThorns:
** The princess in "The Iron Stove" has to get through one of these in order to save her prince. It turns out to be an illusion, but braving it still took a lot of courage on her part.
** The Prince from ''Rapunzel'' falls into one when thrown out of the tower by the Witch, and has to crawl out of it despite [[EyeScream having his eyes injured]]
** The witch's spell in "Briar Rose" is so strong, it covers the entire castle in these and those who tried to get through it wound up becoming ensnared in its vines, succumbing to the spell themselves. When the Prince fated to wake her up gets close, however, the vines and thorns immediately split and let him go inside the castle, and when he wakes up Briar Rose they completely retire.
* HeroesWantRedheads: In "The Six Swans", Elise (herself a redhead) marries a red-haired prince from another kingdom while working on the shirts.
* HoistByHisOwnPetard: In "The Six Swans", the witch, having been exposed for what she really is, attacks with a wind spell. But in doing so, she reignites the pyre where Elise would've been burned to death, and sets herself aflame.
* HotConsort: Many examples
** Some aren't nobles by birth, but become royalty by via marrying a royal.
*** Gretchen becomes Queen in ''Rumplestiltskin'' after marrying the King.
*** Rose becomes Queen after marrying the king in "Brother and Sister."
*** Cinderella, Rapunzel and the maid Lisbeth from "Old Woman in the Woods" become Princesses Consort to their respective Princes.
*** The soldier marries into royalty in "Worn Out Dancing Shoes."
*** The Witch becomes Queen Consort in "The Six Swans."
*** "Snow White" becomes Princess Consort while her little sister Rose Red marries the Crown Prince's younger brother.
** Some are already Royalty, bur become the King Consort or Queen Consort, or Prince/Princess Consort of another land.
*** Elena becomes Queen Consort after marrying "King Grizzle-beard."
*** The Prince in "Briar Rose" becomes the Prince Consort of her kingdom.
*** Either Joseph or Anna will be the consort of either kingdom they return to in "The Water of Life."
** Likewise some of them are unknown to be royalty after some circumstances and become consorts of another kingdom.
*** William becomes Prince Consort by the end of "The Man of Iron."
*** Aleia, a FallenPrincess becomes Princess Consort of Alexander's kingdom in "Coat of Many Colors."
*** Elise is Queen Consort to her husband's kingdom and later discovered to be a FallenPrincess after saving her brothers in "The Six Swans."
* HotWitch: Three of them - the one in "The Iron Stove" (who more closely resembles a [[HornyDevils succubus]] than a typical witch), the one in "The Six Swans" (whose beauty briefly manages to charm the heroine's father), and the one in "The Water Nixie" (who wears a pink see-through dress). All three witches are the villains of their respective episodes.
* InstantSedation: Two soldiers, by order of the King and Princess, administer a sleeping potion to Speedy in "The Six Who Went Far" to sabotage his chances of winning the race against the Princess. Fortunately Hunter, an expert marksman, is able to wake him up by firing a warning shot.
* InteractiveNarrator: In the first part of the episode "Puss in Boots", the narrator lists everything that the miller's three sons received from him after he died. When the narrator says that the youngest son Max was left with the family cat, Max lets out a big "WHAT?", and the narrator talks to Max about what his father's will has specified.
* InterspeciesRomance: Toyed around with the Bear Prince and Snow-White in "Snow-White and Rose Red", as aside of the AccidentalKiss mentioned above, Snow-White is implied to have developed a crush on the Bear ''before'' learning that he was a handsome human prince under a spell. It's rendered moot when he recovers his human shape, logically.
* KissOfTheVampire: Subverted in the episode "The Crystal Ball," although it is a wicked witch, not a vampire, who routinely bites the neck of an innocent princess, in one of the most cruel and sadistic scenes ever imaginable. The princess also turns into a corpse afterwards, and somehow regenerates... only for the Witch to bite her neck and life energy away the following night...
* KneelBeforeFrodo: At the end of "Snow White and Rose Red" the sisters kneel before the Bear Prince when he reveals himself, but the Prince kneels in front of the girls to thank ''them'' for their help. And then he proposes to Snow White, [[BetaCouple with his brother proposing to Rose Red]].
* LaserGuidedKarma: Provided in many tales both as punishment (for bad guys) or reward (for good guys).
* LetThePastBurn: This type of ending was used at least more than once. The Bluebeard episode ended this way, and Hansel & Gretel had the witch's house get struck by lightning and burn down, and the kids reunited with their father the next day.
* LonelyDollGirl: The titular "Briar Rose" was kept away from the world [[GirlInTheTower in a tower of her castle]], with only her dolls as company aside of her [[ParentsAsPeople loving but overprotective parents]]. Her mother the Queen lampshades it as she tells her husband the King that they can't keep Briar Rose away from the world and playing with dolls forever.
* MaleFrontalNudity: In "Brother and Sister", when Rudolf recovers his human form, he is naked and his full body is shown. They probably got away with it without censorship because, when released, he's a young teen rather than an adult man.
* ManOnFire: At the end of "The Six Swans", the witch accidentally sets herself on fire when she summons a mighty wind.
* MasterOfIllusion: The witch in "The Iron Stove."
* MotherlySidePlait: Subverted by Lisbeth in "The Old Woman in the Woods", who styles her red hair like this despite not being a mother.
* MotorMouth:
** The narrator in the English dub sometimes talks very quickly, though it's not immediately noticeable.
** Plenty of characters in the English dub have moments of this. Then again, this wasn't exactly uncommon in English anime dubs of the time. The Japanese language can say a lot with relatively few words, so attempting to get the information out in the same amount of time would often result in rapid-fire dialogue. The Latin-American Spanish dub manages to mostly avert it.
* NamedByTheAdaptation: Some of the episodes give the characters names they didn't have in the original stories (though this depends on which language you're watching the show in). Examples include: Elise (the Princess of "The Six Swans" [[note]](apparently inspired by the "Elisa" name that she was given in Andersen's version)[[/note]]), Josephine (Bluebeard's last wife), Franz and Joseph (the princes of "The Water of Life"), Phoebe and Griselda (Cinderella's stepsisters), Leonora (the princess in "The Frog Prince"), Rudolf and Rose (the siblings from "Brother and Sister"), Lily (the cat maid in "The Marriage of Mrs. Fox"), Helena (the princess from "King Grizzlebeard"), among others who are unnamed in the original stories.
* NeverSayDie: The English dub does this on occasion, typically whenever reference is made to someone dying a violent death (not if someone dies a natural death, such as Maria's father in "Beauty and the Beast"). For example, in "The Six Who Went Far," it's mentioned that those who lose the race against the Princess "never come home", and we even see an executioner raising his sword to [[PublicExecution behead one such loser]], but the words "kill" or "execute" or any variation thereof are never used.
* NiceToTheWaiter: Prince Alexander from "The Coat of Many Colors" is very kind and nice to the apparent SculleryMaid Aleia from the very beginning.
* NoHistoricalFiguresWereHarmed: Their version of Bluebeard is resemblant to UsefulNotes/HenryVIII.
* NobleWolf: The wolves of "Snow White" are quite friendly to Snow White and the dwarves. [[BewareTheNiceOnes That does not stop the wolves from attacking the Evil Queen after she poisoned Snow White]].
* TheNotLoveInterest: Klaus from "Snow White" is very close to Snow White and aids her as much as he can, but he never shows any signs of being romantically attracted to her and they're pretty much LikeBrotherAndSister. She marries Klaus' friend the Prince, and Klaus is nothing but happy for them.
* OneSteveLimit: Averted, as alongside the classic dual title Snow Whites in "Snow White" and "Snow White and Rose Red", both the daughter in "The Magic Heart," and the maid in "Old Woman in the Woods" are named Lisbeth, Hans is both the name of the hero of "The Golden Goose" and the titular "Man of Iron", and Franz is the name of both {{Jerkass}} older brothers in "The Waters of Life" and "The Golden Goose".
* PapaWolf: In "The Six Swans", the King springs into action in defense of Elise and his sons when the Queen materializes a giant serpent in their bed chamber.
* ParentalIncest: "The Coat of Many Colors" has a mentally unstable king try to marry his daughter because she is the only woman who is beautiful as his wife was.
* ParentsAsPeople: In "Briar Rose", the Royal Couple love their daughter to death but, in an attempt to protect her from the curse she's fated to fall victim to, have kept her pretty much locked away for her first 15 years.
* PettingZooPeople: The main character of "The Marriage of Mrs. Fox", the rabbit of "Mother Holle" and the wolf of "Little Red Riding Hood".
* PimpedOutDress: There are several, given the nature of its stories, most based on 18th century styles.
** Josephine in "Bluebeard" is offered lots of dresses, including a white one with several layers of ruffling on the skirt, and a pink on with several ribbons and ruffles.
** The dress made for "Cinderella" is pale pink with plenty of frills and ruffles, and a yellow flounced petticoat. Even the Queen Mother wears an orange dress with golden trimming, white ruffles and petticoat, and giant poofy sleeves. The stepmother and stepsisters have their own fancy dresses as well.
** Leonora in "The Frog Prince" wears a pink and white dress, complete with poofy sleeves and fur-trimmed neckline.
** Princess Anna in "The Water of Life" wears a yellow dress with a pink petticoat of several layers of frills, and a fur-trimmed neckline.
** The princesses in "The Worn-Out Dancing Shoes" wear several dresses, with the eldest wearing a FairytaleWeddingDress at the end.
** "The Old Woman in the Woods" has Lisbeth find many precious dresses with the help of the Owl and a magic key he gives her.
** The dresses that Princess Aleia wears to the balls thrown by Prince Alexander in "The Coat of Many Colors" are made of Golden Sunlight, Silver Moon Beams and Stardust.
** The wedding dress that Gretchen wears in "Rumplestilskin" is made of the golden threads the titular imp had spun.
** Maria from "Beauty and the Beast" wore cute yet simple pink dresses through the story, so the wedding dress that the Prince/former Beast gives her offers quite the contrast.
* PlatonicLifePartners: Snow White from "Snow White" has a CanonForeigner best friend named Klaus in her story, and they're shown as this from the very beginning.
* PluckyGirl: The Princess from "The Iron Stove" is quite stubborn when she has a goal to fulfill, especially if it involves her beloved Prince.
** Elise from "The Six Swans" never ever falters in her decision to save her beloved brothers, even when it brings her enormous difficulties. The most she does is cry in complete silence when she's about to die, and yet she still thinks of her brothers and son rather than of herself
** Rose-Red from rom "Snow White and Rose-Red" counts too, never losing her energy and her smiles.
* PrincessesPreferPink: Most of the princesses and other leading ladies have at least some pink in their outfits. It's easier to list the exceptions: Snow White from "Snow White and Rose Red" (in her case it's because Rose Red is already wearing pink), Lisbeth from "The Magic Heart", and the princess from "The Iron Stove", who all wear green, and Aleia from "The Coat of Many Colours", who has purple, yellow, blue, white, and red dresses, but not pink.
* PromotionToParent:
** In "Bluebeard", two of Josephine's three brothers look ''notoriously'' older than her and the youngest, plus their parents aren't mentioned. This means they probably raised her and their youngest bro.
** In "Brother and Sister", the siblings had been looking out for one another ever since the beginning, but after they escape and Rudolf gets turned into a stag Rose begins taking care of him more openly.
* ProudBeauty:
** Princess Elena in "King Grizzlebeard knows full well her beauty is unmatched.
** Likewise the Queen in ''Snow White'' yearns for nothing more than to be the fairest of them all for as long as possible.
* PsychopathicManchild: The HotWitch from "The Iron Stove" has traits of this, as she's one Hell of a ClingyJealousGirl and some of her retorts against the Princess remind of a SpoiledBrat throwing a fit after not getting what she wants. The Latin-American dub of the series empathizes this by giving the Witch a VA who makes her sound quite child-like.
* PublicExecution: In "The Six Who Went Far," men from the village are forced to compete against the Princess in a race and are publicly beheaded if they lose (although the English dub specifically [[NeverSayDie avoids mentioning the word "killed" or "executed"]], even though the shot of the executioner raising his sword was not cut).
* RedIsHeroic:
** Elise in "The Six Swans" has reddish-brown hair and goes to great lengths to save her brothers.
** Lisbeth of "The Old Woman..." is a red-haired maid who must protect herself and her MysteriousProtector the Owl from the WickedWitch.
** Rose-Red is a reddish-haired GenkiGirl who helps her sister and mother happily and takes no shit from the dwarf.
* RedRightHand: The witch's daughter in "The Six Swans" has blue marks on her cheeks.
* RescueRomance:
** In "Snow White and Rose Red", the girls find a well-cared for horse without its rider. Rose-Red finds said rider (a rather handsome young man) passed-out, tends to him as he wakes up, [[AfterActionPatchUp patches up his leg]] and, when they say goodbye, she's clearly crushing on him. He turns out to be the younger brother of the Bear Prince, and they marry at the end.
** Once the titular "The Iron Stove" recovers his human form, he's taken away by the HotWitch and the Princess must rescue him.
** In "The Old Woman in the Woods", Lisbeth and the cursed Prince team up to rescue one another from the Witch. He first gives her a magic key that allows her to get supplies to survive alone in the woods, and later she repays the favor by going into the Witch's mansion and following his instructions to defeat her.
** Prince Joseph wins the heart of Princess Anna after rescuing her from a demon on his quest to obtain the titular "Water of Life."
** Subverted in "Brother and Sister": Rose needs to be rescued by the King ''after'' they have fallen in love and have been married long enough to have a kid.
* SanitySlippage: It's mentioned in the backstory of "The Coat of Many Colors" that the king gradually lost his mind, with the implication that some kind of meningitis was responsible.
* SecretRelationship: Rapunzel and her Prince, natch. They're mentioned to have gotten married in secret by the narrator.
* SensibleHeroesSkimpyVillains: Very much apparent in the episode "The Iron Stove". The princess wears a long green dress with long sleeves and, while it had some cleavage, it wasn't that big. The witch, on the other hand, wears a very short blue dress with virtually nonexistent sleeves, and visible cleavage.
* SexEqualsLove: [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Heavily implied]] in "Rapunzel". Considering she and her Prince slept in the same bed (albeit fully clothed), and he's described as [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything visiting in the evening and leaving in the morning]], more mature viewers probably have some idea of what they're up to. [[spoiler:Then Rapunzel gives birth to the Prince's son after she gets banished, and the two of them are joyfully accepted by the Prince on being reunited with him, removing any and all lingering doubt]].
* ShapeshiftingExcludesClothing: Mostly averted since the {{baleful polymorph}}s of the stories tend to be dressed when they return to human forms, but played straight with Rudolf from "Brother and Sister". Probably because Rudolf is a pre-teen when he's released, while the others tend to be older teens or adults.
* SheCleansUpNicely:
** "Snow White and Rose Red" finishes with a brief scene featuring the girls in royal clothes (and [[SheIsAllGrownUp apparently older]]) as they marry their princes. The last scene features them with their beloved mother, who is dolled up in a nice blue gown.
** The maid Lisbeth from "The Old Woman in the Woods" is a rather cute [[BarefootPoverty and barefoot]] redhead girl, but she's an absolute ''knockout'' when she marries her Prince and is shown in a FairytaleWeddingDress.
** The Soldier from "The Worn-Out Dancing Shoes" looks a little plain and has a bit of PermaStubble. When he's all dressed up to marry the eldest Princess, he looks so good in regal clothes that [[{{squee}} his bride is VERY impressed and even giddy.]]
** Josephine from ''Bluebeard'' is a quite pretty villager and when Bluebeard takes her to his castle she's given quite the makeover.
** A rather literal example with Johan in "Bearskin". He begins as a clean-faced and rather cute soldier (save for some bruises) and then spends several years going around without being able to bathe, after the DealWithTheDevil he makes (plus he grows quite a BeardOfSorrow). When he finally manages to bathe/shave/dress up/etc., the difference pretty obvious.
** When Rose from "Brother and Sister" marries the very handsome King, she also gets a makeover and goes from a cute teenager to quite the beauty.
** In "The Coat of Many Colors" Aleia is often mocked for her appearance while wearing her fur coat, yet the nights she attends the balls in her fancy gowns she stuns the crowds with her beauty.
** In "Beauty and the Beast", Maria goes from wearing simple villager clothes and a white bonnet to putting on a simple yet prettier gown and LettingHerHairDown. Towards the end she's in a black dress with a just as black veil, signifying her mourning for her father; when the spell over the Beast is broken and he returns to be a Prince, her mourning clothes magically change into a white wedding dress.
** Elise from "Six Swans" starts cutely dressed as the Princess she is, but after her and her sibling's fall of grace she wears more plain country clothes. Then the King takes her to his castle and she's again well-dressed like the Queen Consort she becomes.
* SheIsAllGrownUp: In "Brother and Sister", a TimeSkip takes place right after Rudolf/Brother becomes a stag. The siblings live peacefully in a tiny cabin, with Rudolf as a sleeker and slightly older stag and Rose/Sister as a cute GirlNextDoor.
** Elise from "The Six Swans" grows from a a cute little princess, to such a lovely teen girl that the Prince blushes when he sees her. Her six brothers also fit in: they were transformed into swans when they were either little boys or teenagers, so when the spell is broken after six years, they've grown accordingly and their teen and/or adult human selves look ''quite'' dashing.
* ShoutOut: A lot to Creator/{{Disney}}. The most obvious being in the Mother Holle episode, where Hildegarde meets a [[Disney/AliceInWonderland white rabbit]]. Cinderella and Snow White also resemble their Disney counterparts.
* ShownTheirWork: Not only did the show feature many obscure fairy tales, it also included Literature/PussInBoots and Literature/{{Bluebeard}}, despite only appearing in the Grimm's first collection (Perrault's earlier versions are why those stories are otherwise known today).
* SmallReferencePools: Averted: the anime included many obscure fairy tales such as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Iron_Stove "The Iron Stove"]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jorinde_and_Joringel "Jorinde and Joringel"]], in addition to well-known ones like "Cinderella" and "Snow White".
* SparedByTheAdaptation:
** The stepmother in "Brother and Sister" has her spells broken and ends up wandering the woods in a daze, but she doesn't get [[BurnTheWitch burned at the stake]]. Her eventual death happens off-screen.
** The older sisters in "Bearskin". In the original story, reduced to envy, they commit suicide and the Devil takes their souls. Here they are clearly upset when they find out what they lost, but they don't actually kill themselves.
* SuperpowerLottery: The HotWitch and WickedStepmother of "The Six Swans" has many, MANY skills: SummonMagic (the snake she summons against her stepfamily), some RealityWarper skills (when the King has a GutFeeling after meeting her and almost refuses her mom's marriage proposal, his surroundings begin to change inexplicably), MasterOfDisguise (she disguises herself as the King before cursing the princes), BalefulPolymorph (which she applies to her stepsons), [[BlowYouAway Wind Magic]] (which leads to her KarmicDeath, ironically), etc.
* StockholmSyndrome: Maria in the "Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast" episode eventually develops for the Beast rather quickly. In return, Beast has quite the case of LimaSyndrome.
* StrongFamilyResemblance:
** In "Rapunzel", [[spoiler:the title character's son with the Prince has his father's features and his mother's hair and eye colors]].
** In "Snow White and Rose Red", Snow is pretty much a younger version of her and Rose's mother.
* TalkingAnimal: In "The Iron Stove", a bunch of these aid the Princess. [[spoiler: They're humans under a spell, and when the Witch is defeated and implied to be killed, they recover their human forms.]]
* TamperingWithFoodAndDrink: "The Worn-Out Dancing Shoes" invokes and averts this: the Princesses try drugging the soldier's wine to escape to their dancing "dates", but the soldier outsmarts them by quietly disposing of the drink and then pretending to fall asleep.
* ATasteOfTheLash: The witch from "Brother and Sister" punishes her stepchildren by whipping them. When Rose fails to stop her from doing this, Rudolf shields her by [[TakingTheBullet covering her with his body]].
* TeenPregnancy: [[spoiler:"Rapunzel" has the title character being impregnated by the Prince at age sixteen. Then again the Prince seems to be in the same age bracket, or just a little older]].
* TextileWorkIsFeminine:
** In "Jorinde and Joringel", Jorinde is seen working with her spinning wheel when her boyfriend Joringel visits her [[FlowersOfRomance with flowers]].
** Used twice in "The Six Swans". First, in a bit of AdaptationExpansion the HotWitch transforms a magic branch into a golden needle and then sews six white capes to imbue them with the magic that transforms her stepsons into the titular swans. Then, Princess Elise puts her own sewing skills to work by sewing six shirts from starflowers to free her brothers from the Witch's curse. [[spoiler: She finishes right before being burned at the stake for crimes that she never commited, and the shirts are also tied to her stake/cross; right after they save her, the swan princes wrap themselves in Elise's shirts and are released from the spell.]]
** Poor Gretchen from ''Rumpelstilskin'' gets in trouble when her dad brags about how skilled she is with her spinning wheel.
* TomboyWithAGirlyStreak: In "Snow White and Rose Red", Rose-Red is a very cheerful and no-nosense tomboy who wears pink clothes, has long reddish hair and sometimes ThinksLikeARomanceNovel (especially when the Bear Prince's brother is around).
* TrueLovesKiss: Actually ''subverted'' in "Briar Rose": what wakes up Briar Rose is ''not'' a kiss, but the appearance of a Prince that is ''specifically'' [[BecauseDestinySaysSo destined to wake her up]]... plus him prickling his finger ''and'' lightly bleeding from it when he leans in to kiss her. They do get their BigDamnKiss very soon, however.
* TheUglyGuysHotDaughter:
** The HotWitch from "The Six Swans", Lisbeth from "The Magic Heart" and Rapunzel are all much, much prettier than the {{wicked witch}}es that are either their mothers or their {{Parental Substitute}}s.
** In a sibling version, "Bluebeard" has Friederich and Josephine looking much younger and prettier than their two eldest brothers.
** The King from "The Six Swans" is as much plain-looking, but his seven children look adorable in one way or another.
* TheUnfavorite: Hans, despite his kindness towards them, is treated horribly by his family, while his older brother Franz is adored.
* UnkemptBeauty: Even dressed in peasant garbs and slightly dirty, Prince Joseph is still a rather handsome man.
* UndignifiedDeath: In "The Six Swans" not only the HotWitch fatally catches fire but as she's running around while burning, the huge cross that Elise was bound to ''falls on her'' and definitely kills her.
* UnreliableNarrator: Not in the stories, but the dub theme song itself, which claims that "...every story ends so happily!" Again, this is first-edition Grimm material here: though many charas get their happy endings not ''everything'' ends well even for the protagonists.
* VainSorceress: "The Crystal Ball" has an evil witch murdering a beautiful woman and stealing her identity. To keep herself young and beautiful, she keeps a beautiful princess trapped in her castle, and performs a ghastly and unholy ritual every night where she bites into her neck and drains her of her lifeforce, and leaves her a rotting corpse. For reasons unexplained, the princess revives within a matter of seconds after the ritual is performed. When the murdered woman's sons find out what is going on, she turns two of them into animals, but the youngest escapes and is able to destroy her.
** In the English and Hebrew Dub, the scenes with the biting were removed, and she simply switches ages with the princess. This is actually closer to the original story. The Spanish changed it to drinking her youth, but showed the biting.
* VillainSong: The wolf in the "Little Red Riding Hood" gets one.
** The wicked King and Princess in "The Six Who Went Far," also gets one.
* VillainousGlutton: The wolf from "The Fox And The Wolf", who's always complaining about wanting to eat. [[HoistByHisOwnPetard It costs him in the end]].
* ViolentlyProtectiveGirlfriend: No one shall ever take the Prince from "The Iron Stove" away from his Princess!
* VocalEvolution: In "The Six Swans"'s Latin-American Spanish dub, Creator/ElsaCovian's Elise speaks in a rather high-pitched tone before taking up her vow of silence, and when she finally can speak again her voice is deeper. Justified: six years have passed between both events and she's gone from a little girl to an older teen, ''plus'' her vocal cords were probably a bit "rusty" so to say.
* WarIsGlorious: The king and princess in "The Six Who Went Far" sing a VillainSong about the glory of war (said glory being that the conquering soldiers bring home tons of gold and jewels, which, naturally, all goes to the king and princess).
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse:
** In "The Water Nixie", the little son of the main couple is never mentioned at the end of the story. Maybe a choice of writer because in the original story it is implied that he, alone and without parents, starved to death.
** The two elder brothers from "The Crystal Ball" pretty much disappear from the story after the Witch turns them into animals.
** Nothing is mentioned of what happened to William's mother or his kingdom by the end of "The Man of Iron."
* WhenSheSmiles: At the end of the "The Golden Goose" the boy protagonist (after some people were stuck to him because of the Golden Goose's curse) went to a city where a worried King had decreed that his PerpetualFrowner of a daughter should marry whoever made her laugh. The sight of the procession made the Princess smile and laugh, and so the curse is broken, the boy marries her and inherited the kingdom.
* WhenTreesAttack: A group of evil trees appear in the episode "Jorinde and Joringel" brought to life by the witch who holds Jorinde hostage. The trees chase Joringel through the woods. When he loses sight of them and thinks they are gone, one of them sneaks up behind him and eats him. Luckily, it's revealed to be AllJustADream as Joringel wakes up in a bed right after the tree eats him.
* WomenAreWiser: In "Brother and Sister", Rose is quite savvier than her brother Rudolf and restrains her thirst, warning him to not drink from the stream. When he cannot resist any longer, disobeys her and is transformed into a stag, she hugs and comforts him.
* WorldsMostBeautifulWoman:
** Snow White who is the fairest of them all.
** In a dark take on this trope, Aleia in "The Coat of Many Colors" is the only maiden beautiful enough to fulfill her mad father's requirement for his Queen.
* WouldHurtAChild:
** In "The Six Swans", the witch abandons Elise's infant son to die. [[spoiler: Fortunately, the titular Swans find the baby and rescue him.]]
** The young boy Rudolf and the pre-teen girl Rose from "Brother and Sister" are whipped by their WickedStepmother.

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