!!!Shows with their own pages:
[[index]]
* AnachronismStew/{{Archer}}
* AnachronismStew/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries
[[/index]]
!!!Other Examples
* ''WesternAnimation/KingArthursDisasters'' plays Arthurian anachronisms for laughs; e.g., at one point King Arthur and Merlin land on the moon. At another, Arthur meets ''Literature/DonQuixote''.
** And then there's ''WesternAnimation/ArthurAndTheSquareKnightsOfTheRoundTable'', an Australian animated series that takes this trope and wrings it dry. Seriously, Merlin invented the movie camera and film projector?
* ''WesternAnimation/DinoRiders'' also had wildly anachronistic dinosaurs living next to one another (''T. rex'' lived about 85 million years after ''Apatosaurus''), and threw in a ''Dimetrodon'' (which died out 40 million years before the first dinosaurs lived) for good measure.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''
** Parodied when the family watches ''The Poke of Zorro'' in which Franchise/{{Zorro}} fights Literature/TheThreeMusketeers and Film/TheManInTheIronMask before challenging Literature/TheScarletPimpernel [[GloveSlap to a duel]]. When the Pimpernel [[CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys runs away]], KingArthur crowns Zorro the King of England.
--->'''Bart:''' It's like a history lesson come to life!
--->'''Lisa:''' No it's not, it's entirely inacc--
--->'''Bart:''' Quiet, here come the ninjas!
*** And [[CreditsGag the credits]] mention Robot Zorro, among other strange characters. With Creator/JamesEarlJones as the voice of the Magic Taco.
*** The ending ''rap'' playing over the movie credits also suggests that Zorro will "cut your butt from a '52 Ford."
** In "Lisa's Substitute", Mr. Bergstrom asks the class to identify three things wrong with his cowboy outfit. Lisa points out his belt says state of Texas despite Texas not being a state yet, he has a revolver before it was invented, and there weren't Jewish cowboys. He says he was also wearing a digital watch and [[ITakeOffenseToThatLastOne notes for the record that there were a few Jewish cowboys]].
** When the kids play CowboysAndIndians, Nelson fires with a "Killmatic 3000". Bart tells him they didn't have that back then and Nelson retorts "records from that era are spotty at best."
** Played straight in the flashback episode "That 90s Show". It's supposed to take place in the early 1990s when grunge music came onto the scene, but it references pop culture from all over the decade. Homer is seen drinking Zima, which became popular around 1993, watches ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' episodes from 1995/96, Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog's design from the 2000s is shown, people are shown browsing the Internet in the early 1990s, and songs from the late 1990s are played. Homer also inspired Music/KurtCobain, which means the episode should've taken place in the late 1980s for that to happen.
* In ''WesternAnimation/CatsDontDance'', when the animals are on the out-of-control ark, they crash through a movie production in progress, which seems to be a nod to Creator/CecilBDeMille's version of ''Samson and Delilah''. Except that the columns that Samson is pulling down are part of a Parthenon-style Greek structure, and after the ark crashes through the set, we get a gag shot of Danny and Sawyer suddenly wearing ''Egyptian'' costumes.
** Well, old Cecil himself enjoyed serving up a good bowl of Anachronism Stew, especially in the name of FanService or Spectacle. Like the Art Deco sets in ''Cleopatra'' (although [[OlderThanTheyThink Art Deco itself was partly inspired by Ancient Egyptian finds]]).
*** Also, consider the fact that the movie is set in 1939, a time when biblical epics were not in vogue. [=DeMille=] stopped making them shortly after UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode went into effect, and would not revive them until the aforementioned ''Samson and Delilah'' about eight years later.
** The ending credits which has gag movie posters of the main cast in various famous movies of the 20th century. Them starring in ''Film/{{Beetlejuice}}'' is an eye-raiser considering the film's timeline is the 1930s.
*** The turtle probably would still be around for ''Beetlejuice'' if it had a real turtle's lifespan, but most of the others' careers shouldn't even have lasted out the 1940s.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'' is a similarly deliberate example. Fedora-clad gangsters wield Tommy Guns and the buildings have an Art Deco style, but some characters, like Georgette Taylor, dress in 1960s mod fashion, while others like ComicBook/BlueBeetle wear contemporary 21st century clothing.
** And then there are video games, cell phones, and computers.
** Nobody ever calls attention to the race of characters like ComicBook/{{Firestorm}}, ComicBook/{{Vixen}}, or ComicBook/TheAtom, which probably would've gone quite differently in the ''[[ValuesDissonance actual]]'' [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]]. Similarly, nobody is surprised by the presence of female superheroes like ComicBook/BlackCanary.
* Both ''WesternAnimation/{{X-Men}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Wolverine and the X-Men}}'' portray Japan in a very bizarre light. They acknowledge that the country has modern technology and clothing, but feudalistic ninja are apparently everywhere, and everyone we see is obsessed with the Samurai code of honor.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'', for the simple fact that humans and dinosaurs couldn't possibly coexist... this is due to RuleOfFunny.
** This, however, gets to the Point of MindScrew when ''[[YetAnotherChristmasCarol The Flintstones Christmas Carol]]'' takes place in 10 million B.C., which means 10 million years before the birth of Christ, ComicallyMissingThePoint of the holiday existing in the first place.
** This was also the basis of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MadGwgiRgAM a Christmas-themed commercial for Pebbles cereal]], which features Santa Claus, who urges Fred to share his cereal with Barney.
** They also have a lot of modern-day technology, albeit in more primitive form.
** They also speak modern English, even though Old English was first spoken in the Middle Ages.
*** Tex Avery's 1953 cartoon ''The First Bad Man'' is probably the UrExample as it was one of the inspirations for the Flintstones.
* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'', both the flashbacks and the "present" have their problems. For one thing, the Normans, who conquered England in 1066, built the first stone castles on Britain since the 6th century, which would make the Gargoyles' home castle (built in the tenth century) an impossibility. For another, people still haven't invented anything like the Steel Clan or Xanatos' winged, Rocket-{{Powered Armor}}, making them an impossibility in the 20th century as well.
* The "Starboy and the Captain of Outer Space" film from ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'' is possibly the most Anachronism Stew-y cartoon ever made. For example, the 3 main villains are George Washington, Pablo Picasso and Annie Oakley, who try to destroy the human race by killing their hostages: Shakespeare, Oliver Twist and the Mermaid Queen.
** Another ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'' episode takes place at a medieval fair where Brendon and Jason put on a play about the friendship of King Arthur and Robin Hood... and the episode is titled 'Renaissance'. It invokes the RuleOfFunny showing Brendon's grasp of history, but it's also typical of these fairs.
** In yet another, Melissa once portrays Susan B. Anthony as a gun-nut. The 'B' stands for 'Bitchin''.
* ''WesternAnimation/MickeyDonaldGoofyTheThreeMusketeers'' has alarms, modern plumbing, a production of ''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'', mentions of peanut butter, fast food, an airhorn, etc.
** Most of this is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the character commentary.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}}'' is supposed to be set after DNA paternity tests' discovery (after the 1990s). But all the technology shown are so old-fashioned (Ego uses a typewriter, for instance), that some French reviewers believed the movie was supposed to be set in the 1950s.
** Though considering all the audience saw was a very select group of very, very eccentric people, it could just be their oddities. Ego especially seems like a character who'd dislike a computer.
* Every episode of ''Dino Babies'' had the characters retelling a famous story set millions of years in the future.
* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/RubyGloom'' has a cameo by one of Misery's ancestors who started the Great Fire of London. As you recall from your history lessons, that was in 1666, but the character is wearing a medieval costume complete with tall pointy hat.
* Extremely evident in ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' where the robot modes of ''all'' the Transformers (especially those of Optimus Prime, Bumblebee, Starscream, and Soundwave) resemble their eventual Earth modes even in the distant past and on planet Cybertron. The vehicles' modes were alien, but in robot mode, Bumblebee has a Volkswagen roof for a chest and front for feet ''four million years'' before there would be such a thing as a Volkswagen.
** It doesn't stop once they get to Earth. The toys came first, and before the TF universe was created, they were originally designed for a toyline where humans would pilot HumongousMecha so there was no need to make them vehicles you could find around town. So Astrotrain turns into a ''steam locomotive.''
* The time setting of ''WesternAnimation/AlfredJKwak'' is considerably vague. In general it seems to take place somewhere during the 20th century, but among other things Professor Paljas has access to advanced supertech, and a mediaeval Middle Eastern kingdom also seems to exist.
* Despite taking place in the 17th century, ''WesternAnimation/AlbertTheFifthMusketeer'' has shown bolognese sauce, bowler hats, steel frying pans, and umbrellas, which were more common two centuries later.
* ''Almost'' avoided with the original ''Land Before Time''. The characters include such species as, among others, Triceratops, Saurolophus, Pteranodon, and Tyrannosaurus. So far so good, all are from late Cretaceous North America. Granted, the protagonist, Littlefoot, is a Jurassic Apatosaurus, but audiences can just pretend he's an Alamosaurus. But then there's the introduction of Spike the also Jurassic Stegosaurus, and at one point in the film there is the brief appearance of a-''Permian'' Dimetrodon?? And that's not even taking into account the sequels, which bring up a whole different mess!
* Double Subversion in ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime''. At the beginning of the series, it looks like a massive anachronism stew: a show taking place in the medieval ages, with princesses, knights and swords, mixed up with actual technology, computers and robots. After a while, it's reveled that [[spoiler: The show doesn't take place in the past, but in the distant future, after a Nuclear War]]. So yes, the technology is justified... but what's up with the princess thing, anyway?
** The rise of feminism maybe?
* ''WesternAnimation/DastardlyAndMuttleyInTheirFlyingMachines'' presumably takes place during World War I. In the ''Magnificent Muttley'' episode "The Masked Muttley," Dick Dastardly is seen watching television. Some three decades before it became commercially viable. Then in "Aquanuts," Muttley is left to wash the dishes while Dastardly, Klunk and Zilly go to see a surfing movie, which wouldn't be in vogue for another six decades.
* The WesternAnimation/BugsBunny cartoon "Prehysterical Hare" begs the question, how ''did'' movie film exist in B.C. days?
** Paleontology also seems to exist, as the filmmaker implies that the culture is aware of dinosaurs and mammoths and their having gone extinct before the film's creation.
** Two other cartoons also set in OneMillionBC, "Prehistoric Porky" and "Daffy and the Dinosaur" not only show dinosaurs existing alongside large mammals, but show the two coexisting trillions of years ago. Quite an accomplishment, seeing as the Universe is only around 14 billion years old.
* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' is stylistically set in what looks to be the 1960s or 1970s, so vinyl records and the like have their place, but such futuristic marvels like cassette players, compact discs and cellphones make appearances. Despite the presence of Laptops, desktops by in large are bulky and resemble computers from the early 1980s.
** An in-universe example occurs when people attend a Ren-Faire as ''pirates''.
* ''WesternAnimation/TimeSquad'' uses this trope to its advantage. Almost every historical figure the trio come across are involved in activities that will not be invented for hundreds of years after their respective time periods. For example, Kubla Khan is a nerd who obsessively reads comic books. And Eli Whitney creates a horde of robots who all have the ability to decipher what is human flesh and what is not. The show's creator, Dave Wasson, didn't call his show "The C student's guide to history" for nothing.
* Fans of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' have noticed that the exact tech level in Equestria is rather undefined, even with the presence of magic. The early writers wanted to keep it low-tech, but later writers sneak things in. A good example is the train in "Over a Barrel", which has a proper locomotive but is pulled by a team of ponies; in later episodes, trains run by themselves.
* The short film ''WesternAnimation/PrehistoricBeast'' has a ''UsefulNotes/TyrannosaurusRex'' fighting a ''Monoclonius''. The two species did not live during the same time in the Cretaceous period.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheDaltons'' mentioned Creator/LaurelAndHardy and the UsefulNotes/TourDeFrance, as well as showing modern-looking bras, robots, and a boy dressed in the style of someone from the late 20th/early 21st century and other things for the sake of being more relatable to the target audience. The show is set at the end of the 19th century.
* Though (like its [[Literature/AroundTheWorldInEightyDays source novel]]) ''WesternAnimation/AroundTheWorldWithWillyFog'' is set in 1872, the Statue of Liberty (completed in 1886) can be seen in the opening titles. Also, at one point, Bully comments that Dix "thinks he's Sherlock Holmes", even though the first Sherlock Holmes story was not published until the 1890s.
* "WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill" in the episode "Yankee Hankie" it is implied that cotton hill has videotapes of hank from when he was a young child along with ones of Little Hank. One slight problem, hank was born in the mid 1960's, years before any form of home recording came onto the scene. In 1970 sony realesed the umatic system, but it was expensive and it is unlikely cotton would have bought one, moreover the tapes looked way different than the ones stacked on cotton's shelves (they were bigger and more like a cartridge). Cartrivision was realesed around 1972, but it was built in a TV set, was also too expensive and the black and white camcorder attachment wasn't common and was also very expensive. Practical home video recording came in 1977 with betamax and then vhs, but by then hank was a teenager and camcorders for those formats weren't around until the early 80's.
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