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Affectionate Parody: Film

Film - Animated

Film - Live Action

  • Singin' in the Rain, considered one of the all-time great film musicals was itself intended as an affectionate parody of the original big Hollywood musicals. Right down to there being an overblown fantasy sequence inside the overblown fantasy sequence.
  • This Is Spinal Tap is a fairly obvious example of this, it being a parody of the hard rock and Heavy Metal of the 70s and 80s. It's shown to be an affectionate parody by the sympathetic portrayal of the band towards the end of the film, and the fact that it references things that only fans of the genre could possibly get.
  • Christopher Guest, who played Nigel Tufnel in the movie This Is Spinal Tap, has gone on to make several mockumentaries of his own, such as as Best in Show and A Mighty Wind, all of which can be considered affectionate towards their (rather daft) characters.
  • Stephen Chow's All for the Winner was a parody of Chow Yun-Fat's God of Gamblers, but it was so well-received (by some reports even out-earning the original) it was tied into the series "officially" with two more sequels starring Chow and several other movies without him.
  • Galaxy Quest is an Affectionate Parody of Star Trek, especially Star Trek: The Original Series and its stars (though with some Star Trek: The Next Generation mixed in). Notable in that numerous Star Trek actors have publicly declared their love for the movie. And not just Wil Wheaton (who has always been snarky about being Wesley Crusher); even Patrick Stewart loved it. The Other Wiki has a list of some of the actor's reactions. It is sometimes described as the best Star Trek movie ever. William Shatner apparently loved it, too, even though he's the one the movie comes closest to actually being less-than-affectionate about. Of course, Shatner's developed a pretty good sense of self-deprecating humor about his past behavior.
  • William Shatner did an Affectionate Parody of himself in a little appreciated moved called Free Enterprise.
  • Airplane! is an Affectionate Parody of disaster movies, especially the movie Zero Hour! (with which it shared entire lines of dialogue, such as "The life of everyone on board depends upon just one thing: finding someone back there who can not only fly this plane, but who didn't have fish for dinner"), and one of the best Deconstructions you'll ever see. It's now very, very hard to play the "disaster on a plane" trope straight— and impossible to watch Zero Hour or read the Arthur Hailey book Airplane is based on (it's from the guy who wrote Airport) without going into hysterics from visualizing all the jokes in Airplane!
  • The Naked Gun qualifies as Affectionate Spoof of police movies.
  • Spy Hard.
  • Mel Brooks is a Grand Master of this trope. He has made it clear that he only parodies movies and genres he likes. In fact Mel Brooks has said that he could never do a parody of, for instance, slasher flicks because he can only work with genres he respects.
    • Young Frankenstein is an Affectionate Parody of the 30's Universal Frankenstein movies. It is so well done in that style that it is possible to miss that it was a parody. Points to the director for recreating the way the films from back in the day were made; gigantic, multi-story sets (like the lab, that managed to all fit onto screen, with its huge staircase), extended takes done without cuts, as well as just the slow and deliberate way the actors move and talk.
    • Blazing Saddles is an affectionate parody of Westerns, so affectionate that the singer of the theme song, Frankie Laine, did not know it was a parody. They added the whip sounds into the music later.
    • Dracula: Dead and Loving It was an Affectionate Parody of past Dracula films.
    • Spaceballs parodied Star Wars and included what were very good special effects for the time. The care put into his movies makes them affectionate parodies instead of cheap spoofs.
    • High Anxiety for Alfred Hitchcock films.
    • Robin Hood: Men in Tights for the Robin Hood legends
  • In the same vein, Dont Be A Menace is an Affectionate Parody of "Growing Up In The Hood" movies, sometimes parodying whole scenes (and bringing over actors) from the movies it references.
  • Scream's tongue-in-cheek meta-references to established Horror Tropes were so cleverly done that it initiated a self-aware trend in later horror films.
  • Its parody, the Scary Movie series, also started a trend for other movie genres not taking themselves as seriously, ranging from decent things like Not Another Teen Movie to abominations like Date Movie, Epic Movie, Meet the Spartans, and Disaster Movie (all of which come from Seltzer and Friedberg, one might notice...).
  • The Fifth Element can be seen as straight Science Fiction flick, but works very well as a friendly parody of common action and science fiction concepts, particularly those of European sci-fi/fantasy comics.
  • My Name Is Nobody takes this concept to its logical extreme, no wonder as it was produced by Sergio Leone himself. Whimsical, hysterical, warm and ultimately an achingly gentle farewell to the genre he himself created, it's a wonderful mood-rollercoaster of satire and homage, to the point you will cry Manly Tears every bit as much as laugh while watching it.
  • Enchanted was Disney's Affectionate Parody of... itself, replete with Shout Outs and and subverted tropes. Not that it didn't turn out to still be a good film.
  • Slither is an affectionate parody of (roughly Seventies-Eighties era) horror movies.
  • Grease was an Affectionate Parody of 1950s teen musicals, although most people don't seem to realize this.
  • Cry-Baby was an Affectionate Parody of teen musical, and they made sure everyone would realize it.
  • Murder by Death is an Affectionate Parody of Agatha Christie-type murder mysteries.
  • The Cheap Detective spoofs hardboiled detectives.
  • Affectionate Parody of detective movies is Clue.
  • The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra is an Affectionate Parody of B-rated sci-fi horror movies from the 50s.
  • Samurai Fiction affectionately parodies traditional samurai epics while including a few modern art-film touches — and a rock-and-roll soundtrack supplied by co-star Tomoyasu Hotei.
  • Music and Lyrics is an Affectionate Parody of "disposable" bubblegum pop music, and its slightly pretentious-yet-cheesy tendencies, from the 1980s — especially in the mock MTV video clip for fictional band Po P!'s big hit "Pop! Goes My Heart" — to the present day, with the Britney / Christina Aguilera-type pop star character.
  • Snakes on a Plane is an affectionate sendup of a number of genres, such as airplane disaster, animal horror, and even action-adventure.
  • The Fearless Vampire Killers, or, Pardon Me, But Your Teeth Are In My Neck is a parody of the Hammer Horror vampire films that were so popular when it was made, and it works so well that it's sometimes more suspenseful than they are. This was in itself later adapted into the stage musical Tanz der Vampire, which includes songs mimicking various musical styles.
  • The Turkish move GORA parodies, well, pretty much every big-budget Hollywood sci-fi movie ever made. At the beginning, the extraterrestrials are talking in English before realizing what they're doing and switching into Turkish. The prisoners on the alien ship carry lightsaber shivs. Even the main character Arif is very conscious about doing things 'right', including finding an appropriate hero costume and having his sidekicks film him as he embarks on his adventure.
  • Tremors, while not an out-and-out parody, includes several gentle swipes at 50's monster-movie plots.
  • Tropic Thunder is an Affectionate Parody of both classic Vietnam films such as Apocalypse Now and Platoon, as well as the wider absurdities of Hollywood itself.
  • Wet Hot American Summer is an Affectionate Parody of the multitude of teen summer camp comedies released in the '80s, such as Meatballs.
  • UHF is rife with Affectionate Parodies. Since "Weird Al" Yankovic not only starred in, but co-wrote the film, this wasn't exactly surprising.
  • The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a very affectionate parody of the old B-movies Richard O'Brien grew up loving.
  • Mars Attacks! is an affectionate parody of 1950's science fiction B movies.
  • The Gamers knows too much about D&D to make it a normal parody, and its jokes are mostly aimed for the same people it mocks. An example would be most of the Bard jokes in the second movie.
  • Rustlers Rhapsody makes fun of all those B-grade singing-cowboy westerns produced back in the 50s. But it makes fun in a friendly way.
  • The Evil Dead series includes several subtle jabs at common horror movie tropes, but Army of Darkness is pretty much a giant, overt Affectionate Parody of Heroic Fantasy films. And it is awesome.
  • Star Wreck, a Finnish amateur film, makes fun of Star Trek and Babylon 5.
  • High School High parodies Save Our Students films.
  • Fatal Instinct parodied "Femme Fatale" noir of varying vintages.
  • Walk Hard parodies musical biopics.
  • Top Secret! parodied World War II espionage movies, though it's set in The Sixties Cold War era, the better to also send up 1960s rock and roll musicals.
  • BASEketball spoofs inspirational sports movies.
  • Jane Austens Mafia spoofs gangster films.
  • Kung Pow! Enter the Fist, Steve Oedekirk's awesome tribute to martial arts flicks.
  • The Korean film The Host is hard to take as anything other than an Affectionate Parody of Asian monster movies. Watched with a group of friends, the movie is hilarious.
  • Pootie Tang, The Hebrew Hammer, I'm Gonna Git You Sucka, and Black Dynamite are a few examples of this trope on Blaxploitation movies.
  • The made-for-TV Totally Awesome parodies '80's teen flicks.
  • Eight Legged Freaks was an affectionate parody of monster B movies. Had the nice blend of features like the characters playing their roles without any obvious irony, the classic trope of toxic waste causing spiders to mutate, and it even had spiders acting cartoony and making cartoony noises, and yet everything was played straight.
  • "The Girl Hunt" ballet in The Band Wagon lovingly parodies tropes from hardboiled and noir fiction and film, from the Femme Fatale to the Private Eye Monologue.
  • Die Hard started as both an action film and an affectionate parody of 80s action films, notably in casting Bruce Willis, who was best known before Die Hard for comedy roles. The movie ended up becoming the template for future action movies and transformed Willis into an action star. And the Die Hard movies eventually became an Affectionate Parody of themselves.
  • Hot Fuzz self consciously uses every possible cop movie trope it can, often hanging a lampshade on them, while paying tribute to those films.
  • Shaun of the Dead. Star and co-writer Simon Pegg said it was closer to "a love letter" to Romero's zombie films than a parody.
  • Austin Powers and The Second Best Secret Agent in the World are affectionate parodies of the James Bond style of spy movies. Which were heavily inspired by Our Man Flint. Ausin lampshades this, saying In Like Flint is his favorite movie.
  • Hobgoblins was clearly meant to be such a parody of Gremlins — an incredibly stupid idea considering that Gremlins is itself a parody, of both the "monster attacks small American town" genre of horror films and the "A Boy and His X" genre of feel-good family films.
  • Support Your Local Sheriff is an Affectionate Parody of The Western. Interestingly it's not a bad example of that genre even if you mange to take it seriously. Support Your Local Gunfighter, a non-sequel follow-up produced by more or less the same people, treads the same ground with less success.
  • The Princess Bride is a parody of medieval romances.
  • Press Start, to every videogame in existence.
  • Kung Fu Hustle is, of course, an Affectionate Parody to modern Wuxia genre.
  • The Muppets Take Manhattan is an Affectionate Parody of 1930's/'40's-era movie musicals of the "let's put on a show variety".
  • While Punch Drunk Love is a Deconstruction of Adam Sandler's roles as a sociopathic manchild, Anger Management is its parody.
  • The Brady Bunch Movie and A Very Brady Sequel qualify. They make light of several stories and moments from the original series while still standing true as film adaptations.
  • Starsky & Hutch movie.
  • Stanley Donen's sadly all-but-forgotten 1978 film Movie Movie was a loving Valentine to the cheesy B-list 1930s/early '40s era black-and-white films Hollywood would churn out during the height of the old studio system. Complete with lines so cornball they'd make Captain America blush. It's glorious fun for fans of vintage kitsch.
  • Vampires Suck parodies Twilight. Given who's parodying it, affectionate is probably not the right word though.
  • Down with Love parodied Doris Day and Rock Hudson romantic comedies.
  • Throw Momma from the Train is a love letter to Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train.
  • Some Like It Hot is replete with shout outs to past gangster films.
  • The Big Lebowski affectionately parodies the works of Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep particularly, by showing what would happen if you took a standard twisty-turny Chandler-style plot and occupied the role of the hero with a lazy hippy slacker instead of the usual hard-boiled Private Detective character.
  • Mystery Team does this for Kid Detective series in the Encyclopedia Brown / Three Investigators mode
  • Paul parodied "first contact" alien films like ET.
  • Igor is an Affectionate Parody of Universal Horror and the Frankenstein movies in particular.
  • The Beatles film Help! was an Affectionate Parody of James Bond movies.
  • Super Junior's film, "Attack on the Pin-Up Boys" is an Affectionate Parody of the idol culture, obsessions with passing fads, and the life of a teenager set in a High School AU. The second half of the film dips into Deconstructive Parody territory though as it becomes more introspective than the first half.
  • Man Of The House parodied the role that made Tommy Lee Jones famous, the lawman.
  • Stardust: the affectionate parody of classic fairy tales and fantasy genre.
  • Jack Brooks: Monster Slayer parodies Hillbilly Horrors.
  • Flubber and Inspector Gadget parodies anything from Disney.
  • Woody Allen has parodied genres like 1970s sci-fi (Sleeper) and epic historical romances (Love And Death). One section of Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* but were afraid to ask parodies 1960s Italian films, and another 1940s-50s mad scientist films (complete with John Carradine as the scientist in question).
  • The "I'll Make a Man Out of You" sequence in Mulan can be seen as an Affectionate Parody of a Boot Camp Episode.
  • Casa De Mi Padre is an affectionate parody of telenovelas and grindhouse movies.
  • Sky High is fond of pointing out the more ridiculous tropes in both the superhero and high school drama genres, which it typically accomplishes by using them straight but to an absurdly over-the-top degree. For example, the Commander has an entire drawer full of identical phones for when he pushes the buttons too hard.
  • Eagle Eye parodies thriller and Super Bad.
  • Back To The Beach is a parody of 1960's Annette Funicello / Frankie Avalon beach movies, starring...Annette Funicello & Frankie Avalon!
  • Vamps is one for nearly every vampire movie ever made.
  • Lemonade Joe, or Horse Opera is an Affectionate Parody of The Western pulp movies, and quite the Cliché Storm. There are no Western movies made by Czechoslovakian film school, just this one, and you can sense just how much everybody involved in the movie loved it to bits.
  • Rock Slyde is a parody of Film Noir, even having the first scene in black & white, though doesn't last.

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