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A God Am I: F Ilm
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Animated Films

  • Disney Animated Canon:
    • The Black Cauldron: The Horned King is ready to kill the world to be worshipped as a god by the dead.
    • Aladdin: Jafar does a textbook example of the rundown of this trope, wishing to become an all-powerful genie. In his following exultations, he mentions how the universe is now his to control, even going so far as to create a small solar system between his hands just for the hell of it. This is until Aladdin reminds him what the other half of "phenomenal cosmic power" is... "itty bitty living space".

Live-Action Films

  • The Man Who Would be King is about a British soldier who is mistaken for the god of an Afghan tribe. He and his fellow soldier decide to go along with the ruse.
  • In The Matrix Revolutions, the Train Man is a Physical God while in his subway:
    Neo: I don't want to hurt you.
    Train Man: You don't get it. I built this place. Down here, I make the rules. Down here, I make the threats.
    Train Man: *punches Neo into the back wall*
    Train Man: Down here I'm God.
  • Frankenstein (1931): One of the earliest examples. After Henry's famous "It's alliiive!", when he goes on to say "Now I know what it feels like to be God!" Originally, that part of the line was cut because the censors said it was blasphemous (which it is). It was cut off by a thunderbolt; the full line wasn't restored until 1999, 12 years after most of the other excised scenes were restored in full.
  • Batman Forever: Neatly subverted, as The Riddler makes a deep dark speech involving the titular line, finished with a deep, echoing invocation of "I", then asks, "Was that over the top? I can never tell!"
  • Skeletor has one of these speeches at the climax of the Masters of the Universe live-action movie, right down to the line "I am a god!"
  • The Lawnmower Man (has nothing but the title in common with the Stephen King short story), where Jobe declares his intention to be the "Cyberchrist." His defining line (referring to Cyberspace): "I am God here!"
  • Groundhog Day. After reliving the same day over and over again, and attempting suicide in a vast number of different ways, Phil eventually concludes that he's God, then tentatively adds, "Not the God. Just a god." (He adds that if he were THE God, he would know what was going on!) Lampshaded by the character himself when he explains logically why he's come to this conclusion. Rita brings him back to Earth thusly: "You're not a god. This is twelve years of Catholic school talking."
  • Street Fighter: At the climax, Bison (now mad with power) delivers the following line as he goes One-Winged Angel on Guile.
    "Something wrong, Colonel?? You came here expecting to fight a madman, and instead you find a god?
    • After kicking Guile's ass for the next couple of minutes, Bison delivers one of the hammiest lines ever recorded.
      "You still refuse to accept my godhood? Fine! Keep your own god! In fact, now might be a good time to pray to him! For I beheld Satan as he fell from heaven! LIKE LIGHTNING!"
    • He also seems to think he is Jesus, as he directly attributes Luke 10:18 to himself.
  • In the Mouth of Madness: Sutter Cane, the reality-rewriting author claims to have become god sometime after completing his latest work, and proves it by turning the world blue. However, his true purpose was as a servant to all manners of Cosmic Horrors and Eldritch Abominations, assuming everything in the movie wasn't a figment of the main character's imagination, or part of a meta-gambit by John Carpenter. (Yeah, it's that kind of movie.)
  • Bruce Almighty features a mortal (that's Bruce!) who is granted divine powers for as long he wants. Bruce, being a flawed and limited human, ensures that mistakes are made. The trope is deconstructed since Bruce does not use his powers for any greater jobs than having amazing sex and advancing his career as a reporter by creating amazing events to report. But by doing even such pathetic things he still manages to make big problems for himself and everyone, and manages to lose his girlfriend because she prefers normal Bruce. So God must take his place back and fix everything in a snap using same powers.
    • This trope is exemplified by Bruce standing at the top of skyscraper in a lightning storm, and shouting "I am Bruce Almighty! My will be done!"
  • Xerxes in 300 claims himself to be a "God-King".
  • Trunchbull in Matilda is pretty frank about this:
    In this school... I...AM...GOD!!!
  • Spider-Man: The Green Goblin/Norman Osborn in the first movie seems to fit this bill. "There are eight million people in this city. And those teeming masses exist for the sole purpose of lifting the few exceptional people onto their shoulders. You, me? We're exceptional."
  • From Caligula: "I have existed from the morning of the world and I shall exist until the last star falls from the night. Although I have taken the form of Gaius Caligula, I am all men as I am no man and therefore I am a god."
    • Subverted with his equally insane predecessor and uncle, Tiberius:
    Tiberius: It is fate that rules us, Little Boots, not any god.
    Caligula: You are a god.
    Tiberius: No, I'm not! Not even when I'm dead.
    Caligula: Julius Caesar and Augustus Caesar, they are gods.
    Tiberius: So says the senate, and so the people prefer to believe. Such myths are useless.
  • A particularly creepy example shows up in Gothika when Dr. Grey discovers the torture dungeon that her late husband used to rape and kill his female victims in. As she watches one of the videotapes that he shot in which he just finished molesting another woman he walks up to the camera, adjusts his tie, and states "It's good to be God. I love you." Near the end, Sheriff Ryan (Doug's friend and accomplice in his rape/molestation/murder of young women) reveals that they shared the sentiment, saying "We were their God."
  • This idea is poked fun at in Newsies - Joe Pulitzer is obviously full of himself, and pontificates "When I created The World..." (repeated when this speech is interrupted and he asks his assistant where he was. The response? "Creating the world, sir.") But... The World was the name of his newspaper, so he's not quite as full of it as he sounds.
  • Malice is about an egocentric surgeon who begins to believe he is God, even saying so in a deposition. The film's star Alec Baldwin referenced it in character as Jack Donaghy on an episode of 30 Rock.
  • The villain Benedict declares this in Last Action Hero once he's beginning to fully grasp his newfound ability to cross between dimensions and defy the real-world laws of physics at will...
    Benedict: "If God were a villain ... he'd be me!"
  • In Almost Famous, rock star Russell Hammond takes too much acid and climbs on a roof at a house party to declare "I am a golden god!" Later, when he has sobered up, he doesn't believe he said it. This is actually in reference to Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin having said the same thing on a hotel balcony.
  • Deacon Frost's goal in the first Blade movie is to become La Magra, the vampires' Blood God. (no, not that one) He actually does succeed at it, proving immune to silver and far faster and stronger than even Blade, but even a god has to kneel before anti-coagulants.
  • Inverted and/or parodied in the movie Ghostbusters
    Gozer: "Are you a god?"
    Stantz: "Um... No."
    Gozer: "Then die!"
    (Gozer unleashes a hail of Force Lightning that almost knocks the Ghostbusters off the top of a skyscraper.)
    Zeddmore (to Stantz): "Ray. If someone asks if you are a god, you say, 'yes!'"
  • Dreamscape. When Tommy Raye faces off against Alex Gardner in the President's dream, he tells Alex "In here, I'm God." And, because of his mastery and knowledge of dream warfare, he is.
  • Freddy Krueger in the original A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984).
    Tina: Please God...
    Freddy: This (holds up claw glove)... is God!
    Jesse: Oh God!
    Freddy: No, just me.
  • In The Last Airbender, Admiral Zhao has one when he's about to kill the moon spirit.
    Zhao: We are now the Gods.
  • In the movie Superman II General Zod demands that the president of the United States kneel before him. He agrees to do so in order to save lives. In desperation he utters:
    President: Oh God...
    General Zod: Zod.
    • Actually, Zod wasn't implying he was a god. He thought the president had gotten his name wrong.
      • However, his yellow sun powers have made him believe he has the right to rule the planet.
  • In The Fourth Kind, a tape recorder is accidentally left running during an Alien Abduction. While the video is reduced to static, the sound remains and the lead alien says (in Sumerian) "I AM *static* GOD!"
  • Director Cockburn of Tropic Thunder gave a speech like this.
    Cockburn: The helicopter is God and I am Jesus Christ.
    • Then he stepped on a land mine and ended up being judged by God.
  • In the climax of Dark Star, Doolittle succeeds at convincing Bomb #20 that its external sensory data is a lie and it itself is the only thing it can be sure exists, in a desperate gambit to make the bomb disregard an inadvertent signal to detonate while still attached to the ship. Unfortunately, the character in question uses this new 'insight' to become a solipsist and eventually decides that, in the absence of anything else having any proof of existence, this means it is, in fact, God. And God said "let there be light"... And there was light...
  • Sentinel Prime, the Big Bad of Dark of the Moon has a God complex to some degree. He states that on Cybertron, the Primes were gods, while on Earth, the disrespectful humans see them as only machines. This is part of his justification that humanity should be enslaved. When it seems that his plans will succeed, he declares himself Earth's new god.
  • Johann Schmidt (aka, Red Skull) in Captain America: The First Avenger is shown to have delusions of godhood and according to Dr. Zola, he can't even stop until people say he's a god. It is heavily implied that this stemmed from the serum.
  • While not specifically stating Godhood, Andrew Detmer in Chronicle implies himself to be an "Apex Predator", giving imagery of a lion not feeling remorse when it eats a gazelle. He then crushes a car, just the drive the point home.
  • Judge Dredd's arch-enemy Rico.
    "For the crime of being human, when we could have been gods! Guilty".
  • Loki invokes this in The Avengers (in fairness, he is a Norse god, but in the Marvelverse the Norse gods were Sufficiently Advanced Aliens). Hulk disagrees.
    Hulk: "Puny god."
    • Odin flat out tells him in Thor: The Dark World that while the Asgardians are powerful, they are not gods.
    Odin: We're born. We live. We die. Just like humans do.
    Loki: Give or take five thousand years.
  • Divine from Pink Flamingos. When asked if she believes in God, she replies "I am God!"
  • Played for laughs in Transformers: Revenge of The Fallen. Professor Colan claims to be "the Alpha and the Omega", thus comparing himself to God.
  • Implied in Escape from L.A. with the American President when he corrupts a Bible verse by putting himself in God's place.
  • Mickey Cohen in Gangster Squad.
    Underling: I'm so sorry Mr. Cohen, it won't happen again, I swear to God!
    Cohen: You're talking to God, so you might as well swear to me.
  • Played straight in spirit in Lord Of Illusions, yet subverted in letter by Nix after his return.
    Nix: A man who wanted to become a god...then changed his mind.
  • "Sally" (the Tet's central AI... amorphous liquid metal... control thing from Oblivion (2013) calls itself about being such (in Jack's eyes) at the end.
  • In The Amazing Spider-Man 2, after Electro drains Manhattan of its electricity to supercharge his powers, he declares to Spider-Man that everyone will see him as a god.
  • During his speech in the beginning of Transcendence, Will is asked if he seeks to create a god, given his desire to create an intelligence vastly superior to the collective intelligence of humanity past and present. Will calmly counters that mankind has always created its own gods. Later he essentially becomes this himself.
  • A.I.: Artificial Intelligence: Implied with Professor Hobby, David's creator. When one of his colleagues asks him what the moral implications of creating a truly sentient robot child would be, Hobby responds that God first created Adam to love him too. This is made much more heartwrenching later on when it's revealed that David is made in the image of Hobby's dead son, making him David's Father in more than one way.

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