* MartyStu: Genji, though he's possibly a deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in the narrative as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd.
* {{Squick}}: Reading the interactions between little Murasaki and Genji, when you know that he's flat out grooming her to be his perfect woman, can often be hard to stomach.
* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of the life of a Heian nobleman. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a ''lot'' of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous even back then. Like seducing and siring a son on his father's wife...or making plans for Murasaki when she's ''much'' too young even by medieval standards.