* AlternateAesopInterpretation: It could also be said that the big lesson from the story is to simply ignore what the oracles say in the first place. As in each case it was the people involved trying to AVOID the prophecy that caused it. Oedipus' parents sending him to die, where he is instead brought to a different kingdom far away. He hears about his destiny, and fearing that it might happen, leaves what he thinks is his birth home. Frankly if anyone involved would have said, "This prophecy is silly" it probably wouldn't have happened.
** Alternatively, don't cut people off in traffic or kill people who cut you off in traffic.
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: It's entirely possible that Jocasta knew all along who Oedipus was and, for the sake of maintaining her lifestyle and the city's stability (and because of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_sexual_attraction genetic sexual attraction]]), married and had children with her own son. Her suicide was not caused by her realizing the truth but by her realizing that she couldn't stop the truth from coming out.
** You can also interpret Creon as suspecting the truth but not wanting to pursue it because of the political implications.
* AwardSnub: This play is the most famous of all of Greek tragedy. When it was first performed, it got second place at the city Dionysia competition.
* ItWasHisSled: The play was based on an old story and written with the expectation that the audience knew the ending. Indeed, as pointed out by classicist Bernard Knox, that gave the play its Suspense, since the audience was waiting for when Oedipus would discover the AwfulTruth.
** It also continues into the present day, thanks in large part to people's familiarity with [[OedipusComplex one particular trope]]....
* NauseaFuel: When Oedipus finds out what he has done, he gouges his eyes out with his wife's brooches.
** He also, you know, had children with his momů
* {{Narm}}: To a modern audience, a lot of Greek theater comes off this way, because most modern Western actors lack the training to perform it in a way that doesn't just look like [[WorldOfHam stilted overacting]].
** Upon the revelation that Oedipus is her son, Iocaste immediately leaves the room. A servant walks in shortly afterward to report that the queen has committed suicide. You may or may not find the abruptness of all this hilarious.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96umP9MVz5I I KILLED THEM AAAAALLLLL!!!!! AAAAAAAAARARARAAAAGGGHHHHH!!!! AAAAARRRRRRAAAAAAGGGGHH!!! RAAAAAAGH... aaah....]]
** An earlier scene also has Tiresias giving his signature warning to Oedipus while falling down and flopping around on the ground [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9sEzR1Abuc&t=4m0s as though spontaneously getting heart attacks]]. The Chorus has to regularly push him back up, almost to the point of playing catch with him, and the fact that he's been made to look like some tremendous ghostly bird does not help.
* NightmareFuel: There's a video adaptation out there featuring every actor wearing a gigantic mask with terrifyingly huge, black eyes. Ancient Greek theater was actually performed this way, though.
** That's the 1957 version, by Tyrone Guthrie, which nowadays is pretty rare and usually held at libraries, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZUCgq8LfhY but can be viewed here]] on Website/YouTube.
* NewerThanTheyThink: The play is OlderThanFeudalism but is actually a ''prequel'' to ''Theatre/{{Antigone}}''.
* TearJerker: It's already awfully sad seeing everything go to pot for Oedipus because of Fate, but perhaps the worst part is when he has to explain to his daughters how they will be viewed as disgusting aberrations all because of him.
* ValuesDissonance: Quite a bit. Mainly: To an ancient Greek watching this play, Oedipus would've deserved what was coming to him because of his pride. Nowadays, it just seems kinda mean spirited. There's also the fact that infanticide by exposure was actually common practice in ancient Greece.
** Yes and no. If you read the songs by the Chorus (who are kind of like audience surrogates), they seem genuinely confused about whether Oedipus' suffering has any meaning at all, and the only [[AnAesop Aesop]] they can come up with is "no matter how successful someone is, don't judge him happy until he's died happy, because you never know what could happen."
** It's also hard for the modern to accept the original murder of his father. The only thing that made it a crime was his eventual revealed identity. That Oedipus killed a man for a traffic violation, and even casually talked about it to others, means nobody cared. ...until they knew who it was.
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