-> ''Lazy days like today make me want to hit the Felvine... \\
I'll just drop these YMMV Examples in your YMMV Page, nya?''
----
* EightPointEight: [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee's review]] of ''Tri'' sparked an edit war on the ZP Dethroning Moment page and a Hiroshima's worth of backdraft across the internet. Things got worse when he talked about the game in his "Extra Punctuation" column the following week, in which he announced that he had stopped after the Great Jaggi fight. Said fight is occasionally considered by the community to be the unofficial end of ''the tutorial for Tri'', which certainly did not reflect well on him in their eyes.
* AccidentalInnuendo:
** The description for the Dios Katana says it can "pierce foes and detonate inside them."
** Tri Ultimate's description of the Gigginox mentions that [[FreudWasRight parts of its body harden when it becomes excited.]]
** One of the items you can carry gives you stamina and makes you warm. Its name? "Hot Meat".
** The Gunlance tutorial in ''4U'' has an In-Universe example.
--->'''Ace Lancer:''' But when Gunlancers attack, their vigorous thrusts can result in an explosive climax! ...Hmm? ...Did I say something amusing?
* AmericansHateTingle:
** The series is a blockbuster hit in Japan, and new games have been known to boost sales of the consoles they're on, but in the United States, the games are {{Cult Classic}}s at best; detractors cite the lack of visible monster {{Life Meter}}s, auto-targeting, slightly sub par graphics and heavy grinding as turn-offs to the series. This can leave Westerners surprised that it's [[CashCowFranchise Capcom's third best-selling franchise]], outselling even ''Franchise/MegaMan''. However, this started changing after ''Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate'' sold out, [[http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2015/03/the_nintendo_3ds_was_north_americas_best-selling_hardware_platform_in_february selling a solid 290,000 copies in its first month]].
** The [[CuteKitten Felynes]] aren't hated by most people, but they tend to be ignored in favor of all the {{Badass}} monsters. In Japan, however, the Felynes are the most iconic part of the franchise, getting a series of animated shorts, and even their own spinoff game.
* AnticlimaxBoss
** Ceadeus, to most. While its attacks are fairly damaging and difficult to dodge if you're close to it, especially without the Lagiacrus armor, you can't fail against it unless you faint three times or don't cut its beard before it gets to Area 3. Upon hitting the seemingly narrow time limit of 30 minutes, it flees and you get some materials. You are then free to take the quest over and over until you've completely whittled down its health. ''3 Ultimate'' lampshades this by demoting Ceadeus from a 6-star monster to a 5-star monster, putting it on par with more common, albeit powerful monsters. Goldbeard Ceadus, on the other hand, is a different story; see ThatOneBoss below.
** Lao Shan Lung and Yamatsukami, both of whom are even more predictable than the above. Lao doesn't even have a move that targets players on the ground, whilst virtually every one of Yama's attacks is clearly telegraphed and easily avoidable even if you have the reaction time of a dead cow.
** The Ivory Lagiacrus in Tri Ultimate is hyped up a lot in game, [[spoiler:being the monster that eventually forced the Village Chief into retirement from his hunting career and all]], and is also the last fight before the credits sequence. In practice, however, it's a slightly stronger Lagiacrus who has roughly the same (or, in some occasions, less) health as most of the fights leading up to it, fights nearly entirely on land (generally considered to be easier than fighting them in water), and whose only real additional threats compared to the normal Lagaicrus are slightly wider hitboxes on its electric attacks and slightly increased damage.
** Barring monsters with dodgy hitboxes or unstable animations, any fight can be mastered due to each beast's well defined behavior. Unfortunately even in offline mode most players will ''have'' to run them until they become easy if they want to craft good equipment.
** Rusted Kushala Daora, the TrueFinalBoss of ''4U'''s postgame. All of Dundorma fears it as they believe that it may possibly destroy the entire town, and [[spoiler:it is the monster that cost the Master of Defense his career as a Hunter.]] Most of the postgame focuses on preparing for the fight against it. This unfortunately results in the fact that when you get to the fight itself, it's less of a fight and more about waiting until you can use the new superweapon you put together to OneHitKill it. You can't even fail the Quest; you get unlimited tries. Granted, you ''can'' fight it on the ground for a real challenge, but the fight is so easy otherwise, that [[spoiler:Apex Seregios]] you killed a Quest earlier could feel a little bit harder than Rusted Kushala Daora, if not by much.
* BaseBreaker:
** [[SignsOfTheEndTimes The Fatalis trio]]. You either like them for their [[NintendoHard difficulty]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword powerful equipment]], or you hate them for being [[FakeDifficulty stupidly overpowered]]. Black Fatalis gets this especially due to its [[TheGenericGuy uninteresting design and attacks]].
** [[{{Gasshole}} Congalala]]. Some people think it's [[FunnyMoments hilarious]] and love how it [[WakeUpCallBoss introduces Frenzied monsters]], while others think it's [[NauseaFuel disgusting]] and [[GoddamnedBoss cheap]].
** [[{{Satan}} Dire Miralis]]. Some people like it for its otherworldly design and its [[AwesomeMusic amazing theme]], while others think it's an [[ReplacementScrappy inferior replacement]] to the Fatalis trio. [[AntiClimaxBoss The battle is also considered to be anti-climatic]].
** [[UndergroundMonkey Subspecies]] in general. You either like them for being different takes on the originals and believe they're an integral part of the series, or you think they're a product of lazy programmers and a waste of space.
* BrokenBase: Beginning with the release of ''Tri'', the changes made to the series over time have unsurprisingly split the Monster Hunter fanbase to some degree. The argument primarily centers around whether the 1st and 2nd Generation titles were comparatively better than the 3rd and 4th Gen ones. More specifically:
** Slime/Blastblight status: a fun addition or a GameBreaker that induces ComplacentGamingSyndrome? Made less of an issue when the fourth generation nerfed it.
** The Swimming mechanic in ''Tri'' and ''3 Ultimate'': Diversifying combat with full three-dimensional movement, or an exercise in patience involving slow-moving Hunters vs. monsters who can swim around in circles?
** The [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks scarcity]] of old monsters in ''Tri'' and ''3 Ultimate'' vs. the ''[[ItsTheSameSoItSucks predominance]]'' of old monsters in ''4'' and ''4 Ultimate''.
** How [[RealIsBrown dreadfully flat and dreary]] the 1st and 2nd gen games looked in terms of art direction vs. how ''[[TastesLikeDiabetes sickeningly bright and colorful]]'' the 3rd and 4th gen games look in comparison.
** Did the series get [[ItsEasySoItSucks way too easy]] in the 3rd generation, or was it made more enjoyable by removing some of the FakeDifficulty?[[note]]The fact that 3U may have used the scaled down monster stats from Portable 3rd, in addition to providing an extra 50 base defense for players didn't help the argument.[[/note]]
** Does the emphasis on different elevations in the fourth generation add great variety to the environments and enhance the gameplay, does it make the game too easy by allowing players to just spam aerial attacks and topple monsters with the mounting mechanic, or does it make the game just as cumbersome to play as, if not more than, the underwater combat in ''Tri'' and ''3 Ultimate''?
** Are the Apex monsters of ''4 Ultimate'' a brilliant challenge or do they show that you can take ThatOneBoss [[TropesAreNotGood too far]]?
** The issue of whether ''Frontier'' is an awesome game that deserves to be localized for international gamers, or a hilariously broken spinoff that should [[AmericansHateTingle just stay in East Asia]].
** Whether ''Stories'' is a worthy spinoff to the series great to attract a new generation of hunters with an awesome cel-shaded style... or if Capcom should just focus on making the next main series installment while toning down the even-more-bright-and-colorful-than-''3''-and-''4'' art style.
** Zinogre appearing in ''Frontier''. Some people are fine with the main series and ''Frontier'' integrating, while others see a DoubleStandard; sure, monsters from the main series get to show up in the spinoff, but no [[CanonForeigner spinoff monsters]] [[CanonImmigrant sans Hypnocatrice and Lavasioth]] get to appear in the main series?
** Is ''Cross'''s high emphasis on style and action an exciting way to shake up how players hunt, or is it a disservice to the franchise's tried-and-true formula?
*** For that matter, the announcement coming just four months after ''4 Ultimate''[='=]s Western release: Will there still be time to do everything ''4 Ultimate'' has to offer, or is the announcement too soon and the series falling victim to "VideoGame/{{Madden|NFL}} Syndrome"?
* CatharsisFactor: The Plesioth, notorious for its {{Hitbox Dissonance}}-laced [[ThatOneAttack hipcheck]], appears in ''4'' and ''4 Ultimate''...as part of a fishing minigame. Catching it causes it to die upon landing on the wharf. Revenge has never been sweeter.
* ComplacentGamingSyndrome: One of the series' trademarks used to be the rock-paper-scissors mechanic of picking a weapon with the right elemental type to be good against your enemy, then ''Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate'' added the explosive Slime element (Blastblight in ''4''). Slime/Blastblight does massive damage and isn't actually resisted by anything, so many ''3U'' players just make a good Slime weapon and then never use anything else. Capcom has noticed this and appropriately nerfed the status effect in ''4'', even going so far as to give a few monsters resistances against it, though it largely remains a useful general-purpose tool for breaking monster parts faster than usual.
* CultClassic: A strange example because even though in Japan these games are easily considered a KillerApp and very popular, internationally, it is much less popular overall but the fandom of it still very much love the games. This is one of the main reasons that half of the games [[NoExportForYou are not released outside Japan]]. This same status meant that up until ''4'', players of the portable games outside of Japan had a hard time with multiplayer-capable quests due to the general lack of fellow local players.
* EnsembleDarkhorse:
** Yian Kut-Ku is popular with the fanbase due to how [[UglyCute adorable it is]]. It helps that it served as a WakeUpCallBoss in the 1st and 2nd generation games. In fact, when Famitsu held a poll about which monsters should return in ''Portable 3rd'', Yian Kut-Ku was ranked #1. That should indicate how popular it is.
** Subspecies that have [[DivergentCharacterEvolution many differences to set themselves apart from the originals]] tend to be popular with the fanbase. Notable examples are [[DishingOutDirt Copper Blangonga]] and [[AnIcePerson Glacial Agnaktor]].
** Amatsumagatsuchi only appeared in one game (''Portable 3rd''), yet many people are requesting its return. Mostly because of its ''awesome'' music.
** Zamtrios, due to being an awesome-looking walking [[ThreateningShark shark]] with an infamous and [[FunnyMoments gut-bustingly hilarious]] inflation/"fat" mode.
* GameBreaker:
** Hammers in ''Tri'': attack twice then windup charge, then attack immediately after you go into charge mode, and repeat. You'll attack as quickly as with a Sword & Shield.
** The Slime element introduced in ''Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate'', which throws the balance of the game out the window, making the other elements obsolete. The Kelbi Bow, with the Awaken skill which unlocks its Slime element, was infamous because of this thanks to its level 1 charge spread shot, allowing it to inflict the Slime element quickly and easily ForMassiveDamage. ''And that's before you apply bonuses from the Bombardier skill''. Granted, monsters will gradually increase their resistance against Slime elements (like any other status attacks), farming Brachydios is not easy, and slow weapons [[BoringButPractical prefer high raw damage]] to status or elemental attributes, but Slime's utility makes it a great all-rounder. Fortunately, when it returned in ''4'' as Blastblight, it was heavily nerfed, and some monsters gained a huge AcquiredPoisonImmunity level of resistance to it, particularly Brachydios and Teostra (since they use it as well), though it's still useful for breaking monster parts and in marathon hunting quests. Also of note is that the Kelbi Bow in ''4'' has also been nerfed in response.
** The G-rank Chameleos armour set "Grand Mizuha", when used together with the Chameleos Insect Glaive "Caster's Rod", is nothing but this in ''4U''. On top of the Insect Glaive already being one of the best weapons in the title, Chameleos' version also possesses the [[PoisonedWeapon Poison]] attribute, which is very effective against many monsters including Elder Dragons. Grand Mizuha's perk, on the other hand, is that the armor set has almost ''every single skill you need'' in order to use said Insect Glaive effectively: Earplugs, Wind Resistance, Status Attack +2 and Status Crit. And the materials for both the weapon and armor all come from the ''same monster''. It's possible to grind Chameleos for long enough and go hog wild mounting ''and'' poisoning monsters with this set, and the kicker is that it makes [[LightningBruiser Kushala]] [[BlowYouAway Daora]] substantially easier--which will in turn help you create ''another'' batch of strong endgame weapons using Daora parts. The only catch? [[KillItWithFire If you slip up and get hit by a Fire-based attack]], [[JustForPun you're toast]].
** The Star Knight DLC armor in 4U is one of the best all-purpose armor sets in the game. The blademaster version has the Steady Hand skill, which combines Mind's Eye and Razor Sharp, and has four points towards the Handicraft skill. The gunner version has Load Up and seven points towards the Unscathed skill. In addition, both versions have Rodeo God and Challenger +2 and three pieces of armor with three decoration slots.
** The [[DualTonfas Battle Tonfas]] introduced in ''Frontier'' are criticized for ruining the competitive balance due to their highly versatile moveset. It has the mobility and versatility of Sword & Shield, the attack speed of Dual Blades and charge gauge-based special attacks like the Charge Axe, but with spontaneous damage output like the Gunlance's Wyvern Fire and the ability to do jump attacks similar to the Insect Glaive, with the added perk of ''[[JumpPhysics being able to jump kick against the target]]'' to remain airborne for extended periods, allowing Tonfa users to perform [[Franchise/DevilMayCry DMC-style]] air combos that also serve to help dodge ground-based monster attacks. On top of that, it can also switch between ''both Impact and Piercing damage'' at will using the charge gauge and is therefore the quickest impact weapon you can use to knock out monsters with. Japanese fans have claimed that this weapon has managed to put the Lance, Hammer, Dual Blades and Insect Glaive to shame all at once. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iw7MRYZfjmw Observe]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUOcBdsbuIQ carefully]].
* GatewaySeries: The ''Freedom'' handheld titles are arguably this for the series, with ''Unite'' being its BreakthroughHit and even considered to be the MagnumOpus of the entire franchise [[BrokenBase by some]]. When once the series was an obscure MMO-esque home console game, putting them on the PSP allowed players to easily congregate in public and take full advantage of {{Socialization Bonus}}es, thus spreading the hype even further. ''Unite'' then pulled out all the stops and crammed in tons of content into a single UMD, including the famed G-rank mode. To this day it's still being played by diehard [=MonHun=] fans, especially now that an UpdatedRerelease [[https://itunes.apple.com/en/app/monster-hunter-freedom-unite/id744769918?mt=8 has been created for the iOS]].
* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: In Japan, Qurupeco and Barroth are the [[TheScrappy least popular]] Bird Wyverns and Brute Wyverns in the series, respectively. Down there, Qurupeco is hated for [[ReplacementScrappy replacing]] [[EnsembleDarkhorse Yian Kut-Ku]], and Barroth is considered to be [[OvershadowedByAwesome really bland and ugly in comparison to the other Brute Wyverns]]. In the West, however, they're highly popular due to the former's [[SummonBiggerFish unique battle technique]] and the latter being an effective WakeUpCallBoss.
* GoddamnedBats: Quite a few of them. "STUPID VESPOIDS!" and "STUPID BULLFANGOS!" is practically a catch phrase to some hunters.
** The first generation had Apceros, armor plated herbivores that would charge you on sight and would relentlessly pursue you until you or they died.
** Melynxes don't hurt you and their attacks barely make you flinch, but they steal your items. What they steal could be anything from an Insect Husk to a Max Potion. Granted, you can get them back by hitting them or rummaging through their loot pile, but they are very quick to run once they snag something and in the early games, some maps didn't have a loot pile for you to check. They were toned down somewhat in Tri, which added felvine bombs to distract them and made it so only a specific, easy to avoid attack would filch your stuff.
** Tri adds Goddamned Rhenoplos to the mix. Basically they're a mashup of a Bullfango and an Apceros - they share the Bullfango's love for charging but knock you even further, and they have health about equivalent to an Apceros. Add in armored craniums that can deflect frontal attacks of even green sharpness and you've got one annoying enemy.
** Tri also adds Bnahabras, souped up Vespoids. While Vespoids were annoying for sneaking up on you then leaving you vulnerable to attack by a paralyzing sting, Bnahabras add in the ability to shoot a defense-lowering goop at your hunter, making everything else hurt more.
** In Tri Ultimate, all of the smaller minion bird wyverns. Male Jaggi are tolerable and rarely knock you down. The larger female Jaggia however have a full body check that sends you flying as far as a Bullfango/Rhenoplos charge plus a bite attack that knocks you down. Wroggis also have the same body check as the Jaggia and a poison breath attack. Luckily its not as potent as a fully grown Great Wroggi but the thing that sucks is Great Wroggi will target you with its strongest attacks when you are poisoned. Baggis are just as annoying with their sleep toxin that'll drop you in about 10-15 seconds. Like Great Wroggi, Great Baggi will '''hound''' you as soon as you get drowsy. And they sometimes attack your prey when its sleeping.
** ''4'' and ''4 Ultimate'' add the Konchu, small Crayfish-like crustaceans that can roll into a ball and ram into unsuspecting Hunters. Not only are they as fast as Bullfangos when rolling, but hitting them while they're standing up or curled--whether intentionally or not--will cause your weapon to bounce off, leaving you vulnerable to more lethal threats. They can even latch onto nearby large monsters ''just'' to make your weapon bounce and leave you reeling while the large monster smacks you across the room as a result.
* GoddamnedBoss:
** Any boss in ''Tri'' that is capable of going underwater, due to the [[ScrappyMechanic unpolished underwater controls]].
** Before ''Tri'' and in ''4'', there is the Gypceros, a monster encountered fairly early in the game. While it doesn't have much damage potential, it has an annoyingly tough hide for that point of the game, spits poison projectiles, has a flash bomb-like attack that can stun you, can charge in multiple directions without stumbling while spitting poison bombs left and right, and even ''steal random items'' that cannot be recovered unlike with Melynxes. It also has a move where it will [[PlayingPossum play dead]] and attack if you come near, but at least you can carve some materials from it during that move if you're quick enough, and it also serves as an indication that the Gypceros' health is getting lower.
** The Baleful Gigginox. It ditches its egg-laying ability, freeing you of the worry of Giggis leeching your health away, but in addition to some powerful thunder attacks, it also has a tendency to [[MakeMeWannaShout roar]]. ''[[MostAnnoyingSound A lot]].'' And basic Earplugs won't protect you; you need high-grade Earplugs to shield against its roars.
** Plesioth, who is {{Hitbox Dissonance}} incarnate and probably the sole reason most hardcore Blademasters would go out of their way to craft Gunner equipment. Seeing it reduced to a ''fishing minigame'' in ''4U'' is rather [[CatharsisFactor cathartic]].
** Gravios. The first time you fight it, you'll most likely have green-sharpness weapons at best, and even those will bounce off of any part of its body that isn't its chest. If you're fighting it in multiplayer, you can just assemble a team of Gunners wielding weapons capable of Pierce shots and not worry about sharpness, but if you're hunting it solo, gunner weapons are a highly impractical option due to having less time to shoot safely because of the lack of other players for Gravios to focus on and the relative weakness of your Felyne or Shakalaka companions in tanking Gravios' hits.
** Congalala has a few attacks that cause it to stumble or otherwise lay down on the ground for a few seconds. The catch? Said attacks are certain to knock you down if they connect, and if they don't, Congalala causes tremors when it hits the ground, rendering you immobile and instantly sheathed if the tremors hit and you don't have tremor negation. On top of that, it can eat various mushrooms to gain breath attacks that cause various status ailments, frequently causes the stench status through farts, its stinky breath attack, and flinging shit at you. The Emerald version adds elements of unpredicability where it just does the frog splash move randomly as well as randomly farting when you think there's an opening.
** If Rathalos isn't ThatOneBoss, it's this due to its tendency to fly around out of the reach of your weapons, wasting your time.
** The -drome series of Bird Wyvern bosses: Velocidrome, Gendrome, Iodrome. On Low Rank, they're only slightly more threatening than a Great Jaggi, but on High Rank and up, they become exceptionally annoying. They'll constantly use their pounce attack, which will make you miss attacks a lot at best and get knocked everywhere at worst. This is without mentioning Gendrome's paralysis attack and Iodrome's poison breath, both of which are already bad enough on their own. They get worse on multi-level areas, as they'll jump between the two levels in order to make you waste time chasing them around. The narrow structure of these monsters also means it can be hard to land some clean hits on them, especially if they're facing you head-on. Finally, they tend to be encountered with their younger -prey kin, meaning that you'll be constantly dealing with small monsters potentially disrupting your combos or getting in the way of your attacks.
** Raging Brachydios in 4 Ultimate edges into this. While it is noticeably slower than a regular Brachydios, making its normal attacks easier to deal with, it's new slime mechanic is very painful and incredibly annoying. Basically, the slime in its head, arms and tail is highly volatile and [[PreExplosionGlow heats up]] during the fight, exploding when it reaches the limit and (badly) damaging any hunters nearby. The slime goes critical [[HairTriggerExplosive a LOT faster]] if you are attacking the part in question, meaning you could accidentally nick one of the slimed body parts and suddenly get an explosion to the face and lose close to half of your health. Needless to say, this makes breaking its horn and arms (which you need to do to get its unique parts) a very tedious process.
** Kirin is not a terribly lethal boss, but during its rage mode only its horn is vulnerable to attacks; everywhere else will just result in bounced hits. It is also fast and likes to summon lighting bolts all over the place, making it a literal LightningBruiser.
** If you plan to take on Khezu or its subspecies, you can forget about bringing Nulberries because it loves to spam thunder attacks and if you cure your Thunderblight, chances are the Khezu's just going to inflict it ''again.'' Really, the only sure-fire way to deal with its Thunder attacks is to have at least 20 Thunder Res so you can nullify Thunderblight altogether. The Khezu also loves to scale the walls and ceiling, especially in area 7 of the Frozen Seaway, putting itself out of reach of melee weapons.
* HellIsThatNoise: Some monsters can produce utterly otherworldly roars, take Diablos, Khezu or Gigginox, for example.
** The Leviathan Nibelsnarf, despite its UnfortunateName, probably takes the cake. Its roar sounds less like a roar and more like ''grating metal''. That it comes from a mouth that has MoreTeethThanTheOsmondFamily doesn't help.
** A few hunting horns are capable of this, too; in particular, the Apocalypso, which lets out a loud shriek when a song is played on it; and if you're playing with someone using it, you'll be hearing that sound A LOT. Thankfully, unlike most examples of this trope, the sound is a good thing, as it means that you and your teammates in the room will be receiving a status buff.
** Uragaan, before certain attacks, makes a kind of odd noise that sounds like a deep wheezing noise, typically during its chin slam but other attacks as well. This is usually the sound you hear before you enter [[ThatOneAttack a whole world of hurt]].
** Hearing the Deviljho's roar is bad enough considering what's coming your way, but the roar itself sounds less like it comes from a creature and more like a bomb going off.
* HypocriticalFandom:
** When you hear a Monster Hunter fan complain that a game has too much grind, then you've hit an example of this trope.
** Conversely, when you hear fans of other games that involve tons of grinding themselves complain about this regarding Monster Hunter, you've hit another example in the form of a DoubleStandard.
* IAmNotShazam: "Black Rathian" is actually just a ''FanNickname'' for the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAGqdygI6oY Unknown Black Flying Wyvern]]. Despite sharing some aspects of Rathian's model, it's actually [[http://monsterhunter.wikia.com/wiki/Unknown_%28Black_Flying_Wyvern%29 a completely separate species from the Rath wyverns]]. Doesn't stop people from calling it that or even mistaking it for a Rathian subspecies, though.
* InternetBackdraft: When news that ''Monster Hunter Tri'' was going to be a Wii-exclusive, the 360 and PS3 fans did not take it well.
** When fans found out that not only is the UpdatedRerelease of Tri exclusive to the Nintendo3DS, but the upcoming sequel as well, fans weren't amused.
** In a less UsefulNotes/{{Console Wars}}-based example, the fact that the 3DS version of ''Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate'' has no online multiplayer, being limited to local multiplayer, made some people bitter, especially considering that ''Monster Hunter 4'', which will be released on the 3DS too, will offer online multiplayer. The Wii U version of the game will allow online multiplayer, though.
* ItGetsBetter: Most of the early game of each version tends to consist of dull "collect gatherables or monster carves" quests and small monster hunting quests. It takes a few hours to start beating up the big monstrosities that the series is well-known for.
* ItsHardSoItSucks: ''4 Ultimate'' gets a fair bit of heat because of the Apex monsters, which some players feel add more frustration than fun to the game.
* ItsTheSameSoItSucks: Dah'ren Mohran in ''4'' is derided by many for being a carbon copy of Jhen Mohran from ''Tri'' with only a few key differences.
* ItWasHisSled: Thanks to PlayTheGameSkipTheStory, you can't really talk about the games without someone bringing up the [[WalkingSpoiler spoilerrific]] endgame monsters. For example, anyone who's played ''4 Ultimate'' for at least ten hours and talked about it probably has had the existences of [[spoiler:the Shagaru Magala and Gogmazios]] spoiled to them by now.
* LesYay: The female owner of the item shop in Tri REALLY likes hunters, even if you choose to play as a female. At one point she will even crack a joke about accepting a lock of your hair for an expensive item.
* LoveItOrHateIt: The series as a whole. Highly inaccessible jumbled mess of a {{Widget Series}} with a generous dash of {{Nintendo Hard}} or well crafted fantasy hunting simulator with loads of challenging content? You decide. It's also the biggest reason why many of the games were [[NoExportForYou never brought out of Japan]].
* MemeticBadass:
** Rajang. He's ''[[Memes/DragonBall over NINE THOUSAAAAAANNNDDDD!!]]''
** [[TheDreaded Deviljho]], to the point where people began making [[CoolVersusAwesome Rajang vs. Deviljho]] dream matches. Just look at the number of {{Fan Nickname}}s the thing has.
** The Argosy Captain and Neko (Means "Cat") almost approached this status in ''3U'', with their GratuitousJapanese and "Dirty Fencing". Reaches a new height in ''4U'' where Blademasters can possess the Dirty Fencing skill via wearing their armor. ''Sugoi!''
** Zinogre, proud owner of one of the only two Monster Hunter themes to have [[AutobotsRockOut an electric guitar]] in it[[note]]the other being Alatreon[[/note]], and proof positive that {{Hurricane Kick}}s are made better when giant reptiles perform them. The fact that his BGM sounds like a battle theme from ''VideoGame/MetalGearRisingRevengeance'' certainly helps.
----> '''Website/{{YouTube}} commentator:''' ''[[Memes/MetalGear FULGURBUGS, SON!]]''
** "[[AnimalisticAbomination Unknown: Black Flying Wyvern]]" from ''Frontier'' is slowly but surely approaching this status, being a brutal combination of NothingIsScarier, DarkIsEvil, UnstoppableRage, AllYourPowersCombined and pure, unadulterated NightmareFuel.
----> '''Website/{{YouTube}} commentator:''' ''(Sips tea) So the theory is [[CrossesTheLineTwice maybe a Gore Magala mutant assaulted a Rathian and 9 months later this monstrosity was born]]...''
** Plesioth, the [[Pantheon/{{Gaming}} minor deity]] of HitboxDissonance. To the point that Plessy's hipcheck can warp people [[http://share.gifyoutube.com/vn2LVe.gif through time and space]]. (Sadly, it lost this status in fourth-generation games; see MemeticLoser below.) As one Website/{{YouTube}} commentator put it:
----> ''"When I heard that Plesioth was going to be in 3 Ultimate I made the joke that the Moga earthquakes were caused by him [[ThatOneAttack hipchecking]]."''
* MemeticLoser:
** The [[TooDumbToLive Jaggis]] are infamous for [[BullyingADragon harassing larger monsters to no avail]].
** The [[WarmUpBoss Great Jaggi]], the first large monster that the player faces in the third- and fourth-generation games. The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPmsCMv8N-o "R.I.P. Great Jaggi ;_;"]] video shows a Great Jaggi falling into a Pitfall Trap and then getting destroyed by four Gunlance users and Barrel Bomb L+'s in ''less than 10 seconds.'' In ''4'' and ''4 Ultimate'', the Great Jaggi serves as cannon fodder for the training quests.
** As of ''4 Ultimate'', there's Plesioth, which has been reduced to a randomly-occuring Fishing Machine event and can be killed simply by ''catching it.''
* MemeticMolester: Khezu and Gigginox. The sheer amount of {{Rule34}} that features one or both of the two monsters is somewhere between [[RefugeInAudacity impressive]] and [[NauseaFuel horrifying]].
* MemeticMutation:
** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9NYYewCSxo GOTCHA BITCH!]]
** Don't get hit! HIT IT UNTIL IT DIES!
** NIBELSNARF
** [[GIJoe G.I. 'Jho.]]
** [[HitboxDissonance Hipcheck!]][[labelnote:Explanation]]Plesioth's hipcheck attack is notorious for having a disproportionately large hitbox, allowing it to smack the player even if they aren't touching any part of the Plesioth's body.[[/labelnote]]
** [[RandomNumberGod Desire Sensor]][[labelnote:Explanation]]Trying to obtain the more rare monster items [[RandomNumberGod can take tens or even hundreds of tries to get just one of]], which has led players to swear that the games have some sort of "desire sensor". It's so notorious that [[AscendedMeme Capcom even sold official T-shirts]] with the label [[http://cdn-ak.f.st-hatena.com/images/fotolife/d/dawnpurple/20100103/20100103215259.jpg "Desire Sensor Begone!"]][[/labelnote]]
** For Japanese players, "Nice ROMAN!"[[labelnote:Explanation]]"Roman Hunting", a flashy style of exhibition gaming in Monster Hunter. "Roman" is a Japanese loanword for "Romantic".[[/labelnote]]
** Amongst North American and European fans, ''4 Ultimate''[='=]s release date of February 13, 2015, the day before Valentine's Day, spawned a number of jokes about people (especially those in relationships) [[SadisticChoice having to choose between]] ''Monster Hunter'' or their significant others. Some instead plan on a [[TakeAThirdOption third option]]: [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Playing Monster Hunter with their lovers]].
** The Argosy Captain's and Neko (Means Cat)'s frequent use of [[GratuitousJapanese Gratuitous Nihongo]]. "Nihongo" means "Japanese language"![[labelnote:Explanation]]In ''3 Ultimate'', these two characters have a habit of peppering their (English-language) sentences with Japanese in place of some English words.[[/labelnote]]
** Clawgrip[[labelnote:Explanation]]On the PSP games, the player moves around using the analog nub, and all camera control is done with the D-pad and the L button, meaning that character movement and camera control are handled by the same hand. This forces players to use their thumb on the nub and their index finger on the D-pad, resulting in the infamous and [[SomeDexterityRequired awkward]] "claw grip". May have become an AscendedMeme come the fourth generation of games, when Hori produced a special Circle Pad attachment specifically for the 3DS ''Monster Hunter'' games that places the second Circle Pad just below the L button rather than to the right of the face buttons, allowing players to once again play clawgrip-style.[[/labelnote]]
** ''"Je suis monté!"''[[labelnote:Explanation]]Rough translation: "I climbed up!" The Insect Glaive appears to be a popular weapon within the French ''Monster Hunter'' community, leading to this default "Mounting" chat message getting spammed online when said players manage to mount a monster. It quickly became popular in the Western community before long.[[/labelnote]]
** [[DoubleEntendre "How many honeys you got?"]][[labelnote:Explanation]]Answer: "Never enough." Honey is a valuable item in the series, as it is used for many important health and powerup item combinations. Naturally, it tends to get used up very quickly by dedicated Hunters.[[/labelnote]]
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34_tgUM1Hkw Kyu! Kyu! Kyu! Nya~!]]
* MemeticSexGod:
** Zamtrios, aka "that inflation fetish monster".
** Female Kirin armor is, far and away, the most popular armor set in the franchise just by sex appeal alone. The spiky mane of hair and headband it gives female characters was even made one of the default hair styles in later generations.
* MemeticTroll:
** Plesioth. Fight him in the water? Well, [[ScrappyMechanic it's water]]. Fight him on land? Hipchecks, hipchecks everywhere!
** Rathalos, whose idea of combat is [[GoddamnedBoss flying around for minutes at a time just to run down the quest timer]], i.e. the Rathalos World Tour.
** The -prey series of Bird Wyverns, who love to disrupt your attacks and ruin the egg delivery quests.
** Congala, who treats nature as their [[{{Fartillery}} toi]][[DungFu let]].
** The High Questrix, who loves telling you that you're going to fail. The Arena Bambina is even worse.
** So you're just going around on the latest High Rank quest and--''god damn it, Deviljho!''
** The [[RandomNumberGod RNG]], otherwise known as the Desire Sensor. "Oh look, I cut off the monster's tail, let me carve it so I can get the tail I need for this wea--" '' Scale obtained. '''[[RageQuit Quest abandoned.]]'''''
* MostAnnoyingSound:
** The "bonk!" sound of a weapon bouncing off, especially if it happens in succession.
** The sound that plays when your character is stunned.
** The meowing of [[BanditMook Melynxes]] when you're trying to fight another monster.
** Fittingly enough, the monsters' [[MakeMeWannaShout roars]], especially if employed in succession, as they render you immobile for the length of the roar and, in rare cases, ''damage you.'' Monster roars can [[GoddamnedBoss get very old very fast]].
** The ScareChord that plays when you get knocked out, especially if you keep getting beaten down.
** The Palicos in ''4'' almost NEVER stop their incessant mewling during quests, especially when there's not a giant monster that they're fighting. Worse, if you're playing solo, you're probably going to want to bring them to watch your back, so [[SadisticChoice you can either put up with a non-stop barrage of high-pitched caterwauling or deal with the bosses in a co-op focused game with absolutely no support.]] [[TakeAThirdOption Or, just turn your sound off, but that comes with its own downsides...]]
* MostWonderfulSound:
** The iconic horn that plays when you and your hunting team depart on a multiplayer quest.
** The tearing sound when you finally cut off a monster's tail, which is often used for nasty attacks and [[ItemFarming prized as a source of rare materials]], tends to be very ''satisfying''.
** The meowing sounds the [[CuteKitten Felynes]] make. Subverted if you hear it coming from a [[BanditMook Mel]][[GoddamnedBats ynx]] instead.
** The "SO TASTY!" clip that plays when you successfully cook a Well-Done Steak with the BBQ Spit, or cook one from the last Raw Steak on a Double BBQ Spit.
** The sound of a monster crying in pain as it tries to retreat away from the area, signifying that it's almost dead.
** The "Quest Complete!" jingle; very satisfying especially if you've just defeated a [[MarathonBoss very durable]] or [[GoddamnedBoss very]] [[ThatOneBoss painful]] boss.
** The unique fanfare that plays when you uncover a Rustshard, Battered Weapon, or a high-grade Talisman, or when a Hunters for Hire team comes back with a "Big Success", the latter of which is accompanied by the team of hunters cheering in unison.
** Inverted with the music stopping when you kill or capture a large monster outside of a quest to slay it or as part of a quest to defeat multiple monsters.[[note]]Unless there is another large monster in the area, in which case the music keeps going, or the monster is Khezu, who has no BGM to begin with.[[/note]] A Most Wonderful ''Lack of'' Sound, if you will.
** The sound of the Palicoes' support horns, especially if it's coming from a Healing Forte Palico and you need that health recovery ''right now.''
** The sound that plays when a Wystone is done charging.
* NightmareRetardant: The Frenzy Virus is hyped up to be something horrible if it infects you...yet the worst it does is stop your natural health regeneration (i.e. the red part of your LifeMeter being recovered over time). If anything, it's a case of CursedWithAwesome, as recovering out of it gives you Attack and Affinity boosts.
* OlderThanTheyThink:
** Najarala's annoying attack where it shoots scales at you that resonate and explode when it roars may seem like a completely new attack to get used to... Unless you played ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidPeaceWalker'', where Gear Rex (who preceded Najarala as a 3rd Gen monster) utilized the exact same move against Big Boss.
** The upcoming ''Monster Hunter Stories'' will involve playing as a subclass of Hunters called "Riders", who can tame, befriend and ride monsters into combat. At first this only seems like an AscendedMeme of some sort given the immense amount of fan art involving riding Kut-Kus and Raths, until you realize that one of the staple weapons since the series' beginning happens to be a Lance called the "Dragonrider Spear" or "Gae Bolg", which is [[AllThereInTheManual described to be the weapon of choice for mercenaries who specialize in the forbidden art of Dragon Riding]].
** Believe it or not, Zinogre wasn't the first main series monster to be included in ''Frontier'' after its debut; that distinction belongs to Akantor and Tigrex.
* PlayTheGameSkipTheStory: The ''Monster Hunter'' world is filled with robust wildlife with unique traits, various habitats and lots of locales, many of which aren't even visited. Looking at the quest descriptions can paint a pretty good picture of the type of society the world is, and how the hunters effect them. There are also various sentient races that aren't monsters, like Wyverians, Felynes, Melynxes and Shakalakas. There are even what are presumably maps of the world at the base camps in some locations. Even the weapons and armors have colorful descriptions, especially in regards to the origins of the weapons or the cultures they come from. But go on any forum and 99.9% of what you'll see is how to fight a monster or where to get what material. All ANYBODY cares about is the gameplay. It's even more apparent with ''Monster Hunter 4'', which was announced to have a greater emphasis on story with the player character being part of a travelling caravan that has various colorful characters. This didn't stop western players from importing Japanese copies and not caring a bit about not being able to read one bit of the text.
* PlayerPunch: In ''4 Ultimate'', a High-Rank quest to capture a Rathian [[spoiler:ends in the Seregios chasing her away, resulting in a scripted quest failure. This has angered many players who went through a good deal of prep work for the quest only to have their efforts wasted. Sure, the Caravaneer and the Guild compensate you for your efforts, but all you get is 7000 zenny and some common Rathian parts like the Rathian Scale+; you don't get any rare Rathian drops like the Rathian Plate or Rathian Ruby, and [[ShaggyDogStory any post-completion rewards you would've gotten from breaking her parts are nullified]]. ]]
* TheScrappy:
** [[PaletteSwap Sub species]] [[ItsTheSameSoItSucks that have little to no changes from the originals]] are not popular with the fanbase. The first generation is notorious for this, as the only real changes the Subspecies had were color and increased health and power. Fortunately, later generations gave some of them new traits to set themselves apart from the originals such as new moves and different attack patterns, [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap redeeming them in some people's eyes]]. This also applies to [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute different monsters]]; Dah'ren Mohran isn't exactly hated ''per se'', but it often gets bashed by third-generation players and ignored in favor of more original monsters because [[ItsTheSameSoItSucks the battle with it is too similar to Jhen Mohran's]].
** The Plesioth and its subspecies are among, if not ''the'' most hated monsters in the entire series due to their [[HitboxDissonance broken hitboxes]]. While this was somewhat relieved in ''3 Ultimate'', seeing Plessy get reduced to a ''fishing minigame'' in ''4U'' was a [[CatharsisFactor soul-cleansing moment]] for many fans.
** The [[{{BFS}} Long Sword]] weapon class tends to be highly reviled in group play. In the eyes of fans, while using kenjutsu on monsters and pretending to be [[Franchise/FinalFantasy Sephiroth]] can be [[RuleOfCool very cool]], [[FriendlyFire accidentally hitting your teammates and interrupting their actions is most assuredly not]]. This has gotten to the point where the Long Sword is generally considered a "noob weapon", for better or for worse. It doesn't help that the Long Sword doesn't have any worthwhile benefits to make up for it like the other weapons with wide reaches.[[note]]The Charge Blade can stun monsters and drain their stamina with Impact Phials, the Insect Glaive can mount monsters very easily with its pole vault, the Switch Axe can break the hardest parts of the monster thanks to sword mode having unblockable attacks, and the Hunting Horn's various songs make it perfect for supporting others.[[/note]]
** A lot of the smaller monsters are considered this. Special mention goes to the Bullfango and the Rhenoplos, as they tend to attack the players at the worst moment, and also tend to ruin the delivery quests. They are hated by almost all of the fanbase, and people who claim to like them are usually assumed to be joking.
* ScrappyMechanic:
** Underwater fighting in ''Tri'' and its {{Updated Rerelease}}s is awkward, especially near the surface of the water where panning the camera above the surface [[CameraScrew horrendously obscures your vision]]. Thankfully, ''4'' has no underwater fighting whatsoever.
** Trying to play the PSP games, where movement is assigned to the analog nub and camera control to the D-pad. The same problem comes back in ''3 Ultimate'' on 3DS, unless you've invested in a Circle Pad Pro for the second Circle Pad and two extra shoulder buttons, or you figure out how to control the camera on the touch screen.
** Area boundaries. Players crossing one move to the next area, but monsters ''[[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard don't]]''. This becomes a hassle if the monster decides to stick around out of reach (e.g. due to being exhausted), as it can eat up a few minutes that could be spent whacking the monster to death. You could try ranged weapons, but if you happen to slay the monster while it's beyond the boundary, or break off one of its parts and that part ends up landing beyond the boundary, say goodbye to your carves!
** The lack of online multiplayer for the portable releases up until ''Monster Hunter 4'' means that if you don't have local friends to hunt with, you may as well pretend that the multiplayer component doesn't exist. This can make some quests [[ThatOneLevel nightmarishly]] [[ThatOneBoss hard]]; see Goldbeard Ceadeus below for an example. This may be fine in Japan where the series is popular enough that it's easy to find local hunting buddies, but good luck in parts of the world where ''Monster Hunter'' is a niche title at best.
** The RandomlyDrops mechanic is also this for some players - see "Desire sensor". Repeating a boss fight because you thought it was fun? Great. Repeating a boss fight dozens of times because you need that one item that will complete your armour set or weapon? Then it stops being fun and becomes full out Scrappy. It's worse if there are ways to increase the drop rate to just double digits such as capturing or breaking part of the monster... and it ''still'' doesn't drop.
** The ArtificialStupidity of CPU-controlled allies like the Shakalakas of ''3 Ultimate'' and the Felyne Comrades / Palicoes of other games. Having a couple of critters assist you with healing, attack and defense buffs, traps, and the like would be great...but their AI is set to follow you wherever you go if their focus isn't on a monster or gathering, which means they'll happily stand next to that damage-dishing monster you're trying to fight, failing to pull off any of their support abilities because they keep getting caught in the crossfire until they're forced to retreat due to low health, something they could easily avoid by simply standing on the opposite side of the area and ''then'' using their abilities. They're also terrible when it comes to Slimeblight/Blastblight, as their poor pathfinding means they get it very easily, and they have no way of removing it by themselves. While the Shakalakas will continue to fight before inevitably blowing up, the Palicoes will end up panicking, a ScrappyMechanic in its own right. The same applies with other status ailments and Blights; your Healing Forte Palicoes (and Main Palico if they have Detox Horn) won't think to use Detox Horn to cure poison, for example, so if you don't want them to get knocked out, you'll have to waste time using an Antidote Horn or an Antidote with the Wide-Range skill.
** Trying to get items from the Veggie Elder? Normally, he'll give you an item (often Psychoserum), up to two or three times. But if you have a tradable item, he'll refuse to do business with you if you decline to trade, not even giving you no-trade items. If you have more than one kind of tradable item, he'll pick one and refuse to let you trade using any other such items. All of this even if you're on a delivery quest and the item he wants you to give is one of the items you need to complete the quest; sure, you can just put the target items in the delivery chest to do away with them, but if this causes you to complete the quest, you won't be able to talk to him anymore. On top of all this, you won't know what item you get until you perform the transaction; it could be something useful or something you don't really need.
** Quests that require the player to transport items are reviled by many, and it's rare to go online and see someone attempt one of these quests rather than large monster quests. Players regard them as exceptionally tedious, on top of being frustrating due to the long time to travel from the pickup point back to base, a single high drop or monster attack destroying the item in question unless one has the right skills[[note]]Transporter or Felyne Supercat to prevent knockback, Felyne Lander to prevent stumbling and item breakage upon landing[[/note]], the game happily throwing dozens of monsters in one's way, and often times extra obstacles popping up on subsequent deliveries to force the player to take alternate routes. The rewards for these quests are often high, but players ignore them anyway; that "Deliver 4 Powderstones" quest may dish out 18,000 zenny, but who wants to deliver four of those health-draining suckers by themselves? You could bring along other hunters to ease the pain, whether to deliver the items ''en masse'' or to [[EscortMission provide defense]], but [[HelpingWouldBeKillstealing having a larger party divides up the monetary reward]]. They're not even necessary to complete for HR-increasing Urgent Quests in most cases anyway.
** The Palicoes' panic system. When a Palico panics, such as from a large monster becoming enraged or another large monster suddenly appearing, they'll wildly run in circles before collapsing on the ground for half a minute. Trying to snap them out of it is difficult due to how fast they move, it afflicts every forte except for Leadership, and unlike Cha-Cha and Kayamba's Valor system, it can never be removed. It also occurs to all of them, even Leadership, if they get Blastblight, making them practically useless against monsters that cause it.
** The Fancy Spit allows you to cook 10 Raw Meats at once at the Street Cook's booth, eliminating the tedium of using the BBQ Spit to cook them one at a time out in the field. It does have one irritating drawback: You can't use the Fancy Spit when in a multiplayer room, as the Street Cook's services are closed until you go back offline. This means if you run out of Rare Steaks and Well-Done Steaks, you'll have to leave the room to produce more, or cook them one at a time online, most likely to the ire of your hunting partners.
* ScrappyWeapon:
** Sword & Shield is widely regarded as a poor choice for solo hunts. Although S&S users have generally high elemental or status ratings on their weapons, amazing mobility compared to other melee classes, a shield for blocking attacks (including those ever-annoying flashes and roars), and can use items without sheathing (making them excellent support in multiplayer), the damage-per-second and reach leave much to be desired. And unlike most other classes, the S&S class doesn't have a hard-hitting special attack or SuperMode. Thankfully, Capcom seems to have recognized this last drawback and has given the weapon its own charged heavy slash in ''4U'', among other improvements.
** All Gunner classes (the Bowguns and Bow) can be this in solo hunts as well, due to sacrificing attack power in exchange for allowing attacks from a safer distance. It's possible to defeat most monsters as a solo Gunner within the time limit, but unless you have the correct technique and armor skills, it will usually take much longer than just coming up close and whacking away with a good melee weapon. Also, Gunners have to use separate Gunner armor, which means having to farm for more drops. On top of all that, Gunner armor has only a fraction of the raw defense of Blademaster armor despite boasting higher Elemental resistances, which means if a monster reaches you and starts beating you up, your health is going to be ripped apart like toilet paper.
** In multiplayer, weapons with long sweeping reaches tend to be loathed due to the knockback and tripping when accidentally hitting other players, the usual culprits being the Long Sword, Insect Glaive, Switch Axe (in axe form), Charge Blade (in axe form) and Hunting Horn (otherwise a stellar support class due to its AreaOfEffect buffs and healing). Unless the monster is big enough that everyone can spread out to avoid hitting each other, it is hard to avoid interrupting other players' combos with these weapons.
* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: Some, who have moved on to [[FollowTheLeader other giant monster hunting games]] have felt this way about Monster Hunter, seeing it not innovate as much as it's copiers. Ever since ''4 Ultimate'' was released though, many of these detractors rescind their claims and feel that the verticality and other new features on ''4 Ultimate'' has made the game stand out on it's own.
* {{Squick}}:
** The most common reaction to Khezu and its cousin Gigginox. Even the Japanese title of Gigginox translates to "creepy".
** Conga and its variants, who basically attack using various forms of {{Fartillery}} and DungFu.
* StopHavingFunGuys:
** Go ahead and state that Plesioth's hipcheck in ''3 Ultimate'' pisses you off. Expect 1st- and 2nd-generation veterans to aggressively tell you that [[MiseryPoker they had it worse]].
** Some players will give you the stink eye if you pick a less effective weapon against a particular monster. Even if it's out of not knowing that it's a bad weapon or why, you'll probably get lambasted for not using [[GuideDangIt guides]].
* StopHelpingMe: ''Do not'' hit a player who has mounted a monster. Doing so has a chance to knock them off, resulting in a very irritated player and a wasted opportunity to beat up the monster while it's down. Oh, and do not hit the monster too, because making it flinch, knocking it down, paralyzing it or putting it to sleep will also shake off the rider. This is why many players set their automatic "mounted a monster" message to the tune of "Don't attack!"
* SuspiciouslySimilarSong: [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=444zdjoEBNk The Snowy Mountains battle theme]] in ''2'' is suspiciously similar to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwPbGuMkoqw "The Chase"]] from Anime/SteamBoy.
* SweetDreamsFuel:
** Several maps have small areas that are basically just Felyne bases, with the only monsters being Felynes and non-hostile Melynxes, neither of which you could damage. Often these areas contain a few useful items for you to grab freely, and in ''4'' and ''4 Ultimate'', houses a Palico which you can hire.
** As scary as the Sunken Hollow is to arachnophobes due to the massive cobwebs, seeing Felynes and Melynxes at work in the webbed-up areas helps take some of the edge off. Even a Melynx stealing your last Antidote or Nulberry is absolutely adorable in contrast to the hanging displays of murdered Gypceros in Area 5.
** Occasionally in ''4'', you'll find a wild Poogie during Expeditions. Sometimes, picking it up causes it to crawl onto you affectionately before taking off.
** The Rath-of-Meow Team Attack. Watching your Palicoes hop into a miniature {{tank|Goodness}} to shoot Rathalos-style fireballs at enemies is all kinds of BadassAdorable.
* TakeThatScrappy: The Plesioth, notorious for its [[HitboxDissonance broken-hitbox]] [[ThatOneAttack hip check]], has been reduced to part of a net fishing minigame in ''4'', and ''it even dies without a fight upon being landed on the wharf''.
* TearJerker:
** Surprisingly, one occurs in the High Rank portion of the Caravan campaign in ''4 Ultimate'', after you slay a Pink Rathian to boost the Street Cook's kitchen. The Ace Commander reveals why he's particularly uneased by Rathians: [[spoiler:He and the Master of Defense were out one day hunting a Rathian when a Kushala Daora stepped in. The Ace Commander tried to take it on, and was saved from critical wounds by the Master of Defense, [[CareerEndingInjury at the cost of the latter's hunting career]], and has been [[ItsAllMyFault beating himself up]] about it ever since for indirectly ending his master's hunting days.]]
** The Frenzy Virus tends to change monsters' growls and howls. In the case of some monsters the adjusted cries make them sound like they're in perpetual pain (which might not be far from the truth, considering it's confirmed that Frenzied monsters tend not to live long even WITHOUT the hunters tasked with putting them down, with the survivors becoming Apex variants). Case in point, the Zinogre, whose typically noble roar while charging up energy instead comes across as an agonized whine that you'd expect to hear from a kicked puppy. It really makes you feel like you're performing a MercyKill. As if that wasn't bad enough, while the [[BeatTheCurseOutOfHim Wystones can break them out of the infection]], it's only temporary, which feels like [[HopeSpot they're experiencing a brief period of sanity]] before eventually succumbing again.
* ThatOneAttack: Almost every monster has at least one, if not more. Some examples:
** In general, tail whip attacks are known to piss off many players, due to having a wide sweeping angle that can and will knock back and disrupt the combo of anybody that's in its way. A ''lot'' of monsters have one, from the lowly Great Jaggi to the iconic Rathian and Rathalos, and monsters will happily use them twice in a row all the time to make sure everyone within a few meters of them gets knocked down. The worst tail whip of them all belongs to Yian Garuga, as it comes out lightning fast without warning during its rage mode, and also inflicts poison on top of moderate damage.
** Hip checks are some of the most rage-inducing attacks in the series. They come out very quickly, most of them deal a lot of damage, and they turn the ''entire monster's body'' into a hitbox, making it nearly impossible to avoid them unless you have the Evasion+ skill. Many monsters that can do a hip check are likely to be ThatOneBoss.
** Khezu: Roar during rage and either a thunder tackle or thunder ball shot. Roar will incapacitate you unless you defend or have High Earplugs. The main problem with Khezu in ''Tri/3U'' is that they are unique in having no eyes, so they can't technically see you and thus cannot give you the "spotted" status, and you can only do panic dives (that render you invincible; which regular dodge rolls don't do) in this state. Dodging its attacks at the last second is a no-go as a result. This is no longer a problem in ''4 Ultimate'', as Khezu now gives you "Spotted" status.
** Gravios: Roar and heat beam. Same as above. High and G-rank one-up this and give the Gravios' a ''sweeping'' heat beam. And if you think you can punish the heat beam by standing under it, 80% of the time it'll spray flaming gas immediately afterwards, throwing off unfortunate Hunters and inflicting Fireblight. ''4'' gives it a "super" heat beam in Rage Mode, which it sweeps vertically in a "V" shape while ''backing up'' from the recoil. This move can fry Hunters who think they can get up close and attack while it's firing, as well as those who try to dodge without anticipating the redirect. Breaking Gravios' back in "4" causes the fire gas counter to shoot upwards instead of down and around. It goes back to normal if you break the belly, though.
** Plesioth: Hip-check. HUGE range, fast, and with an [[HitboxDissonance absurd hit-box]] (as in, no part of the Plesioth can touch you and you will ''still'' get hit). This was fixed in ''3 Ultimate'' though.
** Rathian: [[PoisonousPerson poison tail backflip]]. For the beginner, this attack is ''devastating'' if you are not used to it. It comes out quickly and with little warning, it has high knockback, and poisons you as well. Luckily, if you have the poison-negating Wroggi Armor, or can just dodge well, it's much less threatening. The Pink Rathian's version is even worse, as it can use a hovering maneuver to position itself right next to you, then immediately backflip. Problem is, it's very hard to tell where the attack will come from, making blocking or evading it very difficult. Even Guildmarm in ''4U'' knows how much this attack is hated.
--->'''Guildmarm:''' Nothing says "I haaaaate you, Gold Rathian!" like lopping off its tail!
** Rathalos: Has two...
*** High-dive claw attack. Comes almost out of nowhere to the inattentive player and is just as impossibly hard to dodge. Fortunately, a running dive can evade it (you need to see it aiming itself at you first, though, which is the big problem) or you can block it (yes, even with the Sword and Shield!). Failure means you will be poisoned ''and'' likely stunned - on top of the huge damage.
*** Hop and burn. Rathalos flaps its wings and shoots a burst of flame at you while jumping backwards. There is absolutely no warning, blocking it is difficult, it can turn left or right (meaning it can still hit you if you're attacking it from the side), and it inflicts Fireblight, which can be just as bad as poison. It also sends you flying, and Rathalos jumps backwards as he uses it, so he can now get a free fireball shot at you. Also, Rathalos will likely use this attack immediately after it roars and enters rage mode, so good luck dodging that without any earplug buffs.
** The Deviljho's breath attack (Inflicts huge damage and Dragonblight).
*** In ''4U'', its new full-body-hitbox pin attack or leaping pin attack are nothing to sneeze at. To clarify, the Deviljho can ''lightly tap you'' with its tail or graze you with its feet, and you will still get pinned. It's not unheard of to go through an entire 10 Dung Bombs in a single Deviljho hunt--because the alternative usually results in Deviljho biting the hunter to death before they can break free of the pin.
** Tigrex has a couple:
*** Its inhumanly fast turning charges, which can make a player stare in shock after chasing it, thinking it will just halt like usual until it slams on the brakes and does a swift U-turn ''right at them''. And at higher difficulty levels, Tigrex can do this as much as 3 or 4 times in a row.
*** Brute Tigrex's [[MakeMeWannaShout super roar]], in which he rears back and takes a deep breath before unleashing an earth-rending cry that would make ''ComicBook/BlackCanary'' proud. Not only does it inflict ungodly amounts of damage, but at later difficulties Brute Tigrex can also fake out unwary hunters with it by pretending to charge, then quickly shifting into a Super Roar ''without warning''. And if that wasn't bad enough, in G-Rank he can do this ''twice in succession''[[note]]although observant players will know if it's the double roar by taking note of how long Tigrex breathes in deeply before roaring; if he takes much longer than usual, he will do the double roar[[/note]]. The worst part? Compared to Brute Rex, [[MadeOfExplodium Molten Tigrex]] can do the super roar '''three times in a row'''.
*** Molten Tigrex's [[HavingABlast explosive powder]]. Like Teostra, Molten Rex can release clouds of explosive powder into his surroundings with each move. These clouds inflict Blastblight when touched by a hunter, but that's not the bad thing about them: the real danger is that these clouds can knock hunters down and disrupt their movement, potentially setting them up for a nasty combo from Molten Rex's charges and melee attacks--which will in turn detonate the Blastblight and effectively ''double'' the damage they receive. Even if you have a skill that prevents Blastblight, those clouds will ''still'' knock you over, even if you block it.
** Pearl Espinas: The Firestorm. It essentially flies up and nukes the battle area, spreading unblockable, ''poisonous'' flames around it. Get hit by that, and you have a few seconds before it sends out a shock wave clearing everything around it. And it's the main attack this thing uses. Made worse by the fact that making it flinch during the few second gap where it's preparing to jump is the only way to get a much-needed item from it.
** Nargacuga's Tail Slam. It's basically a close range, spammable OneHitKill that can be frustratingly hard to roll through and has a kinda iffy hitbox (you take full damage even if you touch the dust cloud it raises after the tail touches the ground). Granted, you can see it coming from a mile away (he roars very noticeably before doing it), but not even Evade+2 can bypass it.
** Qurupeco's monster calls. If you don't have dung bombs, this turns a one-on-one fight with a relatively easy monster into a two-on-one with anything from the relatively easy to manage Great Jaggi or Rhenoplos to the crap-your-pants scary Rathalos, Diablos or Deviljho. It can then boost their attack, defense and even heal them with other calls, as well as itself.
** Uragaan's mighty seismic chin can count if you aren't watchful. It will blow up any rocks thrown by its tail swing, meaning that if you didn't pay attention you have a chance of flying through the air right now, and it's actual damage and flinch radius are questionable until you've faced it enough. Note that the flinch radius will force you to put away your weapon, meaning that you have to draw it again and it just ruined any charge you had going. Also the roar, while not annoying, is followed directly by an attack in front, meaning that you need a certain skill or you have no way of avoiding it if you were in front.
** Brachydios's [[InASingleBound leap slam]], especially when enraged. It does a LOT of damage, is difficult to evade, has a wide area of effect when in rage mode, causes Slimeblight, and usually comes out of nowhere as the tell happens only a split second before it goes airborne. And sometimes it skips the tell and jumps without warning. Any of it's new attacks it uses while in Rage Mode can be this. Aside from the above, special mention goes to it's two attacks where it sticks it's horn in the ground. One, where it creates a series of explosions in front of it, does '''huge''' damage and has deceptively large rage, and can't be avoided by leaping away from it. The second one, is where it stays stationary and slams its horn into the ground, making spots on the ground around it light up before exploding. This comes with little warning, the spots are hard to see when your next to it, and if you are in the middle of an attack animation you will most likely not have enough time to position yourself in-between them.
** The Sand Barioth's tornado. Unlike the normal ice cyclone the normal Barioth uses, this one lasts much longer. Also, the Sand Barioth can fly into the tornado and lunge at you in an instant. This is almost guaranteed to catch you off guard, and unless you're on the opposite side of where it lunges, the only safe way to dodge it is a well timed panic dive. And in G-rank, it can also shoot mini-tornadoes that move through the area.
** Normal Barioth has a rather questionable hip check. Though not nearly as legendary as Plesioth's, you can be on the opposite side of the hip check and still get hit ''and fly in the other direction.'' Not to mention how, when preparing the hip check, it can somehow rotate on the spot to aim at you, making it even harder to simply run away.
** Rajang in ''4'' will fire its [[BreathWeapon mouth beam]] with a notable warning (it stands up and aims at the sky first), but now it can aim ''at any direction'' without reducing its range and damage.
** Oroshi Kirin's horn charge. Kirin has it too, but because Oroshi has an extremely limited moveset (topping out at ''five'' different attacks), it spams the horn charge ''way'' more often than it should. This becomes a real problem for anyone wielding a slow weapon, because this means that Oroshi refuses to stay still while it's trying to ram you with its horn. Not to mention that the attack itself does fairly decent damage.
** Many a Blademaster Hunter can attest to the FakeDifficulty that is Fatalis's infamous "Snap 'n Drag" attack. While it ''is'' telegraphed, it has long, advancing range due to the sheer size of Fatalis's body, and it's a guaranteed OneHitKill if you're remotely close to any part of its body when it uses it, even if you're wearing the best armor in the game and have maximum HP. Yes, this includes the hind legs and the ''tail''. In ''4/4U'', the attack was [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] to not OneHitKill Hunters under most circumstances, and had its hitbox reworked so that the hind legs and tail deal minimal damage on contact, but getting hit by it still deals an absurd amount of damage.
** Seregios has an attack where it takes to the air and sweeps across the ground with its talons. Unlike [[DeathOfAThousandCuts most of its attacks]], this attack deals a ton of damage, and it's very difficult to tell where the attack will come from. Even worse, it can do it twice when it's enraged, and it can adjust the aim of the second one in case the first strike misses.
** Cephadrome gains an attack in ''4 Ultimate'' where it dives in place repeatedly before bursting out of the sand. During the diving part, Cephadrome will cause anyone it hits to trip, which will slow them down long enough to hit them with its main attack before they can roll away. Problem is, Cephadrome can essentially teleport beneath someone before starting the attack, making it very hard to avoid.
** The Seltas Queen has ''three of them'':
*** One is an attack where she raises her tail over her body and waits for someone to get close enough before snapping her tail at them. This attack can strike you no matter where you attack her from, she can use it multiple times in a row, and its large reach makes it difficult to evade. Unless you can evade with perfect timing, have a weapon that can block in the middle of a combo like the lance, or have the Evasion+ skill, this attack will hit you if you're using a melee weapon. It doesn't help that the Seltas Queen will sometimes use this attack for nearly a minute, which can waste a lot of time. While the regular Seltas Queen can't do this if a Seltas is riding on her, the Desert Seltas Queen can do this even if a Desert Seltas is riding on her.
*** Seltas Queen also inherited Tigrex's charge where it can rotate after a charge and continue the attack. While it can only use this attack when it has a male Seltas riding it, Seltas Queen's version of the attack is much faster and deals slightly more damage.
*** Seltas Queen's Mucus Blast. Huge damage, high chance of stun, only a split second's warning, and it sends out three blasts in rapid succession, so you can't just dodge-roll through the attack. It gets even worse in G-rank, as she can now fire it after stepping backwards a couple of times, and while airborne.
** Just when you thought HitboxDissonance is now a thing of the past in ''4U'', there is still the Shrouded Nerscylla and its BuildingSwing attack. Unlike the regular Nerscylla which can only perform this move once, the Shrouded version can chain this move up to ''three times'' in a row, adjusting its aim to hit the intended target. This puts players at a risk of getting [[TheParalyzer paralyzed]] by its spines if they so much as even get ''brushed lightly'' by them, but the real danger is its body slam finisher at the end of the swing combo: even though the Nerscylla may appear to miss you by landing off to your side, getting touched by the tip of its hind leg ''will still knock you down and deal full damage''.
** Gypceros's item steal attack. If a Melynx steals one of you items, you can hit them to get it back, and if they retreat you can go to the Felyne hideout and most likely you can get your items back. But if Gypceros steals one of your items? It's gone with no way to recover it. Pray that item wasn't something rare and/or valuable such as an Armortalon, Ancient Potion, or worst of all, a [[UnwinnableByDesign Pitfall Trap on a capture quest]] (unless you or another party member have a spare one, and remember, [[NoSell Shock Traps don't work on it]]).
** Teostra has two:
*** For a monster that's famous for fire and explosions, Teostra's favorite attack is just charging into you. The problem is it comes out extremely quickly with no warning at all, it can use it after doing anything (after an attack, jumping back, turning around, doing nothing), it can turn while it's running, and it deals a ton of damage. This makes breaking Teostra's head a real pain for Blademasters.
*** In ''4U'', Teostra's Supernova. No, not the one at the end of its rage mode hunters can easily use a stopwatch to time and evade, the single ranged explosion it conjures up starting from its G-Rank incarnation. The attack comes out fast, where if you see Teostra looking at you menacingly, you have barely enough time to put away your weapon and do the superman dive to evade it. The explosion can catch players (particularly gunners) off guard easily, and is a OneHitKill on practically everyone. Teostra also likes to use this on a player that is recovering from knockdown, making this almost impossible to evade with weapons drawn without Evasion skill.
** The Molten Tigrex can spawn clouds of Slimeblight-inducing powder that float around the battlefield by scraping its claws against the floor. Normally, this is just one more hazard to avoid. When it gets low on health, however, these clouds spawn much more frequently, and even moreso when the Tigrex is in rage mode. The final few minutes of a Molten Tigrex fight often resemble something out of a BulletHell shooter, as the clouds fly fast and thick with often lethal consequences if a player gets Slimed as the Tigrex attempts to attack them directly.
* ThatOneBoss: As a series of {{Boss Game}}s, this is quite expected. Some examples:
** The Tigrex line most of the time. Very fast, massive range, massive damage. These all increase in Rage mode. Compared to other bosses leading up to it, Tigrex represents a massive spike in the difficulty. ''Portable 3rd'' introduces the Brute Tigrex which is basically an even faster and stronger version of the original. The Molten Tigrex in ''4'' is basically a Tigrex on steroids: not only is it about 50% larger, it's crazily fast when fully enraged, spreads explosive powder everywhere that inflicts Blastblight on contact, and being hit by it (enraged or not) is basically a death sentence.
** The Nargacuga, a souped-up Tigrex ''who can shoot tail spikes''. Or worse, a Tail Slam that can send you back to the camp in one hit. Green Narga from ''Portable 3rd'' is able to do the Tail Slam TWICE in a row. Its spikes will also paralyze you. And ''3 Ultimate'' has a rare species of Nargacuga, which can turn ''invisible'' during the fight, and its spikes are poisonous ''and'' can shoot them ''anytime'' after it uses its tail for an attack. And as if that wasn't bad enough, it's able to unfurl its tail spikes at will instead of needing to be in rage mode to do so.
** [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything Khezu]]. It lulls you into a false sense of security with its slow movements and easily telegraphed attack patterns, but its got a metric fuckton of health, is ridiculously resistant to damage (don't bother trying to attack it unless your weapon's sharpness is in the green), and once you finally ''do'' get its health low, it busts out the most devastating [[TurnsRed enraged mode]] you've seen up to this point, utilizing a new lightning charge attack that can easily OneHitKO you and its attacks become ''much'' more quick and unpredictable. Made so much worse when fighting it near Snowy Mountain's ledges.
** [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard Plesioth]]. [[HitboxDissonance How exactly can smashing with its RIGHT hip hit the player when he or she is on its left? Or how can it hit the player with its tail when it's ten feet in the air?]] Plesioth has managed to do both of these things and more. Luckily in ''3 Ultimate'' its hitbox issue was somewhat relieved, but it gains underwater combat prowess rivaling Lagiacrus.
** [[CowardlyBoss White Monoblos]]. Not the normal one. The White one. Why? It has more health than its cousin, and it runs away every 5 freaking minutes. Also, it hides in the ground every 10 seconds, rendering it invincible unless you carry the maximum number of Sonic Bombs, which is 10. And it's not enough. Best thing? With the best Sharpness you could afford at first, the only part you could attack properly was its tail and its horn... ''[[MadeOfPlasticine both of which snap off after only a few hits.]]'' White Monoblos was revamped in ''4 Ultimate'' to be a less annoying but still difficult boss. It's now encountered in G-rank, meaning you'll have a weapon that can attack it more easily by the time you fight it, and it digs far less than it used to. However, it can now use an aimed charge that's harder to avoid than the others, and it sometimes makes a U-turn during its charges. What's more, when it gets angry, it becomes just as fast as an enraged Diablos. Combined with its new attacks, this makes the White Monoblos a much more dangerous monster than it was before.
** Rajang. Has all the elements of speed and unpredictability of a Blangonga, the roar knocks you away, and it fires LIGHTNING BEAMS and THUNDER BALLS (both are actually non-elemental) from the mouth. Once it's enraged, it'll be difficult not to be hit by its attacks or risk One-hit KO. ''Unite'' introduces a type of Rajang that is ALWAYS IN RAGE MODE, and another rage mode upon that (though actually slower). Worse, the best Thunder-element weapons (to deal with Tigrex, for example) can only be made with some Rajang materials. If you're playing MH Frontier then youˇll likely meet [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PN24STb8hEw a Rajang with red aura.]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icwb279vbQc Suddenly the normal Rajang (or any other monster) looks tame in comparison.]] insane speed, hitbox and attack power that simply murders the whole party in no time. It's [[HarderThanHard so bad, so hard]] that during a period when an exclusive quest was available to those HR/SR 999 hunters hunting this particular beast (with every quest's data recorded officially), the overall success rate is ''5.8%''. ''Out of 270,000+ tries''. What makes Rajang worse in ''4 Ultimate'' is that it now uses a more random movement pattern, to a point that it's very hard to predict its next move, unlike the previous version of it.
** The lesser mentioned One-Horned Diablos, aka [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment Devil Diablos]]. It looks like any other Diablos, just slightly bigger and with a broken horn but it's actually a rank above what you're capable of fighting when you can first battle it, which means it hits ''a lot'' harder and has ''[[DamageSpongeBoss a lot]]'' more hp and, of course, the game doesn't give you any kind of warning as to what you're in for. You also get the usual items and only a slightly higher reward for defeating it.
** Tri has [[DeathFromAbove Rathalos]] (which has been turned from a nonissue in ''Unite'' into a genuine ThatOneBoss thanks to a combination of newfound speed and maneuverability and harder access to weapons fit for fighting him) and [[LightningBruiser Barioth]], who is basically Nargacuga but stronger, and who exchanges the ability to shoot tail spikes for being able to ''[[BlowYouAway spit twisters at you]]''. Twisters that ''[[KillItWithIce freeze you solid]]''. Rathalos and Barioth are especially frustrating because of the low availability of fire and dragon weapons early on. Rathalos goes down rather quickly with an upgraded Rusted Weapon with the Dragon element, which can be mined at a very low chance from the Volcano. Barioth is much easier to deal with with a good fire damage dealing weapon. The catch is that most fire-based weapons require Rathalos parts and upgrading a Rusted Weapon requires Frost Sacs from Barioth.
** Chameleos. Probably the most ''irritating'' enemy in the series simply because it is ''invisible'' for maybe 90% of the time you fight it. Also, just like the Gypceros, it can steal items from you and you can't get them back, and it can do so ''at range'' with its tongue, and you likely won't see it coming since it'll probably be invisible when it does it. It also tends to go back into stealth within 10 seconds of bringing it out of stealth and, all in all, a huge pain in a the ass. He also received an overhaul in ''4U'': on the bright side, the amount of time it stays invisible has been heavily nerfed and it no longer attacks while cloaked, thus removing the need for Smoke Bombs. The bad part is that it was given a new move that is basically a ''teleport''[[note]]which can only be rendered ineffective by breaking its horn--which won't happen unless it gets to 30% health[[/note]], is much more aggressive than its previous incarnation with its blindingly quick rushing tongue lash, gains the ability to blanket its surroundings with persistent poison clouds and even rearrange them using gusts of wind from its wings (thus reducing the amount of safe spots from which to engage it) and receives a poison mist BreathWeapon that becomes a OneHitKill at higher ranks--which it uses both as a CounterAttack if you damage it enough, and as an area-effect super move in Rage Mode.
** Try to engage a high-rank Qurupeco. It can summon the Great Jaggi, or the Rathian. It can also summon ''[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Deviljho]]'', who is just as bad as he sounds. Many a Qurupeco quest has ended because it summoned G.I. Jho. And then in ''3 Ultimate'', there's a unique Deviljho roaming around in G-rank quests. And it's ''always in rage mode''. Want to run away from that? You HAVE to farm them because they contain a unique type of carve to make good stuff with.
** ''Portable 3rd'' introduces Zinogre, which looks easy in its normal state, until it starts to charge up 3 times. And it goes into Hyper Electrified mode. It is its rage mode which will not stop until you make it fall down, which means it can stay in this form much longer than others' rage mode. In this state its speed and power rockets to crazy levels, has attacks to make you more vulnerable to thunder-element attacks and fainting, and has a ridiculous hitbox for its attacks. And the paralyzing trap you were using all along is useless, as it's immune to that in that state, and at other times the trap WILL help it to charge up. Also, it can go into rage mode, while already in this mode. Which makes it a [[UpToEleven Double Rage Mode]]. ''3 Ultimate'' introduces a subspecies of Zinogre, which can rain down dragon-element thunderbolts while charging up, and is able to launch ''homing'' thunder balls at you. And they're fast.
** A new contender of ThatOneBoss arrives in 3 Ultimate: Brachydios, also known as "the most powerful package monster" ''throughout the series'' among fans and developers alike, which is saying something. It is very fast and agile and its arms are developed enough to throw punches that will leave what amounts to green napalm on you. Unless you rub this slime off by rolling, it will explode after a while or upon being hit by another slime-inducing attack ForMassiveDamage. Brachydios also uses a moveset very different from that of other Brute Wyverns, and [[InASingleBound its leap attacks are notoriously deadly]]. Once it goes berserk the slime on its body turns yellow and detonates ''on impact'', making it one of the most lethal rage modes in the series. Inexperienced hunters are actually advised to just ''[[ScrewThisImOuttaHere run away]]'' from an enraged Brachydios. And then ''4 Ultimate'' introduces a ''more powerful'' version of it. Of course, beating it will allow you to create new weapons endowed with the Slime status (see GameBreaker).
** Goldbeard Ceadeus, the Elder Dragon you have to slay to unlock G-rank quests in ''3 Ultimate''. The good news: You have 50 minutes instead of 30 or 35, unlike the original Ceadeus. The bad news: Note that the objective is to "slay", not "slay ''or repel''"; you ''must'' kill it within the time limit or you will get nothing. It also will not retain any damage for successive quests; it starts at full health every time, so you must kill it in one go, and [[DamageSpongeBoss it has the durability of a planet]]. While managable in a multiplayer hunt, doing this quest solo is nearly impossible if you don't have a weapon that can do damage fast enough or manage use of the ballista and Dragonator weapons effectively. If you're playing the 3DS version and don't have a Wii U or local hunting friends, prepare for a massive DifficultySpike.
** In G-rank missions, Gigginox gains the ability to lay egg sacs on its back. This happens very quickly and is impossible to stop. Unlike the other egg sacs, Giggi spawned from this one will immediately jump at hunters from the egg sac itself. These Giggi love to jump out while you're in the middle of an attack, and they'll still latch onto you even if you block them. A player with multiple Giggi leeching off of them will lose health very quickly, making slow weapons incapable of rolling a very poor choice in these fights. While the egg sac can be destroyed, that won't stop the Gigginox from laying another one, sometimes while it's on the ceiling. Even the developers seem to be aware of how difficult it is, as missions against a G-rank Gigginox are one of the few G-rank missions that take place in stable environments, so players at least don't have to worry about another boss monster making it even harder.
** The Silver Rathalos and Gold Rathian in Tri Ultimate. Both of these share most of the tricks already mentioned in their species' individual entries above. The catch? [[NighInvulnerable Both are nearly completely covered in nearly impenetrable armour.]] This means that, unless you're using the incredibly rare Fencing skill or have some means of bypassing attack deflections, almost every swing you take will leave you immobile and very, very vulnerable. To make matters worse, both utilize highly effective poison (applied by the Rathian on her backflips and the Rathalos on his claw strikes), which will quickly force you to burn through valuable resources in a hurry, if you survive that long. The base camp has no bed or storage chests, negating the Farcaster healing abuse available in the Alatreon and Dire Miralis fights, meaning that the only means of healing you can have is whatever healing items you can bring with you, unless you or someone in your group has a Hunting Horn with a healing song. Both also have incredibly high health, and will spam fireballs with high damage and a wide explosion radius. And if you want to try to capture them, only a Shock Trap will work since their arena's floor will render the Pitfall Trap unusable due to its hard texture; also, because the arena only has one zone, the monsters can't limp, meaning that without the Perception skill it's nearly impossible to tell when they're on they can be captured without LOTS of trial and error. Thankfully, [[BonusBoss unless you want to unlock the Hallowed Jhen Mohran fight]] or want any equipment that requires their drops, they're entirely optional.
** The powered-up Ivory Lagiacrus from the G-rank event quest "Cruel King of the Sea" in ''3 Ultimate''. It has ''[[DamageSpongeBoss a lot]]'' more health than the regular Ivory Lagiacrus, and its attacks are devastating; not only do they cover a wide range, they do massive amounts of damage. And guarding against the [[ThatOneAttack super discharge attack]] is a LuckBasedMission due to the bolts having random hitboxes; the bolts hit from all angles, which means that they can potentially hit you from behind, making your attempt at blocking them [[ShaggyDogStory pointless]]. Fortunately, beating it gives you the materials you need to make the [[InfinityPlusOneSword Lightning Blaze Gunlance]].
** In ''4'', ''any'' monster infected by the [[TheVirus Frenzy Virus]] becomes one, even for those monsters which you've been familiar with, due to their hyper-aggressiveness and ability to inflict Frenzy Virus. And that's before going to the new monsters in ''4''.
** ''4 Ultimate'' [[UpToEleven cranks it up a notch]] with '''Apex''' Monsters. Monsters in this state will [[NoSell negate]] all traps, elemental damage, and status effects. In addition, different parts of the monster will be hardened to a point that ''all melee attacks will be deflected'', including attacks that are normally immune to being deflected, and even the Fencing skill! This can be a major pain in the ass for players who only play online, as the items needed to temporarily change them back to normal, the Wystones, aren't acquired until late into the postgame single player storyline. What's more, the Wystone that prevents attack deflections against Apex monsters, the Drive Wystone, can only be obtained after completing a series of single player High rank ''and'' multiplayer G-rank quests from the Professor.
** [[GiantSpider Nerscylla]], a [[LightningBruiser horrifying spider]] which spends 90% of the time swinging around, up and down the webs, making players very hard to catch up with its speed, let alone hitting it (especially when it hangs itself upside down). It can also get you poisoned or put you to sleep.
** Even for introductory monsters to the G-rank, [[ThreateningShark Tigerstripe Zamtrios]] in ''4 Ultimate'' is just too strong. It can now inflate its size ''at will'' (while reducing chances for hunters to attack it), then hop and roll around in an unbelieveably fast speed, massive damage included. Its normal state is also very fast. The worst? Most of the time you'll face it in a certain tight area in the desert.
** The first fight against [[spoiler:Gore Magala]] in ''4''. [[spoiler:You get to fight it, a wyvern-size monster, on the Arluq, a ship not unlike the Dragonship in shape and in size.]] It's also a story boss, which means you have to beat it in order to move on. However, the difficulty can be mitigated somewhat if you know that [[spoiler:[[ViolationOfCommonSense jumping off the ship]] takes you to a room with a bed and supplies.]]
** Did you like fighting Seregios? A certain Yukumo Event Quest pits you against one in the exact same situation as in the aforementioned quest, minus the "story boss" part. And as if the devs learned from players using the trick in the above quest, they put an (almost insurmountable) invisible wall around the boat.
** For those who [[TakeThatScrappy caught Plesioth with the Fishing Machine]] in ''4U'' and had a good laugh, facing Cephadrome in the same game might deliver [[{{Understatement}} quite a bit of a shock]]. Not only was he given a few of Nibelsnarf's moves to buff up his offensive capabilities, he also retains his scaled down version of the [[ThatOneAttack legendary]] [[HitboxDissonance Plessy hipcheck]]. And yes, that means [[ViolationOfCommonSense he can hit you from the right side even if you're on his left]]. No wonder he's also known as the [[FanNickname Desert Plesioth]]. It also tends to "swim" on the sand for a long time. Touching its fins while it's "swimming" will cause Paralysis status, and if the paralysis connects, it will usually do a flying tackle right after which does massive damage. And to top it all off? One of the required quests for getting a G-2 license involves ''hunting two of them at the same time''. Good luck.
** Gravios is a GoddamnedBoss on Low Rank, but High Rank and up it becomes this, due to having a heat gas attack that it often uses after firing its heat beam, which prevents players from just easily punishing the attack without worrying about Fireblight. And like before, its skin is tougher than nails, necessitating a high-Sharpness weapon with a good overhead attack to damage its comparatively soft belly consistently without bouncing off, or a squad of Gunners ([[ScrappyWeapon a solo Gunner isn't going to cut it]]).
** Purple Gypceros has several improvements that make it a royal pain in the ass, as if the standard "inflict more damage" fare wasn't enough. When enraged, it will ''constantly'' run around spamming poison all over the place. And not just any poison, this is "Severe" poison, indicated by three purple dots instead of two, a slightly more reddish hue, and most importantly, a higher rate of health drain than standard poison. It can also charge its flash attack ''while it's moving'', and if you don't expect this, you'll find yourself in dizzy status constantly and unexpectedly. In G-rank, it can charge up its flash attack, then store it so it can use it whenever it wants. It will [[PlayingPossum play dead]] ''twice'', and it does the first fake-out ''before'' it's down to capture-ready health, meaning that a player familiar with the original Gypceros but not this one may find themselves wasting traps and Tranq Bombs if they try to capture the Purple Gypceros on its first fake-out.[[note]]Thankfully, Purple Gypceros is not part of any capture quests, so you won't wedge yourself into an UnwinnableByDesign situation if you try to capture it at this time.[[/note]]
** The Dalamadur, the FinalBoss of High-Rank in ''4'', is nearly impossible to solo. Not because of its attack power, not because of being on the receiving end of HitboxDissonance, heck, not even because [[ThatOneLevel the arena you fight it in is huge and full of hills and cliffs that are a real chore to navigate]], but because it's one of the beefiest [[DamageSpongeBoss damage sponges]] in a series that prides itself on [[MarathonBoss long boss fights]] (to the point where it [[UpToEleven makes the Goldbeard Ceadeus look frail in comparison]]. It only has a few attacks, most of which are highly telegraphed, but the real threat is the time limit. It moves around a lot, with most of its weak points often resting near the top of higher cliffs from which it can easily knock you off, costing valuable time, and in the later stages of the fight it spends a great deal of time on the fringe of the map. Even when it stays still and you can wail on it, many weapon types struggle to maintain the DPS required to put it down within 50 minutes. Worse, because it's the final boss of High-Rank, it's impossible to farm up G-Rank equipment by hunting with friends because G-Rank quests require HR8, which is obtained '''immediately''' after killing it. It's much more manageable with a party, but because it's an Urgent Quest, only the host gets credit for the quest, so if you have a party of four trying to reach G-Rank, you'll have to go through this quest '''four''' times in order for everyone to rank-up. [[FromBadToWorse And if you weren't sick of it by then, then there's a G-Rank exclusive subspecies in the final batch of G-Rank quests.]] Thankfully, that one is optionally.
* ThatOneLevel:
** Any quest where you have to hunt two monsters at the same time, in the same area, with no way to separate them. While most quests with multiple monsters allow you to use dung bombs so you only have to fight one at a time, these quests only have one area where monsters can be fought, forcing you to fight both of them at the same time. Not only is it a hassle keeping an eye on more than one monster, players have far less opportunities to attack safely, since a moment where one monster is vulnerable will often be wasted by another monster attacking at the same time. The Arena, which only has one area where monsters can be fought, is especially prone to these kinds of battles.
** Small, thin areas are loathed by players because they make it even harder to avoid a monster's attacks. Besides giving players less room to maneuver, they can cause attacks players could normally avoid to hit them. For example, a charging monster can usually be avoided by moving to the side, but if you're to close to a wall, the wall might "push" the monster toward you, causing you to get hit anyway.
** In ''Unite'', Lance Training Rajang for a Sword Saint Piercing (a piece of headgear which provides the Fencing skill). Unless you're very good with a Lance, the task itself basically pits you as a MightyGlacier against a monster who happens to be a LightningBruiser.
** In ''Freedom 2 / Unite'', the High Rank [=HR5=] urgent quest "Land of the Tremors" is infamous among veteran players, pitting hunters against a pair of Tigrex on the narrow ledges of the Snowy Mountains. As if the precarious terrain wasn't bad enough, you are forced to deal with a pair of [[{{Determinator}} relentless]] meat-eating reptilian freight trains possessing hitboxes [[HitboxDissonance bigger]] than what most modern [=MonHun=] players are accustomed to while minding your positioning. Making matters worse is that they ''very often'' cross paths with one another, forcing players to fight them simultaneously most of the time. Better pack those Dung Bombs!
** From ''Tri'', "Heat Exhaustion", one of the 5-star Moga quests. It requires you to transport two Powderstone items, all the way from the peak of the Volcano map back down to base camp. Since Powderstone is a transport-mode item, you can only carry one at a time. To make matters worse, "Powderstone is extremely hot!" That is, it will constantly sap at your health, regardless of your Heat Res stat. You can't put down the Powderstone to attack or use items (e.g. your Mega Potions), as that causes it to blow up, and unless you have certain skills on hand, getting struck by an enemy also causes the Powderstone to drop. There is a shortcut you can take from the Peak, but it involves a drop and thus ''will'' break your Powderstone unless you have a skill that prevents damage to transported items in a fall (e.g. Felyne Lander). And this quest has an Unstable environment, meaning that you could be running on your merry way from area to area, with no apparent large monster activity on the map, and then Uragaan appears in front of your face. If that wasn't bad enough, ''4'' and ''4U'' have similar Powderstone quests. But unlike the Volcano in the third generation, the Volcanic Hollow has the Powderstones at the ''bottom'' of the map, forcing hunters to climb all the way up to Base Camp to turn the Powderstones in. And three of the maps along the way are infested with either Genprey, Rhenoplos or Konchu. On the plus side, some of these Powderstone quests are in the Gathering Hall, so you can have someone heal you with AreaOfEffect recovery items such as Lifepowders and Recovery Shots and [[EscortMission protect you from monsters]].
** Tri Ultimate has "Sticky Situation", the Urgent Quest for Hunter Rank 6. Brachydios is already considered to be ThatOneBoss on its own; however, Sticky Situation throws [[DualBoss TWO]] of them at you at once, and the G-rank variants of them, no less. While this is already bad enough, the fact that the fight takes place in the Tundra makes it worse as two areas of the map are inaccessible to either Brachydios, which means that they will be crossing paths frequently, even if you chase them off with Dung Bombs. This is particularly frustrating because Brachydios are highly dependent on SplashDamage, ensuring that any crossfire between the two ensures that you'll be treading through a minefield, especially if one or both become enraged. And to put the cherry on it, one of the Brachydios is bigger than usual, which means that it's even harder to evade the nearly ceaseless barrage of attacks. And [[SocializationBonus unless you can find a group who has already surpassed it and can help you grind higher rank G-rank quests,]] it's not like the gear you'll have the first time you'll do this quest will be all that strong for this, either.
** The "Siren's Song" quest, also from ''3 Ultimate'', is the last 6-star Moga quest, and one of the most annoying. You have to [[TimeLimitBoss defeat at least two Qurupecos within the 50-minute time limit]], AND the Qurupecos in this quest can summon the Deviljho if given the opportunity, forcing you to waste time trying to separate the Deviljho so you can fight safely. The first time you encounter this quest, it's possible to run out of time because your equipment will likely give you only just enough power to capture two Qurupecos.
** The 6-Star Quest "Egg-straction: Final Mission" in ''4U''. The Quest requires you to carry three Wyvern Eggs from Area 8 back to the start point in three progressively long runs. That doesn't sound particularly difficult, barring the fact that each Area in between has its own share of annoying {{Mooks}} to run around, including [[GoddamnedBats Remobras]]. However, as soon as you step into Area 8 for the first time, the game sends a Frenzied Rathalos ''and'' a Frenzied Rathian at you, ''at the same time.'' You can opt to hunt them to get them out of your way, but this Quest also happens to be Low Rank, which means that if you didn't skip it and come back with High Rank gear, both can be nightmarishly difficult to fight due to the Frenzy Virus cranking their aggressiveness UpToEleven. And that's before how merely holding the Wyvern Egg on this map causes both wyverns to go PapaWolf and MamaBear at you.
** The ''4U'' Event Quest "Three Virtues" quickly gained notoriety for being ridiculously difficult since its release. It's a High Rank Quest featuring a back-to-back-to-back BossRush against Zinogre, Kirin, and Rajang, two of which are already varying degrees of ThatOneBoss, all of which have High Rank health and do '''G-rank''' damage. And to make it worse, you ''need'' to do this Quest if you want the [[Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda Link armor.]]
** ''4'' features some crazy endgame High Rank quests. One requires you to hunt a Deviljho and a Rajang at the same time. Too easy? How about two Furious Rajang in one map. Still doable? Try "Naked and Afraid", hunting two Deviljho at the same time ''without wearing any armor''? Fortunately, none of these are required to progress unless you really need those new Wycoon trading materials.
** The G-1 quest "Line in the Sand" in ''4U'' has you fighting dual Cephadromes in the daytime Dunes. Normally you could simply toss a Dung Bomb at one of the monsters to drive them towards a different area, but in this quest the Cephadromes only alternate between two locations on the map, meaning they will almost always be fighting side by side even if you managed to temporarily repel one of them with poop. Making matters worse is the fact that Cephadrome in ''4U'' has been buffed up using a combination of Nibelsnarf's and Plesioth's abilities. Hope you brought a lot of Sonic Bombs...
** If you're soloing, the G-1 quest "Death and Taxidermy" can be this. It's a fairly simple quest on paper: capture one Nerscylla. The catch is it takes place in the Primal Forest. Why this is a catch needs explaining. First off, Nerscylla only appears in one zone without webbing. All the others are two level areas. This means that Nerscylla will more often than not be up on top or climbing upside-down underneath the webbing. Now would be a good time to mention that you ''can't set traps on the webbing.'' This means you have to place a trap on the ground and pray that the Nerscylla climbs to the floor and steps on it before it moves to another zone. And since you can only have one trap on the map at a time, you have to wait for your other trap to destroy itself before you can set another. You could easily end up in an UnwinnableByDesign situation.
** The arena quest "Grudge Match: Triplets" in ''4U'' pits you (and potentially, one buddy) against ''three'' Tigrex in the arena. The first two fight you at the same time, while the last one is an Apex Tigrex. Worse yet, three out of the five weapon choices do not have Wystones to help deal with the Apex Tigrex.
** The G-2 quest "Fire Drill" in ''4U'', which pits players against a Stygian Zinogre and a Brachydios in the Volcanic Hollow, is considered one of the worst {{Beef Gate}}s in the game, being a ''mandatory quest'' for getting to G-3. Brachydios is all kinds of ThatOneBoss on his own, but then you factor in Stygian Zinogre, who was given ''massive'' buffs in his combo skills, increased damage for all attacks and ''unpredictably erratic flight patterns'' for his homing Dragonblight balls--the latter of which are [[BulletHell now unleashed with almost every major attack he does]] in his fully charged state--and suddenly you have tons of players getting stuck at this one quest trying to finish it, only to end up getting triple-carted multiple times.
** The G-3 urgent quest "Advanced: Quagmire Quarrel" in ''4U''. It requires you to slay a [[DamageSpongeBoss Gogmazios]]. Its tremendous power brings Blademasters to very low health and outright kills Gunners. While it has obvious tells, its attacks cover wide ranges and can catch players unaware. Its large health pool makes it a long fight and give it more chances to land its attacks. Overall, a tedious fight that can end in an instant. Gathering halls in G-3 consisting mostly of this urgent speaks for itself.
** In ''Tri'' and ''3 Ultimate'', the Flooded Forest is one of the most tedious maps in the game if you're hunting monsters that can go underwater, due to monsters becoming {{Lightning Bruiser}}s compared to you when they go for a swim. Of its 10 areas, half of them have swimmable water, three of which are underwater-only. (To compare, Deserted Island / Moga Woods has only two water areas, one of which is completely submerged.) Get ready to wrestle with the clumsy swimming controls if your target is a Royal Ludroth or Gobul, or worse, a Lagiacrus or a Plesioth. Alleviated in ''Portable 3rd'', which strips out swimming by having the previously-underwater areas dry up and become land areas.
** Several areas in 4U qualify for this in general, thanks to the new emphasis on verticality.
*** On paper, it adds some diverse and visually stunning locations, while allowing players to use the terrain to their advantage through the new jumping and mounting mechanics. In practice, this amounts to awkwardly-placed cliffs and ledges which often impede player movement ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard but rarely the monsters']]) and interrupt rolls. The ledges are also prone to causing CameraScrew, as the camera refuses to view from inside a ledge and instead will zoom way in to give you a nice shot of your character's ass instead of the monster. Slopes look nice and give terrain a more natural feel, but also require extra vertical aiming from weapons that use ranged attacks.
*** Many areas that have two levels of elevation, where the lower level is solid ground and the higher level is made up of vines, can be a real pain to fight in. The upper levels can usually only be reached by climbing, which leaves you more vulnerable to attacks, consumes a lot of stamina if you want to climb quickly, and requires you to sheathe your weapon to climb it.[[note]]You can climb walls while your weapon is out by rolling into them and pressing the A button, but if your weapon is incapable of rolling, like the Lance, you have no choice but to sheathe it first.[[/note]] On the other hand, the lower levels can only be reached by jumping into a gap on the upper level, which can be hard to find in some areas. What's more, fighting on the upper level means you might accidentally roll off a ledge and land back onto the lower level, forcing you to climb back up again. The monsters meanwhile [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard can just change elevations wherever they want]], by digging through the upper level. Some monsters, namely Kecha Wacha, Nerscylla, and G-rank Congalala, can hang from the vines instead of walking, making it hard to hit them from above ''and'' below. This gets especially annoying in multiplayer hunts, because if even one person is on a different elevation than everyone else, the monster might change elevations, forcing everyone else to change as well.
*** Area 4 of the Ancestral Steppe has rather steep slopes and numerous ledges, and the little open space present is close to two zone boundaries. And the kicker: [[ThatOneBoss Rajang]] spawns here in G-rank.
*** Area 2 of Heaven's Mount has two elevations, with the higher elevation only reachable by climbing, and the lower level having numerous ledges that can mess up your dodges. That's already a hassle in the middle of a fight, but the worst part is the lower level has a big trunk in the middle of it, causing the lower level to be a very cramped environment.
*** Area 3 of Heaven's Mount features multiple cliffs that you have to climb up to in order to reach Area 8, where you ''will'' be climbing up to if you're after a Rathian, a Rathalos, or their eggs. The Remobras here can and will knock you off in mid-climb if you're not very mindful of them, and the narrow lower ledges make fighting large monsters much harder than usual.
*** The Tower Summit has two long ridges approximately dividing the area into thirds. The unbroken ridges make it all too easy to attempt a roll only to do a small hop right into an incoming fireball.
*** Ingle Isle, unlike the examples above, actually starts off nice and flat. However, once the battle gets underway and the monsters start stomping around, ''huge'' sections of the ground collapse into lava-filled sinkholes (complete with movement-impeding ledges) which damage players without the Heat Cancel skill. What's left are relatively narrow walkways that provide little maneuvering room around the large monsters that appear here, such as Akantor and Crimson Fatalis.
*** The Everwood lays claim to one of the worst area layouts in the game: the caves. A good third of the area is ''packed'' with small stepping-stone rocks that make any attempt to dodge around them incredibly difficult, while another third is full of flowing sand which will ruin your positioning, hinder your movements and make trap-setting impossible. The remaining tracts of stable ground are narrow and sloped, making them liable to cause CameraScrew. And finally, several of the tougher monsters that can be encountered on expeditions favor this area, including Deviljho and the [[BullfightBoss 'Blos wyverns]], the latter of which are more than happy to charge right over the little stepping stones you're frantically clambering over to headbutt you.
*** One of the least liked Everwood areas is known as "The Maze", a small section of ruins with randomly generated and/or closed off paths that tend to wind around a lot. While [[BreatherLevel no large monsters]] may be encountered in these sections, running back and forth through them while chasing monsters across different areas tends to waste lots of time, which can result in the monsters [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere fleeing the Everwood]] [[LostForever altogether]] if too much time is spent wandering around.
* UglyCute:
** Yian Kut-Ku, with its oversized beak, large ears, and reptilian body, isn't your typical picture of cute. However, its bird-like sounds, funny run, its tendency to trip at the end of its charges, and overall silly appearance has endeared it to the fanbase.
** Nibelsnarf is a beady-eyed, stubby-legged, sand-burrowing monster that, despite having MoreTeethThanTheOsmondFamily, looks more goofy than threatening. Even its name is comical.
** Chameleos is surprisingly cute for an Elder Dragon, thanks to making cute sounds and having some funny movements. Just don't look at it [[http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20140920033509/monsterhunter/images/c/c7/MH4U-Chameleos_Screenshot_001.png when its mouth is open]].
* UncannyValley: ''4U'''s Little Miss Forge has an {{Animesque}} style that looks fine in-game, but does *not* mesh well with the very realistically rendered cutscenes.
* UnfortunateCharacterDesign: Gogmazios has [[http://img1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20141008203543/monsterhunter/images/7/7a/MH4U-Gogmazios_Screenshot_001.png glowing markings]] on its chin that look like a sad face. This has led to it receiving the FanNickname "Gogsadios".
* TheWoobie:
** The Lagombi looks like a bumbling cross between a rabbit and a koala. When it's low on health, it turns its head to look back at you while it's limping away, as if it knows you're going to chase it down.
** The Kecha Wacha is a very friendly-looking monster (until it's enraged), with playful mannerisms. Townsfolk usually ask you to hunt it because it sprayed watery goop at them. Killing the Kecha Wacha for this annoying but mostly harmless prank can feel like DisproportionateRetribution. When it's exhausted, it looks absolutely pitiful with its half-closed eyes.
** Whitescruff, the meek and sad-looking Felyne in Cheeko Sands. He wants to defend the village from rampaging monsters but is too cowardly to even approach them. He hopes that, by watching you hunt big scary monsters, he can learn what courage feels like.
* {{Woolseyism}}:
** The subspecies of a monster in the Japanese versions [[BeigeProse usually just adds "subspecies"]] (亜種) to its name, but the localizations make their names more descriptive to add flavor. For instance, "Lagiacrus subspecies" (ラギアクルス亜種) thus becomes Ivory Lagiacrus due to its distinct white scales.
** In the Japanese version of ''Tri'', Leviathans were known as Sea Wyverns, which [[NonIndicativeName doesn't suit them very well.]][[note]] Wyverns have two legs and a pair of wings. Leviathans have four legs and no wings. Furthermore, you can find them in more environments than just the sea; for instance, Agnaktor resides in volcanoes.[[/note]] Leviathan describes them more accurately as the class is composed of serpentine or fish-like creatures.
** In the localization for ''4U'', Felyne Comrades were renamed to Palicoes, a clever play on "Pal" and "Calico".
** The "Frenzy Virus" was called the "Feral Wyvern Virus" in the Japanese version, a NonIndicativeName on multiple levels.[[note]]The monsters were already feral before being infected, and it infects far more monsters than just wyverns, with the very first infected monster encountered being Congalala, a ''Fanged Beast''.[[/note]] By contrast, Frenzy describes the violent, unpredictable behavior of infected monsters much more accurately.
** Monsters that overcome the Frenzy Virus are known as "Extreme" monsters in the Japanese version, which seems like a case of TotallyRadical to Westerners. The localizations instead refer to them as "Apex" monsters. As in, an ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apex_predator apex predator]]''.
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-> ''How come nobody sends me any exampawls?''
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