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* FairForItsDay: Nowadays, the play gets criticism for codifying the stereotype of Asian women as fragile and nothing without their Western men, but in its time it was meant to ''condemn'' the cruelty of the West towards the East via making Butterfly a victim of Pinkerton's thoughtlessness and {{jerk ass}}ery.
* HarsherInHindsight: Puccini wrote the opera in part to criticize America and the West's treatment of Japan, no doubt having things like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perry_Expedition Admiral Perry's forcible opening of Japan to trade]] in mind. But the theme resounds much more strongly to modern ears when you consider the opera is set in ''[[AtomicBombingsOfHiroshimaAndNagasaki Nagasaki]]''.
* TearJerker: Definitely.
* WhatAnIdiot: People who are less receptive to Butterfly's woobieness (and even some who ''are'') believe that while Pinkerton '''is''' a massive ass, Butterfly shouldn't be left off the hook. She ''is'' given warnings, help offers and/or useful advice by Suzuki, Gorou and even Sharpless... ''but she refuses all of this and chooses to wait for Pinkerton's return'', still blindly believing that he'd come back to her. As you can see, it backfires ''massively'' on both her ''and'' her child, and even if she's NOT responsible for Pinkerton's actions she is responsible ''for her own''.
** Pinkerton is just as stupid, if not even more. Ever since the ''start'' he's warned by the GenreSavvy Sharpless that this Japanese girl has taken the vow he takes for granted ''very'' seriously, and spends the whole first act telling him not to be a jackass ''and'' to take Butterfly's feelings in consideration. He refuses to take Sharpless seriously and insists that he won't give her the time of the day after the first month, then takes off to America and acts almost as if Butterfly didn't exist. ''Of course'' she turns out to be THE Japanese woman who would take his "promise" seriously.
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