* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Obviously Brutus, but also Caesar. Is he a skeptic who refuses to pay heed to the soothsayer (see ArbitrarySkepticism on the main page) or a highly superstitious figure who refuses to "beware" the Ides of March because it would be challenging fate and willingly goes to his destiny, only showing sadness at discovering Brutus among his killers? Or is he just too arrogant to pay heed to any warning of danger; or, is he worried about the threat but afraid of showing his fear out of concern for looking weak?
* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: The play's 'message' can easily be read as "Democracy is bad because people are sheep," given all the scenes showing how quickly and easily the public's loyalties can change and be manipulated: Act I, Scene I, as well as their rapid switch of loyalties from Caesar to Brutus and back to avenging Caesar following the assassination. Of course, in Shakespeare's day [[ValuesDissonance this wouldn't have been a family-unfriendly aesop]], as democracy didn't catch on for another few centuries.
* HoYay: Tons of it, especially between Brutus and Cassius. During Act 4, Scene 3 they have what literally appears to be a lover's quarrel, while alone in a tent together:
--> '''Cassius:''' I denied you not.
--> '''Brutus:''' You did.
--> '''Cassius:''' I did not. He was but a fool that brought
--> My answer back. Brutus hath rived my heart.
** Just after that:
--> '''Cassius:''' You love me not.
--> '''Brutus:''' I do not like your faults.
** Cassius then desperately laments he is "hated by one he loves," jealously accuses Brutus of loving Caesar more than him, and offers his dagger to Brutus, asking him to stab him in the chest because he cannot bear the misery. Ironically, he later asks the same of a servant after learning erroneously that Brutus is dead; the servant obliges. Brutus returns and kills himself upon Cassius' sword. Sound familiar?
* MemeticMutation: It's Shakespeare. He was influential.
** "Et tu, Brute?" (For anyone who has been or feels betrayed.)
** "The ides of March"
** "Cry havoc, and let slip the dogs of war!"
** "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears!"
* MisaimedFandom: It provides no end of amusement to people who are students of history to laugh at the irony of unpopular politicians being placed in the role of Caesar. While hardly without controversy Caesar was a very popular man in his day. When most politicians were seen as increasingly inept, hiding behind their prose and uppity rich classicism to appear more sophisticated than they really were, someone as bold and as blunt as Caesar who told it like it was caught on very quickly with the average working Roman. He was immensely popular with the troops for winning many campaigns and paying them handsomely for their hard work. Caesar was even declared an enemy of the state for his devotion to his army, something that he rectified when he crossed the Rubicon. Making the deal even sweeter Caesar dedicated in his will that a large portion of his wealth be donated to the average Roman citizen, while hardly enough to make them rich, it was nevertheless a nice gesture. Some historians credit his death with the fall of Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, because the dictator/emperor powers that he could not use in life were handed down to his successors. Essentially by putting the face of a politician you don't like on Caesar, you're saying that politician is a popular populist official who led the country to greatness and whose death will lead to the downfall of the country as we know it -- hardly an insult. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement We'll leave which politicians this applies to up to your imagination.]]
* ProtagonistTitleFallacy: Caesar is assassinated halfway through and is never really the focus; this story is all about Brutus.