* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Do Witch Doctors really commune with the spirits or are they just HearingVoices that describe their intuitions? At no point do the "spirits" tell them anything they couldn't have guessed on their own.
* {{Altitis}}: The series was ''born'' for this. Much of the appeal comes from taking its simplistic gameplay style and sprucing it up through [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal constant character customization]]. Shifting between characters and character builds are a sure fire way to fall prey to the game's [[JustOneMoreLevel infamously addictive nature]].
* AnticlimaxBoss:
** Diablo himself, in the first incarnation, is painfully easy to defeat. His only ranged attack is a simple blockable instant hit explosion but can be prevented by going melee, he's fairly susceptible to common magic, and has pretty low armor class. Doesn't help that there is an easy way to lure him out without waking his {{mook}}s. Excusable because [[spoiler:in actuality, the body you're fighting is that of a helpless child]].
** The Summoner in the sequel. You fight through a reality-bending Escher twister full of demons in search of a power-mad sorcerer, who keels over in two or three hits on Normal difficulty. The weakest super-unique creature in the game, hands down. Only the non-boss uniques in the first act are squishier.
* AwesomeMusic: When you defeat Diablo in ''Diablo II'', the introductory guitar riffs from Tristram's theme plays.
** Diablo II is chock full of great music, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BODYxesJLVo straight from the first act.]]
** The music in Act V, starting from the theme of Harrogath itself. The music really reminds you that 'this is it', you've defeated two Prime Evils, went ToHellAndBack, and fought many difficult battles-- and now this is ''the'' final struggle. Time to deal the decisive blow to the devils who have brought so many deaths and despair across the Sanctuary. You're not alone, the Barbarians of Harrogath are fighting alongside you. And if you're a Barbarian yourself, this is also a case of ItsPersonal: for the liberation of your homeland.
* BestLevelEver:
** The Hell Levels of the first game. The most atmospheric hell ever (if you prefer {{Gorn}} hell over firey hell), and you [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu fight the Devil]] at the end.
** The Bloody Foothills of ''Lord of Destruction'' began with a town under siege and its residents hating you. As you progress you rescue Barbarians, repel demon hordes, and destroy catapults as you go, ending it all by destroying the commander of the attack and gaining a socket to place in almost any weapon. No other level throughout the game gave you such a specific goal, or immersed the player so well.
** The Arreat Summit, and, perhaps, the entirety of Act V stands as an awesome level... even before considering the region's SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic.
* BrokenBase: Over the 1.10 patch to Diablo II: Many fans loved the skill synergies because it meant they didn't have to save skill points for high levels anymore, but some were upset that it severely reduced the number of viable builds.
* ChaoticEvil: Hell is depicted this way in the mythos, whose denizens enjoy slaughtering and corrupting mortals and who hold chaos as a cosmic ideal to which all reality should bend. However, besides the Three Prime Evils who rule Hell, most of the forces of Hell seem to in fact be [[LawfulStupidChaoticStupid stupid evil,]] and are perfectly willing to simply slaughter each other for all eternity.
* ClicheStorm: Part of the charm of any Blizzard game.
** PlayTheGameSkipTheStory: Who was going to pay attention to it, anyways? If anything, Blizzard knew they shouldn't make anything too original.
*** Anyone who only played multi-player probably didn't even know there was a story; it skips all the cinematics and most of the background is in the manual.
* ComplacentGamingSyndrome:
** ''Diablo 2'' 's multiplayer was pretty much this: Log onto multiplayer. Pay people in-game loot to run you through the game, sitting by and absorbing all the experience so you can level up as fast as possible. You look up a stat sheet on the internet and follow it ''to the tee'', with no room for deviation (unless you want to be laughed at by all the {{Munchkin}}s, unless you're doing something like a "Crazy run") Then when you hit level 80, you run the final act again and again, get [[SturgeonsLaw nothing but junk 98% of the time]] in hopes of finding that "perfect loot", until a player bribes you with something that ''isn't'' junk and you run them through the game.
** Expanding on what was mentioned above - The game is played in three difficulty levels. When you beat one, you play the same five acts and their quests again. Very few who play on the public servers do anything besides pay other players in-game loot to beat all the bosses for them, skipping sidequests, so that they can sit and leech experience in games run by high-level characters/bots and shoot from level 1 to level 80+ within a few hours. This is justified when making a [=PvP=] character to avoid all the grinding, but most do it so they can rush bosses looking for perfect loot or just because they're bored of the repetitive nature of a three-difficulty playthrough.
** Not to mention, when you play the game in multiplayer, you look up a stat-sheet on the internet, carbon-copy it in your character, and follow the ''exact skills'' in the playthrough. Blizzard was GenreSavvy enough to know that the same thing would happen in ''VideoGame/{{Diablo III}}'' and letting people customize stats would be [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment redundant]] anyways, in part because of this trope.
* CompleteMonster: [[SinisterMinister Archbishop Lazarus]] was a prominent figure in both the original ''Diablo'' and is mentioned in the first act of ''VideoGame/DiabloIII''. He played an integral role in King Leoric's descent into madness and eventual transformation into the Skeleton King, as well as manipulating him into torturing and executing many innocents in the guise of "protecting his kingdom" (up to and including [[spoiler:his own queen]]), feeding Tristram's villagers and the odd adventurer to the demonic Butcher in the first game, and having Albrecht, one of Leoric's two sons, made a vessel for Diablo himself.
* CrowningMusicOfAwesome:
** The first game featured some ridiculously atmospheric tracks. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2evIg-aYw8 Tristram]] theme comes to mind.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7ekMFeC5V4 Raise some hell]]. Sadly there is no studio version of this.
** That's not to say the second game doesn't have it's good tracks. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YruCuC6gbl0 Case in point]].
* DemonicSpiders:
** The original game had the demon mages at the end of the game, who in addition to teleporting about, hit hard with powerful spells to make even ranged players cringe thinking about taking on groups of them (nevermind the melee players, to which those guys are absolute terrors). They came in swarms, had lightning attacks which could shred your HP down to critical in a few seconds, and teleported away from you before you could do any significant damage. The bane of warriors. It's not unknown to run out of money to spend on healing potions before you run out of enemies to kill.
*** And if they weren't bad enough, they'd often be accompanied by Soul Burners. These winged demonic harlots would NEVER be encountered on their own, and while they weren't able to teleport around like the mages, approaching even an average-sized cluster of them with melee in mind still bordered on suicide for anyone not tooled-up to the eyeballs with special items and healing consumables. Succubi are a close second to the mages, particularly for warriors, as they also tend to come in packs and [[BulletHell flood the screen with blood stars]]. They move at the exact same speed the player does, which makes catching up to them with melee in mind nearly suicidal.
*** Never mind the triple-immunes on the highest difficulties. These monsters are immune to ALL attacks save physical damage and Stone Curse. The only reliable way to kill them is to lure them out one-at-a-time, stone curse them, then smack them to death with either your own melee attacks or a golem.
** ''Diablo II'' is the quintessential example of this trope. If the game did not pre-date TVTropes by several years, one could be tempted to believe its programmers used the article as a checklist for creating annoying enemies. To make the game more difficult, nearly every method of unfair fighting is used, including sudden charges forward, death explosions, attacks from off-screen, and worst of all, hitting the player with lightning every time the player hits a certain foe.
*** The infamous "Scarab Demon" [[PaletteSwap enemy type]], which shoots lightning in all directions every time you hit them. Also known as "[[ClusterFBomb that fucking bug that shoots fucking lightning in all directions every fucking time you hit one]]." The same thing also go for when an enemy is "Lightning Enchanted." A further refinement yet is the dreaded "Multiple Shot Lightning-Enchanted," (MSLE) which multiplies the number of lightning bolts released on hits to such a degree that one wad can kill most avatars; also, the engine's limits sometimes fail to display all the clustered bolts, leading to possible surprise death, even at a distance.
*** A note on MSLE: MSLE increases the number of sparks generated on every hit, but also causes those sparks to ''home in on you.'' A standard LE boss can easily be cheesed by standing about half a unit away in any of the four cardinal directions (Directly east/west or north/south) and whacking away at it in melee. With an MSLE mob that just ain't gonna happen. Zap.
**** Thankfully, MSLE bosses have been fixed as of 1.10. They still emit lightning and still use multiples of their normal projectiles, but the two enchantments no longer work together.
*** King of the DemonicSpiders would have to be the gloams/souls (Gloams, Burning Souls, Black Souls) that show up in acts 3, 4, and 5. (So hated that they were listed here in three separate places...) They shoot lightning, at range sufficient to hit you a screen and a half away, which deals insane damage. ''And'' they're invisible most of the time. Very often your first warning of a pack of gloams is when a volley of lightning bolts from something you can't even see hits you in the face and wipes out three-quarters of your hit points.
**** And that's even when you have max lightning resistances sometimes!
**** They are also unleechable. Have you been relying on leeching mana from monsters to power your attack skills? Whoops! Gloams won't give you any mana! Leeching life to keep from dying? Can't get that either! Sucks to be you.
*** The Tomb Vipers as a guest monster in Act V. Their ranged poison attack leaves behind an invisible trail that, if you try to run through them, will inflict half physical half poison damage PER FRAME (the game runs on 25FPS), often instantly killing the strongest characters unless you load up on integer physical damage reduction. This has frequently been requested as a bug fix but blizzard insists that it is "working as intended". Thankfully they are only found in one place. (Tip: if you see those things and don't want to save/exit/reenter for whatever reason, STAND STILL. Also don't count on any of your minions as they're likely to run through the clouds and get killed instantly unless they're dual poison/physical immune revives or Druid's spirit summons in Nightmare.)
*** The Claw Vipers don't seem that fast, but if they get within a few feet of you, they can cover the remaining distance at roughly twice the remaining speed, hitting you and stunning you with their charge attack. It's almost impossible for a non-melee class to get the amulet from the second level of the temple alone.
**** They not only stun you, they knock you backwards. Running into a large group of them can make you feel like a pinball.
*** The highest ranking variants of the Reanimated Horde are naturally Extra Fast-er than the rest, and their deadlier and more frequent charge attacks give the Claw Vipers a run for their money. Since their type can self-revive, players back tracking through an area previously riddled with this sort of undead may be in for a painful surprise.
*** Archer groups with Cold Enchantment. One hit freezes you, so that you can't get to them quickly, and they're shooting at you the whole time. They're especially hell on melee classes, since melee attacks are also slowed to a crawl when you're frozeen. One of these groups spawns in act 1, every time without fail. They will wreck your low-level characters and absolutely ruin your day.
**** Archer bosspacks in general can do quite a lot of damage from range in Hell, especially if they're loaded up with nasty mods. If you encounter them with melee classes to tank for them, you should probably retreat so you can take out any distractions first.
*** Undead flayers. They're tiny little skeletons that run around with giant cleavers as big as they are. They run up to you at super-speed, stab you in the face for a bunch of damage, and zip away. They're so small and fast-moving that it's very tough to click on them. Missed... aagh... missed again... ''HA! Gotcha, you little motherf--'' '''KABOOM!''' (Oh, did I mention they explode when they die? And the explosion damage is enough to kill many characters outright?) Luckily their explosions don't work on mercs and minions for some reason, so you should let yours do the dirty work for you.
*** Until recently, oblivion knights were the absolute bane of melee characters. They're undead casters in the last bit of Act 4 and sometimes Act 5, who throw random curses at you. Every so often they'd throw Iron Maiden, which causes you to damage yourself every time you make a melee attack. If, God forbid, you're in the middle of a high-damaging, long-animation attack such as Zeal or Whirlwind, it's an insta-kill. In fact, damage scales faster than HP in D2, so on higher difficulties Iron Maiden is an insta-kill if you land ''any'' melee attack. The 1.13 patch removed Iron Maiden from their list of curses, and they've since been retired from DemonicSpiders status. They can still make you die quicker though, if they cast Lower Resist while being next to the aforementioned Gloams.
*** Similar to Oblivion Knights, Unique Fallen Shamans were absolute nightmares before later patches toned them down. See, the main shtick of Fallen Shamans is that they can resurrect the Fallen of their "tribe". Now, ''Unique'' Shamans also had the ability to resurrect ''other Shamans'', and they had minions that could do the same, making any encounter with them a mad dash to kill them quickly and pray to Akarat they don't spam their resurrections. Mercifully, later patches eventually both removed their ability to resurrect other Shamans, as well as giving them standard Fallen as minions.
**** In Act 5 Nightmare and Hell, the Cold variants get Glacial Spike. Sucks for mercenaries that get too close.
**** Fetish Shamans. They pace about faster than Fallen Shamans, and instead of a puny fire ball type attack they use the most damaging fire attack encountered so far in regular monsters possibly until Act 4: Inferno. With all of a shaman-type monster's benefits. Oh, and they also have their own fetish to attack you after they're killed. AND they take on the class of the shaman in question ie. Unique shaman, unique leftover fetish with the same mods.
*** Act 5 Wendigoes. Beefed up fundamentally, now also with the ability to stun. Champion packs of these exemplify this trope.
**** The Yetis sort of look tamer once you run into Minotaur packs. Especially a unique pack with nasty mods([[OhCrap Fanaticism AND Extra Strong AND Extra Fast]] on top of their Frenzy, anyone?) that spawned on top of you because you clicked on that evil urn hoping to get an easy-to-handle succubus pack to score on EXP and loot.
*** In the original, and also in the sequel's expansion: Monsters that attack using Blood Star. Due to the game's dearth in providing substantial defense towards the generic "MAGIC"-type damage (ie Bone Spear, Berserk, Blessed Hammer etc) for players, a frequently-encountered stream of blood stars will cause ''immense'' grief to characters that don't explicitly load up on hit points and the mod "Magic Damage reduced by [''integer'']".
*** Hell Bovines are these to casual players. If a 1280x1024 or higher playing resolution was available, once you step through the portal you'd find yourself almost totally surrounded by bovine packs.
*** You know this game RUBS this trope in with those suicide minions in Act 5.
* DisappointingLastLevel: ''Diablo 2'' falls prey to this in Act 4. Whilst having the final chapter in the pits of Hell is pretty cool, there are far fewer areas in Hell than in any other chapter, only a handful of [=NPC=]s in the 'town' of the Pandemonium Fortress, and only three quests, two of which are needed to win the game anyway. Your blacksmith and healer in that town have noticeably been given fewer lines to say and have no discernible personality. "Hail to you, champion" will be stuck in your head after a while.
** On close inspection, this sets in to a lesser extent much earlier. The first of the four acts has more things for your character to say, more bosses, more quest variety, more optional quests, and more optional dungeons. The rest of the game all comes down to enter dungeon, kill monsters, retrieve item, over several hours.
*** To illustrate how bad the game gets compared to the first act, the second one has a quest that's basically raid three dungeons to assemble the staff that opens the last dungeon (with the third dungeon being also appearing as a separate quest), two separate quests telling you to read a book and kill the guy guarding it respectively and the last quest which is given at the very end, just lingers there and occasionally updates as you complete the other quests. Act three has its first quest that's actually harder to trigger than to complete, two fetch quests that require you to retrieve items you probably find before even knowing somebody back in town needs them, and another quest requiring you to assemble the items needed to open the last dungeon. Naturally, the last item is once again guarded by a monster that has a separate quest linked to it. By the time you get to act 4, it's literally just killing things. Luckily, act 5 does its best to rectify that, but you may find yourself spending most of the time level grinding for the last boss fight.
* EarWorm: The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGTUz4OnzdM&fmt=18 Tristram town theme]] from ''Diablo'' (or ''Diablo II'', in this case, as it was exactly the same as the version from the first game but with an extra 3 minutes or so of new music added to the end).
** This theme is so memorable that at the end of ''Diablo II'', after killing Diablo himself, the game plays this theme for five seconds. Every single person who has ever played the first game hears this and ''shivers'' at the very sound.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Gharbad the Weak.
* EvenBetterSequel: ''Diablo'' was a fun, quirky game that is still an excellent play, but its sequel ''Diablo II'' and its expansion ''Lord of Destruction'' was so huge that many people are still playing it today, nevermind the number of clones it spawned.
* EveryoneIsSatanInHell: The fell into this for a number of uninformed parents.
* EvilIsCool: If [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=go2SMXxE-8Q#t=2m29s this]] video is of any guideline, Baal counts.
* GameBreaker:
** ''Diablo''[='s=] Sorcerer was ridiculously easy to break by using the MS No-Stun bug. The "stun" that occurs if your character (or a monster) gets hit strongly enough is a huge part of the gameplay. But, Mana Shield can potentially cancel that. The problem is that it works by first applying damage to your life (as usual) but then converting it to your mana. If the damage is greater than your life, you're considered DEAD (and not stunned) for milliseconds until Mana Shield does its work. If your life ends up below your level (which is the stun threshold) you can never be stunned when using Mana Shield. Since sorcerers rely on Mana Shield in the normal gameplay anyway, well... To make it even worse, there's an otherwise feared enemy "Black Death" that when hitting you removes 1 of your maximum life, which you could use.
** Unofficial ExpansionPack ''Hellfire'''s easter egg bard was breakable without any bugs because of dual-wield. Just equip a haste/peril weapon combo together with an undead crown or helm or spirits for life-steal. Because peril does 1x WEAPON damage to the user, but 3x CHARACTER damage to the monsters, and such big life-steal will almost always get your HP back, such a combo can potentially cause total havoc.
** The sequel is much, ''much'' worse when it comes to imbalance. Hammerdins (A Paladin that works off spamming blessed hammers) unlike other spellcasters, don't hit a brick wall with immunities, and needs no tactics but "spam blessed hammer" and is pretty much the only build good for both PVP and PVM. A Paladin with the Blessed Hammer / Concentration combo can kill virtually everything in the entire game in seconds with no effort, and the beta 1.13 patch (likely to be the last) has done little to remedy this. It's even worse if they have the Teleport skill from the equally-overpowered Enigma Runeword.
** The blood golem iron maiden combo was truly absurd, being a ''casual'' gamebreaker rather than requiring players to put 20 points into the same skills to use. The blood golem healed itself and you for some of the damage it dealt. The iron maiden curse caused enemies to damage themselves for a percentage (200% at ''rank one'') of the damage they dealt. The game registered this as the blood golem dealing the damage to them, meaning after just a few ranks it would heal itself and you for much more damage than enemies were dealing. It only worked on physical damage at least, but against that you were both functionally invincible.
* GameplayDerailment: Most major patches have one or two... Buriza Do Kyanon, Hammeridins, etc... Amazons particularly have a flavour-of-the-month aspect to this.
* GeniusBonus: The first game featured a type of high-level demonic enemy called the Balrog. That is, there were several {{palette swap}}ped variants, and the most powerful ones were called Balrogs, but the type they all belonged to were also called Balrogs. That's just an obvious Creator/JRRTolkien reference. But in the next game, while some enemies are still called Balrogs, the broader type they belong to is now "Megademon". Since "bal" in Sindarin means something like "might" (Quenya: "vala", cf. the Valar, Tolkien's "gods"), and "rog" means demon, "Megademon" is a stylistically odd but pretty much direct translation of "Balrog".
* GoddamnedBats:
** The first game has literal bats in it. They teleport. ''Diablo II'' adds Flayers, Maggot Young, Flesh Beasts, Leapers and Imps. The Imps teleport. Both games have Fallen/Carvers. Flayers, Fallen, and Carvers all tend to swarm and can be resurrected by their respective Shamans (except for the undead Bone Flayers, which ''explode'' for a nasty chunk of damage when they die). Sand Maggots and Flesh Beasts spawn Maggot Young and Flesh Spawn, respectively. Imps are spawned by huts. Leapers move very fast and jump all the time which makes them difficult to kill due more to being hard to click on than having lots of armor or HP.
** Swarms of enemy Archers.
** Blood Hawks are literal GoddamnedBats spawned by nests. There are also mummies spawned by sarcophogi, greater mummies that can resurrect almost any type of undead, and Putrid Defilers, which enchant other monsters to spawn Pain Worms upon death. Oh, and all those monsters that can be resurrected? You don't get more experience for killing them again.
** Plenty of them, but the Leapers most definitely qualify. They attack by jumping, and are knocked away every time you hit them. They are also fast enough to dodge ranged attacks, and always attack in large numbers. The pigmies in act 3 swarm you in large numbers or attack with their blowpipes from a long distance, and their shamans can revive them. Their undead versions are even stronger and explode when killed. Then there are the imps from act 5. They teleport, shoot fire from a long distance, and mount towers or war beasts where they're even harder to touch. And finally, the suicide bombers. They charge you at high speed and explode, knocking you back taking out a large chunk of your life and possibly freezing you.
** The druid can summon these to his side in the form of ravens. They barely do any damage, but they are fast, cannot be attacked in any way, and can blind anything they attack.
** The mummies, who spew clouds of poison in death and can be produced by a MookMaker, the saber cats and slingers, who come in swarms, can throw exploding or poison potions, and move really fast, but die quickly, and ''anything'' that can poison you in Hell.
* GoddamnedBoss: In ''Diablo II'':
** The FinalBoss, Baal. He teleports, [[ManaBurn burns mana]], creates clones of himself, casts spells that can push you nearly a full screen back, and has a [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking rather annoying laugh.]]
** There's also Nihlathak, the boss of the aptly named Nihlathak's Temple. He [[MookMaker spawns minions]] and uses a [[ThatOneAttack devastating corpse explosion]] attack on downed minions.
** And then there's Izual. He doesn't hit that hard and you can life leech it back quickly, but has [[DamageSpongeBoss so freaking many HP]] that the recommended method to kill him as a melee class is to ''weigh down your attack key and go for a snack.''
** Blood Raven, who [[GetBackHereBoss constantly runs around]] [[FragileSpeedster at breakneck speed]] while [[MookMaker summoning tons of zombies]] [[GoddamnedBats that get in your way]].
* GoodBadBugs:
** The first game had a cloning glitch: if you picked up an item off the ground at the exact same time as left-clicking a potion from your belt, the item would appear in your inventory and the potion would be replaced with the same item. Extremely useful for fast cash or online item trades, as rare items sold well, but you could also have duplicate rings (the only item that you were allowed to wear 2 of the same thing).
** Could be easily abused to create a level 1 character with maxed stats, as well, as the game included elixirs that each permanently increased a primary stat.
** A possible item affix determines if an item increases or decreases the light radius (and thus how far a player can see) around the player character. While the original intention of this stat is that a higher light radius is good and a lower light radius is bad (because stumbling around a darkened dungeon is not exactly the sanest thing to do) to the point that ''-lr'' items are considered cursed and a -lr modifier is considered the necessary drawback on several unique items to prevent them from being overpowered... This ''isn't'' exactly the case. Light radius is also responsible for determining just how far away monsters in the dungeon activate and begin hunting you down; a higher radius means that more mobs will be out for your blood and a lower radius means you can actually apply some stealth tactics.
** Although both have been fixed, ''Diablo 2'' had a couple of fun ones for a while. The big one was the homing/pierce bug, which let Amazons with the Buriza-Do Kyanon unique crossbow and the Guided Arrow skill strike an enemy up to 4 times with one shot. The other one was the Marrowwalk glitch. Said item gives charges of Bone Prison at level 33 (when the skill level cap is 20 without items). If a Necromancer, who can learn the skill naturally, equipped the boots but had yet to put an actual point into the skill, the game used the 33 given by the boots for synergy purposes. That means over a 150% increase in synergy power compared to actually leveling the skill, which meant a lot considering how all the bone skills tend to synergize with each other.
* InferredHolocaust: Arguably ''Diablo II''. Although you've defeated the three prime evils, the world is still basically overrun by possessed critters that have wiped out most of the world's population. This is confirmed by the information that's out about ''VideoGame/DiabloIII''. Necromancers running amuck, cursed forests, crazy cultists and the Kingdom and probably the entire world have been smashed down to rubble basically. Oh, and Tyrael is apparently now crazy and all the Prime Evils, plus Lilith, are back. There is some good news though! Now that the Worldstone is gone, all humans will apparently now become super strong half angel, half demons like they originally were. I'm sure that will go just swimmingly, don't you? Talk about a CrapsackWorld. Still, if everyone is a super-strong half-angel-half-demon demigod, and all it took to kill the Prime Evils the first time around was a BadassNormal or two, maybe there is hope that the new not-so-mortals can [[CurbStompBattle mercilessly steamroll]] the forces of Hell (and, if necessary, Heaven) and rebuild their world? If you've played '' Diablo II'' you know how pathetically weak both Heaven ''and'' Hell are.
** Not to mention that in ''VideoGame/DiabloIII'', we find out that Tyrael's destruction of the Worldstone blew up Mount Arreat and corrupted the lands around it. All those barbarians you were helping throughout Act V were probably instantly killed -- ''by your ally'', no less -- just to save the rest of the world.
* ItsPopularNowItSucks: Being a Blizzard franchise, it was inevitable.
* ItWasHisSled: The path to the "secret" cow level? Not at all a secret now days.
* JerkassWoobie: Wirt loses his legs and his mother, becoming a more selfish and sarcastic individual as a result.
* JunkRare: The game will fall into this sooner or later thanks to the RandomNumberGod.
* LawfulGood: Tyrael the Angel of Justice is firmly on the side of good and is compassionate towards humans, in contrast to his LawfulStupid brethren. ThePaladin from D2, the [[WarriorMonk Monk]] and the [[ChurchMilitant Templar]] from D3 are also LG.
* LawfulNeutral:
** Heaven is portrayed this way in the Mythos; notable in that they uphold Order in the universe but don't seem too particularly concerned about "good" (as opposed to their rivals in Hell, who uphold Chaos but are most assuredly very evil.) In fact, Tyrael, the only angel in the games' lore who seems to be in any way good, is considered a rogue by his brethren.
** In the last book of a novel trilogy, we meet the rest of the Council that Tyrael is on when they gather to decide the fate of humanity for [[spoiler:being the offspring of angels and demons]]. One is a fanatic Lawful Neutral who wants to wipe out the humans, another is very nice and on par with Tyrael, another seems neither particularly spiteful or sympathetic, but pragmatic and willing to give humanity the chance to prove themselves, and the last seems neutral. ''Deathly'' neutral.
* LootDrama: ''Diablo II'' had an extreme problem with Loot Drama because every item, bar none, dropped straight on the ground; if your group didn't have strict looting discipline (hint: it didn't), they subsequently went to whoever was fastest at snatching them up.
** One rare item, the ''Stone of Jordan'', which gives + 1 to every skill. This was actually used as currency in the online aspect of the game for rare goods. Before any crackdown on selling in-game items for real money, an eBay auction was selling about 50 of these for $300. Since the crackdown, perfect gems are used as the surrogate currency.
** ''Diablo II'' in general is notorious for this. The expansion added runes and runewords; runes are special socketable items with a range of abilities, depending on the rune. Rune drops aren't determined by [[LuckStat magic find]] so the probability of finding any (much less the one you want) is very low. Runewords are specific combinations of runes in a specific item which when created, imbue the item with increased stats, ranging from useful to [[GameBreaker GameBreaking]]. Runes have supplanted the ''Stone of Jordan'' as the ingame with its own exchange and pricing system to boot. Rampant [[GoodBadBugs duping]] of runes has actually caused ''inflation''.
** For reference: There are 33 runes, and the top 8 are extremely rare, having drop chances of one in tens or hundreds of thousands. To make a runeword, you'll need a specific combination, up to ''5'' of the "high" ones. And, sometimes, finding an item good enough to put these beasts in is going to be just as difficult.
* MagnificentBastard: The Prime Evils. They deliberately lost a war with their underlings so that they could be exiled to the human world. They planned everything that happens from the backstory to the second game and possibly even farther. Not to mention [[spoiler:[[TheBadGuyWins they get away with what they wanted in each single game, even when they are supposed to have been defeated.]]]]
* MemeticMutation:
** Greetings, friend! [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMAbNFptzAA Stay a while and listen!]][[labelnote:Explanation]]The PlayTheGameSkipTheStory attitude of most ''Diablo''players meant nobody stuck around to listen to anybody's exposition[[/labelnote]]
** Turns into a bit of Tear Jerker with [[spoiler:Deckard Cain's death. We never listened...]]
** You've found a Horadric Staff! That's quite a treasure you have there in your Horadric Cube! I'M DECKARD CAIN!
* MostAnnoyingSound: 'Whoa! What can I do for ya?'. Or 'I sense a soul in search of answers'.
* MostWonderfulSound: Loot hitting the floor. There's a reason Blizzard hasn't changed the sound set since the first game.
** The shiny "ting" sound from ''Diablo II'', [[NoticeThis alerting you]] to the presence of a gem fragment. Easily recognizable from across the room, and liable to cause a frantic clicking on treasure.
** In the ''Lord of Destruction'' expansion, this is out-done by that lovely, bearly-audible sound of a pebble being rubbed across another pebble, indicating that a Rune has just been dispensed. Your mouth immediately starts watering as you scan the items to see what kind of Rune it was (the appropriate prayer at this point is "PLEASE GOD GIVE ME ZOD!!!!!").
* MST3kMantra: This is a requirement. FridgeLogic avoided.
* {{Narm}}:
** The ending cinematic in ''Diablo'', depending on which class you played as. When the player character drives Diablo's Soulstone into his/her forehead, the look of pain on the Warrior and Sorcerer's faces is authentic. The Rogue, by contrast, ends up looking like Barbra Streisand.
** Baal, in the opening cinematic for Act V of ''Diablo II''. Sure, he's got an army from hell with him, and he blows up the guard in a very evil way, but... he also gestures emphatically with every line, looks like he's wearing makeup, and seems way too happy about being carried on a fashionable throne by his minions. He may be the most intimidating drama queen ever, but he still acts like a drama queen.
* NauseaFuel: Those worm-caterpillar things that crawl around Duriel's corpse after you kill him.
* NightmareFuel: The Lord of Terror at his finest.
** Though if you think about it, almost everything in this game is a nightmare fuel; this is a dark fantasy game after all.
* OvershadowedByAwesome: It's hard to make the ''Diablo II'' expansion climactic when the previous game ended with you effectively beating ''the Devil in Hell''.
* PlayerPunch: ''Diablo II'' packs a ContinuityNod [[PlayerPunch Player]] [[MegatonPunch Punch]]? If you've played the first game, you were attached to the town (as the game was 5% that town, 95% killing monsters underground) and some of the characters were close to your heart. In the second game, you teleport there to see the whole town burning and infested with monsters. That's the first punch. You see [[TheObiWan Deckard]] [[CoolOldGuy Cain]] in a cage, being tortured in every way. That's the second punch. Then... you see Griswold, the kindly [[UltimateBlacksmith blacksmith]] as an incredibly tough ZOMBIE, a mindless "boss" coming to get you. That right there is a very heavy punch. Just to be extra mean, there are mangled human corpses lying in the spots that every other one of the townspeople occupied in the first game, and you can even find Wirt's wooden leg (but then, [[TheScrappy nobody liked him much]]).
** To make it worse, Griswold is not entirely mindless. You can hear him say "kill me".
** The identity of Diablo's new host - one of the original player classes in the first game. You conquer 16 levels of dungeon to [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu punch that demon into submission]], [[BarrierMaiden reimprison it inside yourself]] by jamming the [[McGuffin Soulstone]] into your head... and the damn thing stays quiet for a few weeks before simply [[TheCorruption taking over your character's body]]. And the other two original classes? One was corrupted by Andariel and is the first real boss you face. The other was DrivenToMadness by Diablo himself and is fought later on in Act II.
*** In short, nearly everybody from the first game was either killed or corrupted by demons.
* PlayTheGameSkipTheStory: The ''Diablo'' franchise does in fact have a story, and there are the hardcore "lore-fans" who spend time debating of it, but most players ignore it completely. The franchise also has loads of [[AllThereInTheManual supplemental materials]]. Of course, as a result, Blizzard became GenreSavvy enough to know they can get away with ClicheStorm plots (and trailers) and only a few Tropers on this site will actually notice.
** On ''Diablo II'', multiplayer mode ''skips'' cutscenes (if you don't have them installed), which doesn't help.
* ScrappyMechanic: Some of the best equipment and rune words in ''[[VideoGame/{{Diablo}} Diablo II]]'' were restricted to players on the ladder, a harder version of the game on Battle.net with a finite amount of time to find the ladder-only items[[note]]Every 6 or so months, the ladder resets. All ladder characters from that season are permanently booted and lose the ability to find ladder-only items but get to keep whatever they found[[/note]]. Players who wanted a slower-paced game, preferred single-player, or didn't have reliable Internet access were out of luck. Have a sucky internet connection or just don't prefer online multiplayer? NO HIGH LEVEL EQUIPMENT FOR YOU!
* SequelDisplacement: ''Diablo II'' to the original ''Diablo''.
* ThatOneAttack:
** When you see the eponymous boss of ''Diablo II'' step back, ''run like hell'' because he's about to unleash [[http://www.infoceptor.net/strategy/diablo2/walkthrough/mission24/shot1.jpg a brutal stream of red lightning]] that can sap your health in seconds. This was nerfed in ''Lord of Destruction'', but it's still very damaging: it can still take most of your health in a single second, if not actually kill you. Diablo's ring of fire, his other attack, hits everything in every direction even when he's not on the screen, making it essentially unavoidable.
** There are various bugged monsters that can nearly instantly kill you. The hardest two are poison vipers, whose poison javelin is bugged and deals their regular attack damage 25 times per second on top of its poison damage; and gloams, who seem to deal 256 times their intended damage.
* ThatOneBoss:
** Formerly (and for some builds, still) Duriel due to some loading issues early in the games life that resulted in him killing you before the game loaded his lair. Even now you spawn right on top of him, and if you get close to him, you are slowed heavily (making melee next to impossible without prepping thawing potions, something otherwise unused). The arena is also the smallest of all the bosses, making HitAndRunTactics virtually impossible. Despite being only the mid-game boss, is probably among the most dangerous of them and easily the most frustrating. For some reason, the designers thought it would be great to pit the player against an enormously fast boss, with an aura that irresistably slows the player, in a bare room perhaps eight times his area. This in a game where hit-and-run is god; half the classes are explicitly designed for ranged combat only. Another relies on enemy mooks corpses to summon minions. On top of everything else, you can't escape the room to catch your breath, even though you enter the room through a big hole in the wall.
** Plaguewrath in the first game, a frustrating spitter boss. Basically he has a bunch of minions that all act the same way: they spit at nearly double, or even triple the speed of regular spitters, which means that often they'd drop a barrage of deadly spit that can drop you in seconds, before you can do anything. Add the fact that they don't have a melee attack, and unlike regular spitters, will actively run away from you if you try to get close, and you get one frustrating boss. Not to mention that the first time you'll encounter him, Plaguewrath himself takes forever to kill.
** The three Barbarian Ancients are pretty much the hardest encounter in the game, arguably topping Duriel, Baal, and even Diablo himself (who at least gave you ample room to hit and run). What made the Barbarian Ancients so damned difficult was that using Town Portal to escape would heal them back to full health, meaning yes, you had to kill them all in one go.
** The councilors in Act III on higher difficulty modes. They're just superuniques, but on higher difficulties they gain a lot of traits, and sometimes those traits work TOGETHER to create a new definition of pain. Can you imagine Conviction plus Might plus Cursed plus Extra Strong plus Lightning Enchanted plus Multi-Shot together?
** Lister the Tormentor is a nasty one. It takes forever to kill him, while all he does is [[ImplacableMan move toward you unphased]] and land in a nasty punch when close enough. You can't even run away because he follows you everywhere.
** The Infector of Souls in the Chaos Sanctuary and his twin brother, Ventar the Unholy in the Woldstone Keep. Big, strong, and [[LightningBruiser faster than you can ever hope to be]]. Their minions also share these traits, so you will end up cornered by half a dozen monstrous demons in the matter of seconds with nowhere to run, and beaten down in just a few seconds. Ventar is only made easier because of the nature of the area you fight him in. It's possible to separate his goons and kill them one by one. If you're lucky.
** Nihlathak (thankfully optional, unthankfully Randomly Drops the item needed to access the 1.11 patchs added bonus boss) in Act V thanks to his corpse explosion (already considered the best necromancer skill in the hands of players, it deals a percentage of a monsters hitpoints in damage by blowing up its corpse, only a handful of obscure items can prevent it) abilities. It does 70-120% of a dead monster's maximum life as damage; he also gets the ability to spawn Mooks to attack the player and double as corpse explosion fuel after they're dead. In later difficulties, 1 corpse explosion is more than enough to OneHitKO a character.
** The Lord de Seis is a mini-boss summoned before you fight Diablo. He is famous for his herd of ultra-powerful Boss In Mook Clothing minions and the aura he grants them flattening even powerful players.
** The Butcher in the first game, he's a huge jump in power above anything the player has met at that point, meaning he will take a massive damage before dying and [[WakeUpCallBoss can kill the player in seconds if they aren't prepared properly]].
* ThatOneLevel:
** Act 3 of ''Diablo II''. You have to slog through a jungle with switchbacks and dead ends populated by a) native pygmy men who either swarm and stab you or shoot you from afar with blowguns, which are led by shaman with the ability to revive the pygmys; b) enormous mosquitoes that drain your stamina and poison you; c) literal DemonicSpiders that are larger than you. This is on top of an act-long fetch quest which forces you to fully explore the jungle [[AbsurdlySpaciousSewer and the sewers]] of a nearby city looking for the unusually well-preserved remains (eye, brain, heart) of an old wizard.
*** The Flayer Jungle. Let's see... massive randomly generated maze-like area which you'll probably have to explore every bit of to find both objectives (one being required to beat the game) brings on the tediousness, and the Fetishes that the area is named after [[DemonicSpiders bring the pain like none other]]. And... just read the entry, remember that groups of these monsters are all you're going to be running into.
*** Even worse is the Flayer Dungeon. Claustrophobic, ugly, full of traps, poison, exploding Fetishes and giant sea monsters that you can't hit properly. Unfortunately, you need to complete it. There is also the Swampy Pit, a second Flayer Dungeon that is non-mandatory. No one ever goes down there. ''[[SelfImposedChallenge Ever]]''.
*** Then there's the Durance of Hate. It's not too bad in Normal difficulty but in Nightmare and Hell the level area is greatly increased into a huge sprawling maze of corridors, also inhabited by those exploding Fetish dolls.
** There's the Maggot Lair in Act 2. Three levels of narrow single file tunnels with glitchy unresponsive slime doors, players getting stuck all the time in the narrow passages, then throw in the those lightning enchanted scarabs that everybody loves for good measure. And when you meet the boss, it takes so long for the room to load up that by the time you do, everything in the room has killed you during the lag.
** The Arcane Sanctuary presents you with four paths at the start, only one of which leads to the Summoner and the portal to the Canyon of the Magi, meaning that most of it is unnecessary. This wouldn't be so bad except for the fact that it's a maze of bridges with lightning traps, Ghoul Lords that can cast powerful spells across the platforms, and ghosts that can fly over the space. The worst part is that this is mandatory to enter the Canyon of the Magi, and it's often difficult to get a group. to go in here.
** Although Arcane Sanctuary is part of most power-levelers setups, 2-15 in tristram then head to arcane sanctuary more or less.
** The Sorceress isn't the only option, either. A Barbarian with a few resistance-enhancing items and several points in Leap Attack can clear almost all of the gaps and maul the crap out of the spellcasters quickly.
* TheScrappy: Wirt in the first game. He insults you all the time, he forces you to pay just to look at his single item, then he charges you ridiculously huge amounts of gold to buy it and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking he stays far outside of town]].
** TakeThatScrappy: Blizzard acknowledge his scrappiness. You find his dead body in the sequel and when clicked, a fountain of gold pops out.
* TheyChangedItNowItSucks: The addition of color was a complaint when ''Diablo II'' was first announced (''Diablo'' really was nothing but [[RealIsBrown brown and grey and blue]]). Of course, no one remembers or even cares anymore.
** Amusingly, some players were confused about a rainbow in a screenshot of ''Diablo III'', even though there was a waterfall as well, so that rainbow was going to be there anyway. RealityIsUnrealistic.
* TrueNeutral: The Necromancers are a clan of magi dedicated to the principle of maintaining the BalanceBetweenGoodAndEvil. In practice, this usually means they fight on the side of good, only because evil seems to always have the upper hand.
* UnwinnableByInsanity: The first game has strong {{roguelike}} influences and can screw you over in numerous other ways.
** Black Death in particular take away 1 hit point permanently on striking (with no indication that this is the case) and can render the game unwinnable if you are playing very badly and get hit hundreds of times, leaving you with a tiny amount of health.
** Unless you're a mage who's using Mana Shield... at which point you get to use the ludicrously advantageous "No Stun" bug.
** When you die, the save function is disabled, but not ''immediately''. Yes, saving at this point makes the current game unwinnable. It requires timing by the milliseconds, though. A frame too late and the game disables the save function. The easiest way is probably to get a +HP item and then get yourself down to health lower than said item provides you. When you remove the item, you die. If you click and press ESC almost exactly at the same moment, you get to save without having that item on you. No, there is no time to put it back on.
** It's possible to make the game unwinnable by abusing the Chamber of Bone entrance in a hilariously stupid way. You need to teleport there before you use the book to open it (either with a scroll of teleport or using a scroll of town portal then going there from town) and leave yourself stuck in a sealed room. Yes, you need to be completely stupid to do this unless you're doing it intentionally for the lulz.
* WhatAnIdiot: In the original game, the Lone Wanderer, upon defeating the title Lord of Terror, sees him revert back to a regular man with a weird-looking stone in his head, a stone that is quite obviously a soulstone of sorts for the thing he's just taken out.\\
'''You'd Expect:''' The Lone Wanderer would put two and two together and destroy the stone so Diablo cannot rise in this world again.\\
'''Instead:''' The Lone Wanderer decides to jam the damned thing into his own head in an attempt to contain Diablo's evil within his own body. This leads to him being taken over by Diablo by the time the second game rolls around, and things just get worse from there. Though, in his defense, shattering it ''would'' have probably just made the problem worse.
* TheWoobie: Marius. Unlike the protagonists, he's just a poor shmuck with no power dragged into the whole mess, scared out of his mind by all the death and destruction happening around him. The only time he tries to do something, he actually makes things worse. In the end, he dies [[spoiler:in an asylum, at the hand of Baal, begging for his pathetic life]].
* {{Woobie Species}}: Ultimately humanity, formerly known as the Nephalem. Offspring of renegade angels and demons, the Nephalem were more powerful that either angels or demons combined. Unfortunately it was this reason, as well as the retribution that would come if the High Heavens and Burning Hells discovered this blasphemous co-mingling, that prompted the renegades (including the top angel Inarius, who would have been the father of the Nephalem) to call for their extinction. When the demon Lilith came to their aid and slaughtered the renegades, Inarius took his former lover and banished her to the void. Then he attuned the Worldstone (the main setting of the series) and proceeded to leech away his progeny's power until they became weaker and weaker through each generation, eventually becoming mortal humans. And of course it doesn't end there. When Lilith finally makes it back from the void, she tricks a human by framing him for the murder of two emissaries working for the Cathedral of Light and the Triune (both of whom were secretly led by the Prime Evils and Inarius to lure humanity to their side) and then, while disguised encouraged him to gather an army of Nephalem to fight the injustice of their oppression. When the ruse is revealed, she sends her human pawn near the {{Despair Event Horizon}}, and tries to use the nephalem army to crush all opposition. If you take this in another perspective, Lilith, the lone demon responsible for saving the nephalem from extinction, is now using them as puppets for the sake of gaining power. And to put even more blocks of salt into the wound, when the angels discovered Nephalem and their world, they made a vote on whether or not to eliminate all mankind. Only one angel saved them from extinction, and he would be responsible for giving power back to the human heroes leading to them ending the Great Conflict and saving Heaven and the mortal realm from destruction.
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