* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Every myth comes in at least two or three variants DependingOnTheWriter, and that is just the ones handed down to the present! Of note are:
** One of [[WarGod Ares]]' [[http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Ares.html#Hymns Hymns]] described him as kind of a [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Proud Warrior Guy]] while the other described him as more of the BloodKnight that people are more familiar with.
** Either Persephone was tricked into eating pomegranate seeds so that she'd have to split her time, she chose to eat them so she could stay with Hades and just claimed she was tricked in order to get MyBelovedSmother off her back, or she ''never'' claimed to have been tricked and instead refused to eat them until Hades gave her the power she needed/wanted in their marriage. Some versions of the story indicate that Persephone was equally attracted to Hades [[PowerIsSexy for his power]] and knew what she was doing when she plucked the flower that brought on her abduction and ''specially'' when she ate the seeds (because she perfectly knew what eating them meant, [[PlayingBothSides and wanted to split her time to get benefits from both her husband and her mom]]). Others state that the "abduction" was just the final part of a BatmanGambit from ''both'' Hades and Persephone so they would be able to get married without interference (since Zeus had meddled in their previous meetings).
** Website/{{Tumblr}} has a [[http://allieinarden.tumblr.com/post/121267473649/ive-noticed-this-revisionist-greek-myth-is-common theory]] regarding Aphrodite and Hephaestus.
** Hades and Pluton, despite being different names for the same god[[note]]Pluton (Wealthy One) was a euphemism for Hades (Unseen One), as the Greeks really didn't like calling him by name.[[/note]] were seen ''very'' differently. Where Hades was the guy who made sure all deaths were final, Pluton was known for providing material wealth, as well as seeds (which are both found in the earth). Thus, Pluton was far more popular with the Greeks than Hades could ever hope to be.
** Plato thinks Orpheus is a coward who mocked the gods by trying to go to Hades and get his lover back alive, instead of choosing to die in order to be with the one he loved.
** Loads and loads for Odysseus. Is he one of the most cunning and admirable heroes because he was faithful to his men, loyal towards his wife (relatively) and ultimately [[WarIsHell hated warfare]], and was a GuileHero on top of it? Or is he a slimy, low-life coward for ''exactly those same traits,'' making him a womanly wimp who would never win in a square fight?
** Some believe Achilles and Patroclus to have been not just best friends but lovers, which may add another dimension to Achilles' behavior after Patroclus' death. Since nearly EveryoneIsBi it is very much likely to have been the case. And before you start to assume this is a modern interpretation of the story cooked up by Yaoi fans, this way of looking at the story is so old, even Plato commented on how probable this was. Maybe Plato was into Yaoi.
** Athena's punishment of Medusa in Ovid's version of her myth. For some, she turned her to a monster to exact revenge on all men. (Which is egregious since she's a DaddysGirl compared with other daughters of Zeus). For others, she simply did it because she couldn't punish Poseidon for desecrating her temple, so she went for the nearest target instead.
** The idea that Medusa was transformed at all is an example. She and her sisters were originally the daughters of Phorcys and Ceto (children of Pontus and Gaia) and were already monstrous. It wasn't until the fifth century that artists began portraying them as beautiful and it wasn't until Ovid about three hundred some odd years later that they became maidens who were transformed by the gods.
** That said, in Ovid's ACI, were Medusa and Poseidon lovers or did Poseidon rape her?
** Medusa's sisters, Stheno and Euryale get ''tons'' of this (when people remember them, anyway), primarily because very little is written about them. Who were they? Where did they go after their sister was vanquished? In the Roman transformation version, what did ''they'' do to elicit Athena's wrath? [[GuiltByAssociation Did they do anything at all?]]
** Hera in general. She's usually seen as an unbelievably cruel and vengeful goddess, and her role as the protector of women, marriage, and families is almost always forgotten. However, according to a Watsonian perspective, all of the tales of mythology are supposedly inspired by the Muses, who are illegitimate daughters of Zeus -- ''of course'' they're going to paint Hera in a negative light. And as the story of Jason and the Argonauts can attest, when Hera picks a mortal champion to favor, she helps them loyally and with all the power at her disposal ''as long as they honor her back''. When Jason ''didn't'' and abandoned Medea (who had sacrificed everything for him already), Hera was really fucking angry AND the other Gods backed ''her'' up.
** The story of Arachne has multiple endings, each of which paints Athena in a different light. In some Arachne lost and committed suicide, causing Athena to make her a spider in respect (making Athena look gentle and loving), or Athena turned her into a spider just for losing (making her look proud and unforgiving). Or in some versions ''Athena'' was the one who lost the contest and killed Arachne in a rage over it, making her a spider afterward as a way of apologizing (which makes Athena look spiteful and HotBlooded, prone to throw fits and then [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone regret her reckless actions]]). Or a combination such as Arachne winning and Athena destroying her work out of spite, leading to Arachne killing herself and Athena turning her into a spider out of regret (Making Athena still a spiteful jerk but [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold less so then other interpretations.]])
** The myth of how Cassandra receives her curse has many different version, all of which paints Apollo in different light: She either cheats on him, takes his gift of prophecy during his advance on her and then blew him off (both of which makes his curse excessive but understandable), or she left her service as his priestess after receiving the gift of prophecy (which paints him as petty).
** Hope in Pandora's Box myth could mean either of two things: That it is a force of good that will be released later to help fix everything that has gone wrong, or that it is the worst of all evils and Pandora has done good by sealing it. How can it be evil? Well there's the hope that helps you get back up... and the hope where you tell yourself someone else will come along to fix your problems for you, which the Greeks saw as the worst reaction possible.
** Why is Aphrodite attracted to Ares? Some say it's a simple case of AllGirlsWantBadBoys, but other people have a more generous interpretation. They argue that Aphrodite likes Ares due to him being (in their view) the most pro-woman of the male Olympians, something that a Goddess of Love would definitely appreciate.
* CompleteMonster: [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Greco-Roman myth]] is replete with examples of mortals who tried to outsmart the gods and paid for it. Yet none of them found as disgusting a method, or deserved their resultant punishment, as these people did:
** Tantalus, a Greek king who was a favourite guest and host of Zeus', proved that familiarity breeds contempt. Deciding that the gods were fools rather then omniscient beings, Tantalus set out to show that they could not even tell what they were being served for dinner, let alone comprehend the secrets of the cosmos. Murdering his [[OffingTheOffspring own son, Pelops]], Tantalus had him boiled, and served to the gods as the [[IAteWhat main course at dinner]]. By tricking the Olympians into eating their host's child, he sought to demonstrate that the gods were utter imbeciles. Instead, he proved that he was a relentlessly vile person and that even [[JerkassGods Olympian gods]] [[EvenEvilHasStandards have standards]]. When his ploy was uncovered, Zeus both [[PetTheDog resurrected Pelops]] and trapped Tantalus in an IronicHell, cementing cannibalism, the slaying of one's own children, and the mistreatment of guests[[note]]see ''xenia'', the Ancient Greek code on how to treat guests[[/note]] as major taboos in Greek culture.
** Following in Tantalus' bad, bad example is Lycaon, tyrant of Arcadia, and the [[FirstOfItsKind first werewolf]]. Appearing in several compendiums of myth from the time period, the most infamous version of Lycaon's story appears in Ovid's ''Metamorphoses''. A cruel, bloodthirsty ruler, Lycaon was angered when his citizens celebrated Jove's (Zeus) visit to his city. Determined to prove that Jove was not really a god, and was therefore unworthy of their worship, Lycaon offered Jove a room for the night, plotting to murder him in his sleep. He also, like Tantalus before him, sought to test Jove's divinity, by [[IAteWhat serving the god human flesh at dinner]]. Butchering a hostage[[note]]in some earlier versions of the story, it is his own son or infant grandson[[/note]], Lycaon roasted his flesh, [[ImAHumanitarian ate some of it himself]], and placed it on the table before Jove, who reacted in outrage and disgust, [[BalefulPolymorph cursing him with lycanthropy]]. Watching the newly lupine tyrant slaughter a herd of sheep, Jove noted that Lycaon's nature had not changed; it was simply that he was now as savage on the outside as he had always been on the inside.
* CounterpartComparison: There are plenty of people that mistake Hades as the God of ''Death'' instead of ''the Dead'' (Death was Thanatos' and the Keres' position).
* DarknessInducedAudienceApathy: Can be this for modern audience. Since many heroes have [[DesignatedHero questionable behavior]] and very few of them get a happy ending.
* DesignatedHero: Whether you were a hero in Greek myth was not dependent on how {{Jerkass}} you were, how many [[MoralEventHorizon babies you killed]], or whatever.
* EnsembleDarkhorse:
** Among modern fans of Greek myths, Hades is generally accepted as one of the nicer gods of the pantheon.
** Endovelicus is the only Lusitanian god still remembered by the Portuguese people, and also very popular as a recipient of worship in the Western Roman Empire.
** Hephaestus is considered one of the major [[TheWoobie Woobies]] of the Pantheon due to his shoddy treatment for being lame and "ugly" despite being one of the most intelligent and useful residents of Olympus, especially by his own wife.
** Prometheus has become a positive symbol of progress, ingenuity, determination, and human resourcefulness. It helps that he's usually considered responsible for humanity's creation and is one of the kindest deities. This is a big step up for a somewhat-controversial minor deity with few cults or rituals associated with him.
** Psyche. Her love story with Cupid is only a fifth of the original novel's length but is the best remembered portion and has been depicted in many work while inspired tons of romance story, most notably Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast. The fact that they are one of the few HappilyMarried couples doesn't hurt.
** Diomedes for being badass enough to wound two Olympian gods during one of the battles at Troy.
* EvilIsSexy: Echidna and the Sirens. Granted they were also half-snake and half-bird respectively. Eris could also qualify.
* FandomRivalry: Different Greek city-states (poleis) chose different gods as especially important and different heroes to claim as their own. Also, every city had to have at least one mythical founder, preferably a demigod or god, whose name frequently tied in with the city's name. This of course led to quite a few conflicting myths which basically showed that "our town's deity or our local hero can beat their deity or hero" or "this great hero really is our local boy, not theirs". For instance, Thebes and Argos quarreled over Herakles; unfortunately we only know the Theban version (partly because the Thebans were on better terms with the Athenians), but quite possibly the villainous role played by Hera is due to the fact that the Argeians were great worshipers of Hera.
* FridgeHorror: The story of King Midas plays on this trope: "OK, yippee, everything you touch turns to gold. Now go try to eat your dinner. Or hug your daughter."
* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: Ares doesn't get much respect for his savage nature. As Mars, the Romans thought he was hardcore, with his barbaric side toned down via HistoricalHeroUpgrade. Though that may be a little bit of CrazyPrepared. A city at war as often as Rome might prefer to have his favor after all. And after all one could argue that [[TheEmpire Mars was grateful]] to Rome.
** For that matter, even the Spartans worshiped Athena more than Ares, despite the former being the patron goddess of their main rival. Archaeological evidence of Sparta shows that there are three times as many temples dedicated to Athena compared to Ares.
** Unsurprisingly, Athens takes great pride in proclaiming Athena to be the patron goddess. The vast majority of Greek myth we have comes from the Athenians, and they saw themselves as the embodiment of her (goddess of--[[ComboPlatterPowers among other things]]--defensive/just war and strategy).
* HilariousInHindsight: The Amazons. In the myths, they were just about the only civilization at the time where women oppressed men instead of the other way around. What part of the world do you think they lived in? [[RussianReversal Ukraine and Russia]] (according to [[Literature/TheHistories Herodotus]], that is).
** Eros and Psyche. The God of Love falls in love with and marries a girl who later goes on to become the Goddess of the Soul. You could say that they are ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8CSjDC18b0 Heart and Soul]]''.
* HoYay: Quite a lot going on here. [[ValuesDissonance The Greeks had different ideas on homosexuality than modern cultures do]]. Just to name a few famous duos, Achilles and Patroclus, Apollo and Hyacinth(us), Heracles and Hylas, Zeus and Ganymede. The list really goes on.
** On the ladies' side, we have this...interesting mention of Athena and Artemis during the story of Persephone's kidnapping:
-->''...Pallas [Athene], on that side hand in hand with her beloved Diana [Artemis]...''
*** However, this may simply be reference to the dance of Persephone from a Roman version of her story, mentioning how she danced from god-to-god during her flower picking activities. Indeed, the Rape of Persephone is the only clear reference to a friendship between the three goddesses, in an older time where they may have been more childlike. The complete quote is as follows.
--->''"Proserpine [Persephone] in spring-time led the dance over Hymettus’ flowery ridges or beneath the cliffs of Sicily, on this side stepping close by Pallas [Athene], on that side hand in hand with her beloved Diana [Artemis], taller than they and surpassing her fellows, ere, she grew pale at the sight of Avernus [Haides] and all her beauty fled.''
* MagnificentBastard: Odysseus. His possible father, Sisyphus as well.
** The Romans were ambivalent about him because on one hand he was responsible for the fall of Troy and they claimed to be descended from the Trojans; on the other hand they also believed they were descended from Ulysses through his grandsons Latinus (son of Telemachus and Circe) and Italus (son of Telegonos and Penelope).
* MemeticBadass: Every Greek hero either became this or sought to become this. ''Who'' would win [[UltimateShowdownOfUltimateDestiny in a fight between Achilles and Leonidas]], again?
** Hercules ([[SpellMyNameWithAnS shut it]]) stands above them all, being probably the most widely recognized of all the Greek heroes. Having once wrestled death itself into submission and holding up the sky itself, his name has entered into the English language as "Herculean", a feat of extraordinary strength.
* MemeticMolester: ''Zeus''. There's a reason he's the page image for DoubleStandardRapeDivineOnMortal. Notably, though, most depictions of him leave out such things as Ganymede...even if [[VideoGame/GodOfWar those works]] which depict him without his [[DepravedBisexual bisexuality]] will [[DoubleStandard happily show]] [[GirlOnGirlIsHot female-on-female action.]]
** May have something to do with Ganymede being underage.
* {{Misblamed}}: Some stories depict that Aphrodite took her wrath to anyone who was claimed to be [[TheWorfEffect more beautiful than her]], and even said that she was the one who turned Medusa into a Gorgon because she's more beautiful than Aphrodite, or she was the one Cassiopeia boasted Andromeda on in terms of beauty, causing her to request Poseidon to demand Andromeda's sacrifice. The more believed versions was that Aphrodite has no business within these territories, she only did those jealousy things on Psyche; Medusa either became a gorgon because Poseidon raped her in Athena's temple which incited Athena's wrath or was a monster from the very beginning, whereas Cassiopeia boasted that Andromeda was more beautiful than ''the Nereids'', beautiful creatures of the sea, which was taken as an insult by ''Poseidon''. There were also several women considered most beautiful/on equal/better than Aphrodite, and she didn't go on a jealous rage: Helen of Troy (in which she even approves and uses to persuade Paris in the Trojan War) and Heracles' mother Alcmene.
* MoralEventHorizon:
** [[{{Pride}} Hubris]]. That was the cardinal sin; you could do just about anything else (yes, even rape and murder with a good enough excuse) and [[SociopathicHero come out a hero]], but putting yourself above your place (as compared to the gods) was a big no-no.
** The big three were Hubris (See above), [[FlatEarthAtheist impiety]], and violation of [[SacredHospitality xenias]]. Hubris and xenias were often a part of impiety; people indulging in hubris often didn't limit themselves and [[BlasphemousBoast ridicule the gods]], [[BullyingADragon which tended to get negative attention]]. And xenias was the domain '''of Zeus himself''', making repeated, willful violations of hospitality as good as direct affronts to the authority of the Lord of Olympus. Honoring xenias honored Zeus, trampling the tenants of hospitality was an insult to him.
** Cronus eating his newborn children one by one as each were born, becoming the same as his prejudiced father, Uranus, but arguably worse.
* OneTruePairing:
** To modern audiences anyway, Hades/Persephone is this. It helps that they had probably the most comparatively happy romance out of the Olympians and that Hades was probably the most loving and ''faithful'' husband among the Gods.
** Cupid/Psyche is also very popular to the point that it inspires a very popular fairytale: Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast.
* ScienceMarchesOn: Zeus was described as giving birth to Athena "by himself" because many Greeks believed that women didn't contribute to child development beyond holding the man's seed. Thus Metis proved Zeus's body was just as good after he ate her, passing on the whole embryo development process to him and using the time to forge Athena's armor, her pounding causing headaches that eventually led to his head being split open. To a modern audience, though, nothing is really proved because we know sperm needs to meet an egg.
** This is also the logic that leads to him taking Dionysus into his hip, further "proving" the father of the gods can do everything the mother can.
*** Let's also take into account we are discussing a man who throws lightning and a couple who can both shape-shift.
* TheScrappy: The Romans were both much more fond of Ares (as his local {{Expy}}) than the Greeks were (the Greeks tended to favor the strategic war goddess Athena over Ares). On the ''other'' other hand, modern media seems to be learning enough from SadlyMythtaken portrayals to have Ares as the GodOfEvil rather than [[DarkIsNotEvil Hades]]. Properly speaking, if you're looking for a Greek god of evil you won't find one: however; there are Kakia (vice), Hubris (see above), Dyssebia (impiety), Dysnomia (anarchy or political corruption, the correct interpretation is not known), Koros (greed and a rare male example of good or evil), Ate (foolishness) and others.
** To the ancient Greeks themselves, Hades was TheScrappy. Thanks to ValuesDissonance, however, he's ([[EverybodyHatesHades usually]]) the nicest Greek God nowadays. Hell, even one of his SadlyMythtaken [[Disney/{{Hercules}} portrayals]] is an EnsembleDarkhorse!
* SignatureScene: If there's any entry into the Greek myths that just about everyone knows about, it's of Persephone and Hades.
* {{Squick}}: Best example: How [[OedipusComplex Kronos castrated his father Uranos]]. Think about it (if you dare): At first, Uranos made sure that Gaia's children never were born, by constantly raping her, so their way out was...blocked. So Gaia gave unborn Kronos a weapon, and Kronos did the deed while Uranos was doing the other deed.
** Poseidon's various escapades in stallion guise with the mares of Greece, fathering many of the supernatural horses populating the mythic world (Including Pegasus in Ovid's myths, via his rape of Medusa, although he was probably in human form this time). Of course, once again he's got nothing on his younger brother Zeus.
* UnintentionallySympathetic: The ancient Greeks never intended for Ares, Hades, or Hephaestus to be sympathetic - they never even really liked them. Although it was more [[AxCrazy justifiable]] in Ares' case, Hades was hated by the Greeks because [[EnemiesWithDeath they feared death]], and Hephaestus was loathed because he was an ugly cripple. To modern audiences, however, Hades and Hephaestus are often viewed as [[NiceGuy the nicest]] of the Greek Gods, while the gods the Greeks adored, such as Zeus and Hera, often come across as JerkassGods at best or [[GodIsEvil tyrants at worst]]. Ares, on the other hand, was adored by the militaristic Romans (and possibly Spartans, though archaeological evidence show rather few temples devoted to him in Sparta) conflated him with Mars - he got a [[HistoricalHeroUpgrade Mythological Hero Upgrade]]. Certainly the fact that classical mythology attributing Ares (who the Romans associate with Mars) as helping found Rome had a lot to do with it.
* ValuesDissonance: Well, what do you expect from stories that are over two millennia old?
** The cause of Achilles's sulk was a much bigger deal in his milieu. Some would notice that Achilles' sulk is also an example of a lack of a soldierly sense of duty to his comrades.
** Also, the way nearly everybody treated women, the way kings sometimes treated their subjects, and the way hospitality was taken so extremely seriously. Now it's kinda... silly, in comparison.
** There's a story where one of Hera's faithful priestesses has trouble getting to the temple to fulfil her duties so the priestess' sons take the place of the horses and take her there. Touched by their piety and duty, the priestess asks Hera to grant the greatest boon to her sons that a mortal can have. Hera kills them in their sleep. We are supposed to focused on how they died without pain and getting sick and weak (they were young men at the peak of their health), but readers likely forget this in the fact that they, well, ''died''.
** Hades' kidnapping of Persephone, as mentioned earlier, [[http://herskyofdiamonds.tumblr.com/post/77535721358/lillian-raven-hungrylikethewolfie was considered a Greek wedding.]] By today's standards, it would be kidnapping, but an appropriate modern interpretation of the events would be [[http://kata-chthonia.com/post/69903384941/yes-im-officially-creeping-on-you-i-just Hades and Persephone]] falling in love, reaching an agreement, eloping behind Demeter's back to dodge her ParentalMarriageVeto ''and'' Zeus' meddling and THEN dealing with the aftermath, and not to mention they're [[HappilyMarried most stable couple in the Pantheon]]. And that's not even getting into whether one prefers Persephone as the sweet little innocent who gets kidnapped and perpetually victimised, or the [[{{MyBelovedSmother}} smothered]] teen who intentionally seduced Hades to get free and snag some agency for herself, [[TakeAThirdOption (Or maybe both)]].
*** This is an issue that appears frequently, since the ancient Greeks didn't really differentiate between what we'd consider rape or abduction and the seduction of a woman by a man other than her husband. Hence, for example, why it's often unclear if Helen of Troy consented to leaving with Paris or not.
*** Demeter's treatment of Persephone is a more mild example; the fact that she kept trying to protect her whether Persephone wanted it or not and starved the world for months when Persephone went missing was treated as a ''good'' thing because it showed her as a devoted mother. By today's standards, this is seen as [[MyBelovedSmother exceedingly extreme]].
*** Hell, ''everything'' about Hades qualifies. Even though he was one of the only two gods who could be remotely considered decent people by modern morals (the other being Hephaestus - and he was hated by the Greeks simply because he was [[TheGrotesque ugly]]), the Greeks hated him even more than [[EverybodyHatesHades Hollywood]] does! Why? Because, well...he was the God of the Dead, and nobody wants to die. They'd [[HeWhoMustNotBeNamed avoid saying his name]] and look away when making sacrifices - temples to Hades weren't even named because venerating death was seen as a bad thing.
* ViewerGenderConfusion: The Chimera is supposed to be female, but since she has the mane of a male lion, you'd be forgiven if you thought she was male.
* WhatAnIdiot:
** The very concept of {{Hubris}}.
** There were occasions where, given the circumstances, mortals did things so thoroughly stupid and/or pig-headed that the gods' typical DisproportionateRetribution was hard to bat an eye at. For example, the crew of the Odyssey (save Odysseus himself) perished under Poseidon's wrath after killing and eating the sacred cattle of Helios. ''Which the blind seer Tiresias had specifically warned them not to do''. On top of that, '''''they had already made Poseidon mad beforehand'''''.
*** This one is actually somewhat excusable, compared to other moments of idiocy in Classical Myth. Odysseus' crew was ''stranded'' on Helios' island, was rapidly running out of food, and had little else to eat besides the cattle. Considering that gods actually control the winds, and you've got a nice recipe for YouCantFightFate - it's not too unbelievable to imagine that Poseidon or someone dropped the wind-gods a line to trap Odysseus' crew between a rock and a hard place.
** Also, Theseus and Pirithous' plan to abduct Persephone from the Underworld was widely recognized as absolutely hare-brained. Hades got pissed, tied them both up in chains of forgetfulness, and only agreed to let Theseus go when Hercules arrived to rescue them.
** Laomedon, Priam's father and a king of Troy, had Apollo and Poseidon working for him as part of their punishment for ticking off Zeus in some way. So he had Apollo watch his herds and Poseidon build a wall. And then he tried to welsh on paying them. Apollo sent a plague that killed thousands of people, and Poseidon sent a sea monster to eat one of Laomedon's daughters, but Laomedon managed to talk Heracles into killing the beast. And then tried to welsh on paying ''him.'' So Heracles and his comrades sacked Troy.
** Arachne. Did she ''honestly'' think that she could get away with claiming to be better than Athena [[TextileworkIsFeminine at weaving]]? Even more so if we consider that in at least one version, ''Athena herself'' told Arachne to not be arrogant an warned her about her own damnation.
** As well as all those mortals, Cronus, leader of the Titans, counts too. After defeating Uranus to free the Cyclopes and Hecatonchires, you'd think he would try to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong. Instead, he goes and ''[[FullCircleRevolution reimprisons them with no well-recorded reason]]'', pissing off Gaia all over again and inciting her to raise Zeus to overthrow Cronus.
* TheWoobie:
** Both Hades and Hephaestus, by modern standards. One is the lonely (until he got his wife), overworked, [[EverybodyHatesHades generally disliked and often-misunderstood]] god of the Underworld. The other is the equally-disliked, equally-overworked, crippled, undeniably brilliant smith-god with a hot wife who's screwing everyone ''but'' him.
** Io got a crappy deal too. After being desired by Zeus, she had to be turned into a cow to hide from Hera's wrath. And Hera still found her and had her tethered and guarded by the hundred-eyed watchman Argus. And even after Hermes beheaded Argus and saved Io, Hera sent a gadfly to chase her out of Greece and into Egypt. Only then did Io find peace as a priestess of Isis.
** In Ovid's Metamorphoses, the sisters Medusa, Euryale and Stheno got turned into Gorgons after Medusa was raped (in some versions of the myth, in others it was consensual) by Poseidon in Athena's temple - and of course we all know Medusa's final fate at the hands of Perseus, ''with Athena's help''.
** There is no version of Tiresias that was not put upon by the world. Once a priest of Zeus, he's said to have been turned to a woman for interrupting snakes mating. S/he then spent several years as either a priestess of Hera, a prostitute, or both. S/he is later turned back to a male by leaving another set of snakes alone, but this gets the attentions of an arguing Zeus and Hera. They're having an argument about who enjoys sex more: Zeus says women get more pleasure out of it, and Hera says the man gets more pleasure. They ask Tiresias (who clearly has experience on both ends), and he lets out the secret that a woman's climax is ten times better than a man's climax. Hera gets upset and strikes him blind; Zeus can't undo the blindness, instead giving him prophesy to make up for it. Which makes Tiresias miserable, because peoples like Oedipus waste his time by demanding his help and then ignoring his advice.
*** Then there's the one where he was struck blind by stumbling across Athena in the bath. By accident. Athena also cannot undo said blindness and is sincerely sorry for her mistake... but then she gives him prophesy too, and you know what followed.
** Nerites; there is no version of him that ''doesn't'' get [[{{Metamorphosis}} permanently transformed into a shellfish]] for extremely petty (by today's standards) reasons. To make matters worse, in one of them, he was the first person Poseidon truly loved.
** The original cyclopes. Their father locked them in Tartarus since birth. Their older brother Cronus doesn't bother to free them after his rebellion. When Zeus frees them, they return his favor by forging weapons for the gods and finally live peacefully working as Hephaestus's helpers. That's until Zeus kills Asclepius and a vengeful Apollo doesn't have the guts to turn against his father, so he kills the group of cyclopes who forged Zeus's lightning bolt instead. Though there are versions that have both them and Asclepius [[UnexplainedRecovery get better]].
** Cassandra. There's literally nothing that ever seems to go right for this girl, making her perhaps one of the biggest woobies in Classical Mythology on a whole. First: either [[JerkassGods Apollo tries to rape her]], she commits the "sin" of blowing his affections off, she [[YourCheatingHeart cheats on him]], ''or'' she leaves her work as a priestess of his temple in Troy without counting on how [[BerserkButton that would piss the Hell outta him]]. Then, he curses her so that none of her visions of the future are ever believed. Then the Trojan War happens and her brother Hector dies. Then she [[SanitySlippage starts to lose it]]. Then she tries to hide in Athena's temple only to be kidnapped and [[RapeAsDrama violently raped]] by Ajax the Lesser, while her entire family is either killed or enslaved. Then, she ends up as King Agamemnon's concubine. And finally, Agamemnon's cheating wife Clytemnestra ''kills'' her. And if the ''Agamemnon'' play is to be believed, she ''clearly'' knew shit was about to go down [[DespairEventHorizon but was resigned already to her and Agamemnon's bloody fate]], not attempting to run away even when the local elders expressed sympathy for her.
** JerkassWoobie: Hera's not nice by a long shot, but her husband continually cheats on her- [[{{Irony}} the goddess of marriage]]- even though he knows it will make her mad. And she [[KarmaHoudini can't punish him]] because he's stronger than her, so she has to settle for [[RevengeByProxy hurting his lovers and children]].
** Oedipus. Big Time. He accidentally kills his own father [[YouCantFightFate while traveling in order to avoid this fate]], [[ParentalIncest marries his mother]] and have four children with her, then blinded himself after finding the truth. It doesn't end there. His two sons exile him and he dies wandering with his daughter, who's also his half-sister.
** A case could be made for Actaeon too: he accidentally sees Artemis bathing and gets [[BalefulPolymorph turned into a stag]] only to be [[CruelAndUnusualDeath torn apart by his own hounds.]] And, in Ovid's Metamorphoses at least, it's implied ''that's what she wanted to happen'' (" They say Diana the Quiver-bearer’s anger was not appeased, until his life had ended in innumerable wounds.") [[DisproportionateRetribution All because he accidentally walked in on her bathing.]]
** Dionysus' early story reads like a TraumaCongaLine. His mother was burnt to death while still pregnant with him because his mother was tricked by Hera to ask Zeus to show himself in his true godly form, so Zeus had to sew fetus Dionysus into his thigh. After the baby was ready to be born, Zeus gave him to Hermes to take to the relatives of the dead mother, who dressed him up as a girl to hide his presence from Hera. They succeeded... for three years. Then Hera drove them insane, made them kill their own children and themselves, and the only reason why Dionysus survived was because Zeus turned him into a goat. The toddler gets shipped off to Mount Nysa, where he is raised by satyrs and nymphs and lives the good life, having friends, till one of them dies trying to get him a new strange plant, which Dionysus makes bear fruit in penance, creating the first grapes and then wine. He starts to get a following and then the first time he and his entourage offer the king of a city their help, said king kills several of the satyrs, Dionysus' SECOND stepmom, and almost Dionysus himself too, but he gets away into the sea where he stays with Thetys for a while to regroup.
** Hyacinth. A young prince who enters a loving relationship with Apollo over Zephyrus, the West Wind. And what does he got for his trouble? A brutal death by a discus to the head either by wanting to impress Apollo or because Zephyrus got jealous. Atleast he got a flower named after his honor.
** IronWoobie: Psyche. No matter how much crap life (and Aphrodite) throws at her, she never gives up on her love for Eros. It's easy to see why the latter disobeys his own mother to forgive and save her from the deep sleep from Persephone.
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