* AccidentalInnuendo: While it's less prevalent than it is in the movie (see below) the book still manages it at least once:
-->''Oh, the joy of being able to cram large pieces of something sweet and solid into one's mouth!''
** In one of Dahl's writings for Playboy, "schnozzberry" was used as a euphemism for "penis."
* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Mister Wonka is either a {{g|adgeteerGenius}}enius or a [[PsychopathicManchild monster.]] [[MadScientist Or a combination thereof.]]
** Charlie is merely a patsy, intended to inherit the responsibility for the multiple acts of child abuse, unsafe working conditions and slave labour, committed in Wonka's factory.
** Is it possible that Wonka is an example of {{Asexuality}}? His devotion to a field of work most would consider only a hobby and the fact he didn't get married and chose to find an heir rather than have children suggests he might be a CelibateEccentricGenius.
** Perhaps Wonka's real thinking behind the bratty children meeting their various fates is that they serve as a RadishCure of sorts, or alternatively a way to ScareEmStraight; they all are taken out of the running when they go to steal or use something that clearly isn't safe but they still want. In adaptations, Wonka seems decidedly unconcerned with rescuing or stopping the kids, so...
** As Willy Wonka is an InterpretativeCharacter, every major adaptation takes him in a different direction. The 1971 film portrays him as a traditional TricksterMentor, while the 2005 film presents him as a [[AmbiguousDisorder stra]][[NoSocialSkills nge]] man who refuses to grow up -- which serves as a foil to Charlie, who really is acting a little too mature for his age when he should be enjoying his childhood. For a third option, the 2013 musical presents him as a SugarAndIcePersonality AntiHero. Each of these provides fodder for unique Alternate Character Interpretations.
* AngstWhatAngst: The Golden Ticket tour group learns how dangerous Wonka's Factory can be -- not to mention how nonchalant their guide is -- when Augustus Gloop winds up sent to who-knows-where via the pipes, but it doesn't dampen their enthusiasm for the rest of the tour, even as further members are eliminated in similarly absurd disasters. No matter what they witness, no one ever asks to ''leave'' if they aren't directly affected by events, and the AudienceSurrogate is having the time of his life. Granted, the disasters are all played for BlackComedy and the victims are all repulsive brats and coddling parents. The [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage adaptation]] plays with this trope a little, again for laughs -- even though the party is horrified by what happens to Augustus (and in this version [[DeathByAdaptation it's suggested he might not survive]]), when the impatient Mr. Wonka asks them "Anybody want to go ''home''?" not one answers in the affirmative! As the party further dwindles, though, anxiety creeps into the wonder of those still standing...
* {{Anvilicious}}: The fates of the bratty kids. LampshadeHanging in the 2013 musical gently tweaks this: "True, we lost a few children along the way...but we all ''learned something'' and that's the important thing!" according to Wonka.
* CrazyAwesome: Who else but Willy Wonka?
* EscapistCharacter
** Charlie Bucket is poor but virtuous and has as warm and loving a family as one could wish for. They suffer quite a bit early on, but he not only gets the rare chance to visit the factory he's always wondered plus a lifetime supply of sweets, but winds up becoming heir to the place. Life as Willy Wonka's guest (and, in the sequel, sidekick) is sometimes terrifying, but so long as you follow the rules, it's never boring.
** Willy Wonka himself: A RenaissanceMan extraordinaire, possessed of remarkable wit and intelligence, he doesn't just ''live'' in TheWonderland but '''created it'''. Moreover, while the real world can a harsh place for the good and too-comfortable for the bad, in his world, be it by chance or plotting, LaserGuidedKarma prevails. For anyone dispirited by just how unfair the world can be, this is a deeply satisfying fantasy.
* FirstInstallmentWins: Raise your hand if you didn't know there was a sequel...
* HarsherInHindsight: Viewers might view the Oompa-Loompas in a different light once they lean about the real life child slavery issue the cocoa industry has.
** And the AmusingInjuries the kids suffer are much more terrifying if one remembers that children used to ''work'' in factories, and often suffered horrific actual injuries (sometimes fatal) in case of a slightest mistake.
* IconicCharacterForgottenTitle: To an extent. Willy Wonka ''is'' the standout character and the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory most famous adaptation]], a 2005 American stage musical, and a defictionalized candy brand are named after him rather than poor Charlie. But other adaptations use the original title without any trouble.
* ItGetsBetter: The first third of the book is devoted to backstory and DevelopingDoomedCharacters, but once the tour begins, wheeeeeee! Also applies to all adaptations, which easily split into two halves -- the first set in the mundane world, the second in the absurd one.
* ItWasHisSled: Between all the adaptations and parodies, TheReveal that the Golden Ticket contest is a way for Wonka to find an heir has become this; some adaptations (most obviously the 2005 film) pull NotHisSled twists to compensate.
* MagnumOpus: For Creator/RoaldDahl, at least where his work for children is concerned. Though cases can and have been made for ''Literature/JamesAndTheGiantPeach'' and ''Literature/{{Matilda}}'' as well, ''Factory'' is his most popular and most-often adapted work, and Willy Wonka is not only his most famous character, but one of the most famous characters in children's literature as a whole.
* NightmareFuel: Potentially the fates of the other kids. Also, the Oompa-Loompa song dedicated to Mike Teavee in the 2005 film is a heavy metal number with lots of deep voices and fast-moving action, including a spoof of a clip from ''Film/{{Psycho}}'', of all films. For more, see [[NightmareFuel/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory this page]].
* {{Squick}}: Augustus Gloop goes for a swim in chocolate intended for eating. A few days later someone in the world will be eating chocolate that a fat boy has been swimming around in for a few minutes....
* ValuesResonance: Gum-chewing may not be seen as a vice anymore, and Mike's plot thread leans on NewMediaAreEvil, but by and large the obnoxious behavior of the brats and their parents' willingness to indulge them are timeless issues that are easy to adapt to whatever ThePresentDay is, which might be a reason the story has been consistently popular and [[AdaptationOverdosed frequently adapted]] for 50 years as of 2014.
* TheWoobie: Charlie, for all the criticism about his being a UselessProtagonist, is clearly a good, selfless kid who's been dealt a lousy hand by life and deserves a break. He's particularly woobie-ish in the 1971 film (see that version's YMMV page) and the 2013 musical (see below).

!!Specifically the 1971 film:
''see {{YMMV.Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory}}''

!!Specifically the 2005 film:
* BrokenBase: Better than the original movie? Or is the original still the best? Woe betide the one who voices an opinion on the subject!
* [[ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch Complaining About Movies You Haven't Watched]]: Gene Wilder (the Willy Wonka from the 1971 film) notably dismissed the new film as well as claiming to have no intentions of actually watching it based solely on its advertisements. Ultimately subverted when Wilder later called the film an "insult" and expressed his disappointment with director Tim Burton, implying he had actually seen the film.
* EarWorm: Every last song on the soundtrack.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Mike or Violet. Mike for being an InsufferableGenius DeadpanSnarker and Violet for being a LittleMissBadass [[BadassAdorable Adorable]], with attitude.
* HilariousInHindsight: The references to [[Film/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet cannibalism]].
* JerkassWoobie: [[spoiler:Willy Wonka.]]
* MagnificentBastard: The Oompa-Loompas' 'improvisation' smacks of conspiracy, but ramps it straight into [[GambitRoulette casino territory]], as it rather implies that he cherrypicked those kids specifically.
* MemeticMolester: Willy Wonka. Beyond the NightmareFuel elements of JohnnyDepp's performance, when the film hit theaters it was in the wake of Music/MichaelJackson being found not guilty on child molestation charges. As Depp!Wonka and Jackson are superficially similar in appearance, [[TooSoon the film was the butt of jokes and questions as to whether this was intentional]].
** "Oh, and my name is... [[DoubleEntendre Willy]]."
** [[MockTheWeek "Discuss the idea that Willy Wonka was a pedophile."]]
* MemeticMutation: [[Theatre/{{Hair}} "Good morning starshine! The Earth says 'Hello!'"]]
* NightmareFuel: The soundtrack and visual style can get pretty creepy and weird. The opening scene has nothing especially frightening going on, but the music and lighting alone is enough to make it frightening.
** The animatronic show catching fire and melting.
* PuritySue: Charlie's a ''saint'' in comparison to his 1971 self (who was still a good kid, but flawed like a regular child). He's got IncorruptiblePurePureness and is hardly even given a chance to test his character for the first half of the film, whereas in '71 he faces the temptation of both Slugworth's deal and the fizzy lifting drinks. This is more in line with how he was written in the book, so whether or not staying faithful to the book is a good thing in this case depends on the viewer.
* UncannyValley: Though no one ever mentions it, Violet's mother has clearly had some plastic surgery.
* ViewerGenderConfusion: In this film, Johnny Depp as Willy Wonka actually looks like a girl.
* WhatAnIdiot: Veruca's father, who can't work out how to climb over a very small gate.
* {{Woolseyism}}
** Mike Teevee received an update from a television addict obsessed with Westerns to an videogame-playing technology nerd, an image children of the day can better relate to. His flaw is that too much time "gaining intelligence" from TV and playing violent video games has made him a dickish, violent little know-it-all with no imagination. This may be HypocriticalHumor, as some of Creator/TimBurton's works, this one included, have actually gotten video game adaptions (See: ''WesternAnimation/TheNightmareBeforeChristmas''). And it does make the Oompa-Loompas still insisting that television was responsible pretty nonsensical.
** Likewise, Violet is updated to being overly competitive, rather than merely a gum chewer. Following on from the book, this film even lampshades the hypocrisy of Wonka hating gum, when he manufactures and sells the stuff.

!! Specifically the 2013 stage musical:
* CriticalDissonance: While it did receive a few rave reviews, other professional critics and serious musical theatre fans thought it merely okay or panned it outright. Nonetheless, it's proven popular with family audiences thus far, actually breaking West End one-week sales records twice over in 2013. Considering 1) the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory 1971 film's iconic stature]] (especially since this show uses one song from that version, thus begging comparisons) and 2) the high critical praise ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}'', another musical theatre adaptation of a Creator/RoaldDahl novel, has enjoyed, that this show is finding an audience even with such tough acts to follow is impressive.
* ReplacementScrappy / TheyChangedItNowItSucks: Poor Alex Jennings, the first replacement Willy Wonka. As early as his Olivier Awards performance of "Pure Imagination" in May 2014, a month before he took the stage at Theatre Royal Drury Lane in the role, he was getting unfavorable comparisons to Douglas Hodge from fans. Now that they're checking the show out again, he's almost always found wanting, specifically where his singing is concerned. Once updated show trailers were uploaded to the show's offical Website/YouTube channel in July, the bulk of the viewer comments were lamenting the change.
* RewatchBonus: Knowing TheReveal throws a lot of business involving [[spoiler: the tramp/Willy Wonka]] into a new light.
* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: Both the condemnation of CreativeSterility and mindless consumption and the celebration of imagination and grateful appreciation are drilled into the viewer hard along with all of the story's "classic" Aesops. But when so much modern pop culture glorifies materialism and obnoxious behavior to both children and adults, such messages ''really'' need to be repeated and heard.
* TheWoobie: Charlie. Part of it is that he's the most rounded version of the character since the 1971 film: A CheerfulChild prone to daydreaming who works so hard to make the best of his meager situation, a light in the lives of his toiling family, who wish they could give him the life he deserves but just can't (as seen in "If Your Mother Were Here") -- really, they're '''all''' woobies. In any case, a lonely kid who has dreams that he can't attain is a sad sight indeed, and watching him fall into a blue funk as each Golden Ticket is found is heart-tugging. Even when he gets his golden chance, the poor, shy kid keeps bringing up the rear come tour day, lost in the shadows of the limelight shed on the other finders. This makes TheReveal that [[spoiler: Willy Wonka, the man the boy admires more than any other, was secretly looking out for him all along]] quite touching and gratifying.
* {{Woolseyism}}: Again, Violet and Mike's personalities are tweaked to fit the times. Violet is a ShamelessSelfPromoter who, with her father's help, has parlayed her record-breaking gum chewing abilities into a CashCowFranchise -- a spoof of celebrities who manage to become inescapable without demonstrating much actual ''talent'' (i.e., many reality show stars and socialites). Mike was a nasty, hyperactive piece of work ''before'' his mom decided to just let electronic media babysit him, and the resultant overstimulation has made matters worse.

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