* AcceptableLifestyleTargets: Augustus Gloop and Angina Salt are both mocked in-story and in the narration for their obesity; the Salt family in general is also the epitome of obnoxious, spoiled rich people who use money to get everything they want.
* AccidentalInnuendo:
** While it's less prevalent than it is in the movie (see below) the book still manages it at least once:
--->''Oh, the joy of being able to cram large pieces of something sweet and solid into one's mouth!''
** In one of Dahl's writings for Playboy, "schnozzberry" was used as a euphemism for "penis."
* AdaptationDisplacement: In the U.S., the story and characters are better known from the two film adaptations, especially the 1971 version, than the source novel these days.
* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
** Mr. Willy Wonka is either a {{g|adgeteerGenius}}enius, a [[PsychopathicManchild monster]], [[MadScientist or a combination thereof.]] As he is an InterpretativeCharacter, every major adaptation takes him in a different direction. The 1971 film portrays him as a traditional TricksterMentor, while the 2005 film presents him as a [[NoSocialSkills strange]] recluse who refuses to grow up -- and serves as a foil to Charlie, whose poverty and responsibilities leave his childhood almost joyless. The 2013 musical presents him as a SugarAndIcePersonality AntiHero. Each of these provides fodder for unique Alternate Character Interpretations, but questions that can apply to most any reading/viewing include:
** Is Charlie merely a patsy, intended to inherit the responsibility for the multiple acts of child abuse, unsafe working conditions, and slave labour committed in Mr. Wonka's factory?
** Could Mr. Wonka be an example of {{Asexuality}}? His devotion to a field of work most would consider only a hobby and the fact he didn't get married and chose to find an heir rather than have children suggests he might be a CelibateEccentricGenius.
** Is Mr. Wonka an AesopEnforcer and [[TheChessmaster Chessmaster]], deliberately steering the unknowing brats towards their various fates as a RadishCure of sorts or a way to ScareEmStraight? Each is taken out of the running when they go to steal or use something that clearly isn't safe but they still want, all playing right into their various vices -- which Mr. Wonka is likely aware of, having presumably followed the press coverage of the contest. It would also explain why the Oompa-Loompas seem to know so much about the kids (a question actually broached in-story in the 2005 film). In adaptations, Mr. Wonka usually seems to be decidedly unconcerned with rescuing or stopping the kids, so...
** In a related issue, are any or all of the tickets ''intended'' to fall into the hands of the kids who find them, that they may be punished or rewarded as appropriate? Depending on which version one's reading/watching, the possibility may be unaddressed, teased, lampshaded, and/or confirmed.
** Is Mr. Wonka [[AmbiguousDisorder autistic]]? ([[http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-22853835 One prominent interpreter of the role thinks he's close to it...]])
** So, Grandpa Joe has spent decades in bed, being waited on hand-and-foot by his daughter-in-law, while his son slaves away to earn the pittance that the family exists on. As soon as his grandson gets some good news, though, he's straight out of bad and taking the opportunity to be Charlie's escort. Which raises the question: Did the good news really jolt some life and vigor back into Grandpa Joe, or is he actually a lazy individual? The most recent major adaptation, the 2013 musical, outright declares it to be the former (as explained in "Don'cha Pinch Me Charlie"), while the latter take was spoofed in a February 2017 ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' sketch.
* AngstWhatAngst: The Golden Ticket tour group learns how dangerous Wonka's Factory can be -- not to mention how nonchalant their guide is -- when Augustus Gloop winds up sent to who-knows-where via the pipes, but it doesn't dampen their enthusiasm for the rest of the tour, even as further members are eliminated in similarly absurd disasters. No matter what they witness, no one ever asks to ''leave'' if they aren't directly affected by events, and the AudienceSurrogate is having the time of his life. Granted, the disasters are all played for BlackComedy and the victims are all repulsive brats and coddling parents. The [[Theatre/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2013 stage adaptation]] plays with this trope a little, again for laughs -- even though the party is horrified by what happens to Augustus (and in this version [[DeathByAdaptation it's suggested he might not survive]]), when the impatient Mr. Wonka asks them "Anybody want to go ''home''?" not one answers in the affirmative! As the party further dwindles, though, anxiety creeps into the wonder of those still standing...
* {{Anvilicious}}: The fates of the bratty kids. LampshadeHanging in the 2013 musical tweaks this: "True, we lost a few children along the way...but we all ''learned something'' and that's the important thing!" according to Wonka.
* {{Applicability}}: The novel has enough of this going on that Lucy Mangan's MilestoneCelebration retrospective ''Inside Charlie's Chocolate Factory'' devotes two sidebars to examining the Marxist and Freudian interpretations, albeit with tongue planted firmly in cheek. Let's not even get into the adaptations...
* CrazyAwesome: Who else but Willy Wonka?
* DesignatedVillain: Mike and especially Violet have the potential to be seen this way due to ValuesDissonance; in the source material, they are considered "bad" primarily because they are addicted to television and chewing gum, respectively. Most 21st-century adaptations deliberately give both of them unlikable, even straight-up evil, personalities so that they do not end up UnintentionallySympathetic.
* EscapistCharacter
** Charlie Bucket is poor but virtuous and has as warm and loving a family as one could wish for. They suffer quite a bit early on... then he not only gets the rare chance to visit the factory he's always wondered about ''plus'' a lifetime supply of sweets, but also winds up becoming heir to the place! True, life as Willy Wonka's guest (and, in the sequel, sidekick) is sometimes terrifying -- but so long as you follow the rules, it's never, ever boring.
** Willy Wonka himself: A RenaissanceMan extraordinaire, possessed of remarkable wit and intelligence, he doesn't just ''live'' in TheWonderland but '''created it'''. Moreover, while the real world can a harsh place for the good and too-comfortable for the bad, in his world, be it by chance or plotting, LaserGuidedKarma prevails. For anyone dispirited by just how unfair the world can be, this is a deeply satisfying fantasy.
* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: Music/MarilynManson, a longtime fan of the 1971 film, expressed interest in playing the role of Willy Wonka in the 2005 film, and has a theory that Wonka is Satan, tempting and leading the damned souls (the children) into Hell!
* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: Some people are just shitty parents.
* FandomBerserkButton: Feel free to debate the merits of the two movies or any other adaptation, but remember that the novel came first.
* FandomRivalry: The fandom has many rivalries within it over the novel and its adaptations, making it an inter-media example.
** Is the 1971 film a wonderful, tuneful PragmaticAdaptation that makes Charlie truly [[EarnYourHappyEnding earn his happy ending]] and has become just as iconic a story as, if not moreso than, the book...or is it an AudienceColoringAdaptation that violates his noble character, has drippy songs, and unfairly overshadows the novel and all other versions of it, including more faithful ones? Notably, Creator/RoaldDahl hated the film.
** Is the 2005 film beautiful, lavish, TruerToTheText and worthy of Dahl's novel...or is it a soulless parade of weird imagery that derails the wonderful character of Willy Wonka to push a LonersAreFreaks/"family knows best" message that is the antithesis of Dahl?
*** The rivalries get even more heated over how the '71 film impacted the '05 film's public perception. Attackers will cite that the first film has become such a cultural touchstone that trying to re-adapt its source material would only lead to failure (consider that there hasn't been a straight adaptation of ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' for film after the [[Film/TheWizardOfOz 1939 film]]'s success.) Defenders appreciate the TruerToTheText approach and agree it would be a lot more acclaimed if it weren't in the first film's shadow.
** Is the 2013 West End musical a darkly lovable PragmaticAdaptation, clearly created by people who wanted to preserve Dahl's spirit and humor, that steps out of the shadow of the film versions even with a BootstrappedTheme and some {{Internal Homage}}s, and ''finally'' remembers that Charlie is the central character, not Willy Wonka...or is it just another flashy spectacle lacking drama and heart, with a boring first act and frantic second one, and songs that don't hold a candle to those of the '71 version (most people agree they're at least better than the '05 one)? ''Many'' people who don't like this show state that they would have preferred a straight ScreenToStageAdaptation of the '71 film (which the first musical version was), and/or are excited that the Broadway {{Retool}} will sub in more material from that version. (Bear in mind that Dahl's estate likely wouldn't have allowed the former option, because ''he hated that version''.)
* FirstInstallmentWins: Raise your hand if you didn't know the book has a sequel! Even ''Inside Charlie's Chocolate Factory'' barely acknowledges its existence. (It doesn't help that it ''was'' a case of MoneyDearBoy for the author.)
* HarsherInHindsight: The AmusingInjuries the kids suffer are much more terrifying if one remembers that children used to ''work'' in factories, and often suffered horrific actual injuries (sometimes fatal) upon the slightest mistake.
* IconicCharacterForgottenTitle: To an extent. Willy Wonka ''is'' the standout character and the [[Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory first and most famous adaptation]], a 2005 American stage musical featuring that first adaptation's songs, and a defictionalized candy brand are named after him rather than poor Charlie. But other adaptations use the original title without any trouble.
* ItWasHisSled: Between all the adaptations and parodies, TheReveal that the Golden Ticket contest is a way for Mr. Wonka to find an heir has become this; some adaptations (most obviously the 2005 film) pull NotHisSled twists to compensate.
* JustHereForGodzilla: Many fans of the novel and/or adaptations are Just There for Willy Wonka and complain that he and the factory don't get enough "onstage time" in favor of that boring poor kid and his family. Go to any theatre message board discussing the 2013 musical and there '''will''' be complaints that boil down to this and wonder why the 2017 Broadway {{Retool}} didn't change that. Some versions, including said retool, try to address this by giving Mr. Wonka a KingIncognito identity as a candy vendor who befriends Charlie, and even revealing his ZanyScheme and true identity to the audience at the top of the show...but this has the effect of killing the mystery the novel and other adaptations build up around him and his world ''stone dead''.
* MagnificentBastard: While little in the novel suggests that anything related to the Golden Ticket contest and the tour (i.e. the bratty kids' fates) is deliberately planned by Willy Wonka, it's not uncommon for adaptations to tweak things to turn him into this to varying degrees.
** In the 1971 film, [[spoiler: the whole business with "Slugworth" turns out to be a Secret Test of Character masterminded by Mr. Wonka]].
** In the 2005 film, other characters note that the Oompa-Loompas' 'improvisation' of their songs smacks of conspiracy. This ramps things straight into [[GambitRoulette casino territory]], as it rather implies that Mr. Wonka cherrypicked those kids specifically.
** In the 2013 musical, [[spoiler: tropers are directed to the Walking Spoiler folder on the character sheet for the details..]].
* MemeticMutation: ''Inside Charlie's Chocolate Factory'' briefly discusses two that are certainly not limited to the Internet: "'Willy Wonka' is now shorthand for [[TheWonka any kind of innovator or eccentric genius]].[...]Having a Golden Ticket is synonymous with getting an access-all-areas pass to anything desirable." The former's memetic status is reflected on this wiki with Mr. Wonka becoming a TropeNamer -- one of the few remaining ones that's named after a specific character.
* NightmareFuel: Potentially the fates of the other kids. For those and more, see [[NightmareFuel/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory this page]].
* SlowPacedBeginning: The first third of the book is devoted to backstory and DevelopingDoomedCharacters, but once the tour begins, wheeeeeee! Also applies to all adaptations, which easily split into two halves -- the first set in the mundane world, the second in the absurd one.
* {{Squick}}: Augustus Gloop goes for a swim in chocolate intended for eating. A few days later someone in the world will be eating chocolate that a fat boy has been swimming around in for a few minutes. The novel both addresses this ''and'' makes it worse with Mrs. Gloop yelling that Augustus will be spreading his cold into the chocolate!
* ToyShip: Though many fanworks age them up a few years, shipping the kids happens pretty often.
%%UnfortunateImplications require citations
%%* UnfortunateImplications: The Oompa Loompas were originally [[DarkestAfrica an African Pygmy tribe who lived in squalor and ate bugs]] before [[MightyWhitey Wonka came along]] and had them work in his factory for chocolate rations. You can probably figure why the movies hastily changed them to orange-skinned green-haired FairFolk.
* UnintentionallySympathetic: By 21st-century standards, the first four children's respective vices don't ''quite'' justify them [[ScareEmStraight being placed in highly traumatic situations]], even when they are self-inflicted. This is why most 21st-century adaptations give Augustus, Veruca, Violet, and Mike [[AdaptationalVillainy significantly nastier personalities]].
* ValuesDissonance:
** Violet's primary vice being gum chewing has aged poorly, so starting with the 2005 film the character is tweaked in adaptations to make her the proudest or vainest of the kids, with the gum chewing habit endemic of the larger issue.
*** In the 2005 film, she is a CompetitionFreak who has to be a winner in everything she sets her mind to, hence her becoming a world-champion gum chewer.
*** In the 2010 opera, she is vain and obsessed with being thin. She chews rather than eats.
*** In the 2013 musical, she is an airheaded starlet who, with her dad's help, parlayed her "talent" for gum chewing into a multimedia CashCowFranchise.
** Augustus Gloop's status as an AcceptableTarget was subject to considerable criticism by the time of the 2005 film, due to weight and body-shaming being far more sensitive issues in the 21st century. That doesn't keep that film and later adaptations from sticking with a straight FatIdiot / FatBastard portrayal, though, probably because the primary reason he's fat is because he's ''greedy'' and overeats.
* ValuesResonance: Gum chewing may not be seen as a vice anymore, and Mike's plot thread leans on NewMediaAreEvil, but by and large the obnoxious behavior of the brats and their parents' willingness to indulge them are timeless issues that are easy to adapt to whatever ThePresentDay is, which might be a reason the story has been consistently popular and [[AdaptationOverdosed frequently adapted]] for 50+ years.
* VanillaProtagonist: Charlie's NiceGuy lack of vices sets a contrast when he's surrounded by the colorful brats; he's their foil. There's also his lovable Grandpa Joe, and eccentric Mr. Wonka.
* WereStillRelevantDammit: Post-1980s adaptations, particularly in their efforts to update Violet and Mike, can easily run into this trope. The 2005 film has a sight gag involving an Oompa-Loompa watching Oprah Winfrey; the 2013 stage musical has a BoastfulRap (later a pop number) for Violet and CyberpunkIsTechno for Mike in the GenreRoulette. Of course, most all of this is strictly PlayedForLaughs, and it helps that both of the above-mentioned versions take place in RetroUniverse settings and, again, make their of-the-moment vices endemic of timeless issues.
* WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids: It may be the most beloved BlackComedy in children's literature, SweetDreamsFuel and NightmareFuel all at once. For years it was a near-fixture on lists of banned/challenged kids' books.
* TheWoobie: Charlie, for all the criticism about his being a UselessProtagonist, is clearly a good, selfless kid who's been dealt a lousy hand by life and deserves a break. He's particularly woobie-ish in the 1971 film (see that version's YMMV page) and the 2013 musical (see below).
* WoobieSpecies: The Oompa-Loompas, if one doesn't regard them as just exceptionally tiny humans (their children are only a few inches tall). Their lives might be HappinessInSlavery now, but it's still a substantial improvement on their previous existence in Loompaland...
* {{Woolseyism}}: A mild case. Veruca Salt's surname was changed to Paprika in the Hebrew translation because "Salt" doesn't have a meaning in Hebrew and young readers wouldn't understand there's a connection between the name and the dad's business.

!!Specifically the 1971 film:
See [[YMMV.WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory here]].

!!Specifically the 2005 film:
* EarWorm: Every last song on the soundtrack, but ''especially'' Wonka's welcome song.
* EndingFatigue: The AdaptationExpansion results in a NotHisSled situation ([[spoiler:Charlie initially turning down the offer to be Wonka's heir]]) that draws out the film's conclusion by at least five minutes.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Mike or Violet. He's an InsufferableGenius DeadpanSnarker, she's a LittleMissBadass [[BadassAdorable Adorable]] with attitude!
* FandomBerserkButton: Don't refer to this movie as a remake of the 1971 film! Even Gene Wilder made this mistake.
* HilariousInHindsight: The references to [[Film/SweeneyToddTheDemonBarberOfFleetStreet cannibalism]].
** Mike Teevee, during his musical number, ends up in a parody of ''Psycho''. Charlie's actor, Freddie Highmore, later played Norman Bates in ''Series/BatesMotel''.
* JerkassWoobie:
** The big example of this turns out to be [[spoiler:Willy Wonka, due to his backstory]].
** Violet is a lot more sympathetic than in most adaptations, as it's made abundantly clear that her brattiness is the result of years of psychological abuse by her hideous StageMom, who is the true HateSink of her arc. This has likely contributed to Violet being one of the most popular characters of this adaptation. It also helps that's she's portrayed by Creator/AnnasophiaRobb, who's had a far more successful career than the other child actors.
* MemeticMolester: Willy Wonka. Beyond the NightmareFuel elements of Creator/JohnnyDepp's performance, when the film hit theaters it was in the wake of Music/MichaelJackson being found not guilty on child molestation charges. As Depp's Wonka and White Jackson are superficially similar in appearance, the film was the butt of jokes and questions as to whether this was intentional.
** "Oh, and my name is... [[DoubleEntendre Willy]]."
** [[Series/MockTheWeek "Discuss the idea that Willy Wonka was a pedophile."]]
* MemeticMutation: [[Theatre/{{Hair}} "Good morning starshine! The Earth says 'Hello!'"]] And "HEY, LITTLE BOY? MY CHOCOLATE MUST BE UNTOUCHED BY HUMAN HANDS!"
* OneSceneWonder: Creator/ChristopherLee as Dr. Wilbur Wonka gets only a few short scenes, but they are significant and lots of fun regardless of what one thinks of the AdaptationExpansion. He takes all of the {{Dracula}} and [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings Saruman]] mannerisms and transposes them onto a dentist. Just imagine Christopher Lee throwing his resonant ''basso'' into the word "Lollipops."
* TheProblemWithLicensedGames: See [[http://www.mobygames.com/game/charlie-and-the-chocolate-factory/mobyrank these]] [[http://www.computerandvideogames.com/124799/reviews/charlie-and-the-chocolate-factory-review/ negative]] [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/r_charlieandthechocolatefactory_ps2 reviews]]. To quote the last one, "It was at this point that we realised we were already drowning in a sea of warm, brown, sticky goo, and that it wasn't chocolate."
* TheScrappy: Willy Wonka himself! Johnny Depp's performance was panned especially in comparison to Gene Wilder's much-loved take on the character -- this usually being the main reason the 1971 film is considered superior to it. Not helping matters is his AdaptationPersonalityChange, which reaches a low point when he [[spoiler: wants Charlie to abandon his family completely to work in the factory]]. His resemblance to Music/MichaelJackson was also much remarked upon, especially since the film came out at the height of a sex scandal.
* UncannyValley:
** Though no one ever mentions it, Violet's mother has clearly had some plastic surgery.
** Willy Wonka also qualifies, thanks to his unnatural paleness, lack of social skills, and DissonantSerenity.
** The first scene with Augustus Gloop, [[http://s2.dmcdn.net/HsQdb.jpg which features his delightful plastic face.]]
* ViewerGenderConfusion: In this film, Johnny Depp as Willy Wonka actually looks like a girl.
* WhatAnIdiot: Veruca's father, who can't work out how to climb over a very small gate.
* TheWoobie: Charlie and his family, of course. There's also Mr. Teavee, Mike's father; unlike the other parents who spoil their children rotten, he's just an ExtremeDoormat to a TV-obsessed son, admitting he just can't get a handle on someone who grew up too fast. And Mr. Salt, who's obviously getting very tired of catering to Veruca's every demand, before finally snapping at the end when she sees the Great Glass Elevator.

!! Specifically the 2013 West End musical:
* AcceptableProfessionalTargets: Violet and her father, as representatives of HorribleHollywood in its shallow/talentless and greedy aspects, respectively.
* AmericansHateTingle: U.K. reviews ranged from straight-up pans to "fun but not as good as ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}''" to raves. U.S. critics universally panned it. This may or may not be a reason why the 2017 Broadway production is seeing an extensive {{Retool}}, given that stage adaptations of extremely popular children's stories have a tendency to be CriticProof.
* {{Applicability}}: As noted above under AlternateCharacterInterpretation Creator/DouglasHodge, who originated the role of Mr. Wonka in this show, regarded him as "almost autistic". Indeed, Mr. Wonka ''does'' have several traits overlapping with high-functioning autism/Aspergers (sometimes LiteralMinded, often [[BrutalHonesty brutally honest]], thinks logically, fully devoted to his craft, no close friends, extremely energetic) and in this adaptation is also a MotorMouth who HatesSmallTalk, and, as played by Hodge, is prone to extravagant arm/hand gestures. With all that in mind, his IAmSong "Simply Second Nature" -- and his quest to find someone who has a similar creative spirit and understands his way of thinking to become his successor -- becomes even more poignant than it already is in context. (And cold though he can be at times, the brats and their parents, via insults and [[TheyJustDontGetIt looking down on his motivations]], come off as picking on someone who is ''trying'' to be a good host and sincerely hopes they'll appreciate his work.)
* CriticalDissonance: As noted above, a lot of professional critics thought it merely okay or panned it outright -- and '''everyone''' compared it to not only the film adaptations, but the ''other'' Creator/RoaldDahl musical on the West End (as well as Broadway by that point), the highly-acclaimed ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}''. Nor is there much love for the show on musical theatre message boards. Nonetheless, it lasted three-and-a-half years in London, breaking West End one-week sales records twice over in 2013 and setting house records for Theatre Royal Drury Lane more than once, with its final run of performances over Christmas 2016 the most successful of all.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Mrs. Teavee. Not only does she survive the longest (sans the Buckets and Mr. Wonka) on the tour, she also provides a great deal of comedy throughout the show with her alcoholic [[StepfordSmiler Stepford Smiling]] tendencies. She also gets a surprising, funny resolution to her character arc: [[spoiler: she comes around to Mr. Wonka's way of thinking and is ''happy'' Mike's been shrunk]].
* FriendlyFandoms: At least on Tumblr, there's some overlap between this show's fanbase and that of ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}''. Beyond the obvious connection of being Creator/RoaldDahl adaptations, they also share a choreographer, their respective book writers touched base with each other on the challenges of adapting Dahl, and owing in part to the need for West End shows to triple/quadruple cast child roles a few child actors wound up logging time in both productions. One adult actress, Lara Denning, played Miss Honey in ''Matilda'' and Mrs. Bucket in this show.
* HilariousInHindsight: Two relating to previous roles of Creator/DouglasHodge.
** In 2006, he played Theatre/TitusAndronicus -- who kills the sons of his enemy and serves them up to her in a pie -- at Shakespeare's Globe. He went on to play an AntiHero whose bratty charges [[DeathByAdaptation stand a good chance of being served up on platters]] upon disobeying him!
** In 2007, he played a Time Lord in the AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho audio story ''[[Recap/BigFinishDoctorWho095Exotron Urban Myths]]''. The [[WMG/TimeLord Grand Unifying Guess]] that Willy Wonka is a Time Lord just became more credible.
** In addition, back in 1983, he was in a stage musical with Julie Dawn Cole, who played Veruca Salt in the 1971 film adaptation.
* MemeticMolester: ''Averted''. In the runup to the opening, the catastrophe of the Jimmy Savile revelations (for non-U.K. tropers, he was an eccentric ''Series/TopOfThePops'' and children's show host posthumously revealed to be a horrifically prolific serial pedophile/rapist) was still fresh news, and Creator/DouglasHodge acknowledged in interviews that launching a musical about an eccentric chocolatier whose world is highly dangerous for bratty kids was skirting the latter trope under such circumstances. But in practice, the show didn't elicit the unsavory comparisons that the 2005 film did to Michael Jackson -- likely because it fully embraces the BlackComedy of the source material and presents Mr. Wonka as an AntiHero DeadpanSnarker with a SugarAndIcePersonality, rather than the UncannyValley StepfordSmiler ManChild of the '05 version, not to mention DeadArtistsAreBetter had long kicked in for Jackson at that point.
* PanderingToTheBase: "Pure Imagination" was incorporated into the score at the behest of the show's producers because so many people, when they heard about this show, thought it would be an adaptation of the 1971 movie. So to keep them from feeling ''too'' let down that it wasn't...
* ReplacementScrappy: Poor Alex Jennings, the first replacement Willy Wonka. As early as his Olivier Awards performance of "Pure Imagination" in May 2014, a month before he took the stage at Theatre Royal Drury Lane in the role, he was getting unfavorable comparisons to Douglas Hodge from fans. Once updated show trailers were uploaded to the show's offical Website/YouTube channel in July, the bulk of the viewer comments were lamenting the change. Those who saw both performers were split on which actor did a better job with the ''characterization'' (Jennings' icy-yet-still-playful approach versus Hodge's extravagant-even-for-Wonka hamminess), but general consensus was that Hodge[[note]]who has a side career as a SingerSongwriter[[/note]] was the better ''singer''.
* RewatchBonus: Knowing TheReveal throws a lot of business involving [[spoiler: the tramp/Willy Wonka]] into a new light.
* SuspiciouslySimilarSong: "When Veruca Says" sounds similar to "Sing!" from ''Theatre/AChorusLine''.
* TheyChangedItNowItSucks: There was real disappointment in some corners of the fandom over Alex Jennings and later Jonathan Slinger choosing to play Willy Wonka as '''clean-shaven''' rather than following Creator/DouglasHodge's precedent of a prosthetic makeup-based neatly-groomed mustache and chin tuft combination (though ''understudies'' followed said precedent). This is partially because Mr. Wonka ''does'' have a goatee in the source novel and illustrations thereof -- sometimes with a mustache added -- a detail both movie adaptations, and from there pop culture in general, ignore in favor of clean-shaven Wonkas.
* ToughActToFollow: An unusual case, in that it's with regard to other adaptations of the same story and/or the other work of the source material's writer rather than having the same creative team as a previous hit[[note]]Though both this and ''Matilda'' share a choreographer[[/note]]. Considering the status of the 1971 film and the critical acclaim given to the ''other'' Creator/RoaldDahl musical on the West End, ''Theatre/{{Matilda}}'', this was inevitable. While critical reception was mixed, the show was able to stick around for three-and-a-half years (by far the longest run enjoyed by a West End musical that ''wasn't'' an American import since ''Matilda'') -- and even though it's not quite as beloved as the '71 movie, it's ''far'' less hated than the '05 film. Note that this only applies to the '''original''' West End staging, not the much-altered Broadway production (see below), which was widely condemned from its first preview performance onward.
* VisualEffectsOfAwesome: ''All'' the projections, the Department of the Future sequence (particularly the perfect timing of the dancers with the television images in "Vidiots"), the Great Glass Elevator gliding out over the first few rows of the stalls (though some viewers think it wobbles too much)...even the simple trick that sends a paper airplane flying up to the balcony gets oohs and aahs.
* WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids: For a megabudget family-friendly musical rivalling/exceeding the Disney stage productions, there's a lot of potential offstage (if ''lovingly'' described via the songs) DeathAsComedy here -- visited upon ''children'' no less. Nigel Planer (who originated the role of Grandpa Joe) explained to the ''[[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2345458/Wonka-time-How-took-10m-25-years-007-director-bring-Charlie-And-The-Chocolate-Factory-West-End.html Daily Mail]]'': "There were contingency plans if it scared children too much; if it was too dark. But after a few days of previews it became apparent kids love that. They laughed as they watched Veruca Salt going down a grinder. Kids find that funny. They’re nasty, kids, aren’t they? I think they enjoy someone telling it like it is; we soon realised we could be as gruesome as we liked." This has LampshadeHanging early on: When Charlie asks to hear the story of Prince Pondicherry (who, in this version, died in the melting ruins of his chocolate palace), Grandpa Joe quips: "Oh, you like the scary ones, don't you Charlie?"
* TheWoobie: Charlie. Part of it is that he's the most rounded version of the character since the 1971 film: A CheerfulChild prone to daydreaming who works so hard to make the best of his meager situation, a light in the lives of his toiling family, who wish they could give him the life he deserves but just can't (as seen in "If Your Mother Were Here") -- really, they're '''all''' woobies. In any case, a lonely kid who has dreams that he can't attain is a sad sight indeed, and watching him fall into a blue funk as each Golden Ticket is found is heart-tugging. Even when he gets his golden chance, the poor, shy kid keeps bringing up the rear come tour day, lost in the shadows of the limelight shed on the other finders. This makes TheReveal that [[spoiler: Willy Wonka, the man the boy admires more than any other, was secretly looking out for him all along]] quite touching and gratifying.

!!Specifically the 2017 Broadway staging
* JustHereForGodzilla: To judge from the [=BroadwayWorld.com=] message boards, a lot of regular theatergoers are only seeing this show for Christian Borle (a two-time Tony Award winner) as Willy Wonka.
* PanderingToTheBase: The heavy revisions to the show from London are almost entirely motivated by pandering to fans of the story who 1) regard the 1971 film adaptation and its songs as definitive and/or 2) don't want to wait until the story's halfway point for Willy Wonka to show up.
** Three more songs from the 1971 film -- "The Candy Man", "I've Got a Golden Ticket", and "The Oompa-Loompa Song" -- are incorporated into the score.
** Mr. Bucket suffers DeathByAdaptation and the grandparents besides Joe are DemotedToExtra because that's what the movie did to them.
** Willy Wonka shows up in ''the show's opening scene'' and maintains a KingIncognito masquerade as the candy shop owner who strings Charlie along with never-fulfilled promises of free chocolate throughout Act One.
** "Pure Imagination" is moved to the Chocolate Room scene because that's where it turned up in the movie, coming at the expense of "Simply Second Nature", a song that was crucial to understanding Mr. Wonka's life philosophy and the show's larger theme of "creation".
* TheyChangedItNowItSucks: Those familiar with the London production, whether they enjoyed it or not, are near-unanimous that the many changes made to the show in the transition to New York City are mostly for the worse. Particular scorn is given to the removal of the SceneryPorn, having the four brats be portrayed by adults rather than children, the shockingly violent death of Veruca Salt, and the addition of an odd dream ballet between Mrs. Bucket and her ''dead'' husband to "If Your Father Were Here".
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