[[quoteright:326:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Bartok_the_Magnificent_5509.jpg]]

''Bartok the Magnificent'' is a 1999 direct-to-video Semi-prequel to Creator/DonBluth's ''WesternAnimation/{{Anastasia}}''. This film is interesting for a couple of reasons:

# On the Creator/DonBluth trope page, we mentioned that because he does not own the rights to the films he directed, his films tend to suffer from {{Sequelitis}}. Bluth had absolutely nothing to do with any of the sequels to any of his movies... except this one. This is the only sequel he directed. (If you're wondering, if it isn't "better" than most sequels spawned off Bluth films, then at least it is [[DerangedAnimation one hell of a lot weirder]].)
# And, funnily enough, it barely counts as a prequel to ''WesternAnimation/{{Anastasia}}''. It's really more of a {{Spinoff}} ([[WordOfGod Bluth himself]] put it "somewhere between a movie and a very expensive video"). The only things connecting ''Bartok the Magnificent'' to the previous film are the Russian setting and Bartok himself.

In this movie, Bartok is a traveling entertainer and a conman traveling Russia with a bear named Zozi, pretending to be a great hero and adventurer. His facade as a hero backfires when Tsarviech Ivan Romanov disappears, kidnapped by the mysterious [[Literature/BabaYaga Baba Yaga]]. Ludimilla, Ivan's advisor hires Bartok to get him back, and the bat finds he can't say no. So the pair set off, and Bartok might become a hero yet.

Has nothing to do with the composer BelaBartok.

----
!!!Examples:

* AdaptationalHeroism: Bartok was [[MinionWithAnFInEvil hardly a villain to begin with]] in his debut, but here he becomes a straight up hero, with some mild trickster elements.
** Baba Yaga is portrayed as a sympathetic character in the movie once its revealed shes not the real villain, and that her reputation as a child kidnapper and eater is unfounded. She even (indirectly) helps Bartok save Prince Ivan.
* AntiHero: Bartok starts off as this. He's a traveling performer who brags about feats he's obviously never done, and uses Zozi (who acts like a feral bear out of control) as part of his act to trick people into thinking he's a hero, conning the townspeople out of a great deal of money, and Prince Ivan of a ring. By the end, he ends up becoming a hero for real and actually does feats similar to what he bragged about in the opening.
* AnachronismStew: Oh sweet sanity, where do we ''start''? The setting is supposed to be pre-revolutionary Russia, but it mixes Imperial Russia (18th-19th centuries) with Russian folklore from the first millennium AD, features a fictional Romanov prince based on a fairy tale character from said folklore, a witch who sings jazz (which wasn't invented until either the late 19th or early 20th century), and it only gets worse from there.
* AppliedPhlebotinum: The stuff Baba Yaga puts in the potion. Especially that mysterious glittery liquid she wrings out of Piloff.
* AscendedExtra: The main character was nothing more than a comic relief PunchClockVillain in ''WesternAnimation/{{Anastasia}}''.
* BadBadActing: Ludmilla upon "discovering" Prince Ivan has gone missing.
* BatDeduction: Puns aside, when Bartok sees the dragon rampaging outside the castle, he immediately deduces that its Ludmilla having been transformed by the potion.
* BigBad: Baba Yaga is set up to be the main villain, but that [[MisunderstoodLonerWithAHeartOfGold turns out to be a charade]]--Ludmilla turns out to be the real villain of the film, having Prince Ivan kidnapped with the intention to kill him, and framing Baba Yaga for kidnapping him, all as part of her plan to usurp the throne.
* {{Bizarrchitecture}}: True to Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga's dingy old hut is seated right on top of two giant chicken legs.
* BlatantLies: When the Cossacks arrive to escort Bartok back to Ludmilla, he denies being himself even though his wagon has a sail with his name and face proudly displayed on it behind him. He notices and hastily paints over the A in his name with an E to pass himself off as someone else. The Cossacks don't buy it for a second.
* BraggingThemeTune / IAmSong: The opening song number, "Bartok The Magnificent".
* BrickJoke: After getting the potion from Baba Yaga, Bartok asks Baba for a hug for the heck of it, and she warns him not to push his luck and shoos him off. In the ending, Baba shows up and grudgingly lets Bartok hug her, since he saved the day.
* ButtMonkey: Bartok.
* CallBack / {{Foreshadowing}}: Everything Bartok does during the climax is a reference to something he claimed he had done in his show at the beginning of the movie, from defeating a dragon to dousing a city in flames.
* CardCarryingVillain: Ludmilla compares herself to Attila the Hun when singing about what kind of ruler she'll be.
* ChekhovsSkill: Baba Yaga's "magic intuition" is briefly mentioned in her song number "Someones in my House Tonight", and seems like it was just there to justify her knowing Bartok was hiding in her house. After Bartok completes her challenges and shows her compassion, she uses the same intuition to reveal that not only did she ''not'' kidnap Prince Ivan, but that he ''never even left the castle''.
* TheCameo: Rasputin...possibly. When Bartok returns from Baba Yaga with the potion and begins talking about its effects, an old man who bears a striking resemblance to Rasputin (albeit less evil-looking) comes over to him. Considering ''Bartok The Magnificent'' is a prequel to ''Anastasia'', perhaps this is how Rasputin and Bartok first met?
** CreatorCameo: The villager crying for more water during the climax appears to sport Don Bluth's mustache.
* ClassicallyTrainedExtra: Zozi. Of corse, he's played by the guy who also did [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Sideshow Bob]].
* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: Ludmilla seems to shop at the same store as [[Disney/SleepingBeauty Maleficent]] and [[{{Disney/Aladdin}} Jafar]], as much as her color scheme (not to mention the SpikesOfVillainy) just screams villain.
* CoolOldLady: Baba Yaga turns out to be this. She gets a jazzy song number to herself, and even helps Bartok save the day.
* CoversAlwaysLie: The cover art for the film proudly proclaims "The lovable hero from Anastasia is back!" Bartok was the sidekick to the villain of that movie and while he was [[MinionWithAnFInEvil hardly what you'd call "evil"]], he didn't really do anything heroic either, unless you count him abandoning Rasputin in the end.
* DarkIsEvil: Ludmilla dresses in black, is drawn in an angular, bony physique as cold as her vain personality.
* DarkIsNotEvil: Baba Yaga is a witch, [[{{Gonk}} mildly gruesome looking]] and lives in a dingy old house on chicken legs within a far out of the way area, but it turns out she's not evil, just an antisocial person with a bad reputation.
* DeadpanSnarker: Some of Ludmilla's prisoners ''sing'' snark in her direction during her VillainSong.
-->"More than just the peasants are [[DoubleEntendre revolting!]]"
-->"Hide, run away or go on a vacation!"
-->(''while about to be killed and presumably thinking of the idea of [[AxeCrazy Ludmilla]] being queen'') "Gee [[LesserOfTwoEvils the future]] looks great!"
* DisneyVillainDeath: Dragon Ludmilla is lured to the top of the castle by Bartok, and the watertower can't support her weight and comes falling down, crushing her to death under it.
* DomesticOnlyCartoon: A rare example of a direct-to-video sequel being produced in-house at the studio that created the original. And ''[[AwesomeArt boy]]'' [[AwesomeArt can you tell]]!
* TheDreaded: As the opening song tells, Baba Yaga has this reputation among Russian folk, but that turns out to be out of gossip more than anything else.
* EatsBabies: Baba Yaga has a reputation for kidnapping and eating children, but that turns out to be false.
* EatTheCamera: Ludmilla as she drink's Baba Yaga's potion.
* EverythingDances: Baba Yaga's introduction song, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jt3USF3bVZU Someone's in my house.]]
* EvilChancellor: Ludmilla again.
* EvilHasABadSenseOfHumor: The first thing we learn about Ludmilla is she hates entertainment, and wants to have Bartok shut down.
* EvilIsHammy: Ludmilla. She even drinks dramatically.
** She even hams up sitting down on a throne.
* EvilIsPetty: Besides the convenient smokescreen of sending a local hero on a quest to save Prince Ivan, its implied Ludmilla sent Bartok off on his quest out of spite against him.
* EvilWitch: Subverted with Baba Yaga. She has all the hallmarks of one at first, but she was framed for kidnapping Prince Ivan--she's not evil, just a loner.
* {{Expy}}: Oblie is a hairless [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Tasmanian Devil]].
* FanDisservice: Ludmilla's transformation into a dragon is intentionally made to be bizarre, if not downright grotesque, to watch.
** During the climax, Zozi crossdresses as a disguise, and it is not a pretty sight.
* FakeUltimateHero: Bartok when the story starts. Ludmilla exploits this by sending Bartok on a quest to save Ivan from Baga Yaga, solely because she believes it would mean a nuisance would be out of her way and would smokescreen her secret kidnapping of Ivan.
* {{Filler}}: The giant talking skull scenes are just there to pad out the films length--they contribute virtually nothing to the plot at all.
* FlyingBroomstick: Baba Yaga makes her first appearance riding on one, but her classic flying mortar and pestle also make an appearance in the end.
* GagBoobs: Not really boobs, but when Ludmilla is transforming into a dragon and her dragon chest pops out it resembles ludicrously large breasts before her dragon belly pops out to go with it.
** Amusingly, the filmmakers apparently felt this part was worthy of making it into the freeze frames in the credits.
* GagNose: Baba Yaga has the largest nose of all charcaters.
* GenreShift: ''Anatasia'' was a historical fantasy with some romantic elements (albeit its ties to history are very, very loose) while this movie is a straight-up magical fantasy with comedic elements.
* GoOutWithASmile: During "The Real Ludmilla" three men sentenced to death just lie back and accept it, happy that they won't have to live under Ludmilla's rule.
** [[Film/{{Waterworld}} "Oh thank god..."]]
* GratuitousAnimalSidekick: Played with. Bartok, who was a sidekick himself In Anastasia, becomes the hero and gets his own sidekick, Zozi, a talking bear who is fascinated with acting. Ironically, Bartok is barely an couple inches high, while Zozi is very large.
* HartmanHips: Taken [[UpToEleven to ridiculous proportions]] when Ludmilla transforms into a dragon; the result with the "gag boobs" above is very similar to one of those ancient fertility goddess figurines.
** Even when Ludmilla is skinny her hips are quite a bit wider than the rest of her.
* HeelRealization: Not a full example, but Ludmilla is apparently very surprised that "the real Ludmilla" is a fire-breathing dragon as apposed to a beautiful queen or something.
* HoistByHisOwnPetard: Dragon Ludmilla is crushed to death under the same water tower she intended to drown Bartok and Ivan in.
* IAmBecomingSong: "The Real Ludmilla", although Ludmilla isn't aware of her transformation until after the song ends.
* IdenticalGrandson: Prince Ivan looks like a male version of Anastasia, so he must be one of her predecessors since this takes place before Bartok even met Rasputin.
* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Bartok is a shameless thief and rather whiny and sarcastic, but he's good natured at heart.
* KarmicTransformation: Ludmilla's transformation into a fat, purple dragon.
* KickTheDog: After Bartok finds out about Ludmilla's scheme and kidnapping of Ivan, she locks in up in a cage, steals his potion, smashes the tower floor so he, Ivan and Vol can drown, and she rubs the situation right in their faces before closing the door.
* LeanAndMean: Ludmilla, except for the hips.
* {{Leitmotif}}: An instrumental of "Bartok The Magnificent" plays pretty much every time Bartok does something heroic, or gets a heroic idea.
* LionsAndTigersAndHumansOhMy: Bartok is a TalkingAnimal, his [[GrotesqueGallery grotesque]] bear companion is ''almost'' [[FunnyAnimal anthropomorphic]], there are a couple of monsters and UglyCute [[CartoonCreature oddities of indeterminate species]], and everyone else is human.
* LighterAndSofter: The film is considerably less dark than Anastasia in both tone and aesthetic, the main leads are cartoon animals and explicitly fictional characters, and the comedy and fantasy elements are played up a lot more.
* MeaningfulName: Piloff is frozen to the top of a boulder, and it's Bartok's job to "peel" her "off."
* TheMindIsAPlaythingOfTheBody: Sort of happens to Ludmilla at the end. Baba Yagas potion makes anyone who drinks it "ten times the person" they are inside. Ludmilla drinks it thinking it will turn her into what she thinks she is: beautiful, sweet and graceful as a flower, but since inside she's rotten and villainous she instead turns into a monstrous dragon. Her manner of speaking noticeably becomes much less sweet and controlled -- and more manic and aggressive - over the course of her VillainSong, but she doesn't even realize anything's changing until she gets a look at herself in the mirror. Up until that point she was still talking about how she's going to be the golden ruler to the people of Russia - by the time Bartok gets to the city she's a rampaging beast setting everything on fire, and she doesn't talk at all or act like anything but a feral monster for the rest of her appearances. Since she's the villain anyway it's less noticeable - and it's more of a "''mind is a plaything of the body which is a plaything of the inner self''" type deal - but it's definitely an example.
** If you interpret the events to mean that Baba Yaga knew Ludmilla would steal the potion and therefore she made it a "turn into dragon" poison from the outset, then it's a completely straight version of ''Mind Is A Plaything of The Body.''
* MinionWithAnFInEvil: Vol. When Ludmilla told him to "get [Prince Ivan] out of the way" he didn't realise she meant "kill him" and instead locked him in the tower.
* MisunderstoodLonerWithAHeartOfGold: Baba Yaga. The film sets her up to be a villain, but she's really just a solitary witch with a bad reputation. At worst, she's just a jerk to Bartok.
* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Again, sort of. Ludmilla's last words are a shocked "oh, my goodness" and gasp when she realizes that Baba Yaga's potion is turning her into a monster, but by then it's far too late.
* NoodlePeople: Ludmilla, sort of. Everything above her shoulders is normal and the rest of her body is noodly, which looks...odd.
* NonActionGuy: Zozi the Bear, Bartok's business partner and sidekick contributes almost nothing to the plot, and otherwise just serves as comic relief--he's even specifically forbidden from helping Bartok by Baya Yaga's orders. The only plot relevant scenes he has are contributing to Bartok's fake hero charades in the opening, and later freeing Bartok and then rescuing Prince Ivan from the watertower while Bartok deals with Dragon Ludmilla.
* ObviouslyEvil: Ludmilla dresses in wasp like colors, is drawn very lean and angular, and has a cold, condescending personality. Even before the reveal, it's clear that she's a villain.
* OffModel: The film has surprisingly good animation for a direct-to-video film, but there are some goofs or odd bits of animation here and there. In Bartok's opening song number, there are scenes of animation in crowd shots that are clearly unfinished and have extremely choppy animation. There's also some occasionally digital shrinking of Bartok during his song, which looks rather strange in motion compared to the rest of the animation.
** During the "Possible Hero" song, at Zozi's line "You're unafraid...", for no clear reason you can see the background right through him and Bartok.
* OhGodWithTheVerbing: As in the original film, Bartok is prone to this. A lot.
* OneWingedAngel: During Ludmilla's VillainSong. She downs a potion Baba Yaga gave to Bartok (it was supposed to turn him into a heroic creature capable of saving the day) and turns into "the real Ludmilla" - a none-too-intimidating [[LoopholeAbuse purple dragon]].
* {{Prequel}}: The movie is supposed to be a prequel.
* PublicDomainCharacter: Baba Yaga, the famous witch of Slavic folklore.
* ReusedCharacterDesign: Piloff bears a passing resemblance to a SmallAnnoyingCreature from an unfinished project of Bluth's called ''Jawbreaker''.
** As does Dragon!Ludmilla to the dragon from ''VideoGames/DragonsLair''.
* RedHerring: Ludmilla has her lackey kidnap Prince Ivan while disguised as Baba Yaga and locked up in the tower (with the intent to kill him), framing Baba for the kidnapping and planning to claim the throne from Ivan in his absence. She sends Bartok out to find Yaga and retrieve Prince Ivan just to get him out of her way, honestly believing he wouldn't come back.
* SecretTestOfCharacter: Baba Yaga puts Bartok through four challenges, which seem like what he has to do to get Prince Ivan back from her, but are revealed to be a test of his good nature and necessary to make a potion that will allow him to save Prince Ivan from his real kidnapper.
-->'''Bartok''': "Wait a minute. You mean, the whole time I was doing all that stuff for me?"
-->'''Baba Yaga''': "Mm-hmm. Now, leave me and save the prince."
* SexyWalk: Ludmilla walks like this a lot. YMMV on whether it is actually sexy or not.
* ShoutOut: A couple to ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'': The scene of Bartok attempting to get Piloff off of the boulder is clearly borrowing a few ideas from WesternAnimation/WileECoyoteAndTheRoadrunner cartoons, right down to the backgrounds resembling Maurice Nobel's paintings. The ogre they later encounter is a spoof of the Tasmanian Devil.
** During the final battle, Bartok cat-calls Ludmilla by going "[[Creator/JerryLewis Hey dragon LAY-dee!]]"
* SmallAnnoyingCreature: Bartok himself. Also Piloff the... pink... squishy... thing.
* SpinOff: The movie is ostensibly a prequel, but its setting and tone has few ties to ''Anastasia'', that it really feels more like this.
* SpikesOfVillainy: Ludmilla has several superfluous spikes over her wardrobe, just in case you didn't realize she was the villain.
* StockSoundEffect: For some reason, Baba Yaga's flying uses the same sound effect as [[WesternAnimation/RockyAndBullwinkle Rocky Squirrel's flying.]]
* SuperSerum[=/=]PsychoSerum: Baba Yaga's potion, which turns whoever uses it into their inner self, can be either depending on who drinks it. If taken by a repressed hero like Bartok, it would have supposedly made him into a heroic superbat. However, when taken by Ludmilla - a repressed murderous sadist - it instead turns her into a violent fire-breathing dragon. This noticeably surprises her, but [[GenreSavvy not Bartok or the audience]].
* SwissArmyTears: The final ingredient Baba Yaga wanted for her potion is Bartok's tears, shed because of "compassion". Awww...
* TookALevelInBadass: Bartok by the end of the movie. He succeeds in distracting and taking down a dragon on his own, and without even laying a finger on her.
* ToiletHumor: A mild example, but after wolfing down Baba Yaga's potion, Ludmilla makes a very loud, vulgar burp, complete with expelling a technicolor odor to go with it.
* TheUnintelligible: Oble, with the exception of a few key words, like "crown"... or "buggler."
* TheVillainSucksSong: The opening number, "Baba Yaga," which of course turns out to be a fakeout.
* VillainSong: "The Real Ludmilla". "Someone's In My House Tonight" would seem like one on the first viewing, until its revealed that Baba Yaga isn't a villain.
* WellIntentionedExtremist: Part of Ludmilla's motive was wanting to usurp a prince she didn't feel was taking his royal responsibilities seriously. It doesn't hide her cruel, sadistic and vain personality.
* WhamLine: When Baba Yaga reveals that she never kidnapped Prince Ivan, and that he never even left his castle.
-->'''Bartok''' (seeing the tower of Ivan's castle): "Whoa, whoa. The tower...Uh, you never took him, did ya?"
-->'''Baba Yaga''': "I never said I did."
* WickedCultured: Ludmilla.
----