[[WMG: Bajorans would start playing baseball]]
To the Bajorans baseball would not only be the national past time for the entire planet, it would actually be a religious observation. Each vedic temple would form a team to play in the league and each temple would have a baseball field, the bigger temples would be full on stadiums. Whichever temples wins The World Series gets to name the next Kai. Before each game a vedic would give a speech about the history of baseball, and how the Emissary used the lessons of baseball to explain linear time to the Prophets. Hot dogs and beer would become like the communion wafers.
* Buck Bokai and Willie Mayes would be like saints.
* The vedic temples would start ordaining ringers to make their temple teams the best.
* The Pah Wraith Cultists, atheists and half cardassian children would have to play in a separate, unofficially recognized league.
* I assume the crew of DS9 would be an official team as well. They would also have to open a league for aliens to play in.
* In fact it would become tradition in the Bajoran sector for each ship to form a team and when the ships come in to dock at DS9 the crews play each other. These games get sent out across space and the ship crews develop sports fan followings and fame. It would become part of the tradition that the Umpire had to be a Vedic.

[[WMG: Jake Sisko is the 24th century Jack London]]

* A writer who spent his formative adolescence and early adulthood on a distant frontier outpost, played a major role in the Dominion War as a Starfleet correspondent and spy, emphatically rejected a Starfleet career to focus on his writing, turned down the Pennington School on Earth in favor of staying on the politically unstable and strategically important Deep Space Nine, has a thing for native Bajoran girls (He had a of girlfriends over the series and all of them were Bajoran), is a charmer, and a survivor. Is adventurous and the older he gets, the less he heeds his fathers' warnings to the point where his dad has to acknowledge that his son is old enough to make his own decisions... this "kid" has had enough adventures to write twenty books about life on the frontier, by the wormhole, in non-Federation space.

[[WMG: O'Brien's flucuating rank]]

* My theory: O'Brien was an NCO who was made an acting officer first with the rank of ensign and later lieutenant with a reassignment to the operations division. ALl this was probably due to his distinguished war record. He had a lot of experience that even officers lacked and either Picard, Starfleet or both saw this potentia. Alernatively he may have been made an officer so he could direct much younger Academy graduates, as although he had never gone there himself, as his experience and training were still considered assets. This might have been rescinded later in the series after O'Brien had seasoned his students on board the Enterprise, but because O'Brien is an engineering genius and a war veteran, Starfleet Command had a great amount of respect for him, so when his time as an acting officer was over, even as an NCO, he got to keep his officer's privileges, pay (if Starfleet pays, that's not clear), status, etc . My personal theory, and this is based on my understanding of O'Brien's character, is that prior to accepting his transfer to Deep Space 9, he seriously considered leaving Starfleet. In fact, he tried really, really hard to leave Starfleet, but Starfleet didn't want to let him go. He and Keiko had even made plans to move to Earth, settle down in a nice neighborhood in Kyoto, and one of Keiko's relatives would set O'Brien up with a cushy job, and the O'Brien family would never set foot on a spaceship again. Then, Starfleet made O'Brien an offer he couldn't refuse: basically he'd be the highest compensated NCO in the Federation, however it is that Starfleet compensates its officers. All he had to go was travel across the Federation to an abandoned Cardassian Space Station and make it work. And as much as O'Brien wanted to leave, his engineer's instincts took over and he couldn't refuse that challenge. O'Brien even said himself in the series that he was bored on the Enterprise and much happier on Deep Space 9 because something was always going wrong and he felt more needed there. It may be that on starbases, the Chief of Operations does most of that work, and chief engineers are more like starship officers who specialize in Warp Drive and other things a ship would have that a space station or a ground installation wouldn't. So O'Brien having that authority (ordering officers around despite being an NCO) makes sense on a relatively small outpost like Deep Space 9. But given how much I suspect O'Brien wanted to leave Starfleet before accepting the Deep Space 9 transfer, they must have offered him something even better than he got for working on the Enterprise, or I doubt he would have taken such an assignment considering that it involved moving his wife and very young daughter to a politically unstable, highly disputed area of space filled with criminals, terrorists, and Cardassian military paranoids. Think back and remember how unhappy Keiko was in the first season when she and Miles' relationship seemed the most strained... I always suspected that O'Brien had tried to leave Starfleet and Keiko had worked herself up over going home, only to be disappointed.
* I always thought that accepting posting at [=DS=]9 was one of those marriage compromises whereeverybody kinda got what they wanted, but kind didn't. After having Molly Keiko wanted to leave Starfleet because galavanting around the galaxy with a child was dangerous, plus Myles had a little person thankless job on the ship. I'm sure [=DS=]9 spun life on a starbase orbiting a planet as a somewhat like settling down to make Keiko happy, and he got a real job.
** That could be the case. My theory still pins down the fluctuating rank between low ranking officer/high ranking NCO though. In "The Wounded" (a TNG episode) O'Brien's former captain referred to him as having been a tactical officer. We've never seen anyone below the rank of ensign take tactical, ever, except for O'Brien once to cover for Worf in [=TN=]G and later in [=DS=]9 on the ''Defiant'' at times. Seems like he got a temporary field promotion during the Cardassian Wars and Starfleet decided to let him keep it for a while for whatever reason (I assume his field experience and technical abilities) until later in TNG when he was preparing to transfer to [=DS=]9 (which meant losing his field promotion but getting a better job anyway). So he went back to being a CPO and retained all the prestige than a chief engineer would on a starship. After all, Starfleet Academy wanted him as a professor of engineering and he never went to the academy himself.

[[WMG: Pure Klingons and part-Klingon hybrids, have very diverse aging patterns. It has nothing to do with hybridization with humans.]]
This would explain Alexander, Worf, Kang, Kor and Koloth's ages. Remember that statistical variation exists within any population. It may be that Klingon individuals are subject to more varied aging patterns, such that an 8 year old Klingon could either resemble a cognitive and physic young adult, an adolescent, or even a child, depending on their individual genetics. This leaves open the possibility that Worf was in his 20's during ''StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' or possibly much younger like Alexander was when he joined the ''Rotarran's'' crew (9 years old and looking like an older teen or young adult). Officially Worf was in his twenties during ''Next Gen'', so maybe the super-aging comes from his mother's side of the family (and she was half human). But if the pattern holds, any Klingon young adult might be between 9 and 21 in human years. The onset of Klingon puberty might be much less regular or predictable among Klingons than humans or other species. Puberty could hit them at 6 or at 12-14. It depends on the individual and probably the developmental patterns in their families. If I had to guess I'd assume that Romulans and Vulcans experience something similar, since they can either look middle aged to elderly in their mid 100's, or much younger at the same age, like Tuvok from ''StarTrekVoyager.'' This might complicate ''Ponn Farr'', though.

[[WMG: Worf has the Klingon version of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder]]
Compared to other Klingons, Worf is anal retentive. This was part of his own culture shock in early ''Next Generation'' episodes. He's often at odds with other Klingons. His quarters are always immaculate and he likes everything a certain way and becomes very irritable when he doesn't get what he wants. Then, there's his obsession with the details of his wedding, and just watch his interaction with General Martok (and other Klingons) in the later ''Deep Space 9'' seasons.

[[WMG: The "Orion Syndicate" is actually the '''O'Ryan Syndicate''', a 24th century descendant of the ''Irish Mob'']]
Hence, the reason we never see any actual Orions (the green-skinned humanoids from The Original Series) in episodes that involve the Syndicate, and why humans seem to fill its higher ranks, along with a bunch of other aliens including people from other Federation planets (and non-Fed species like the Yridians). Also explains why the Federation seems so interested in it. It's not an Orion venture at all. It's the O'Ryan Syndicate!
* Is this why they're green? Oh, ''little green men!!!''
** No, it has to Leprechauns...the Ferengi!

[[WMG: The Dominion War was instigated by the Cardassians, and was part of a long-term Cardassian political strategy to infiltrate the Federation]]
The war was instigated by the Cardassians to make them seem like really sympathetic pawns; remember that Cardassians are long-term planners; sacrificing the dignity and comfort of a generation, not to mention millions of lives when they rebelled against the Dominion at the end of the war, is second-nature to them. Even their epic novels typically take place over several generations and involve a tradition of sacrifice and duty to the state. Their militaristic culture is practically based on Machiavellian politics. Now, as an occupied power, they've endured horrors eerily similar to what they themselves did to the Bajorans. By the end of the war, when they rebel against the Dominion, the Cardassians really look like they've been tragically screwed. But this is what they want. They want the rest of the galaxy to see them as just as sympathetic as, if not more than, the Bajorans. In the next generation, growing up after the Dominion War, the Cardassians will basically be the new Bajorans, dispossessed and broken. Then eventually they'll join the Federation, supposedly as a last resort, but this is actually in line with their greater plan: once they've got their foot in the door, they will use their superhumanoid politicking skills to take over the Federation Council, and Earth itself. They'll beccome the lawyers and intelligence agents of the Federation, just like Vulcans are the diplomats and scientists of the Federation. Earth will become a colony of Cardassia, and Cardassia will take over the Federation without a single shot fired.
* Works, but only if Cardassians age the same rate as everyone else. Who's to say that they age 2-5x the speed of humans so that 3 generations of Cardassians represents just two decades of human growth. Not to mention, there is probably some give-and-take between the Cardassians for Federation aid. They'd probably have some say in schooling, military, etc. Notice that Japan hasn't taken over the UN.
* Related secondary WMG based on the Cardassians' shown abilities: There is indeed such a plan amongst part of the Cardassian leadership. It will fail, because the Cardassians are not ''that'' superhumanoid in their politicking or planning, and the Federation is ''very'' good at assimilating cultures into its greater overarching culture. The Cardassians will become an influential and powerful species in the Federation, but they will not rule it (as a species. Individual Cardassians might very well end up as President from time to time) nor will Earth become a colony of Cardassia in any sense.

[[WMG: Captain Boday, a "Gallomite," is really just a '''human''' with a transparent skull.]]
Why not? We've never actually seen him, and the "Gallomites" could easily be a human colony, or a religious organization rather than a species. Maybe Gallomites are just humans who are really into bio-augmentation. Maybe they display their brains like status or wealth. They're not Federation citizens because they practice genetic engineering, which is banned by Federation law. But they probably trade with the Federation. Captain Boday was an often-alluded-to freighter captain.

[[WMG:Bashir's genetic enhancements were done on the order of Section 31]]
Bashir's parents were constantly changing jobs, so it is unlikely they would have been able to accrue enough finances to afford the expense of such intensive therapy. The therapy took place on Adigeon Prime, a planet outside the Federation, and therefore the technicians performing the operation would have required monetary compensation, not the credits that are only good within the Federation. It has been established that the ad-hoc currency between space-faring economies is gold-pressed latinum, something the average Federation citizen doesn't usually have or need, and it is unlikely the Bashirs would have access to, at least in large amounts. However, an organization as powerful and most likely as well-funded as Section 31 would be able to afford such an operation. It had also been stated by Sloan in "Inquisition" that they had been observing Bashir for a long while. Section 31 approached the Bashirs with the offer of the operations, with the agreement that they would raise their son in such a way to be amenable to joining Section 31 when they felt he was ready[[SecretOrganizationCravingIntelligentEnigmaticTropersYonder .]] Throughout the series, Bashir mentions that his parents strongly disapproved of his considering a career in tennis and their encouragement in his decision to join Starfleet (most of their recruits are from Starfleet). His interest in spy literature may have been introduced by his parents, wanting him to have a certain romanticism towards the profession. Richard and Amsha didn't ''accidentally'' reveal his enhancements to his colleagues and Zimmerman, but were ordered to by Section 31, who hoped that Bashir would become isolated and have no one to turn to but S31. However, his colleagues pretty much just shrugged and told him to throw darts from further back. Richard chose to come through for his kid and make that prison deal so Julian could live his life on his own terms, at least until Sloan came for him.
* To drive this even further: What if ''all'' recruits of Section 31 are genetically altered and then raised in such a way? (Is that a case of MoreThanMindControl by the way?)
** Consider [[StarTrekDeepSpaceNineRelaunch Ethan Locken]], who is also genetically altered and whose catalyst for joining was instigated by S31, definitely making this MoreThanMindControl. Perhaps Bashir was the prototype...
* This is still very possible, although even Federation credits are not normally used on Earth, and are likely provided in limited qualities as "traveling money" to Terrans leaving the planet. However, it is likely that under the New Economic System, changing jobs is not detrimental to material or social status if you are good at the new job, and prominent citizens (which the Bashirs are implied to be, by manner if nothing else) find ways to invest in off-planet capitalism. Credits can doubtless be used to buy latinum, and the exchange rate is probably decent given that the Federation seems to be the Alpha Quadrant's richest and most stable political entity. However, genetic enhancement is probably an entirely different and more obscure sort of black market than Romulan ale or looted antiquities, and a couple of overcivilised StageParents likely needed a bit of help finding it...

[[WMG:The wormhole aliens/Prophets are descendants of the Bajorans.]]
The Bajorans will evolve into them at some point in the future, at which point they'll exist at all times simultaneously. This will allow them to use the Orbs and, later, the Emissary to guide their ancestors' development. They are literally "of Bajor." "The Sisko is of Bajor" because he's half-Prophet and therefore half-Bajoran.
* PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad: Federation makes a big deal of saying "Wormhole Aliens"; Fed never says "Klingon Aliens" or "Cardassi Aliens". The Fed doesn't even say the word "Cardassians" The Federation is too busy rolling on its belly and saying to the Cardassi aliens "Take me big-boy!"
** Because "Wormholians" would sound either suggestive, wrong or just plain silly?
** The Klingons call themselves Klingons and the Cardassians call themselves Cardassians, so that's what they're usually called. The prophets don't call themselves anything, partly because it's really hard communicating with them in the first place, so they're given a straightforward descriptive name. If the Bajorans had a name for them without the religious connotations, they'd probably use that.
** They are also literally an alien species, bearing little resemblance to humans in any sense. A similar example is Species 8472, who are simply referred to by their Borg designation. It happens when a species is so divorced from what humans are used to that they don't even have a concrete name for them (and the species can't or won't provide one to them) - they just give it some arbitrary designation that is descriptive in some way.
** Remember, "The Sisko is '''of''' Bajor." Now the view could loosely interpret that the Prophets mean "Bajor" to be outside the wormhole. However, given the {{timeywimey ball}} nature of their existence and that they created Sisko. Cassidy Yates is pregnant with his child in the finale. Their children and descendants live on Bajor and marry Bajorans. Their prophet-enhanced DNA spurs the Bajorans to "evolve" into the Prophets over the centuries. Since they need to live in the Wormhole they enter/create it. And then they create the Sisko....oh, no, I've gone [[{{Film/AustinPowers}} cross-eyed]].


[[WMG:Jake Sisko is a [[Literature/{{Chrestomanci}} nine-lived enchanter]], and the "writing school" in New Zealand is the twenty-fourth century equivalent of Chrestomanci Castle; he's supposed to go there to train to be the next Chrestomanci.]]
This is why he's the only person who doesn't have a duplicate in the mirror universe.
* Then what does it mean when he ends up ''not'' going? (It seems that the Federation is uneasy about the idea of dying for your art.)
* Partially {{jossed}} early on. Jake doesn't exist in the mirror universe because his would-be parents broke up.

[[WMG:The dim who gives Dax her combadge back in "[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Past Tense, Part II]]" is one of the hippies Kira and O'Brien encountered earlier in the episode -- and ''much'' earlier in the timeline.]]
Think about it. The guy's obsessed with the idea of becoming invisible -- which is how the transporter must have looked to him -- and he seems to realize that the badge (just like those ones he saw back in the sixties) has something to do with it. It's unclear how he knows aliens were involved; maybe Kira was speaking Bajoran the whole time and he wasn't privy to the [[TranslatorMicrobes translation]], making it clear that her language was not of this world.

(One possible objection to this theory: he seems awfully spry for the septuagenarian he must be by 2024. But assuming a strong constitution and maybe some just-over-the-horizon advances in medical care, it's within the realm of possibility.)

[[WMG: Kira Nerys is a [[Manga/DeathNote Kira]].]]
And what is more, she is the latest of a long line of Kiras. That is why she was such an effective member of LaResistance.

This did not come out in that episode where the caste system was briefly reintroduced because what government figure would want to impose that caste from above?
* If that was true, then why does Dukat stay alive for so long?
* "Dukat" is a fake name. He's a Cardassian, after all.
** "Dukat," rather, is only his last name (His first name is "Skrain" in non-canon sources). The reason he never mentions his first name is because knew about Kira's nature all along.
** Death Note works on humans only. If Shinigami have ways to kill other species, they haven't revealed them. So Kira maybe Kira gave it back when she found it it wouldn't work on Cardassians.

[[WMG: In the Mirror Universe, the Dominion is a democracy.]]
A liberal, Utopian democracy where genetic engineering ensures food for billions of citizens of hundreds of worlds. The Dominion is a powerful trading entity, it exports it genetically engineered supercrops. The Changelings walk freely among the Solids, long ago having defended them against invasion by infiltrating the invaders. There are no Jem'hadar or Vorta, they were never created.
* No, the Vorta and Jem'Hadar still exist, but they're the result of various uplift experiments, rather than go-betweens and cannon fodder. They have full rights.
* In the Mirror Universe, the Changelings have uplifted many, many lower life forms in the Gamma Quadrant to sapient status, and are still worshiped as physical gods by their creations. Genetic engineering is to the Dominion's utopian, liberal democracy what matter replication technology is the Federation in the Prime Universe: the technology that makes Utopia possible. It has defended the Gamma Quadrant from the Borg for at least 2,000 years, and watched the Terran Empire rise and fall from a distance.
* So what was Mirror Odo doing at Mirror Terok Nor?
** He was still sent out by the Founders to explore the galaxy, it just so happens that when he went through the wormhole he found the despotic, autocratic Alliance instead of the (comparatively less-so) Cardassians/Bajorans.
* In fact, a major point of the whole series seems to have been that the Dominion was the complete opposite of the Federation: where humanity used its unique characteristics to bring thousands of species together in racial harmony, the Dominion's founders used their species' unique abilities to conquer and redesign the other species of their quadrant to suit themselves. Where the Federation outlawed genetic tampering and augmentation, the Dominion used it extensively to reshape every species to serve it in some capacity. Since the Dominion is such a complete inversion of the Federation, it's likely that over in the morally inverted MirrorUniverse, the Dominion ''is'' the Federation. It probably even calls itself that, or something like it. (The "Gamma Confederation" maybe?)
* {{Jossed}} in the EU novel ''Rise Like Lions''. The Mirror Dominion is in fact ''worse'' than the Prime Dominion. This makes sense, as the MirrorUniverse isn't really a moral inversion of the Prime, it's more like an exaggeration of its negative aspects:
** Mirror humanity in general has our selfishness magnified.
** Prime!Kirk's womanizing tendencies and confidence-bordering-on-arrogance get magnified into blatant sexism and AttemptedRape.
** Prime!Sisko's cocky streak takes over his character to where he basically starts the Rebellion because he was bored of being Kira's {{privateer}}.
** The Mirror Klingons and Cardassians have their species' asshole sides exaggerated, and Mirror Worf wasn't raised on human tales of Klingon honor so he's more like a House of Duras-style drunken asshole Klingon.
** Point of order: ''that'' novel does not establish that the Mirror Dominion is worse, merely that it exists and is organized in the same basic way (with ketracel white-dependent Jem'Hadar cannon fodder, Vorta as the organizers/commanders, and the Founders firmly on top). The Mirror Dominion being worse comes from the Decipher Star Trek RPG, although there's nothing contradicting it in the short glimpse shown in ''Rise Like Lions''.

[[WMG: The {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' are the [[Main/StarWars Force ghosts]] of Jedi and Sith Lords.]]
At some point between the two continuities, both orders died out (or decided to Main/AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence to prevent the Borg from assimilating the secrets of the Force -- even the Sith would have to acknowledge that they'd be unable to stop the Borg). They took up residence in a wormhole and continued fighting with each other and messing with the {{Main/Muggles}}. Like the Force users, the Wormhole Aliens have a [[Main/ColorCodedForYourConvenience blue-good/red-evil color scheme]], display the power of telekinesis while possessing humans, and are maddeningly cryptic about anything important.

[[WMG: During the Dominion War, there was a popular Klingon play written based on ''Film/{{Glory}}''.]]
Klingons would love that story. An officer helps those under him [[LevelGrinding Level Grind]] [[TookALevelInBadass in badass]], and then he and many of them die in glorious combat.

They could just watch ''Glory'' if that work survived Earth's Dark Age -- which is dubious, given how fragile film is as a medium. But Klingons would want the story retold in the original Klingon and with the original Klingon characters.

[[WMG: Quark's bar is a multi-dimensional nexus.]]
In the Mirror Universe, everybody has a different role than in the "normal" universe - ''except'' Mirror Quark, who also ran Deep Space Nine's bar until Mirror Kira had him executed for helping Terrans escape from the station. Maybe Quark has a bar on Deep Space Nine in ''every'' universe in which a version of Deep Space Nine exists.

Another example: In our own universe, Deep Space Nine exists as a fictional station in a TV series. Quark does exist as a character in this series's narrative and has a bar on Deep Space Nine.

* Isn't the station still in orbit around Bajor in the mirror universe? How does being located around half a star system away from its counterpart affect this theory?

[[WMG: Darvin subconsciously ''wanted'' the crew of the Defiant to prevent him from changing the past.]]
That's why he made this remark about his statue having a tribble in his hand, thereby hinting at the location of the bomb.

In fact, that's why he told them the plan at ''all''. If he'd waited a few hours, then he could have told them "YouAreTooLate."
* He may have realizied the bomb might kill or injure him if he was close enough when it went off, or that since he's a [[{{ProudWarriorRaceGuy}} Klingon]] killing Kirk in a sneak attack would be very dishonorable.

[[WMG: O'Brien gets replaced by a replicant sometime during "Armageddon Game".]]
Recall that, in "Armageddon Game", O'Brien's death gets faked, and Keiko figures it out by SpottingTheThread that he never drinks coffee in the afternoon -- except, as he claims at the end, he ''does'' drink coffee in the afternoon.

In "Whispers", the episode immediately following, he's been replaced by a replicant. The replicant drinks a ''ton'' of coffee.

Keiko was right. The real O'Brien doesn't drink coffee in the afternoon. It's just that, sometime on the way back from being rescued in "Armageddon Game", he was swapped for a caffeine-powered robot.
* Interesting, but then how does Miles have a (presumably) natural son with Keiko a few seasons later?
** In "Whispers", the real O'Brien comes back in the end.
* Except "Whispers" specifically spells-out exactly where he was when the replicant was made, and it wasn't the planet in "Armageddeon Game". Your theory would have been some brilliant writing, but it's more likely that these episodes were either not originally intended to go back-to-back, or nobody thought of connecting the two.
** Is it possible he was replaced before "Armageddon Game" but after "The Alternate"

[[WMG: SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas takes place on ancient Bajor.]]
Sinbad's ship looks like an ancient Bajoran lightship. The gate to Tartarus is, of course, the wormhole. And Eris is probably a Pah-wraith.

The Book of Peace may somehow be related to the Tears of the Prophets.

* Actually, it was produced by the Cult of the Pagh-Wraiths.
** Eris is really a Prophet, and the wormhole being the gate to something akin to Hell would only make sense from the Pagh-Wraiths' perspective.
** A book from Ancient Bajor with mysterious powers? The Book of Peace is clearly the Book of the Kosst Amojan.
** The story tells how the hero ventured into the "Evil" Prophets' temple and forced them to give him the knowledge of how to release the Pagh-Wraiths.

[[WMG: TreasurePlanet ''also'' takes place on ancient Bajor.]]
Morph is somehow related to the Founders. Captain Amelia is an ancestor of Kira Nerys.

[[WMG: Joseph Sisko spends the first few years of the show in stasis, waiting for a medical breakthrough.]]
Early on, Captain Sisko speaks of his father as though he was dead (though he never quite comes out and says it); sometime around the beginning of season 4, he starts referring to him in the present tense again. When Joseph appears in "Homefront", he's had a number of organ replacements and Benjamin and Jake both feel the need to nag him about his health.

We know, based on the way Bashir treats Vedek Bareil, that Starfleet medical procedure includes the option of putting a patient in indefinite stasis until their condition can be cured. Now, back in the TNG episode "The Neutral Zone," when the Enterprise ran into the cryogenic satellite, Dr. Crusher and Data referred to its occupants as dead, ''including'' those who were revived. Apparently, this applies to modern stasis techniques as well.

Presumably, Joseph Sisko was brought out of stasis during the break between seasons 3 and 4, which is why we don't hear about it on the show when it happens. Perhaps when the ''Enterprise-D'' blows up, Dr. Crusher decides to spend some time on research again...

[[WMG: Odo and the other changelings are the result of [[Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion Instrumentality]].]]

[[WMG: The Founders' standard appearance is an (attempted) imitation of the appearance of the ''original'' Humanoid we see in the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration The Next Generation]]'' episode "The Chase".]]
They look suspiciously similar. Of course, the female Founder is played by the same actress (Salome Jens), but the makeup is also similar (except for the ears).
* The problem with this theory is that it's canon that Odo's appearance was due to him not being very good at doing faces -- and, indeed, in the episode "Children of Time" future!Odo has a slightly more humanoid (but still not perfect) face. The reason why all the other Founders look like that is because they're copying Odo.
** What if the Bejoran people, which Odo was trying to mimic, are closer to the founders genetically.
* In one episode, Odo is visited by another changeling, Laas, who hasn't made contact with the Founders. Laas' humanoid form appears to be mimicking whatever species he grew up around, although with an Odo-esque 'smoothness' to it, with no lips or eyebrows. And Laas doesn't have the "can't do one of your noses" excuse - he's an expert shapeshifter who can turn into fire, fog, and even a freakin' warp-capable ''starship''. This suggests there's some 'pure' Changeling-humanoid look in there somewhere. If the other Founders were purely imitating Odo, why don't they all look like the same actor?
* Alternatively, the Founders ARE the Precursors. All the evidence is there: they admit themselves that they used to be "solids", implying quite an old race, and they also state that they used to explore the galaxy, as the Precursors did. The Female Changeling looks like she does because she's acting as a mouthpiece for the Founders, like the Precursor in "The Chase", and that form was found to be most effective.

[[WMG: Eris (the first Vorta to appear in ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'') was not really a Vorta, but something completely different.]]
Eris was able to beam away from the Station with no Dominion ships ''anywhere'' nearby (and we know that the Dominion does not use cloaking devices). If the Dominion had this technology, why do they never use it again? My guess is that Eris is not really a Vorta, but something entirely different.
* Alternatively: she beamed nowhere. She's now a discorporated mass who sent her intel she gathered already. If she's a Vorta, she's basically a disposable, replaceable clone.
* FridgeBrilliance: If you take this together with the WMG further above that SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas takes place on ancient Bajor instead of earth, you get... something extremely weird.
* She ''was'' the only Vorta to ever display telekinetic abilities.
* Maybe she was a clone of the original prototype of the Vorta species. Maybe the Vorta were originally designed with telekinetic abilities. Maybe the Vorta were originally intended to be the Dominion's footsoldiers as well as diplomats, but at some point the Founders decided that it would be better to create two weaker species which they could easily control, rather than one single "supersoldier" species: they removed the Vorta's psi powers and kept them on as administrators and diplomats, and then they engineered the Jem'Hadar as a more easily controlled species of supersoldiers without tricky psi powers that could threaten the Founders. However, every once in a while, the Dominion activated an Eris clone when they felt they needed her. She would be programmed to complete a single mission and then commit suicide in the most convenient way possible, such as by beaming into space.
* The transporter part was {{Jossed}} on-screen: Dominion transporter was stated having range of at least three light years, when enchanched with a homing transponder like [[http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20050913103625/memoryalpha/en/images/a/a6/Transporter_crystal.jpg the one used to kidnap Kira and move her from ''Deep Space 9'' to ''Empok Nor'']]. Maybe she had one of those in her pocket. Still doesn't explain the telekinetic abilities...
** As someone who features Eris in his fanfiction extensively, I think she is one of a handful of Vorta who opted for telekinesis when she first became a clone.

[[WMG: The Dominion didn't defeat the Maquis.]]
The only information we have is the intelligence gathered by Starfleet's secret service. We never ''see'' it happen. Also, it's very unlikely: neither the Cardassians nor the Federation were able to defeat the Maquis, and the Dominion isn't THAT much more advanced.
* It wasn't a matter of tech. It was a matter of will and resources. The Federation doesn't (publicly) engage in atrocities, while the Cardassians didn't really have the resources to wipe them out and withstand the inevitable backlash from the Federation. The Dominion were perfectly fine with committing atrocities, and they could easily withstand any attack at that point. Also, one of the biggest sources was Mike Eddington, who ''was'' a member of the Maquis, and was trying to evacuate the last survivors of his cell in his last appearance.
* That one guy from VOY "Repression" was still around.

[[WMG: Nagus Zek was replaced by a shapeshifter/surgically-altered Section 31 agent/surgically-altered Romulan agent sometime in season 7 -- or, alternatively, he and Quark's mother were both suffering extreme dementia.]]
Seriously, abdicating in favour of Rom? In the unlikely event we return to the Star Trek Prime universe continuity in the future I predict it will show the Ferengi as the alien trash of the galaxy as their world and society have imploded. This will give the Dominion/Federation/Romulans/[[MonsterOfTheWeek Threat Of The Week]] an excuse to set up in the Alpha Quadrant again to "help" rescue Feringinar.
* Don't underestimate Rom.
* Let's not forget that there were distinct ''hints'' within the show's canon that Zek ''was'' suffering from dementia.

[[WMG:The Federation wanted to start the war w/ Dominion but found themselves outclassed and outgunned when they did.]]
Despite numerous warning from residents of the Gamma Quadrant about the Dominion, Star Fleet kept constantly probing deeper into the Gamma Quadrant and establishing colonies until they provoked the attack that destroyed the USS Odyssey. Then the Federation attempts a poorly planned and executed "peace initiative" that ends in its delegation being captured and "brainwashed" by the Dominion. This failure wasn't followed not by a retreat from the Gamma Quadrant, but a military buildup of Deep Space Nine.

When it was it was discovered that Dominion had infiltrated all levels of Star Fleet,the Tal Shi'ar and the Obsidian Order,the Federation did not warn the Romulan and Cardassian governments against an attack into the Gamma Quadrant (although they knew it was imminent) and thus ensured that two of their Alpha Quadrant opponents were weakened.
Finally,rather than destroying the wormhole and thus preventing an attack on the Alpha Quadrant, the Federation "dithers" and allows the a war to begin w/ an enemy that,it's later revealed to have been manufacturing bio-weapons to combat against.

A conspiracy of dunces? No...a series of actions and misdirections that lead to an intended goal: A confrontation w/ the Dominion
* Closing the wormhole was tried, but a saboteur reversed the polarity and made it too strong to destroy instead.

It was all instigated by the Cardassians to make them seem like really sympathetic pawns; remember that Cardassians are long-term planners; sacrificing the dignity and comfort of a generation, not to mention millions of lives when they rebelled against the Dominion at the end of the war, they've endured horrors eerily similar to what they did to the Bajorans. In the next generation, growing up after the Dominion War, the Cardassians will be the new Bajorans, dispossessed and broken. Then they'll join the Federation, supposedly as a last resort, but this is actually in line with their greater plan: once they've got their foot in the door, they will totally use their superhumanoid politicking skills to take over the Federation Council, and Earth itself.

[[WMG:The Prophets didn't need Sisko to explain anything to them.]]
They were putting on a act in order to force him to come to terms with his own grief, because the Prophets work in mysterious ways.

[[WMG: Q doesn't bother the station much because of the Prophets.]]
When he shows up, he doesn't do anything truly Q-like--he basically annoys everybody because why not. He didn't do any truly spectacular things out of courtesy to the Prophets, who don't like other godlike beings playing in their backyard.

[[WMG: Commander Sisko created the Bajoran Religion.]]
The Prophets live outside of linear time. While they did send out probes, Cdr. Sisko is the first time any linear being responded to them. The Prophets then send out more probes to gather data; however, they appear at different time periods due to the Prophets living outside normal time. And since Sisko told the Prophets that they were of Bajor, the Prophets decided to fulfill their designated role as gods of Bajor. Some wanted to guide Bajor, others wanted to rule or destroy it; these later become the Pah-Wraiths.

The main evidence for this is the Prophets' behavior. They go from people who have no idea of Bajor to declaring "We are of Bajor," and performing various miracles that determine the course of Bajoran history (such as when they destroyed the invading Dominion fleet). There's also the sketchy evidence of the Bajoran symbol; when it is standing on end, it bears a vague resemblance to the Star Fleet Delta, with three points and a star. The reason the Prophets' behavior appears so contradictory is because they are operating outside of linear time; this allows them to meddle in Bajor's past as they grow more accepting of their apparent role as gods.

[[WMG: Garak "betrayed" Tain by coming out of the closet.]]
We're never told ''exactly'' why or how Garak betrayed Tain. (And that's good, WMG is more fun than knowing.) He himself claims he did no such thing. What if Garak came out of the closet to his father as being anything other than a [[HaveIMentionedIAmHeterosexualToday healthy Cardassian heterosexual]]? That would be a flagrant violation of the Cardassians' most sacred belief, that family comes first, since that means Tain would never have grandchildren. (Except for those leading the Obsidian Order, I guess.)
* That makes a surprising amount of sense.
** And maybe his father's favored punishment of locking Garak in a closet was meant to be symbolic.
** Wait, didn't he have a relationsship with Ziyal? Or are we assuming Cardassian {{Heteronormative Crusader}} types, and his bisexuality was the issue.
*** Actually, in canon, while Ziyal cared for him, Garak ever saw Ziyal as a daughter, and was even a little puzzled by her affection. However, in Andrew Robinson's character novel, Garak did feel attraction to both men and women and WordOfGod, from Robinson and writers, who saw him as being omnisexual.
*** Both Robinson and Alexander Siddig have [[WordOfGod said]] that they both played up the obvious HoYay between Garak and Bashir until their storyline started getting dropped when Bashir bonded with O'Brien.
* The problem with this is that Andrew Robinson decided to play Garak with homosexual subtext because he saw no reason that alien species like the Cardassians should follow human sexuality norms by default. On the other hand, that approach doesn't mesh well with the overall paternalistic portrayal of the Cardassians and the already mentioned emphasis on family and procreation.
** Whatever Robinson's thinking, it's perfectly in character for Garak to be a non-conformist in many senses.
** Cardassians do value the family very highly, as a microcosm of society and a bulwark of strength, but like the Romans and some other cultures with this attitude, they likely treat bisexuality and discreet adultery without children (for which same-sex relationships would be perfect) as normative or at least unimportant.

[[WMG: Garak "betrayed" Tain by confessing to someone that he is his son.]]
Although word never got out (the guy he confessed it to was probably killed right after) such a "blatant lie", as Tain undoubtedly would have called it, would be reason enough for a permanent exile from Cardassia.

[[WMG: The series does take place in Benny Russell's head.]]
Otherwise, why would Vic Fontaine exist? A 1950's lounge singer is out of place in a science fiction show except to appeal to Russel's imagined audience. To them, having Fontaine there is the equivalent of having modern rock stars interact with characters from the future.
* This would also explain why O'Brien and Bashir, an ''Irishman'' and a ''Briton'', are obsessed with the Battle of Alamo, an ancient event in ''American'' history that few Europeans care about even today. Russell would have been imagining things from the point of view of a mid-20th century American, to whom Alamo was much closer both historically and culturally.
* Fontaine is from the 60's, not the 50's. That aside, WordOfGod [[http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Benny_Russell has said]] there actually ''was'' an idea at one time to have a scene at the end of "What You Leave Behind" (the finale) showing Benny sitting in a director's chair in a studio holding a script marked "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine."
** The Fontaine program is officially set in 1962, but nothing in it is particularly 60s, all the elements used in it already existed in the 50s. Also, who's to say how many years spends in imagining the various stories set on Deep Space Nine? Maybe by the time he gets to Fontaine it's the 1960s already?
** Now ''that'' would have been... ''[[MindScrew interesting]]''.

[[WMG: Alternately, the whole StarTrek franchise is created by Benny Russell, who becomes the fictional equivalent to GeneRoddenberry.]]
After Russell gets out of the mental institution, he comes to the realization that the world isn't yet ready for a black space station commander, but ''one day it will be''. So he creates a pitch for a TV series set in the same universe as Deep Space Nine, and names this series ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Star Trek]]''. After a few years, he manages to sell this pitch, and ''Star Trek'' begins to air in 1966. Social attitudes have changed enough that Russell manages to include a black character, Uhura, in the series, though only as a minor officer. A couple of dedaces later he pitches [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration another series]], with more substantial roles for black characters. That series is a big success, and Russell is now confident the world is finally ready for Captain Sisko and for ''Deep Space Nine'', which is indeed given the green light by the studio. The new series doesn't need any original scripts, because Russell already wrote all of them almost 40 years earlier.

[[WMG: Ezri's eldest brother is going through the process of becoming Joined.]]
At the end of ''Prodigal Daughter'', after the younger brother was arrested, Ezri advised her older brother to "make a new life for yourself. A life of your own." She meant that he should get out from underneath their mother's wing and find out what he wants to do with his life. But since they were talking throughout that whole weekend about her having recently been Joined and the difference it made to her life, he thought she meant ''literally'' make a "new life" for himself, by becoming a Joined Trill. So he applies to be Joined and ends up being fast-tracked since his family have a history of being Joined and coping with it even without training, let alone after actually applying.

[[WMG: The modern day-to-day language spoken on Bajor is not Bajoran.]]
Rather, it is Cardassian. This can be chalked up to the CulturePolice effect, most notably language suppression. It's the case with long-term occupiers throughout history, in such places as Ireland and Taiwan, and the switchover takes a generation, or less sometimes. And the Cardassians have been there for two generations. If they started immediately, Kira's generation and the generation before might well have never learned Bajoran as a day-to-day spoken language, but relegated it to use just in religion and ritual. Of course, 50 years isn't long enough to completely wipe out a language, so modern Bajoran children will probably be learning Bajoran as their primary language, as a way to recover their culture. But, just like in Taiwan, these children will probably have a hard time communicating with their Cardassian-speaking grandparents.

How can we know if this is true or not? We can't. Everyone's using [[TranslatorMicrobes the universal translator]]!
* "Necessary Evil" seems to imply that Odo cannot read the Bajoran language (though curiously, Rom can), which might support this point: Odo would be trained only in the administrative language, Cardassian.
** We do know that the Bajoran language is used in religious rituals, and Rom and Leeta had a Bajoran wedding. Rom could have learned to read Bajoran in preparation for the ceremony.
*** "Necessary Evil" was well before Leeta even appeared, but there are plenty of ways Rom might have picked up a bit of the language -- all he does in the episode is identify names on the list, so all he'd have to know is the basic rules of pronunciation.
* We can know this is true because when the Bajorans pray we hear an alien language that we the audience, nor the characters in the show understand.
[[WMG: The Jem'Hadar were modified from a race with a HiveCasteSystem.]]

Specifically, they were modified from the Warrior caste and Ketracel White is based on an enzyme excreted by the HiveQueen caste (which has probably been exterminated). The Worker caste may still exist somewhere for slave labor.

[[WMG: Ziyal is Nerys's half-sister.]]

This is just a crazy thought, but it fits reasonably well. Basically, since Ziyal was born the same year that Meru died, my bet is that the death was in child birth or just happened, and that Dukat convinced the next woman he hooked up with, Tora Nepram, to be a surrogate mother for the child. Nepram never told Ziyal what the truth was, and Ziyal was given her name, so the deception was perfect. Dukat never told Kira because he was holding it in reserve to mess with her psychologically (just like how he held off with Meru), but died before he got the chance.
* Or, following that train of thought, more likely ''Ziyal'' died before Dukat got the chance, and since Ziyal's death lead to his VillainousBreakdown he just wasn't ''sane'' enough. Although, he was evidently sane enough to tell Kira he had been involved with Meru in the first place, so maybe he was still just waiting for the right moment.
* I've had this theory too. But in mine Kira's mother had to assume the name Tora Nepram for some reason, probably something to do with Dukat's enemies. Meru's death was faked in the records.
[[WMG: Baseball symbolizes Good.]]

I mean, everything about baseball including the ball itself kept being ''treated'' symbolically, right?

[[WMG:Sisko has Bajoran ancecestors]]

* Well, he obviously has ''Prophet'' ancestors (however ''that'' might work), so who can really say? Especially if you note the WMG way up there that suggests the Prophets were descended from the Bajorans in the first place.

[[WMG: The Prophets are more powerful than the Q.]]
Note that they perceive all of time, being nonlinear. Q, on the other hand, can't, seeing as how he's "tested" people without knowing how it would come out. He also hasn't demonstrated much ability to read minds, which the Prophets do. Q's a powerful RealityWarper, but the Prophets may be more so, but are [[WeaksauceWeakness restricted]] to the wormhole.
* Q is omnipotent but not omniscient. He can change form and hack reality to fit his whims. But the Prophets, while EnergyBeings like Q, have a much more StarfishAlien-like psychology, being nearly unable to perceive space and time the way that humans and Bajorans do. It's not a matter of power, but rather a matter of Q being better able to readily understand humanoid life than the Prophets, who are on a different level of perception entirely.

[[WMG:Garak is a [[SociopathicHero sociopath]].]]
Something I've noticed about Garak when he's not in his "humble" mode. He's still polite and rather amicable. From what we've seen, whether it's torture or sharing lunch with Bashir, it's all the same to him. Not that he's entirely without morals, as we've seen him do things even without getting anything in return, but he also notably finds that behavior unnerving in himself.
* He pretty clearly displays empathy in ''The Die is Cast''. Anyways, do we really want him to be a sociopath? He's a much more interesting character if he's a normal person with ambiguous morals who's capable of both good and evil.

[[WMG:Section 31 was right.]]
The purpose of Section 31 was to protect the Federation, whatever the means. To this end, they engineered a disease that would kill the Changelings, and infected the Great Link via Odo. This is supposed to be reprehensible, but consider that this action is what actually SAVED the Federation and stopped the Dominion. Consider that previously a group of genetically enhanced individuals had previously determined that there was no way for the Alliance to win a military victory, and that even the best case scenario, trillions of lives would be lost and the Federation and Klingons conquered. But, they were able to win because Odo offered a cure for the disease to the Founders, in exchange for ending the war. If Section 31 created the disease to wiped out the Founders, why create a cure for it? That could have been Section 31's plan all along? Infect the Changelings with a virus, bring them to the brink of death, and then offer them the cure in exchange for their unconditional surrender. Section 31, as distasteful as their tactics may have be, were ultimately responsible for saving the Alpha Quadrant from the Dominion.
* It's Section 31's job to be right.

[[WMG: The Wormhole Aliens Sisko met in the the Pilot weren't the ones who opened up the wormhole]]
Their relationship is a lot like [[Series/DoctorWho the Doctor and River Song]]. When Sisko met them in the pilot, they didn't know who he was or what linear time was. They didn't even seem to know about Bajor. After Sisko left, they sent the orbs to Bajor, ensures Sisko was born, and created the wormhole in the first place. Thus creating a [[StableTimeLoop Stable time loop]].

[[WMG: The founders are [[Creator/HPLovecraft Shoggoth]].]]

[[WMG: [[Film/TheBlob The Blob]] was a deranged Changeling.]]
The blob was one of the hundred infant Changelings sent out to explore the Alpha Quadrant. When its vessel crashed on Earth, it was exposed to some substance in the air or soil that induced psychosis and an increase in mass (similar to Odo's experience with a psychotropic gas on L-S VI).

[[WMG: The Klingon restraunt took care of the tribbles]]
Who else on the station would have a hatred of tribbles and a need for fresh meat?
* I think I'd rather eat gagh.

[[WMG: The Cardassians are descendants of the Ancient Bajorans who came to Cardassia in the Lightships.]]

[[WMG: The Bajor was a very adverse envirerment to technological progress.]]
It is stated they have tens of thousands of years of recorded history, but what technology they have is either equal level or behind the Cargassians, who are not even at Federation tech level, what gives? Well, technological developement is actually depends greatly on geography and local climate. On Earth, the reason the western world had a technological edge over the people they colonized was because they had many other people on a similar latitude that they could trade with (they had little in the way of water barriers or mountains from Spain all the way to at very least India. That meant there is a large amount of area that the same kinds of foods could be grown on. Technology followed these trade routes, allowing the Europeans to gain gunpowder from the Chinese, for example. Now, the reason why Africa and the Americas didn't have that great of tech growth was because either they had mountains, great water barriers, hostile wildlife, or other things that made trade between people very hard. That is why the Maya and Aztec had writing, but the Incas or the tribes of what would be the US didn't. Bajor continents may be set in such a way to utterly screw over any attempts to advance. Another problem is that their "gods" actually did exist and sometimes did directly interfere with Bajor, making it much easier to explain that "the Prophets did it" for any scientific questions, preventing new theories and developments from happening.

[[WMG: The Ferengi were once a matriarchy]]
Given the total debasement of Ferengi females (to the point that they not only are banned by law from wearing clothing but are also traditionally supposed to prechew the food for the males in the house), it seems that this is not a casual bias against females. This is a full-on hatred of them. If Ferengi females were once dominant in society, then the males would have been supressed by them. After an uprising, the females were brought low and forced into humiliation in order to keep them from reorganizing and retaking Ferengi society. Over the generations, much of this became cultural and institutionalized, brought on by fear of females regaining the upper hand. As evidenced by Moogi, Pel, and even Prinadora, female Ferengi have been shown to have more skill in profit-making than their male counterparts even after centuries (or milenia) of subjugation, which is why the males have worked so hard to keep them down.
** On the other hand the males don't seem to actively hate their females, repressing them only because it's the law and how it's always been done. Nudity doesn't seem to humiliate any of them so it's possible the only reason the males wear it is because they go out in the rain while the females were supposed to stay at home. As for the pre-chewing, it sounds degrading to us but they're an alien culture, maybe that's just how Ferengi have always done things? Many female species partially digest their food when feeding their young, maybe Ferengi just never saw the point in stopping.
*** Incidents with Ferengi in ''Star Trek: The Next Generation'' indicate that female nudity ''does'' indicate inferior status, if not humiliation per se. Also, pre-chewing food is performed only by females for male relatives and partners of all ages. For instance, when Nog goes on a date, he considers it a compromise to refrain from asking his date not to chew his food for him. This suggests that pre-chewing is an act of subservience and not just a means of feeding offspring.

[[WMG: Odo's forced transformation into humanoid form in "Broken Link" was actually a reversion to the Changelings' ancient form]]
The Female Changeling once told Odo that the Changeling Founders were originally solids who evolved into shapeshifters. In "Broken Link", when Odo is punished by the Founders by being transformed into a humanoid, the Founders merely de-evolved him. That is, they forced him into a "throwback" humanoid form that was already encoded in his genetic material.

[[WMG: Jake has a secret drinking problem]]
Jake spends a ''lot'' of time in Quark's Bar, in fact, he even dated a dabo girl for a while (which raises a whole host of questions in itself).

In ''The Sound of Her Voice'', Odo is hassling Quark over some minor code violations, and tells Quark that he must replace all of the barstools because they were supposedly unsafe. Quark is granted a reprieve in the form of Major Kira, who invites him to lunch. After he's gone, Jake comes from out of nowhere and tells Quark, "It's too bad about the barstools, I kinda liked them," and Quark shares his excitement that Odo is distracted. The whole scene suggests several things about Jake.

# Jake is fond enough of Quark's barstools that he laments their loss.
# Kira is taking Odo to lunch, so Jake is hanging out in a bar in the middle of the day.
#The episode makes no effort to give Jake any real reason to be there--and Jake seems an odd character choice for the scene--leaving us to infer that he is probably a customer.
# Jake is the son of [=DS=]9's commanding officer, yet Quark is comfortable enough to share with him his excitement that Odo is distracted, and that he intends to use this to his advantage (probably in criminal endeavors). Everything established about Quark's character suggests that under normal circumstances he would never share that with Federation citizens, especially humans; but he doesn't hesitate to tell Jake.

All of this points to a Jake having a drinking problem that Quark is helping Jake keep secret from his dad.
* All of that points to Jake being Nog's best friend and a good friend of the family. After so many years he doesn't need Nog present to be welcome at the bar and he's not part of Starfleet or security so he's got no responsability to stop or report any of Quark's illegal activities, in fact Jake seems to be better at seeing opportunities for profit than Nog or Rom. As a reporter Jake likes things to be interesting and Quark's bar is where a lot of interesting things happen. Plus they serve more than just alcoholic beverages at the bar, you can get pretty much anything there if you can pay.
** Does Quark really seem like the kind of person who would allow someone to loiter in his bar, even if that person is a close friend of his nephew? Jake is almost certainly at Quark's because he's a costumer, and that means probably there for one of four things: Booze, gambling, holosuite time, or food. If he's there to drink, he'll probably keep buying more the longer he stays. If he's there for the holosuite, why is he just kind of hanging around the bar area? If he's there to eat, why wouldn't he leave after he's finished--and wouldn't Quark shoo him away, he's just taking up space and wasting Quark's time? If Jake's there to gamble, would he really be interested in Quark and Odo's conversation? Quark should be encouraging him to get back to the tables or get out, otherwise Jake's just wasting Quark's time.''[[note]] Rule of Acquisition Number 240: Time, like latinum, is a highly limited commodity.[[/note]]'' Even though Jake isn't a Starfleet officer, he is a human, and he's close to a number of Starfleet personnel, why would he take the chance of Jake slipping up and accidentally telling someone about Quark's plans?''[[note]] Rule of Acquisition Number 46: Labor camps are full of people who trusted the wrong person.[[/note]]'' Jake ''is'' a reporter, which means ''it's his job'' to disseminate information, so Quark's taking a pretty big risk, even if he doesn't give Jake any details.''[[note]] Rule of Acquisition Number 99: Trust is the biggest liability of them all.[[/note]]''

[[WMG: Joseph Sisko's Restaurant doesn't make any money.]]
The Restaurant is basically the equivalent of a modern webcomic, something he does because he enjoys it and likes sharing his creations with others, but which makes no money and isn't expected to. The food is all free as is the service, he counts his success in 'hits' (guests). He can afford to do this because humans don't really use or need money anymore, hence people who aren't in something like Starfleet tend to do things like grow vineyards or run restaurants purely for the love of the art.
* If Trek-Earth works anything like [[Tropers/JChance I]] think it does, all activity on Earth is something like this, although with real consequences--your priority for anything contested or otherwise scarce is determined by the popularity and reviewed quality of your work, weighted by provable knowledgeability and lack of likely bias.
* Depending upon how the food is made, it might be that it has to be merely cheap rather than free, in order to cover its own operating costs. If he insists on using organically-grown produce, it probably goes back to being a limited status resource, unless there are also a ''lot'' of artisan-farmers out there (could be I guess). This is building off an earlier WMG (not sure if I saw it here) that high-quality replicated goods aren't necessarily available to regular civilians due to licencing and/or energy constraints. Not ''needing'' money and not ''using'' money are very different things: the first is fine if you don't mind eating porridge and living in a state-provided pod, but...
* using an interpretation of how the 'credit' works in the Federation I see it going something like this: Each Federation Citizen is given X amount of credits which can be used to support specific industrial projects. Everyone gets the same amount of credits. Joseph Sisko used his credits to build his restaurant and put in self supporting agriculture, then he started serving food. You just walk up and as long as he has the food and resources to produce your order he gives you a plate, you don't have to pay for it. BUT if you really like it then you can allocate a credit or two to his project to help expand and support his restaurant. So the 'customers' aren't paying him for his services with money rather they are just putting their share of the resources into his plan. If someone at some point unlikes his restaurant for whatever reason then he would loose some of his resources being used for maintenance or expansion.
** In that case he would probably prioritize 'reservations' based on how many resources a person put in. Which I think is a perfectly ethical 'utopian' tit-for-tat exchange.
** Joseph Sisko himself probably has a bunch of his credits sunk into a nearby farm, with an old farmer family on it.
*** So by supporting Sisko's place with your credit, you know you would also be helping to support a local nearby farm.

[[WMG: The Great Link deliberately sent out the hundred Changeling infants so that they would experience bigotry and isolation.]]
When the Great Link sent out one hundred infant Changelings to live among Alpha Quadrant cultures, it knew they would experience social isolation, if not outright hatred from humanoids. This was a deliberate strategy by the Great Link to ensure that future generations of Changelings shared its disdain and paranoia of "solids", thus ensuring the Dominion's status quo. Had the infants experienced Alpha Quadrant cultures differently -- say, as a collective group rather than isolated individuals, or as visitors with a home among the Great Link rather than stranded orphans -- they wouldn't have cultivated the necessary resentment needed to run a xenophobic empire. However, they didn't expect Odo to turn out the way he did ...

[[WMG: Mirror!Bashir is still an Augment...]]
But given the general crapsackness of the Mirrorverse, he's significantly more Khanlike than Prime!Bashir. He'd almost have to have been treated, if he was born with the same learning disabilities as Prime!Bashir. Mirror![[StarTrekEnterprise Arik Soong]] was able to hide and keep the Augment technology around, though out of the hands of both the Empire and the Alliance.

[[WMG: Adigeon Prime, where Bashir was augmented]]
Is the trekverse version of [[Literature/HonorHarrington Mesa]]. Only rather ''less'' evil and into [[TakeOverTheWorld taking over the galaxy]]. Like Mesa, the Adigeons rebel against the general NoTranshumanismAllowed attitude of the galaxy at large.

[[WMG: Grand Negus Rom brought Baseball to Feranginar]]

[[WMG: Garak was exiled for being a political dissident]]
Garak initially had a promising career in the Obsidian Order thanks to his father Enabrin Tain. One of his assignments was to infiltrate Natima Lang's dissident group who sought to end martial law, the big brother police state, and the occupation of Bajor. Eventually, he privately came to side with their views, became a double agent, and covertly helped them, perhaps by helping them to escape from Cardassia when the heat was on or giving them sensitive information about the inner workings of the Obsidian Order. Garak managed to avoid execution thanks to the intervention of his powerful father but had to be punished by being sent to Terok Nor under the guise of being a tailor but also because the Obsidian Order wanted to mess with Gul Dukat's head by convincing him he was under investigation by the guy who had Gul Dukat's father executed.

[[WMG: ''Series/{{Revolution}}'' took place long before the events of this show.]]
Of course, they had to get the power back on first, but when they did, they found uses for the nanomachines, like constructing space stations.

[[WMG: Quark was a spy for the Nagus]]
Why would the Cardassians let a Ferengi with little money and few connections set up a bar on a station in an occupied area? Why would the Bajorans let an alien who was buddy-buddy with the occupying force remain after said occupiers left? Why does the Nagus pay so many visits to the station? Why does the Nagus choose him to make official first contact between the Ferengi and the Dominion? Why is the Federation willing to trade an extremely valuable prisoner for a bartender's mother? It's because Quark is actually a member of whatever intelligence service the Ferengi have. Much like Garak, he is living on [=DS=]9 and keeping tabs on everything that goes on around him while maintaining his outward appearance as a "pillar of the community". His connections allowed him to remain in place aboard Terok Nor (later [=DS=]9) posing as a simple bartender while he is gathering information and latinum (he is still a Ferengi, after all). He accepts the loss of his business license after Brunt's machinations for two reasons: 1) it's not worth blowing his cover to protest to Zek about it, and 2) it helps to establish stronger connections with the crew, enabling him to further his mission by having them trust/pity him.
* Quark was a spy, all right- he just didn't know it. The Nagus greased a few Cardassian palms to get Quark onto the station, where Quark- who has no idea of his true role- has ingratiated himself with the station staff as part of expanding his business. All Quark knows is that every once in a while, his mother's new boyfriend drops by to harass him for information.

[[WMG:Why ensigns call O'Brien "Sir"]]
'''The Problem:''' [[Website/SFDebris Chuck]] noted in his review of "Whispers" that ''Franchise/StarTrek's'' rank structure is so screwed up that an ensign is calling O'Brien, an NCO, "sir".

'''The JustifyingEdit:''' In real militaries, an informal part of [[SergeantRock senior noncoms']] jobs is mentoring [[EnsignNewbie new officers]]. Starfleet formalized this relationship to where the above ensign is literally O'Brien's inferior (and ''only'' O'Brien's; he doesn't call any of [=DS=]9's other noncoms "sir").

[[WMG: How to reconcile the Ferengi warships of TNG: "The Battle" with the cowardly money-grubbers of ''Deep Space Nine'']]
The Ferengi are like the Federation in that they are a peace-loving people surrounded by warlike neighbors (the Cardassians and the Breen, for starters), so they ''do'', in fact, maintain a well-equipped military for self-defense. And like the Federation, they don't like to talk about themselves having a military.
* At least one piece of expanded universe material says that the Ferengi acted so differently in early TNG because they didn't understand the Federation, and thus acted extremely hostile towards them so that it would give them time to understand the Federation (a society that didn't use money, which they considered insanity) so that trade agreements could be reached later.

[[WMG: The real Sarah Sisko faked her own death]]
So here's the story as Joseph and Ben Sisko (now) know it: A prophet possessed Sarah, and made her marry Joseph and give birth to Ben. Then the prophet left her body. Sarah realized she was in a marriage she hadn't chosen, and left. Joseph tried to track her down. He found evidence of her living in Australia--along with news that she had been killed just a few months earlier, in a hovercraft accident. Kind of...suspicious, huh? Just when Joseph gets close to finding her, she's suddenly "dead." The real story is probably that Sarah knew her husband was searching for her, and created a false report of her death to get rid of him once and for all. This way, she could wash her hands of the family she never chose to have, and start over with her own life.
* Or, alternatively, Sarah did die, and there was fowl play involved, on the Prophets' part.
** The hovercraft must've taken an engine hit from a precisely aimed heron.

[[WMG: Lwaxana Troi defeated the Dominion.]]
While the show played Lwaxana up as a comically annoying buffon she was one of the top ambassadors and political leaders in the Federation, because behind the scenes she was a total chess master bad ass. While we know Section 31 worked behind the scenes, SOMEBODY in the Federation had to be the ones giving them orders and assigning them missions. I speculate there was a cadre of Federation high ups who were the power behind Section 31. Notice that after the parasite invasion of Season 1 that got stopped by Picard and Riker she took a personal interest in Picard. Then when the Dominion threat was discovered, and it became known among Starfleet that the Dominion was run by Odo's people she took an interested in Odo. I submit that Lwaxana Troi was the one who infected Odo with the virus to destroy the Dominion. However her goal was never genocide, because she also made sure to manipulate events so that Dr.Bashir received the cure. Being an empath she knew Odo was in love with Kira, and knew what kind of man he was and figured that she could use him as a carrier for the disease, and then later give him the cure and use him not only as a carrier for the cure, but also a carrier for the power of love to make a kinder gentler Dominion and end the war. Perhaps the Dominion attack on Betazed was a personal attack by the Dominion...or even more likely, the fleet to defend Betazed was away from the planet when the Dominion struck, perhaps she sent them away and used Betazed as a piece in her chessmoves to draw the Dominion in and then close the trap on them. Also...why did Alexander out of the blue join the Klingon Defense Forces? Because he and Lwaxana became friends when he was a kid right? So she asked him to join the forces to act as her personal eyes and ears in the Klingon Empire. Lwaxana is much more bad ass and important to the Federation than we give her credit for, just as she wants it.
* She had already been interested in Odo before the Federation knew about the Dominion though.
* When she first met Odo she did become interested in him, she was really curious about what sex with a shapeshifter would be like and she liked his personality. Then Starfleet realized that the Dominion was controlled by the Founders. Deanna's arranged marriage fiancÚ had run off with the Tarellian plague ship, because of that Lwaxanna had always kept an interest in how his attempts at curing the plague were going. In a burst of dark inspiration she put two and two together and conceived a plan...she contacted Agent Sloan and a plan was born.

[[WMG: The Dominion War and Sisko as the Emisary were also part of Q's test and trial of humanity.]]
Q's appearance on [=DS=]9 was not random or as purposless as we may think, he was checking in on Benjamin Sisko who was a sort of double blind test of humanity. Picard was the human Q chose to make aware of the test, and he put Picard through hoops that Picard knew about to judge humanity that way. The much more meaningful test was Sisko, and by extension the entire Dominion War. Check it - Omnipotent Q introduced the Enterprise to the Borg, the Borg attacked at Wolf 359, Jennifer Sisko was killed at 359, which drove Sisko out of regular duty to be posted at [=DS=]9, where he becomes the emissary and discovers the wormhole starting the war with the Dominion. Whereas Q tested Riker with the physical powers of a god, he tested Sisko with the social/ethical powers of a god by putting Sisko in a position to be worshipped as a god by another race of being, how would humanity handle that? Q tested Picard with the temporal anomaly to see if humanity could grasp a paradox. Sisko had to actually speak to non-linear and learn to communicate with them, was this a test of humanities ability to communicate on a deeper esoteric level? The Dominion was an enemy capable of plunging the peaceful Federation into a loosing war, how would humanity handle that challenge, would they rise to it, would they loose their way?

[[WMG: This is less of a WMG and more of a proposed fan fic idea.]]
So at some point during the Dominion War, the Federation was loosing. On one of the fronts someone remembers...wait a minute, we the Federation own a powerful weapon system called the Echo Papa 607, remember Captain Picard bought it as a way to shut it down. So though we never bought it intending to use it, we can activate it and defend this front against the Dominion. But wait the Echo Papa is dangerous someone says. But we're desperate someone else says, and they flip the switch. The EP 607 goes active and begins turning the tide of battle on this front. So...the Dominion travels to Minos and purchases one themselves. Now two Echo Papa's are duking it out, to a stalemate. Eventually the war ends, and both forces agree to de-activate their EP 607s...however when they try to do so, the EPs join forces and turn against their foes. Now a Dominion/Federation alliance has to fight back against their own weapons. Far away across the Quadrant. An Angosian soldier hears about the EP 607. While the soldier himself seeks peaces, the training won't let him sleep at night, he can't rest, he can't focus, because he has already calculated the tactical danger the EP 607 represents. He flips out and tells other Angosians. Their conditioning has the same reaction. Against orders they renegade and steal the USS Prometheus, the only ship they think would have a chance against the EP 607. The Angosians fight absolutely everybody to get to the EP 607. The Angosians presence causes the EP to evolve a further step, it is now more dangerous than ever. Across the quadrant, hearing of this brewing and worsening scenario, augment Sarina Douglas breaks the other mutants out of the Institute and they join the fight as well. Now the Angosians, Jemh'dar, and the Augments are fighting the Echo Papa 607. The battle is now spreading, the EP has evolved near sentience. The augments are out of control, star fleet can't stop them, the Dominion can't stop them. All projections show this battle will rage completely out of control and engulf the Federation. In swoops the Enterprise E commanded by Picard. Against all dangers he blasts his way to the front lines and takes command of the augment forces. Follow me he orders, they do. The fleet confronts the EP 607 fleet, and Picard blares out on all frequencies. "Echo Papa 607. This is Captain Jean Luc Picard. Speaking on behalf of the combined Augment, Dominion, Federation Forces....we surrender, unconditionally." Everone is aghast. And then further surprised when the Echo Papa 607 powers down and returns to Minos.

[[WMG: They made Far Beyond the Stars because Ciroc Lofton wasn't a strong enough actor when he grew up.]]
The Visitor was an attempt to frame the narrative of the story of [=DS=]9 as if it were a novel written by Jake Sisko. This would have made a very, very cool framing device for the story. Jake was supposed to ultimately be the view point character, like Ishmale from Moby Dick, left to tell the story. But unfortunately Cirroc Lofton did not grow into an actor with the kind of gravitas they were looking for to be able to pull this off. So they made Far Beyond the Stars to try and salvage this framing technique in some way, making Benny Russel the Ishmael...sort of.

[[WMG: The Prophets was the factor that threw off the calculations of certain doom in "Statistical Probabilities"]]
As has been pointed out elsewhere, the Federation was supposed to lose even if both the Romulans joined the war on their side (which did happen) and the Cardassians began an anti-Dominion rebellion (which ''also'' happened, although only after the war was turning against the Dominion), and that, to all appearances, did not take into account the Breen joining when they did. So what turned the course of war towards victory? One major possibility is that it was the Dominion remaining cut-off from the Gamma Quadrant despite the minefield going down (that the minefield would go down eventually may well have been a statistical near-certainty in the calculations), which only happened because the very alien and very unknown Wormhole Aliens for once made a personal and impressive intervention in response to a desperate last-shot gamble by Sisko. The Jack Pack calculated based on it being inevitable that sooner or later the Dominion's Gamma Quadrant power could come into play, but in one swoop the Prophets ensured that would not happen -- and so allowed the Federation to win the Dominion War.
* It's actually pretty heavily implied by the show (though never directly confirmed) that the Prophets and Pah-Wraiths are applying subtle influences on the course of the war, considering that the alliance gets pretty bogged down when Dukat [[spoiler:sticks a Pah-Wraith in the wormhole]]. See the Series/DS9 entry on DivineConflict.
* They also probably did not calculate Section 31 attempting genocide. This and the Prophets not being included, showed that the Mutants calculations had many flaws because they lacked all the information.
** And then there's the fact that they predicted a rebellion led by earth five generations down the line, when a prior episode indicated that the Dominion was planning to preemptively glass Earth to prevent exactly this eventuality.

[[WMG: All of Garak's stories in "The Wire" were true.]]
Well, not ''completely'' true, because it's [[ConsummateLiar Garak]]. But they are based on events from Garak's past- wholesale slaughter of Cardassian citizens, interrogating Bajoran war orphans, betraying close friends- no one can work for an organization like the [[StateSec Obsidian Order]] and keep their hands clean.

Why would Garak bring it up now? Because he's reached his breaking point, after years of living in exile. He might die soon, and Bashir, a Federation officer, is the only friend he has left. When Garak says "I need to know that somebody forgives me," it's the first utterly true statement he's said in years.
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