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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pokemonxandyver1_4425.jpg]]
''Pokémon X'' and ''Pokémon Y'' are the first games in the Sixth Generation of the ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' game series, for the Nintendo3DS; fittingly, [[VideoGame3DLeap they are the first main-series games to have full 3D polygonal graphics]]. These games are set in the Kalos region, [[FantasyCounterpartCulture modeled after]] real life UsefulNotes/{{France}}.

These games are perhaps most notable for two new features: the new [[OurFairiesAreDifferent Fairy-type]][[note]]the first new type since [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldSilverAndCrystal Generation II]], a 14-year gap[[/note]] and [[TransformationSequence Mega Evolution]]. A new Eeveelution, Sylveon, was the first announced Pokémon to have the Fairy type; older Pokémon that have [[RetCon inherited]] this type include Jigglypuff, Gardevoir, Marill, and Mawile. Primarily introduced to balance the Dragon type, the Fairy-type is strong against Dragon, Dark, and Fighting types, and weak against Poison- and Steel-type attacks. Mega Evolution allows many older Pokémon to transform into [[SuperMode even more powerful forms]] during battle, with new stats, Abilities, and sometimes new types. This is balanced by the inability of Mega Evolved Pokémon to hold any items that would aid them in battle other than the ones that activate their Mega Evolution, and that only one Mega Evolution can be used by a Pokémon Trainer on his/her team per battle.

The games were announced on January 8, 2013 via Nintendo Direct, and were released October 12 later that year across most territories, another first for the ''Pokémon'' series[[note]]Previously, countries outside of Japan would have to wait weeks or even months for Game Freak to finish localization before they could get their hands on a non-Japanese copy[[/note]]. ''X'' and ''Y'' feature multilingual support rather than all languages being on separate game carts, although choosing a specific language "locks" the game to that language until saved data is deleted.

''Anime/PokemonOrigins'', a four-episode anime special MiniSeries, was produced as a [[CallBack nostalgia-laden]] [[MerchandiseDriven tie-in special]] to help entice and garner support from players of [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original Pokémon games]] and to [[EarlyBirdCameo premiere]] Charizard's Mega Evolution of Mega Charizard X. The miniseries aired in Japan 10 days prior to the release of ''Pokémon X and Y''.

* The official English commercials for the games can be viewed here: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuJhP2QbE-A first variant]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeVqnFjxRHA second variant]], [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBlBWznWq44 third variant]].
* The first announcement trailer for the games can be viewed [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bIrWryFc7A here]].
* The two ''Creator/{{Nintendo}} Direct: Pokémon Direct'' presentations focusing on the games can be viewed here: ([[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzO6J981nAw January 8th, 2013 broadcast]]; [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbqkqdfrfes September 4th, 2013 broadcast]]).
* The official website for the games can be visited [[http://www.pokemonxy.com/en-us/root/ here]].
* The ''Iwata Asks (in Motion)'' interview for the games can be read [[http://iwataasks.nintendo.com/interviews/#/3ds/pokemonxy/0/0 here]].
* Additional ''XY''-centric videos can be viewed in [[http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQWzKIaERirwczLwQE6HegZyd4pYV5AwH this official playlist]].

Not to be confused with JustForFun/XMeetsY, the TheXOfY trope, the [[MilestoneCelebration Pokémon 10th anniversary]] CD album ''[[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Pok%C3%A9mon_X_%28CD%29 Pokémon X: 10 Years of Pokémon]]'', Lugia (which has been referred to as [[CodeName "Pokémon X"]] in some media), ''[[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Pokémon Crystal]]'' (which was [[WorkingTitle once known as]] ''Pokémon X''), or the webcomic ''Webcomic/PokemonX''.

Please place information regarding the new Pokémon on the page for [[Characters/PokemonGenerationVIFamilies Generation VI]] Pokémon sheet.

----
!!Tropes that ''Pokémon X and Y'' provide:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:A-D]]
* OneHundredPercentCompletion: ''Seeing'' all of the Pokémon in the Kalos region (minus the two Legendary Birds you won't get to see) rewards you with the Oval Charm, which makes eggs show up much faster at the Day Care. There is no reward for capturing all of the Kalos region Pokémon, but the reward for capturing all Pokémon in the National Pokédex (excluding some special and event Pokémon) is the Shiny Charm, which increases the chance of encountering shiny Pokémon. This is only possible with the Pokémon Bank.
* OneHundredAndEight: The hot soup entrée at Restaurant Le Yeah contains 108 herbs and spices.
* AbandonedPlayground: There's one in Route 14, albeit seemingly in good shape.
* ActionMom: Your mother, Grace, is a former Rhyhorn racer, instead of just a homemaker like previous versions. Her Rhyhorn is even outside your house, and it's known you since you were born! Professor Sycamore chose you to help him out because he heard that she had just moved into the region.
* AIBreaker: The in-game AI has considerable difficulty dealing with the Protean ability. The ability changes the user's type right before it attacks, but the AI makes its decisions based on what the Pokémon's type and what it thinks its stats are ''before'' Protean takes effect. As such, the AI cannot make complex predictions on the type changes and is easily defeated. Ever hear stories of people who earned insanely high streaks in the Battle Mansion? Chances are very high they had a Protean Greninja on their team.
** If the [[DifficultButAwesome Invincible Shedinja]] trick[[note]]Having a Carbink with [[LastChanceHitPoint Sturdy]] use Skill Swap on a Shedinja who has had its ability changed for whatever reason, such as being hit by Simple Beam or Worry Seed[[/note]] is successfully pulled off, the AI will attempt to target the Shedinja at every possible opportunity. Presumably this is because it is a OneHitPointWonder who usually relies on its [[NoSell invulnerability to all damaging attacks that aren't super effective against it]] to survive, and without that ability it SHOULD be a sitting duck. However, because [[LoopholeAbuse Sturdy ALWAYS works at full health]], turning Shedinja into a NighInvulnerable StoneWall, the repeated attacks against it are [[ShootingSuperman absolutely pointless]], allowing the player's other party members to wipe the enemy out with near complete impunity (excluding AreaOfEffect attacks)
* AirJousting: While seen in other Pokémon media, this game actually introduces it in the form of Sky Battles, where only Flying-types and Pokémon with the Levitate ability can participate. Certain Flying Pokémon that stand on the ground in their idle animations are ineligible for Sky Battles, including Doduo, Dodrio, and the brand new Hawlucha.
* AllThereInTheManual:
** A lot of information regarding Mega Pokémon can only be found on the XY official website.
** The music that appears in the obligatory professor's "introduction to the Pokémon world" prologue [[spoiler: and the epilogue]] is supposed to be the {{Leitmotif}} to the Kalos region itself. This, however, is only revealed in the song's official name, which can only be seen within the game's official soundtrack due to the game not mentioning it otherwise. [[note]]In case you're wondering, contrary to popular beliefs (and contrary to what at least one official public concert called it), the song's literally called "Kalos Region Theme".[[/note]]
* AlphaBitch: "Viscountess Danielle" insults your clothing asking if you dressed in the dark or found it in the trash, regardless if you're the most stylish person in all of Kalos.
* AlwaysAccurateAttack: [[StandardStatusEffects Toxic]] becomes this if the user is a Poison-type.
* AmazingTechnicolorBattlefield:
** [[spoiler: Both the battle against the title legends and [[BigBad Lysandre]] are some particularly vivid examples of this with it being a battle in space and above a pool of fire, respectively.]]
** Olympia's entire gym has you battling out in the middle of space, standing on top of galaxies with stars and celestial objects all around you.
* AmbidextrousSprite: Averted. Asymmetrical Pokémon, like Greninja and Absol, have different mini-sprites used on the 3DS's lower screen if they face left.
* AmbiguouslyBi: Gym Freaks' host, April, will compliment/fangirl over several gym leaders' good looks, regardless of gender.
* AndNowForSomethingCompletelyDifferent: From taking care and interacting with your Pokémon, players suddenly shift into a third-person shooting game with Super Training.
** Also, Inversed Battles. As the name suggests, the resistances and weakness are inverted (immunities become weaknesses). This means Steel goes from the best defensive type to the worst, while Normal hits everything for at least neutral damage.
---> Website/{{Smogon}} user: ''[[InfinityPlusOneElement Inverse normal is pre-Gen VI Dragon on crack.]]''
* AndYourRewardIsClothes: There is one NPC in Kiloude City that asks you to dress in a specific clothing style because she is in an art slump. Dressing appropriately as requested nets you a special piece of clothing that isn't found in any of the stores[[note]]A Pangoro-styled "Bamboo Sprig Hat" for boys or a Slurpuff-styled "Sundae Dress" for girls[[/note]].
* AntiFrustrationFeatures: Many examples exist, in line with the intention to quicken the pace and accessibility of the game.
** Pokémon now get more EXP from wild Pokémon. The EXP Share is obtained right after you beat the first gym, and has [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue returned to its roots of granting the entire party experience]]. They even get experience when you capture a wild Pokémon.
*** Even more, EXP is no longer split up amongst the combatants, but instead each participant is given out the FULL reward, or a reduced amount if it's only through the EXP Share. There is now no downside to leaving the EXP Share on all the time (whereas before it made leveling an individual Pokémon very slow by splitting up the EXP through the entire party), unless one doesn't want to end up hideously out leveling the enemies without even trying or messing up EV spreads. And you get the EXP Share very early on, too.
** You can actually start off being able to run, and using the circle pad will automatically swap you to the faster moving roller skates (which you receive fairly early on).
** To aid in capturing Pokémon early on, the game actually gives you the TM for False Swipe a little after beating the first Gym.
** It's not mandatory to use Flash anymore. There are no insanely dark places in need of a light, so Flash simply expands your view by zooming out the screen and lowers encounter rates.
** Trades with [=NPC=]s no longer require you to have the requested Pokémon in your party, allowing you to trade Pokémon that are currently in your PC.
** There's now a PC at the lab where Pokémon fossils are de-fossilized, so you don't have to walk to the Pokémon Center just to make space in your team. While it wasn't the first time it happened (''[=FireRed=]'' and ''[=LeafGreen=]'' were the first), it hasn't been done in a long time.
*** Even more convenient, you don't need to have an open slot to take it in, and can be deposited straight to the PC boxes. While you won't be asked if you want to give it a nickname if you choose to have it sent directly to the box, the Name Rater is in a nearby town and accessible with only minor backtracking.
** Just got the HM Surf? Somehow don't have a Water Pokémon or other Surf user by this point? Just right next to the river you need to cross to continue the game, an NPC gives you a free Lapras.
** In the first forest area, one of your friends follows you everywhere and offers to heal your Pokémon whenever you like. Later on [=NPC=]s offer the same somewhere along the longer paths so you don't have to trek back so far to the next Pokémon Center.
** Super Training as a whole takes the frustration and GuideDangIt out of EV training. A process that used to take hours if not days can now be done within half an hour. Also, if you mess up you can reset [=EVs=] with a Reset bag, or some Perilous Soup from the Juice Shoppe in Lumiose.
*** Horde battles make "classic" EV training much, much easier once you gain access to Power items. [[http://nuggetbridge.com/articles/ev-training-hotspots-x-y/ This guide]] shows how.
*** [=EVs=] in a stat now max out at 252 unlike the previous 255, preventing you from wasting the last three points.[[note]]4 [=EVs=] mean +1 to that stat at Level 100.[[/note]] This applies to both Super Training and "classic" EV training!
** Berry cultivation has been massively streamlined, with the player given one big field for it a stone's throw from a [[WarpWhistle Fly]] target instead of having to scramble all over the map for multiple smaller patches. Crop yields have also been pretty much doubled. There are also new ways to obtain new types of berries.
** In the past, when trading at the Global Trade Station, you needed to have the Pokémon you were looking for already registered as "seen" in the Pokédex, meaning that there was no way to request Pokémon that was unavailable in your game (which is the whole reason why many people trade in the first place). In X and Y, there's an option that allows you to type in a specific Pokémon's name.
*** In addition, the GTS has a much more streamlined trading process. Instead of only being shown seven available trades, almost all of which were guaranteed to be phony or complete rip-offs (for example, someone offering a Magikarp in exchange for a Mewtwo), it's now possible to browse as many trading options as you want. Plus, you can filter out any special Pokémon, such as the aforementioned Mewtwo, and filter results to show only Pokémon that you own that other players want in exchange for the Pokémon you're looking for (or at least it leans the results in that direction, you're still gonna see a lot of requests for legendaries in exchange for the Pokémon you want).
*** In the listing for the possible trades you're likely to see requests for every legendary under the sun, or some other extremely hard to obtain pokemon. There's an option to filter out requests for pokemon you don't have in your PC (even if you have an Eevee registered in your pokedex but not in the PC, it won't show you trades asking for Eevees), making it easier to find trades you can make.
** All Pokémon that can't breed whatsoever (mostly legendaries and baby Pokémon), are guaranteed at least three perfect [=IV=]s when you catch it. This makes SaveScumming for a good legendary ''much'' easier.
** The Safari of this game is pretty much interface friendly unlike before. It now has set Pokémon depending on the friend you picked, and you can engage the Pokémon like a normal battle rather than being limited to tossing items. Plus, the Pokémon you get there have two perfect [=IV=]s of random stats and may have its hidden Ability, with better chance of that if the friend owning the zone is online!
*** For extra fun, you can go to the Safari of any friend you have on your 3DS, even if they don't have ''Pokémon X'' or ''Y''.
** Breeding has been even further streamlined from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2''. For example: Both parents can pass on Hidden Abilities and Egg Moves, and the Destiny Knot now guarantees that five [=IV=]s from either parent are inherited, making passing down existing perfect [=IV=]s much less time-consuming.
** Getting Hidden Abilities is now easier. Aside from the mentioned things above (breeding hidden abilities being easier to do, Friend Safari encounters may contain them), horde battles may have one or two Pokémon contain its hidden ability.
** For those that want to breed Pokémon early: Fletchinder, the evolutionary stage after the early bird Fletchling, has Flame Body, giving you an early access (only level 17 to evolve) to quick egg hatching.
** Meanwhile, the central area of Lumiose City -- the Prism Tower area -- has a circular road with a rotating camera, giving you virtually an "endless" road to bike with that has no screen changes. Even if you bump to an NPC, your character will "swerve". If you need to hatch eggs, one can simply leave the analog pad hinged to keep your character moving on one direction indefinitely in that area.
** Pokémon hatched in these games can now relearn Egg Moves they had forgotten. In addition, Event Pokémon distributed for these games use the same feature to be able to relearn event-exclusive moves they've lost.
** Many moves that Pokémon can only learn at very high levels can simply be obtained from the Move Relearner.
** While Pokémon will still forget moves as they level up in the Day Care, the changes don't actually apply until the Pokémon is removed from it. This means the player doesn't have to constantly remove the Pokémon and rearrange its moveset when breeding for Egg Moves.
** Fail to capture that sleeping Snorlax? Don't worry, he'll come back and fall asleep again.
** Your character will turn your head and look at nearby objects of interest such as signs and hidden objects. This is useful for finding all three items for the Lost and Found job on the 4th floor of the hotel, which requires you to look over the ''entire'' floor.
** Additionally, in Generation V, you couldn't use [=TMs=] to restore PP, because newly taught [=TMs=] would take the PP of the move you replaced them with. No longer the case here, where if you replace a move with even 0 PP with a new TM, it will be replaced with full PP, ready to go and everything. And since Return can be learned by any Pokémon, you can teach them that and you'll never have to use Ethers for TM moves again, and they'll save you some trips to the Pokémon Center.
** There's a new item called the Ability Capsule that allows you to switch a Pokémon's ability to another one that is available to it (although you can't give a Pokémon its Hidden Ability or give a regular ability to one that has its Hidden Ability). However, there are a couple downsides: [[AwesomeButImpractical They cost 200 BP and they are only able to be used once each]].
** The judge in Kiloude City who tells you if your Pokémon have any good Individial Values will also tell you if any of them have any Individual Values of 0. This is helpful if you're trying to breed Pokémon for Trick Room teams or maximize Gyro Ball's power, as both strategies require the Pokémon's Speed to be as low as possible.
** In most previous games (excluding Red, Blue & Yellow which had a stone shop), getting the precious Evolution Stones requires luck, patience, talking to trainers, or completing Battle Institutes. Here, you can get all the evolutionary stones as rewards in Secret Super Training, and Fire, Water, and Leaf Stones simply by going to the store. Well, okay, you can only get them at ''one'' store, and they're ''very'' pricey, but at least there's no trick to finding or entering it. The Sun and Moon Stones are also commonly found if you have a Pokémon with Pickup starting at level 61.
** Each of the attractions on the Pokémon Global Link can give players items that are one-of-a-kind or cost a lot of BP. The attractions only cost 100 PokéMiles to use, which can easily be gained through Wonder Trade.
*** The Balloon Popping attraction can give you evolution items as prizes. Many of these prizes can only be found once in the game (like the Deep Sea Scale and Deep Sea Tooth) or in the Battle Maison (like the Razor Fang).
*** The Graffiti Eraser attraction gives out a variety of items that make LevelGrinding easier, such as the EV raising items, the Power items, Heart Scales, [[RareCandy Rare Candies]], and even Lucky Eggs.
** Pokemon Black & White introduced a lot of pokemon who have different formes that can only be accessed with a specific item. Since items cannot be transfered over from the Pokebank, [=NPC=]s in this game have them.
*** You can find the DNA Splicer needed to fuse Zekrom and Reshiram with Kyurem from a Punk Girl in Kiloude City. She doesn't explain why she has a one-of-a-kind artifact that's been passed down in Opelucid until ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' specifically designed for fusing those Pokemon together, but she has no problem letting you have it.
*** The Reveal Glass needed to transform the Kami Trio is given to you by a scientist standing next to the Shalour City exit in the Reflection Cave.
* AntiPoopSocking: If you use O-Powers a lot. The regeneration rate for energy increases the more steps you take with your 3DS. As steps only accumulate with the 3DS closed, and the regeneration rate resets each day, you're encouraged to take a walk before you start playing. The powers regenerate over time, so you can also just wait, but the O-powers recharge based off the 3DS' internal clock, and not by the game. If you activate an O-Power, but forget to save and/or immediately reset, the power's energy was just wasted and you have to let it recharge.
** Quite a few things you can only do once per day, along with the clothes offered changing daily.
* AntiVillain: [[spoiler:Both AZ and Lysandre]] depending on how sympathetic you find them. [[spoiler:AZ in particular]] was simply so overwhelmed with pain and grief at the loss of his partner that he was willing to sacrifice any and everything to get what he cherished back.
* ApologeticAttacker: One of the Butlers in the Battle Chateau fights you with his Pokémon, but apologizes profusely because he's doing it in the name of his [[TheMaster Master]]. When you beat him, he says he'll [[TheUnreveal never reveal his Master's identity]].
* ArtificialBrilliance:
** One particular Horde battle has a gang of [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration Seviper attacking a Zangoose, or vice-versa depending on version]]. The Seviper all have Persim Berries and will occasionally use Swagger[[note]]raises the Attack stat two stages, but inflicts Confusion[[/note]] on ''each other'', then use said Persim Berry to cure the resulting Confusion, leaving them stronger with no drawbacks. Granted, they're all Level 8 and your party will probably be 15 or something by that point, especially if you're using the Exp Share, but it might still catch you off guard. You can also find the same thing with a group of Durant attacking a single Heatmor, one being an anteater and the other being ants! There is also a rare occasion where, in a horde of Trevenant, you may find a single Sudowoodo among the crowd. Although they don't attack each other, it's still pretty smart considering that Sudowoodo pretends to be an actual tree.
** The Battle Maison is a much straighter example. Battles there use the same rules as online competitive battles, such as all Pokémon being automatically set to Lv. 50 and having no duplicate Pokémon/held items. As you start out a run, the trainers are a cakewalk, but as you reach higher and higher numbers of wins, their Pokémon get downright ''cruel'', using moves and tactics you'd only expect to see in ''actual'' online battles. On a lighter note, however, this makes the Maison perfect for gauging how well your team would fare in online battles without having your Versus Ranking destroyed first. Even better, this is the first time that the opponents do not use pokemon with illegal movesets for the most part - the only instances of cheating [[note]][[DownplayedTrope Even then it is a case that is more debatable than some of the more blatant instances in past games anyway.]][[/note]] are Pokémon with hidden abilities that are simply unreleased, and or usage of Gen 5 items unavailable in the current games. [[note]]Said items are untransferable via Pokémon Bank.[[/note]]
* AsideGlance: Your Pokémon do this during battles if their affection for you is high enough, though it's not breaking the fourth wall as they're looking at you, their trainer.
* AsskickingEqualsAuthority:
** At the Battle Chateau, you are given a title in the nobility and can raise your rank by winning more battles.
** Naturally, this means that Gym Leaders and the Elite Four, when they show up, all have high ranks (and their Pokémon tend to be stronger than standard trainers of the same rank, even more so if you use a Writ). Gym Leaders are all Marquis/Marchioness rank, the Elite Four are the Duke/Duchess rank, and [[spoiler:Diantha]] (who appears after you defeat everyone else there) is a Grand Duchess.
** Averted with some of the trainers there being fairly weak for their rank, with dialogue hinting that they were basically born into it.
* AttractMode: Leave the game long enough on the title screen and it will start to showcase its gimmicks, like how you can ride some monsters, how the camera pans in certain areas, the freedom of movement, the roller skates, etc. It finishes with some attacks performed by the starters and your version's Mega Evolutions.
* AuthorAppeal: Lots of trips were made to France for research in preparation for Pokemon X and Y. This is due to the fact that Japanese people have a [[ForeignCultureFetish great fascination]] with France and French culture in general (So much so that Japanese tourists may end up getting a psychological disorder, known as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris_syndrome Paris Syndrome]], just from the culture shock of the actual France not fitting their idealized image of France). Note that the tourist trainer classes are intentionally based off the JapaneseTourist.
* AutobotsRockOut: All of the "important battle" themes have a hardcore techno-rock feel, apart from the rival battle theme (which is more playful) and the Team Flare themes (which are somewhat tribal-sounding, with Lysandre's being more orchestral).
* AutomaticNewGame: When starting the game for the first time, you first select your language, are shown the title screen, then taken ''straight'' to the introduction with the Professor.
* AwardBaitSong: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLLAHb4mlgE KISEKI]], the second song played during the end credits - complete with (written) lyrics, in seven languages no less! It can be seen as a theme song for [[spoiler:AZ and his relationship with his Floette]], though the lyrics also bring to mind [[http://www.gamefreak.co.jp/blog/dir_english/?p=613 the themes that Junichi Masuda himself chose for the games]].
* AwesomeButImpractical: The Sushi High Roller's reward for beating all the trainers without fainting and wasting any turns is ''25 Big Nuggets''. Unfortunately, even if you score them, you will still end up at a 220,000 loss out of the 500,000 Pokédollars you paid to take part.
** The only way to turn out profit from this is to use Lv. 3 O-Power, Happy Hour and Amulet Coin/Luck Incense, then sell all Big Nuggets (this will give you a profit of around 100k, not counting the discount for style), making it more of DifficultButAwesome.
* {{Badass}}: Many species and Mega Evolutions, but in particular Victory Road's wild Pokémon range from Level 57 to ''59'', the highest wild Pokémon catchable in any game prior to completion. They're just as high level as most of the trainers you fight there, in fact.
** On the human side of things, BigBad [[spoiler:Lysandre is quite badass, with a diabolically evil, world-spanning plot and a team of powerful Pokémon that includes a [[SuperMode Mega]] [[{{Kaiju}} Gyarados]]]].
* BadassAdorable: The Fairy-type is made of this, being super effective against and immune to [[InfinityMinusOneSword Dragons]], strong and resistant to both [[CharlesAtlasSuperpower Fighting-]] and [[CombatPragmatist Dark-]]types, and having only two rather [[ColdIron uncommonly used]] [[PoisonousPerson weaknesses]].
** KillerRabbit: They could count as this, considering the cute sounding type and the mons associated along with their type strengths.
* BadassBookworm: Professor Sycamore is the first Pokémon Professor[[note]]Actually, a glitch in Gen I games allows you to fight Professor Oak.[[/note]] who you can actually have a Pokémon Battle with. (Even better, once you defeat him, he'll let you have one of the Gen I starters ''and'' the stone needed for its Mega Evolution! Badass ''and'' generous.)
* BerserkButton:
** Your Pokémon will snap at you if you persist in petting the wrong parts, such as a Meowstic's ears, one of Chesnaught's shell spikes, etc. in Pokémon-Amie.
** Honedge's Pokédex entry mentions that if someone touches its hilt it drains their life force. In Amie, if the Honedge hasn't warmed up to you, you can touch its hilt or tassle with no recourse; it actually enjoys it. If you and the Honedge are friends, it gets angry if you touch the hilt or tassle.
** Espurr has the same reaction with its ears, which supposedly have organs that store huge amounts of psychic power. The face Espurr makes if you accidentally touch its ears is a bit unsettling. So angry...
** Subverted with Pikachu. They don't like being petted in the stomach, but if you persist, they're actually very ticklish there. Various Pokédex entries mention that it'll get angry if you touch the tail, but they like it. Though logically, if you pet their cheeks, you'll get shocked. Even so, it's averted there, as Pikachu actually likes you trying to pet its cheeks anyway.
* BetterToDieThanBeKilled: Wild Litwick in the Lost Hotel will sometimes knock themselves out with Memento when you're trying to catch them. Their oddly delighted expression when they faint makes it look like they're saying, "Ha ha, you didn't catch me! I win!"
* BigBallOfViolence: The Fairy-type move [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Play_Rough Play Rough]] has this as its animation, except with hearts and stars rather than the usual dingbats.
* BigEater: A little boy in Shalour City tells the player that he wants to show off his awesomeness in eating contests.
* BilingualBonus:
** Kalos (or rather καλός, ''kalós'') is Greek for "beauty".
** The virtual pet component of the game is called Pokémon-Amie in English. "''mon''-amie" is French for "my friend."
** There are dozens of them dotted around the Kalos region in French and occasionally Japanese. ''Kizuna'' from the Kizuna Cafe means "Bond", fitting the friendship theme of the cafe. Route 21 is named Derničre Way (meaning last, as it's the last route before Victory Road)
** As in ''Diamond'', ''Pearl'', ''Platinum'', ''Black'', and ''White'', the odd foreign speaking trainer or NPC can be found.
** In one of [[spoiler:Looker's]] sidequests, there's a woman who speaks only in Japanese (English in the non-English languages) - and [[spoiler:Looker]] fails at translation. Thankfully, another NPC is much better at Japanese and is far more helpful for the mission.
*** Also helpful is the fact [[spoiler:there is an Espurr nearby that shares its power with you, to be able to read the woman's thoughts.]]
* BlatantLies: You can engage in this when Calem/Serena comes up to you in Geosenge Town to ask if a Team Flare grunt had just run past you (which one did less than three seconds previous). Your rival doesn't believe you for a second if you deny it, assuming instead that you're lying to try to protect them from Team Flare. Even the response options basically call you out on it, since they're not ''quite'' the usual blunt 'Yes' and 'No' choices.
-->'''Rival:''' Was someone from Team Flare here just now?
---> > Yes
---> > [[BadLiar No...]]
* BlueWithShock: The move Worry Seed, which changes the target's ability to Insomnia, puts a purple tinge with "horror" lines on the screen.
* BookEnds:
** At the start of the game, a Fletchling flies into the player character's room and bumps into them, waking them up. Later, before the credits, a Fletchling performs a FlyAtTheCameraEnding.
** Another example: Both the prologue[[note]]Where the professor introduces you to the game[[/note]] and the epilogue[[labelnote:endgame spoilers]]the parade at the end[[/labelnote]] uses the theme of the Kalos region as its background music.
* BossInMookClothing:
** On Route 6, there is a Double Battle involving two Furfrou, a mon which has rather well-rounded stats and an ability that cuts physical and contact damage in half. For special attackers, the fight might be lengthy. For physical ones? Absolute hell if the Pokémon being used isn't of the Fighting type.
** And on Route 5, there's a Rising Star who only has one Pokémon, but it's a Kadabra at Level 13, ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard a lower level than when Abra evolves at no less)]]. It's very fast, most likely faster than anything you're likely to have before then, and can hit very hard with Confusion. It can catch you off-guard if you're not anticipating it.
** Route 10 has wild Hawlucha, which are ''very'' fast and strong compared to your likely team at this time and can easily beat down your Electric- and Psychic-types, especially if your Exp. Share is off. Fortunately, it has a hard counter in Honedge (and, since you can catch them right then and there, itself).
*** Additionally, there's a trainer (Hedvig) in Reflecting Cave whose Hawlucha has a deadly, unique combination of Fighting (Karate Chop), Flying (Aerial Ace), and Rock (Rock Tomb) techniques that can sweep an entire team if you don't have a good (i.e: Psychic or Fairy) counter.
** In Victory Road's outdoor areas, there's a chance for a mon to swoop down on you. It's usually Fearow and sometimes Skarmory, but there's a very rare chance where it's ''[[InfinityMinusOneSword Hydreigon]]'', the Unova region's pseudo-legendary.
*** Additionally, the ''very last'' trainer in Victory Road, a Veteran who has an Alakazam at Level 57 with the moves Psychic, Focus Blast, Dazzling Gleam, and Shadow Ball. As with the Kadabra example above, it's very fast and hits extremely hard. May Arceus have mercy if you're playing a Nuzlocke run and lose a Pokémon to that thing.
** A Psychic in a house on Route 18 does in the flavor of DamnYouMuscleMemory. To be specific, he changes the setting so it's an Inverse Battle, which changes type effectiveness so that attacks once super-effective are not very effective, and vice-versa. In addition, they're at quite high levels and have maximum [=IV=]s and are fully trained. If you aren't prepared, he can easily decimate a good deal of your party.
** Many of the Sky Trainers qualify. They have surprising variety in what they use, and exploit the fact that most Pokémon that can participate are have common weaknesses. Expect to see lots of Rock and Electric moves to take down the Flying types you are generally forced to use. The one on Route 19 with a ''Flygon'' is a particularly notable example. Thankfully they're all optional and you aren't booted back to the Pokémon Center for losing to them, which is helpful especially since you probably won't have more than one or two Pokémon in your normal team that can participate in Sky Battles.
* BossRush: [[spoiler:Aside from the regular one with the Elite Four and Champion, this happens on Route 19 where you have to battle Shauna, Tierno, ''and'' Trevor in succession with no breaks in between (though Trevor does heal your Pokémon before he battles you). Unlike the rest of the FiveManBand-involved activities, you are given no warning about it nor a chance to prepare before engaging them.]]
* BrainsAndBrawn: One of the new trainer classes is a duo of a Psychic and Black Belt named "Brains and Brawn".
* BreakingTheFourthWall: Malva of the Elite Four tends to do this when she announces events through the Spotpass feature of the Holo Caster. Especially obvious with announcements like the one for Pokémon Bank, where she states that not only can it be downloaded from the 3DS eshop, but you can also download an application that allows you to transfer Pokémon from the fifth generation through it.
* BrickJoke:
** Same as in BookEnds: At the start of the game, a Fletching flies into the player character's room and bumps into them, waking them up. At the very end of the game, before the credits, a Fletchling flies by, then [[FlyAtTheCameraEnding into the camera]].
** On the North Boulevard of Lumiose City is Cafe Triste, which is struggling due to getting no customers. On the same Boulevard is Office Cafe, which is just an office building floor for people who couldn't get into any ''popular'' cafe.
* BrokenAesop:
** An example where it happens ''to the villain''. [[spoiler:Lysandre wanted to wipe out everyone but Team Flare because people were ruining the world through their selfish greed. Yet everywhere the player goes, there are people who give you all kinds of useful items for free, and you'll be hard-pressed to find ''anyone'' that can be considered greedy. Indeed, the only people who come across as selfish are Team Flare and Lysandre himself, meaning if anyone is ruining the world, it's ''them''.]] Then again, the villain in question is clearly stark raving mad.
** What your rival says to you on Victory Road about Team Flare and everyone's actions doesn't make a lick of sense. While the idea of both sides having a voice to speak out and meeting half-way is nice and all, it falls apart by the fact that both sides already gave their voices and yet it's Team Flare who refused to compromise when everyone else offered the opportunity to work together and form a truce. You can't really say that your actions in stopping Team Flare were "wrong" when [[spoiler:they're about to use a WeaponOfMassDestruction to wipe out both people and Pokémon at that very moment and there was no other option available. Made worse is that Lysandre still refused to compromise even after everyone offered a chance of co-operation and understanding, and he instead chooses to use the Ultimate Weapon on everyone in the area. Overall, it was not a lack of understanding, but Team Flare's arrogance that brought their end upon themselves.]]
* BrokenStreak: This game ''loves'' to do this:
** First off, each of the new starter Pokémon does this. Delphox ended the common Fire / Fighting streak set for three straight generations, Greninja is the first Water-type FragileSpeedster, and Chesnaught is a Grass-type mammal (literally a Chestnut) starter instead of a reptile.
** The two box legendaries are Fairy and Dark/Flying, ending two generations of dual-type dragon mascots.
** These are the first generation-entry games where, not only are previous-generation starters and legendaries obtainable normally, but they're even in the regional Pokédex.
** In the first five generations, there was always a Ghost-type in the Elite Four or Gym Leader lineup (Agatha, Morty, Phoebe, Fantina, and Shauntal). Ghost is absent from both in Kalos.
** [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Cynthia]], who has appeared in some form since her debut either as an event cameo or a BonusBoss, is a no show this time around.
** The current pseudo-legendary zig-zags this. It's a dragon, but it's single-typed, is more defensive than offensive, and also has two regular abilities instead of one.
** After many games of being unable to legally learn Flare Blitz, Flareon ''finally'' gets it this gen at Level 45.
** The games' release marks a departure from how Nintendo usually does things, being the first games that were released in an international format rather than one for each region.
** Every previous Ice-type Gym Leader gave out the seventh badge. Here, Wulfric is the ''eighth'' Gym Leader instead.
*** On that note, every previous Rock-type Gym Leader gave out the first badge. Here, Grant is the ''second'' Gym Leader.
** Despite having both the Voltorb line and the Foongus line, there aren't any {{Chest Monster}}s.
** These games come right after ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' when there were remakes before a new generation since Generation III (which incidentally enough, was about due for a remake)
** One of the Elite Four specialized in Dragon types. Previous Master trainers [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Lance]] was the Pokémon Champion before he lost the title, [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Clair]] is his cousin and the hardest gym of the second Gen and just as badass as Lance. [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Drake]] is the Fourth and final Elite Four member of the third Gen and a BadassGrandpa sailor, [[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 Drayden]] again a BadassGrandpa (Though depending on the version, you may have to fight his granddaughter instead) in a nice suit that leads the take action Gym leaders of Unova. Drasna the Elite Four member of this gen, is an EyesAlwaysClosed nice lady that is just ''pleasant'' and kind but still has some mons that could wipe out teams.
** This game also introduced more than one family of dual-typed Pokemon that was part Ghost (Pumpkaboo and Phantump, both Ghost & Grass). Until now, all dual-typed Pokemon that were part Ghost were all unique.
* BroughtToYouByTheLetterS: Xerneas and Yveltal, which resemble an X and a Y respectively. A third legendary Pokémon, Zygarde, roughly resembles a Z.
* BuildingSwing: Courmarine Gym has this with [[http://i.imgur.com/XlWC8.jpg ropes]] for the player to use.
* TheBusCameBack: Meta example. The Hex Maniac trainer class returns to Generation VI after its last (and only) use in Generation III.
* ButNotTooBlack: The darkest skin option is still relatively light (and described as "Mediterranean" on this very page), and due to the anime like art style, the only way to make your character recognizably "black" is to give them a haircut typical of Afrocentric people (of which, for males, there is exactly one.)
* ButThouMust:
** [[spoiler:Just like in ''Black and White'', you are ''forced'' to catch your version legendary. Defeating it won't progress the story, or get you any experience.]]
** A more subtle example: An Ace Trainer in Kiloude City asks the player character about ways to hit a Pokémon with Levitate. Every suggestion he asks the player for is a correct one.
** When you encounter Team Flare for the first time in Glittering Cave, the first grunt will ask you, "Don't you know not to play with fire?". You actually have to answer No before he'll battle you.
** When battling with Korrina to test out Mega Evolution for the first time, any and all actions you take that don't involve Mega Evolving your Lucario will lead to its instant defeat. Afterward, Korrina will insist that she wants both her Lucario to experience Mega Evolution, and than the battle will start up again as if nothing happened.
* BystanderSyndrome: You are able to invoke this trope in Geosenge Town [[spoiler: after Team Flare activates the Ultimate Weapon that not only is going cause a lot of destruction, but will absorb all the life force of the residents in Route 10]], where Phil the Photo Guy still offers his services. Yes, you can take a picture in ''front of'' ''[[spoiler:a goddamn world-ending nuke]]''. Overlaps with LostForever, since [[spoiler:the Ultimate Weapon gets destroyed. If you want that picture, you ''have'' to take it before completing Team Flare's secret lab]].
* CameraAbuse: Very minor, but when it is raining outside, your Fight/Bag/Run/Pokémon buttons have water droplets cascading down them. Similar things happen with other weather conditions such as sandstorms or snow.
** There's also a very brief occurrence of this when [[spoiler:the Ultimate Weapon emerges from the ground in Geosenge Town.]]
* CanonImmigrant: While not mentioned by name, the Pokécenter Nurse is [[http://31.media.tumblr.com/5485bc8ae02cb43df62ed0576bc16320/tumblr_mtdfs62sw51r8sc3ro1_400.png Kalos']] [[Characters/PokemonAnimeOriginalSeries Nurse Joy.]]
* CantUseStairs: This is why you can't make off with the Skiddo at the place where you can ride them. They jump ledges but can't do the stairs just outside the broken fence area.
* CaptainObviousReveal: InUniverse.
** Guess who Team Flare's leader is! [[spoiler:Hint: It's the guy who goes on long tangents about beauty and global destruction, has fiery red hair, dresses like someone associated with Team Flare, and owns a cafe that Team Flare hangs out at.]]
** The champion isn't much obscurer. [[spoiler:Hint: It's the ultra-famous, highly admired NPC you bump into twice, who promises a battle next time you meet.]]
* CatharsisFactor: Invoked in Super Training with the Team Flare punching bag. The description says "For some reason, hitting this Team Flare-themed bag just feels so good." After a good beating, the Pokémon that wailed on it will be re-energized, ready to get back to training.
* CelShading: Cel outlines and simple textures are easily noted in all (non scenery) 3D models, although the cel-shaded light-and-shadow effects are only present on the higher resolution models used in battling and certain cutscenes (the overworld models have static light and shadows).
* CharacterNameLimits: Expanded from 10 to 12. Previous obviously-shortened names like Victreebel and Feraligatr haven't had their spellings {{retcon}}ned, but one of the new Pokémon, Fletchinder, has an 11-letter name.
* ChattyHairdresser: The hairdresser in Lumiose City will always talk to you while she's cutting your hair.
* ChekhovsGun: Early in the game, you meet a martial artist who says he's heard of something that can switch a Pokémon's ability from one to the other, something that's been impossible in previous games. This item, the Ability Capsule, does exist, but it's hard to get; it's the most expensive prize you can win at the Battle Mansion.
* ChefOfIron: The chefs in the restaurants in Lumiose City, who challenge you to special Pokémon battles (Double, Triple, or Rotation) if you eat there. It isn't ''free'' to dine there, of course (they're classy places) especially if you leave a tip (and doing so will endear you to the folks in the city more) but if your Pokémon do well in the battles, you win Mushrooms, that you can sell to make a profit. (These places are like unofficial Battle Institutes (they count as real battles, so items you use are consumed), where you not only have to win several battles in a row, but do it in ''exactly'' the number of turns specified. The more stars a restaurant has, the higher the entrance price is, the more skilled the chef, and the better the reward for succeeding. A special sushi bar opens up after you complete the main storyline ''and'' the job for Looker where the price is the most expensive, the trainers are the best, and you get ''25 Big Nuggets'' if you get a perfect score.
** LoopholeAbuse: If a Pokémon faints during one of these battles and you use a Revive on it, it does ''not'' count as having fainted.
* CherryBlossomGirl: A new Trainer Class called the Furisode Girl fits the trope; they come in four varieties, each with a different style of kimono and hair, but all are similar.
* CherryTapping: In Super Training, any Pokémon that wields the yellow ball - it rapidly fires, but scores very low on each hit compared to other balls. (Nonetheless, it's great for hitting the red bonus targets.)
* ChildProdigy: The new Rising Star trainer class, which are essentially younger Ace Trainers.
* CircleOfStandingStones: There's one at Geosenge Town. [[spoiler:They turn out to be where The Ultimate Weapon is concealed.]]
* ColdIron: One of the weaknesses of the Fairy-type is the Steel-type, which also resist Fairy-type attacks.
* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: The National Pokédex has a slider on the side that categorizes Pokémon by their generation of origin, going from Red, Yellow, Green, Blue, Pink, and then White for Gen VI. The pokedex entry is also the same color as the generation it represents.
* CommonplaceRare:
** You'd be surprised that it's actually hard to find a Magikarp these days when they were all over the rivers and seas of the previous generations. They're in two specific areas, and for one of them you need to climb a waterfall to a dead end in Route 22. Gyarados on the other hand, can be easily fished with the Super Rod in Route 22 and other places. Those things are annoyingly common.
** Zubat used to be found in every UndergroundLevel, and were the worst pests, but in this game, wild Zubat are only found in one place. Even there, there are other Pokemon who are far more common than Zubats, and the cave is named after them. Woobats, however, will plague you even on Victory Road.
** A few others can be hard to find due to only being encountered under specific circumstances such as using Rock Smash on a boulder or leaping out of specific bushes randomly. Some are also exclusively found only in Horde encounters.
** Audino used to be found in any route that has rustling grass in Unova. In X and Y, however, they're found only in route 6. Even then, you have to walk past a rustling bush that, most of the time, have Venipede in them. It's still possible to benefit from the huge amount of EXP they gain, since the Marchionesses and Duchesses wearing furisodes in the Battle Chateau use them as their only Pokémon. (Especially if you used [[spoiler: a Black Wit of Challenge]].)
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: Actually downplayed this time.
** As always, a few [=NPC=]s scattered around the game have illegal Pokémon: Evolutions who should not actually exist at their current level or otherwise have skillsets that it shouldn't be able to have. For example, there are a few Mienshao that are below level 50.
** Downplayed with the Battle facilities. Unlike the main game, there are no illegal Pokemon or movesets used against you. There are held items and hidden abilities that cannot be legally obtained by the player as of yet, but it is more a case of "intended to be made available, but unreleased for some reason", or "were available in the [[PokemonBlackAndWhite previous games]] but cannot be transferred to this generation via PokeBank." The AI will throw ''legendaries'' at you if that's what it believes necessary to stop your run, but the trainers use legendaries that are actually '''legal''' in ranked battles. The Chatelaines take this to its logical extreme by use parties composed of nothing but legendaries. (And should you do well there, you can use your BP to score some ''great'' prizes, not just hard to find stuff like Life Orbs and Electirizers, but new stuff like Safety Goggles, Weakness Policies, and Ability Capsules.
** Chatelaine Evelyn was accused for the longest time of having an illegal Entei because it had Sacred Fire, which is ''Ho-oh's'' SecretArt. It took until the Pokémon Bank came out for people to discover that [[GuideDangIt Entei had Sacred Fire ninja'd into its moveset in the transition to Gen VI]].
* TheComputerIsALyingBastard: The maid at the Battle Chateau tells you that only one writ can be active at a time. In reality, as many as three writs can be active at once.[[note]]The writs can be sorted into three categories: frequency (the regular and Silver Writ of Invitation), level (the Writs of Challenge), and money (the Gold Writ of Invitation). Each category can have one writ active at a time. This means a player can have a Silver Writ (frequency), a Black Writ (level), and a Gold Writ (money) all active at the same time.[[/note]]
* ContinuityNod:
** Santalune Forest is the first area you travel through. The Pokémon found inside are the same as Viridian Forest in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'': Caterpie, Weedle, Kakuna, and Pikachu, among others.[[note]]Even the encounter rates are similarly skewed by version, with Caterpie/Metapod and Weedle/Kakuna being more common in one version than the other.[[/note]] That's not all though, as even the layout, item locations, and position of ''trainers'' are identical to Viridian Forest.
** An NPC in Lumiose City notes that Professor Oak's grandson (the original rival, Blue) visited, and still uses "Smell ya later!" as a goodbye.
** A worker in Shalour City mentions he knew [[HopelessSuitor a hiker]] [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite who loved]] [[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 Ferris wheels]]. Apparently he [[ThrowTheDogABone finally found love]].
** ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' gets another. Visit the standing stones and an NPC will mention that someone named Colress spoke to them.
** There's a cave in the Pokémon Village, whose entrance is barred by a trainer. However, after beating the Elite Four, the guard disappears, and you can enter and meet a familiar face: Mewtwo. The music that plays in the battle against it is a remix of the wild Pokémon encounter music from ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue''. Also, the name for the cave itself, the Unknown Dungeon, is what Cerulean Cave, Mewtwo's home in Kanto, was commonly called in Gen I.
** The sound effect for Hyper Beam is the same as in the original Gen I/II games, as well as other moves like Psychic, Psybeam, and Aurora Beam.
** The Laverre City Gym has the same gimmick as Saffron City's (small rooms connected by teleport pads).
** The museum is full of these. There are paintings of the Unova and Johto regions, the Sinnoh Underground, the Battle Subway from Unova, etc. There are also some paintings in the museum that were originally artwork on [[{{TabletopGame/Pokemon}} Pokémon trading cards]], like [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/File:TownVolunteersAquapolis136.jpg Town Volunteers]] or [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/File:ForestGuardianAquapolis123.jpg Forest Guardian]].
** Just like in ''Black 2 and White 2'', one NPC bothers you with a few questions, asking about how to prepare Ground-types to fight against levitating Pokémon by using items like the Iron Ball, moves like Gravity, and abilities like Mold Breaker, then challenging you to a match only to find out that there's a huge difference between how something looks on paper compared to actual battle experience. He still has an Eelektross as his final Pokémon.
** At one point, you need to get a Poké Flute to wake up and fight a Snorlax that blocks your way, just like in ''Red and Blue''. The sound the flute makes is also the same as in those games.
** Pikachu's cry now uses Creator/IkueOtani's voice. This actually dates back to ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Pokémon Yellow]]'', which also uses the voice.
** A Madame mentions how her hometown has a Pokémon center right beside a hot spring. She's referring to Lavaridge Town in ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire''.
** The Water Room in the Pokémon League has a contraption that plays out a 3D version of the first gen's animation of Hydro Pump.
** An NPC will ask you if you've ever heard of Team Plasma and say that they've caused trouble in Unova "a while back".
** Parfum Palace's garden contains statues of Reshiram and Zekrom.
** Route 16's bridge walkways with fisherman trainers, is very reminiscent of Kanto's Route 12. Both of which locations you get a super rod.
* CrazyPrepared: The guy who you can battle in Inverse Battles on Route 18, ''definitely'', given the movesets of his Pokémon. Also, a Pokémon is usually very vulnerable to its own Type in an Inverse Battle, but many of his have Abilities that make them ''completely'' immune to their own Types (or even another type it might be vulnerable to here), like Lightning Rod, Sap Sipper, and Water Absorb, eliminating that problem. Since his Pokémon are randomly selected from a set of about three dozen for each battle, these battles aren't easy, and unless you use a guide book, TrialAndErrorGameplay is the best way to get the best prizes here.
* CreativeClosingCredits: The credits, the longest of any Pokémon game, feature concept art for items and locations rendered in a parchment-like style. The second half pairs this with an instrumental AwardBaitSong, with lyrics displayed on-screen in both the game language and either French or Japanese.
* CreepyChild: The Fairy Tale Girl class has shades of this. One in particular, near the bridge in Route 19, really has a few screws loose. She's living in her own fantasy world, claiming that she can see the fairies everywhere, while laughing in a really creepy manner. Made even more creepy when you battle them in a Tag battle when they're with a Hex Maniac.
* CriticalAnnoyance: Not an issue this time around. When a Pokémon's health bar reaches red, a series of beeps will play just once and continue the action. No more obnoxious beeping or BackgroundMusicOverride!
* CriticalHitClass: Actually a viable strategy now. The critical hit formula was changed so that any Pokémon with at least three boosts to its critical hit rate will always land critical hits. This is commonly achieved by using Focus Energy (+2) while holding a Scope Lens (+1).
* CrutchCharacter:
** Just like in Generation I, you can catch a Pikachu early on in a forest. It'll almost assuredly be the first Electric-type a player will find (thus very useful against early Flying and Water Pokémon), but even after evolving it into Raichu, it'll be very outclassed by mid-game. Possibly subverted if Pikachu's holding a rare [[GlassCannon Light Ball]], which lets it hit like a nuke, but doesn't make it any harder to knock out if the enemy manages to survive.
** You can get Farfetch'd in an in-game trade very early, and it's actually somewhat ''useful'' in this game (unlike other games, where it had the reputation of being a complete joke). Seeing as it knows Aerial Ace right off the bat, it can run over the first Gym Leader, and after you get the False Swipe TM from a scientist in Professor Sycamore's lab (where you can go after the first Gym), it can learn it, making hunting for Pokémon much easier. (Sadly, its stats are still pretty bad, so it's only useful until you find a better Swiper.)
* CutAndPasteEnvironments: The hidden-floor of Lysandre's lab is the same exact layout as the lab's spin-tile floor. They didn't even bother tweaking the side-room entrances, just [[InsurmountableWaistHeightFence blocking them off]] with poster boards. This is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by Malva beforehand, telling the player it should be easy to make it through the floor since the player has been in that layout before.
* DamageTyping: ''X and Y'' appear to be playing with the long since established damage categories of the series:
** The new Ice-type move Freeze Dry is super-effective against Water types, opening the way for similar attacks.
** A new move, Flying Press, is a dual-typed Fighting/Flying move. [[note]]It's calculated by multiplying Fighting effectiveness by Flying effectiveness, so Ghosts are immune.[[/note]]
** Moves themselves are given further categories that interact specifically with certain types. Ghost types are immune to [[YouWillNotEvadeMe trapping moves]], Electric types are immune to [[StandardStatusEffects paralysis]], and Grass types are immune to spore-like moves (in addition to Leech Seed, which they've always been immune to.)
* DamnYouMuscleMemory:
** Inverse Battles (only doable on Route 18) invokes this by changing type effectiveness with super-effective being not effective and vice-versa (Meaning that Fire becomes super effective against Water, and Water super effective against Grass, etc). This ends up making the Psychic who challenges you a BossInMookClothing.
** Also, the inclusion of the Fairy type. It's all too easy to fall back to the habit of hitting a Clefairy, Jigglypuff, or Mawile with a Fighting-type move, or a Gardevoir or Mr. Mime with a Dark-type move, and forget that they're part (or entirely, in the case of Clefairy) Fairy-type now, so those weaknesses are gone. And God forbid you forget that Dragon-type moves no longer deal normal damage or better to anything that's not Steel-type... On the other end, also because of the part-Fairy type, sending said Gardevoir/Mr. Mime in on a Poison type is now risky, because Poison-type attacks are now super-effective against the two.
** Sending a Kingdra against an Ice-type Pokemon? Doable in Gen 2-5 (x1 neutrality), risky in this generation (x4 weakness). Said Ice-type may know Freeze Dry, which is, unusually for an Ice-type attack, super-effective against Water.
** Veteran players might find themselves moving around while pressing B to run while not on a bike... even if it doesn't make the skates any faster.
** If you have a choice between Yes and No, the cursor always starts on Yes...''unless'' you're asked to give a tip, when No becomes the default. If you push buttons too fast you can end up a Scrooge by accident.
* DarkerAndEdgier: In comparison to ''Black 2 and White 2'' which was fairly lighthearted even at its most serious moments. This series starts off innocently enough, but soon brings up numerous mentions of death and destruction and has it involved in the plot. One of the Pokédex entries give an aversion to InfantImmortality, and much like Yamask, other Pokémon are born from the spirits of dead humans (one of them from those of ''dead children'') [[spoiler:AZ's backstory, meanwhile, could easily be on par with ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'' when it comes to video game {{Tear Jerker}}s.]]
** SurpriseCreepy: Kalos looks like an innocent region but makes all of the above subtle hints before bombarding you with what could be the bloodiest backstory for a region to date. Team Flare is a stunning example: at first a silly Team Rocket-esque gang with a penchant for fashion, but revealed to be an insane terrorist cell whose ultimate goal [[spoiler:is essentially ''mass murder'' of all Pokémon and people not part of them to clear living space for themselves once they become immortal supermen -- which itself is achieved by draining the life out of thousands of Pokémon and (by implication) the trainers nearby.]]
* DarkIsNotEvil:
** The Hex Maniacs can be awfully ''nice'' for a group of creepy {{goth}} girls who are obsessed with ghosts, giving you valuable [=TMs=] like Toxic and Will o' Wisp simply for talking to them. One of them even gives you the stone needed for Gengar's Mega Evolution ''absolutely'' free!
** The punk gang who hangs out in the Lost Hotel are pretty decent folks too; the leader even teaches you an advanced rollerblade move called the cosmic flip, so long as you already know the backflip and the 360.
* DarkSkinnedBlonde: A possibility for the protagonist, if the player chooses the darkest skin tone and dyes their hair blonde at the hair salon. The female Swimmer also applies.
* TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything:
** When Shauna is following you in the early stages of the game she'll sometimes say that she is looking for a Pikachu. If you catch one, she'll [[{{Squee}} comment]] on it.
** Likewise, when Prof. Sycamore's assistants explain the new Fairy type to you and you have already caught one in the form of Flabébé, they'll acknowledge it.
** Both Seviper and Zangoose, and Durant and Heatmor can appear in Horde battles together. Since these species despise one another, they will fight each other instead of you. (This is a mixed blessing, because a mixed Horde ''always'' means one Mon that's ''very'' rare for that game and four common ones, meaning that if this phenomenon occurs, you've got four Mons that are going to mercilessly gang up on the one you likely want to catch, and you can only catch the last remaining one. You have to somehow ''help'' the odd Mon out in this case if you want to catch it.)
** Pokémon-Amie is a really well-thought out game mode. Depending on Pokémon species, there are parts they don't like to be rubbed, and there are parts that shouldn't be touched at all. Some examples: If you try to rub Pikachu's cheek (where its electricity is stored) you'll get a shock. You'll get frozen when you touch the gems on Aurorus's forehead and neck. [[ShmuckBait Good luck petting Regice.]] Most Fire-type mons have a part of their body that will burn you if you touch it. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LVsQlbk0qI In some cases, that "part" is all of it.]] Be careful with Pawniard, Bisharp, Ferroseed, or any other Pokémon with sharp pointy areas- you'll easily cut your hand if you aren't careful where you touch. While it's okay to pet a Ditto, Solosis, or any other fluidic Pokémon, your hand doesn't glide as freely due to its gooey form. Certain Ghost types such as Phantump and Haunter will have your hand phase through the ghostly part of their bodies. Also, trying to select a Pokémon egg to play with would result in a buzz sound and a humorous "You can't play with an egg, silly!" message to appear.
*** Also, some Pokémon can't be fed since they have no mouths, particularly the cocoon-stage of Bug families. Although you can still feed the Honedge line. The manner in which Pokémon eat also differs, Wailord for example eats the whole Puff in one bite.
** If you don't have enough money to pay the cabs, the drivers get angry and battle you. There are several different designs with several different dialogues even though almost no one will be short enough on cash for this to happen.
** There are little character touches all over the place, when you find things on the ground your player will actually kneel and place it in their bag, and if you should talk to a small child or Pokémon they will stoop down in order to be on eye-level with them.
*** In addition, if you stay standing in one place for too long, [[IdleAnimation the player character will actually start fidgeting, looking around, and stretching]], which is what many people do in {{real life}} when they're forced to stand still for a while.
** Trees, sand piles, stalagmites, crystals, and other objects that appear to be background elements randomly appear when battling in particular environments. A very select few moves can cause those objects to be cut down, blown away, or destroyed, yielding items for you to obtain.
** The sky is synced up with the 3DS's clock. When it first turns to night time, you'll find the moon just on the horizon in battle. As the night goes on, it moves higher up into the sky.
*** It'll even change to match the time of day in real time. It could be night at the beginning of an event, as you can just watch as the sun rises in the background...
** Mega Stones join Master Ball as being one of the few regular items you can't sell, since merchants know ''how'' valuable they are.
** Tilting the 3DS around during story-related Holo Caster messages, such as the one you get just before entering Route 5, will show up as your character tilting all around, in the same angle as you're tilting.
** Usually, when your PC wins a boss fight, they will smile and pump their fist, a modest but clear "Yay, I won!" gesture. However, when you defeat the BigBad, Calem pumps first to his side, then follows through with the above, while Serena sighs in relief.
** In the postgame, [[spoiler: during the first few fights with Essentia, her face is completely covered by her visor, showing that she's under Xerosic's control. However, if you fight her in rematches after completing the side-quest, her face does show through the visor, which shows that ''she'' is in control now]].
** Team Flare is known for striking flamboyant poses throughout the game. When they do so before battle begins, they'll stay in that pose even when the game cuts to the battle screen and more detailed models.
** The "Encounter" and "Stealth" O-Powers are the only ones you can't use on other people. No doubt the developers knew that some people would try to use them to grief other players.
** The shape of your character's shadow in the overworld will actually change depending on what time it is.
** Facing the Elite Four? Their dialogue, while remaining mostly the same, changes somewhat depending on the order you face them in. As an example, [[PlayingWithFire Malva]] will say say there's three left to go if you face her first, or that you've 'defeated them all' if she's the last one.
** The Pokemon Storage System gives you a maximum of 30 boxes during the main game, but after catching the version legendary, it's increased to 31. Why? Well, in the ''incredibly'' unlikely event you've managed to fill all 30 boxes by that point, you'll still have someplace to put your new legendary (Or, more likely, whoever you sent to the PC to make room for it)
** When a Pokémon holding an Air Balloon is sent out, it will not make its landing sound and effects, though it'll still land on the ground if its model shows that.
* DeathIsDramatic: It's not death, of course, as Pokémon who are defeated simply faint, but in this installment, a lot of them try to go out in style. Some of them, like Axew and Mr. Mime do a {{facepalm}} before retreating to their Poké Balls, others like Spinda stagger around drunkenly before collapsing, many do an OhCrap before disappearing, while Haunter holds its hands up with a BigNo before it is called back.
* DevelopmentGag: Rollerskates were intended to appear as far back as ''Gold and Silver'', but were cut out for unknown reasons.
* DidWeJustHaveTeaWithCthulhu: Did we just play games with, pet, and feed Poké Puffs to various legendaries in Pokémon-Amie? The game doesn't stop you from doing that! Lampshaded [[http://atwotonedbird.tumblr.com/post/65059182953 in this comic]] where Mewtwo was seen as visibly distraught when the trainer played with him in Pokémon-Amie.
* DiscOneNuke:
** You can get some ''very'' decent Pokémon right away in the forest just north of the town you start at, including all three of the elemental monkeys and a Pikachu, and because Shauna comes with you the first time to heal your Pokémon whenever you desire, you can hunt until you run out of Poké Balls.
*** You can also catch an Azurill on the route that has the forest's exit, which can have Huge Power as an ability. Couple that with the fact that at least three of its stats will have perfect [=IV=]s, and it and its later evolutions become nearly unstoppable. The catch? Azurill has ''really'' bad stats initially, and it evolves into Marill via happiness. Without any assisting items to increase happiness (such as the Soothe Bell), you'd have to [[MagikarpPower work pretty hard]] to earn its power. The only other way to increase happiness is grinding for Soothing bags in Super Training, which are much rarer than other bags, but still easier to get at that point in the game.
** A promotional Torchic is available with every copy of the game bought before January 2014. This Torchic can be received at the very first Pokémon Center you reach, where it will probably be at least the same level as the player's highest level Pokémon. Due to it being a trade Pokémon, it will also level up faster. It also has two other special attributes: its Ability is [[StatusBuff Speed Boost]] that turns its final form Blaziken into a LightningBruiser, and Blazikenite that lets Blaziken Mega Evolve. Furthermore, its typing (Fire/Fighting with a couple Flying Moves) is effective in the first four gyms, and after that is plenty strong enough to take on almost every other threat in the main game; yes, it's possible to do the entire game ''just'' using Mega Blaziken. This can also [[AwesomeButImpractical have the inverse effect early on]] if you aren't careful. It's very easy to be overlevelled, and since the Torchic is treated like a traded Pokémon, it can possibly start refusing to follow your commands in battle if you don't have enough badges.
** Depending on your luck (in more ways than one) Wonder Trade is essentially this. You can trade as soon as you have 2 Pokémon. Trade one and you could get a level 50 Pokémon from someone who has beaten the game. This also could hurt you due to the disobedience factor though but even then, a level 50 Pokémon before you get your first badge would wreck everything for quite a while, including Victory Road fodder.
*** If you're especially lucky, though, you could receive a just-hatched Pokémon with a favorable moveset. While it'll take a little time for it to catch up in levels, the quicker level-ups should assuage that and then you'll have an optimized Pokémon at a manageable level.
** EXP Share is a very, very useful item this time around. When it's activated all Pokémon in your party get 50% of the experience they would've gotten for fighting. This makes grinding even faster and easily bridges the gaps in levels with lower level Pokémon you add to your party.
** LuckBasedMission aside, ''X and Y'' really give you chances to get powerful mons pretty early. For instance, think about catching a Riolu ''before fighting the first Gym'' (or you can wait to receive a ''free'' Lucario after completing the third gym and subsequent plot), you have a chance to catch Snorlax on ''Route 7'' (its level is proportionally lowered, obviously) and just a bit later, an ''[[MagikarpPower Axew]]'' in the Connecting Cave, an Absol ''and'' a [[InfinityMinusOneSword Bagon]] in Route 8, a Kangaskhan in Glittering Cave, and so on -- all before the second gym!
** Also, if you don't want to worry about the disobedience factor, just use Pokémon-Amie frequently. Pokémon with a high affection also gain experience points quicker.
* DoorToBefore: All of the gyms give you some way of returning to the start when you defeat the Gym Leader, like a set of stairs or a slide. In Olympia's case, there's no path that opens for the player, instead she'll teleport you back to the start when you talk to her.
* DowsingDevice: The Dowsing Machine. This time though, you're actually shown holding them in front of you while they emit two [[HardLight beams of light]] that change from blue to green to orange to red (and cross over each other) when you home in on a target. Pretty much high-tech versions of the old two sticks version.
* TheDragonSlayer: One of the Fairy-type's ''raisons d'ętre.'' Fairy-type attacks are super-effective against Dragon-types on top of Fairy-type themselves being immune to Dragon-type attacks.
* DubNameChange: Par for the course for ''Pokémon'', but this also creates some interesting situations in-universe.
** One TV program quizzes you on the Japanese names of Pokémon (in romaji), and explains their etymology and pronunciation too.
** Although Looker has a different name in most languages, when Emma and the foreign tourist are conversing in Japanese (or English, in non-English versions), Looker is referred to by his name in the game's language (transliterated if necessary) rather than the conversation's language.
* DudeWheresMyRespect:
** Averted, as defeating Team Flare and becoming Champion earns you a parade in the streets of the capital. When you wake up in your room post game your mother mentions seeing the parade on TV and how Professor Augustine Sycamore really went all out getting everyone to attend, except her apparently.
** Another ''serious'' aversion occurs in the Power Plant. There a guy there who sells Fresh Water (a healing item) for 300 PokéDollars a bottle. However, after you drive Team Flare out and restore the power, he gives you a discount, charging you only 100 a bottle. (In most RPG video games, a merchant showing such generosity to the hero is unheard of.)
** Played straight in the Battle Chateau, where even as a Duke/Duchess you'll get trash talked by the low-ranking Barons and Viscounts. A Lady also wonders if you picked out your clothes in the dark, or perhaps found them in a trash can, even when you're wearing clothes bought in the highly expensive and stylish Lumiose Boutique Couture. (Of course, unlike the trainers here, your rank [[JustifiedTrope is not included in your name]], and most of them ''do'' apologize if you defeat them.) Ironically, this become less prevalent (though still exists) with the higher-ranked members; one Duchess even acknowledges you as a rising star.
** Also played straight in the Looker story, where the Lumiose City gang trash-talks you despite likely being aware you're the champion.
** The bouncer at Sushi High-Roller will tell you to "get famous or something and then come back" if you don't have enough Style Points in Lumiose City; this occurs even if you've become the Pokemon Champion, saved Kalos, become nobility at the Battle Chateau, and perhaps most jarringly, ''AFTER you've had a parade in your honour in Lumiose for your exploits.'' Talk about oblivious.
* DummiedOut: Pokémon games often have dummied out content, but an NPC mentions an item called a "Shalour Sable", which is a cookie that acts as a Full Heal. It was probably dummied out because the Lumiose Galette does the same thing.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: E-K]]
* EiffelTowerEffect: The TropeNamer in action; the game's Eiffel-counterpart was all that was needed to tip us off as to the location. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pG-q-WIYTs Even referenced by Masuda himself!]]
* ElementalRockPaperScissors: As usual, but ''X'' and ''Y'' also introduces the Fairy-type, the first entirely ''new'' type since ''Gold'' and ''Silver''.
* EscortMission: Hordes of Seviper and Durant will have a single Zangoose and Heatmor in them respectively (or vice-versa for Zangoose and Seviper, depending on version), with the rival Pokémon ganging up on the poor souls. They actively fight back, but unless you can help them without killing them in the process, they'll be torn apart pretty quickly; woe betide you if you aren't lucky enough to encounter the rare ones alone, as fishing them out of the hordes can be a ''massive'' chore. Fortunately you can catch a Pokémon[[note]]Ralts[[/note]] that learns Heal Pulse by level fairly early into the game which helps ''immensely'', though there's still some luck involved. There are also a few attacks that can hit an entire Horde at once, and they might help too if the attack is super-effective against four of them but not the odd one; for example, if you use Heat Wave against four Durant and one Heatmor, the Heatmor might survive (especially if it has Flash Fire), but the four Durant likely won't.
* EvenEvilHasStandards: Assuming Yveltal counts as evil (possible, seeing as it represents Destruction and can drain the life force from other beings, not usually considered good) it clearly objects to [[spoiler:Lysandre's]] genocidal plans, as it is just as willing to oppose him in ''Y'' as Xerneas is in ''X''.
* EvenTheGirlsWantHer: Not that this hasn't happened in the franchise before (usually unintentionally) but Shauna seems to have a crush on your character even if you choose the female one. More than one scene seems to suggest this. ''And'' if your go character goes to the beauty salon enough times, the female hairdresser appears to get a crush too (suggested by what she says) no matter which character you use.
* EvolutionPowerUp: ''X'' and ''Y'' expand the ways in which certain Pokémon evolve, particularly with regards to the new "Mega Evolution" feature (a temporary SuperMode) available to some (otherwise fully-evolved) species.
* ExactWords:
** A certain psychic trainer claims your aura's that of the unlucky type. When you beat her, she says "Unlucky for me, I see.". Talking to her again would result in her stating that she finds your aura's that of a kind and caring type, and would appear unlucky for anyone who wishes to challenge you.
* ExcitedTitleTwoPartEpisodeName: The names of various Super Training courses follow this sort of pattern, with titles such as "Catch It! Noivern's Wild Wind!" or "Shoot Back! Get the Giant Wailord!"
* TheFairFolk: A few Fairy-type Pokémon could be described as such. Gardevoir appears to be a classical glamourous fae, though just like all other times, Gardevoir's PokéDex entry says it is [[UndyingLoyalty utterly dedicated to protecting its trainer]].[[note]]of course, if you were someone who wanted to ''harm'' its trainer...[[/note]] Closer to traditional fairies are Mawile (called the Deceiver Pokémon, no less, and quite vicious) and Whimsicott (a trickster sprite, reflected in its Prankster ability). Discussed by a Fairy Tale Girl NPC on Route 15, who says that the fairies cuteness is the most terrifying thing about them.
* FantasticNuke:
** Yveltal in the storyline of ''Pokémon Y''. When killed, it absorbs the life energy of every living thing in the vicinity. This combined with the fact that it is being used by [[KnightsTemplar eco-terrorists]] and you can see why it is called the destruction Pokémon.
** [[spoiler: The ultimate weapon created 3,000 years ago is another example, as it was single-handedly used to end the war and killed thousands of people and Pokémon.]]
* FantasyCounterpartCulture: Like ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', instead of being a region based on Japan, Kalos is based on France, in particular Paris and other notable landmarks. [[http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/2/24/XY_Prerelease_Paris.png It even has an Eiffel Tower.]] The Professor even drops gratuitous French into his sentences!
** GayParee: The game's equivalent of Paris is known as Lumiose City, and is a major hub city in the heart of the region, similar to Castelia City and Hearthome City.
* FeaturelessProtagonist: Actually zig-zagged both ways in this installment:
** On the one hand, '''everything''' about your avatar is customizable this time around. Especially once you unlock all the clothing stores, the number of options available to the player is dizzying. The only thing you cannot change after character creation is skin color, and even then you get to choose that when you first start the game (you can choose between light skin with blonde hair, fair skin with light brown hair or brown skin with dark hair). Everything else is up in the air at any time and you are welcome and encouraged to create a signature look for yourself.
** Even their ''age'' is [[VagueAge a little hard to determine]] at this point; their default art and outfits make them seem a bit older than the likes of [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Red]] and other early protagonists (much like [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Hilbert and Hilda]]), but it's very difficult to assign an age to them and none of the supplementary materials really address the question. Enhancing this even further, though, is the fact that the various outfits and hairstyles can make you ''look'' older or younger; this can get especially obvious if you play as Serena, as a combination of pigtails and a "cute" outfit can actually make her look ''younger'' than Red, while on the other end of the spectrum, a turtleneck outfit from Snowbelle or the fancy clothes from Lumiose paired with the proper haircut can make her look practically like a college student.
** Muddying the issue further is the actual model size. Serena and Calem have to kneel down to talk to children, and a certain character in a post-game mission with a model about the same size as yours is given the explicit age of sixteen. TeensAreShort is in full effect here. Even Veteran Trainers, who are clearly adults in their battle profiles (Males have 5 O'clock Shadows) are represented by the same size models as the player. You can't tell what their age is until you battle them. It's probably intentional.
** On the other hand, the Protagonist(s) have the most pre-established backstory of any character in the main game franchise since the [[PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III protagonists]], and even they didn't have nearly as much established history as the [=X/Y=] ones do. It is made explicit that:
*** Your character is ''not'' a native Kalosian; this is brought up many times and isn't left up for debate. You aren't from around here.[[note]]In nearly every other game, it was only vaguely implied how long you'd lived in your "hometown"; only [=R/S/E=] had the similar idea that you weren't local.[[/note]]
*** Your mother, Grace, is a Rhyhorn racing star. You've known the family Rhyhorn since birth, and you're friendly to it and it to you.
*** You have not one friend, but ''four'', and all their relationships with you are pretty well-defined by the game.
* FighterMageThief: The starter trio. Fennekin is a witch (the mage), Froakie is a ninja (the thief) and Chespin is covered in armour (the fighter). WordOfGod says this was intentional and made to fit within a MedievalEuropeanFantasy theme.
* FingerPokeOfDoom: A new physical Fairy-type move with 90 base power (as in, the same base power as ''Flamethrower'') is called "Play Rough". In the German version its name translates to ''Cuddle'', and in Japanese its name translates to ''Frolic''.
* FiveManBand: See TheTeam below. Notable because this is the first game in the series to feature an actual five-person group at the start (in earlier, games you are alone, or if you have a companion, you usually don't see each other very much).
* FlavorText: New Pokédex descriptions are par for the course, and may or may not reflect a species's in-game abilities.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: At Geosenge City, your rival notes that a Team Flare Grunt ran into a dead end and disappeared. [[spoiler:Later on, that "boulder" turns out to be a secret entrance to the Team Flare HQ]].
* FoodPorn: The waiters in the restaurants of Lumiose City (except the Sushi High Roller) give you some rather ''detailed'' descriptions of the entrees. For example, the third course at the two-star Restaurant Le Yeah is "Azure Bay Slowpoke Tail [with] Payapa Berry crudités glazed in extra virgin Oran oil". The chef claims that "it has been described as the gastronomical equivalent of a Gastly glaring at a Hex Maniac". The ''fourth'' is cheese made from an Arbok's Toxic venom, aged up to 180 years; the chef claims that "simply biting into this blue cheese will give off an odor so foul, your nose hairs will burn." [[SarcasmMode (Sure... Sounds delicious.)]]
* FourTemperamentEnsemble: Calem/Serena (choleric), Trevor (melancholic), Shauna (sanguine), Tierno (phlegmatic) and the player character (leukine).
* FreeRangeChildren: A staple as always, though in the Protagonist's case the logic behind the parenting makes a little more sense this time: the Protagonist's mother is a champion Pokémon racer and is very familiar with how rewarding such a journey can be, and approves of the idea immediately on hearing it.
* FreezeFrameBonus: Furfrou was revealed through one of these on the [[http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/3/33/XY_Prerelease_Unknown_Pok%C3%A9mon_Sept_4.png September 4th Pokémon Direct]]. And it really was only a single frame.
* FrenchJerk: Averted for most of the characters in the game, as they're just as kind to the player as the characters in any other region or generation. Played straight for [[spoiler: Lysandre]] and the rest of Team Flare.
* GameBreakingBug:
** A nasty glitch was quickly discovered after release where sometimes saving in specific areas of Lumiose City, specifically outside in the streets of North and South outer ring would cause the game to freeze, forcing a restart. Nintendo released a patch that fixed the glitch and improved search filtering on the GTS. [[note]]This will also repair already broken savefiles. You can download it for free in the Eshop on your 3DS [[/note]]. Another gamefreeze may occur when trying to access the Holocaster for updates from the PSS menu while in Lumiose, as the game fails to initialize the rear cameras.
* GameplayAndStoryIntegration:
** In a bit of a blink and you'll miss it. [[spoiler:When Lysandre is defeated for the last time, he throws his glasses down to the ground. Someone with a keen eye can notice that the glasses are indeed on the ground when the game reverts to the standard mode.]]
** Zigzagoon walking in a zigzag fashion was established as early as ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue FireRed and LeafGreen]]'', but due to technical limitations, this was never shown in the games, aside from the ''PokemonColosseum'', ''PokemonBattleRevolution'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonRanger'' side games. With the new engine for the portables main series, order a Zigzagoon to use a physical attack and it will indeed charge its enemy in a zigzagging motion.
** During the day a Chinchou's antennae will have a normal yellow look, but during the night, they noticeably light up. This is because it normally lives on the dark ocean floor, where it uses the light its electric antennae emit to communicate.
** Likewise, Pumpkaboo's and Gourgeist's pumpkin holes glow at night, like an actual Jack-o'-lantern.
** More examples include Grumpig actually dancing when using a special attack, Stunfisk smiling when using a special attack and Shedinja having almost no animations besides floating, even in Pokémon Amie (like what the respective Pokémon's Pokédex entries say they do).
** Sudowoodo gets this in a horde encounter with four Trevenants. Apparently its good enough to fool these tree Pokémon.
** Any time a Zangoose gets mixed up in a Seviper horde (or vice versa), the rival Pokémon families will ''attack each other'' before turning their attention to you.
* GameplayAndStorySegregation:
** The new Sky Battles only allow Flying-type Pokémon and Pokémon with Levitate to participate. This leaves out several Pokémon that are always shown flying in animations (usually Bug-types) and includes Pokémon that can't fly (such as Gyarados). It also leaves out small bird-like Pokémon whose default animation is a standing one (like Farfetch'd), despite their Flying type.
** Banette is often seen opening its mouth, to eat or to smile. However, it's said that if it opens its mouth, its cursed energy escapes. When it Mega Evolves, its mouth unzips (along with its hands and legs), but it seems like all that's inside it are a second set of appendages.
** You can take Muk into Pokémon-Amie. It is extremely poisonous to the touch, yet petting it is still possible.
** It's been established in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Pokémon FireRed]]''[[note]]and, by extension, ''Pokémon X'', since it uses [=FireRed=]'s entry for Scyther[[/note]] that Scyther seldom flies, but not only is it eligible for sky battles, it's also depicted as constantly flying while battling.
** Mega Evolution is possible if there is a strong enough bond between a Pokémon and its trainer... or so the in-game explanations say. There is no such requirement to pull this off, so have fun with a super pissed Mega Evolution letting it all out on its prey.
* {{Gasshole}}: A new Poison-type move called Belch, which can only be used if the user had eaten a berry beforehand. Despite sounding silly, this burp is ''stronger than Fire Blast, Blizzard, Hurricane and Thunder''.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: These games have so much of these that ''[[Radar/PokemonXandY it has its own page]]''.
* GimmickLevel: Riding on top of Pokémon is a gimmick in itself. That said, Route 9 and Route 17 can only be crossed by riding on a Rhyhorn and a Mamoswine, respectively. Only they can cross the rough terrain and knock the rocks out of the way. All in all, riding on top of Pokémon can only be done in very specific and limited areas.
* GoldenMeanFallacy: Your rival keeps insisting that everyone has a good point and that the truth must always lie in the middle. [[StupidNeutral S/he even insists that this is true about Team Flare's agenda, implying that instead of either saving everyone or killing everyone, the ideal would be to kill half of everyone.]]
* GoldDigger:
** Baron Herisson, a trainer at the Battle Chateau is a rare male example, at least that's his plan. He claims he's there to "hook up to some rich Duchess", and once you defeat him, he confesses that he's actually dead-broke.
** Duchess Elise is another, more successful example there who doesn't even deny it, she flat-out tells you that she "has [her] master wrapped around my little finger" and is using him for money. She has a slight FreudianExcuse however, saying after you defeat her that she does it (and trains Pokémon to win battles) because she was born into poverty.
* GoodMorningCrono: The adventure opens with a Fletchling flying in through the player's house and waking him/her up from bed.
* GratuitousFrench:
** The route signposts, in addition to identifying the route, also have nicknames that the locals use, some of which contain French words (Ex: Route 11, also known as Miroir Way) and Professor Sycamore and several random [=NPC=]s use a few French phrases, among other things. Even ''Pokémon'' use GratuitousFrench; if you talk to a Furfrou, it says "Ouaf!" which is a French onomatopoeia for a dog barking. Fitting, as the Kalos region is based on France.
-->'''Alexa:''' If you want to reach Route 13, 14, or 16, you can get there from here. But, of course, we locals all know them as Lumiose Badlands, Laverre Nature Trail, and Mélancolie Path.
** Subverted with the French lyrics to KISEKI, which are displayed if you play the game in English (or Japanese, or Korean); they tend to flow a bit better than the English lyrics, and given the game's setting, it isn't out of the question that the song was written in French first.
* GreatOffscreenWar: A massive war that occurred 3000 years ago is a major plot point. Various poets and historians repeatedly mention how thousands of humans and Pokémon alike were killed because of it.
* GrindBoots: Your skates can act as this. Korrina's Gym includes stretches of rails to cross in this manner. A few others are scattered throughot Kalos, mostly to reach hidden secrets or act as shortcuts.
* GuideDangIt:
** Berry growing is back! ''Yay'', right? Not exactly. On one hand, you ''do'' get one centralized location to plant massive Berry crops, and all you have to do is occasionally check up on them to control weeds and Bug Pokémon, but acquiring new Berries can be rather difficult: You can get a few free off of trees along routes, while others you are given by NPC's or (rarely) held by wild Pokémon. You can also crossbreed to get rarer berries if you plant different kinds together[[note]](hint: the free Oran and Pecha berries you're first given can crossbreed to make Qualots)[[/note]], but with over 30 types of berries [[note]](and over 500 potential combinations between them)[[/note]] the only way to discover the hybrid recipes is either through trial and error, or by looking it up in a guide.
** How to get stylish enough to unlock certain features in Luminose City. Pretty much anything you do in the city (even taking cabs) counts, but there is no way of telling when you reach a new rank in game other than trial and error aside from the price reductions for Mega Stones at the Gem Emporium, and there's precious little in-game indicating this.
** How do you level-up your rank in the Battle Chateau? By fighting and defeating Trainers repeatedly; the higher the Trainer's rank, the more it counts towards your Chateau title. But with the exception of the Marchionesses carrying Audino (and Gym Leaders), there's no way to know the rank of that generic NPC you're about to battle, and no way to check your progress (though you are notified when you rank up).
** Par for the course, how to evolve certain Pokémon. ''X'' and ''Y'' add such fun conditions as ''holding the 3DS upside down'' or ''having another Pokémon with a specific type in the party''. Sylveon's true evolution method wasn't discovered until a week after the game released; It was previously thought to require maximum affection in Amie, but it actually requires only two affection hearts ''and'' knowing a Fairy-type move.
*** Sliggoo's evolution into Goodra deserves special mention. Even if you figure out that a sign that mentions a Pokémon that evolves in the rain is referring to Sliggoo, you have no way of knowing that it needs to be raining in the overworld; Rain Dance and Drizzle won't cut it. And finding rain is a LuckBasedMission...
** Finding Mega Stones postgame. It doesn't help that the Mega Ring's ability to detect hidden Mega Stones is limited to ''one hour per day'' (and even more specifically, ''between 8 and 9 PM'', when the in-game sunset illuminates the sundial at Anistar City), and some of them are hidden in very unexpected locations, like [[spoiler:in the Cyllage Gym -- more specifically, it's located in the dead end of one of the paths you can take.]]
** Speaking of Mega Evolutions, a Pokemon still acts on the same speed as its previous evolution on the same turn it Mega Evolves. There is nothing from Korrina or her grandfather mentioning this, and anyone who isn't aware is likely wondering why their speed-boosted Megas get outsped and knocked out when they Mega Evolve.
** How to get to the Boss in the Lost Hotel. [[spoiler:You have to talk to four roller skaters in Lumiose City and learn new skating tricks before you can meet the Boss.]]
** How to easily avoid the wild Pokémon encounters on Route 13: The Pokémon only moves when you move, and disappears a bit after it appears. Therefore, the best way to avoid them is to stand still until they disappear.
* GuiltBasedGaming:
** A little bit, thanks to the Pokémon-Amie mechanic. The higher a Pokémon's affection for you, the more detailed the battle description. This includes telling you that your Pokémon is "about to cry" if its hit points become critical in battle. Try denying it your last Full Restore with ''that'' on the screen. [[YouBastard It shakes off paralysis because it loves you, and you won't even give it medicine?]]
** Having Memory Girl read your Pokémon's memories. It can be heartwarming if the best thing that the Pokémon remembers about you is its first battle with you, or the time it hatched and saw you for the first time. On the other hand, it might suck if the most poignant memory of the Pokémon is the long and harsh Super Training sessions it went through (but only if your Pokémon isn't energetic during the time of training. It'll remember it as a good thing if it is.) So, the next time you start up Super Training, you may not want to do it all in one go ever again...
* GustyGlade: At certain times, Route 13 has a strong wind that pushes the player character to the right.
* HeroicMime: Surprisingly, Averted, at least compared to other games in this franchise. The protagonist doesn't talk ''much'', but he/she has quite a bit of dialogue when interacting with other characters.
** Also the encouragements during the punching bag training could be seen as your character saying all that, since s/he is the one training them after all.
* HoistByHisOwnPetard:
** [[spoiler:Like with Reshiram/Zekrom in Black and White, you ''have'' to capture the cover legendary that Lysandre wants to use as his weapon and turn it against Lysandre's team. Even more fitting is that his first Pokémon (a Mienshao) is weak to ''both'' cover legendaries (Fairy and Flying).]]
** [[spoiler:Also, when finally defeated, he foolishly activates his Ultimate Weapon [[RevengeBeforeReason out of pure rage]], accomplishing nothing but killing himself in the process.]]
* HonorBeforeReason: Every trainer that is able to use Mega Evolution ''always'' brings the only Pokémon capable of it out last, even if you are mowing down the rest of their team down with your own Mega Evolution.
* HorseOfADifferentColor: Various Pokémon can be ridden as mounts in certain locations, like Gogoats in Lumiose City or the Skiddo ranch along Route 12. A Rhyhorn is used to cross rocky terrain near Ambrette Town, and a Mamoswine is used to plow through snow between Dendemille and Anistar.
* HubCity: Lumiose, which is probably the clearest example yet in the main series since it connects to ''five'' routes.
* HumansAreWhite: Actually, a surprising aversion - You will encounter a lot of [=NPC=]s who are various shades of brown. This also isn't including the ability to make the player character look AmbiguouslyBrown, passable for Arab, Latino/a, North Indian, Native American, etc.
* HumbleHero: The protagonist can be one if the player wants him/her to be one at a few points in the game, depending on what you say to other characters. (Before taking down Team Flare, in which case it's hard to be one.) One example: After you arrive in Lumiose, where power has been restored after you drive Team Flare out of the Power Plant, Shauna meets with you, and is giddy about the stories about how someone heroically drove the bad guys out. When she asks you if you know who it was, you can choose to tell her it was you, ''or'' you can keep it to yourself by saying "Who knows?"
* IdleAnimation: The players stretch, look around, and so on - things actual people do when bored. Pokémon have an extra animation they do when they've been on the field without making a move for a while, most of which count as idle animations. For instance, Mawile clacks its huge jaw, and Riolu wipes or fidgets its right foot along the ground.
* IdleRich: ''Lots'' of folks in Lumiose City are like this. When you first get there, they look down on you, not letting you in some places and charging astronomical prices for some things, not because you're a lower social class, but because you aren't "stylish" enough. In this case, however, there are ways to make them change their opinion by taking certain actions in the game, like using the services in the city and the Battle Institute. (The things that increase your "stylishness" score the most tend to be more expensive and not available until later in the game, but they do open up some useful things; for example, you can reduce the price of Mega Evolution stones that would normally cost ''a million'' Poké Dollars to only 10,000 if you keep at it.)
* IMeantToDoThat: One Team Flare Grunt in the Power Plant insists "I lost on purpose..." when you defeat him.
* ImprobablePowerDiscrepancy: The Battle Maison is a post-game facility that only people who have beaten the Pokémon League can enter. The trainer classes that can be fought include butlers, tourists and ''preschoolers''. Some of them even have legendaries.
* InterfaceSpoiler:
** In a way, the fact that Mewtwo would be getting two version-specific Mega Evolutions was spoiled by an early image of the then only revealed form having the filename m2'''y'''.
** Additionally, the page had two spots under Mewtwo's main Form, one with Mega Mewtwo Y (at the time called Speed Form). The other was empty.
** If a character has a coloured text box, it means they're important.
* InvisibleGrid: X and Y have one like previous games in the series, but this time, not only can you move diagonally (in fact, the first gym's puzzle is pretty much there to tell you that you can), you can overcome the grid altogether using the rollerblades or bicycle[[note]]But only if you use the circle pad, which you use to use the roller skates, to control instead of the d-pad. It's likely that the circle pad ignores the grid except when walking in buildings that don't allow skating or biking.[[/note]]. Surfing also appears to be off the grid.
* {{Irony}}:
** Mega Mewtwo Y is ''much smaller'' than standard Mewtwo, despite the name. On the other hand, Mega Mewtwo X is about a foot taller than standard Mewtwo.
* ISOStandardUrbanGroceries: The Beauty class in the game carries a brown paper bag with a prominent baguette sticking out of it.
* IsThisThingStillOn: In television, Azusa goes through an entire episode of ''[[ShowWithinAShow Koukan Talk]]'' in Japanese before realizing and apologizing to the audience.
* JapaneseTourist:
** A new trainer class. Though it's called simply "Tourist", all of its members have Japanese names and use Pokémon from the first four regions, which took place in analogues of Japan.
** One post-game mission involves one of these tourists whose Pokémon have been stolen, but she can't tell you because she only speaks Japanese. [[spoiler:Looker]] believes that she is asking for some tea and [[ButtMonkey goes to buy an expensive, fancy type of tea that turns out to be completely unnecessary]]. [[note]]This is averted in the Japanese and other non-English versions of the games, as she [[KeepItForeign instead speaks English]].[[/note]]
* {{Jerkass}}: Quite a few trainers are this, but the one who really takes the cake is Viscountess Danielle at the Battle Chateau, who will mock your outfit no matter how cool it looks. Even if you beat her, [[JerkWithAHeartOfJerk she will continue to mock your outfit]].
* JumpScare: A new method of encountering wild Pokémon where Pokémon jump out, dive down, drop or swoop down at you.
* KeepItForeign: In the Looker sidequests, a tourist gets her Pokémon stolen by a gang. In the Japanese version (and most other languages) she speaks English, in the English version she speaks Japanese. Interestingly, Looker's DubNameChange applies in the respective language, so you have Emma mentioning "Mr. Looker" in katakana (ルッカー) rather than "Mr. Handsome" in the English version, and "Mr. [=LeBelle=]" while speaking English in the German version.
* KilledOffForReal: [[spoiler:Lysandre's implied fate in ''Pokémon Y''; he is directly hit by the death ray of the Ultimate Weapon, making him the first character in a main Pokémon game to canonically '''die'''. It is vaguely suggested that he's still alive in ''Pokémon X'', but his fate is [[AndIMustScream even worse]]...]]
** [[spoiler: Looker implies in the postgame that one of his former partner Pokemon was killed in action. This is likely the Croagunk he had that was only seen in Platinum.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:L-R]]
* LampshadeHanging:
** When [[spoiler:Lysandre]] appears with [[spoiler: The robotic limbs attached to his back]], Shauna points out how ridiculous he looks.
** Wulfric the ice gym leader talks about how "[[GlassCannon ice is very strong but it's also fragile]]" and says "depending on what type of Pokémon you have I may be one of the hardest or easiest gym leaders you've faced". This is [[LampshadeHanging lampshading]] many fans' grievances over the ice type's poor resistances and it's weaknesses to some common types.
* LargeHam: Super Training's messages as a whole seem to come from the hammiest personal trainer on earth.
* LastRequest: [[spoiler:An old man in Anistar City has been feeling very lonely since his wife died, and he knows that he's not long for this world either. He asks that you give him a Pokémon level 5 or under and just let him spend some time with it before his time comes. When you come back to his house after defeating the Elite Four, you will find your Pokémon in the center of the floor along with an item and a note from the old man, thanking you for letting him spend his final days in comfort and happiness.]]
* LeaningOnTheFourthWall: A Hex Maniac on route 16, who says she knows all about you, tells you this after you've defeated her:
-->'''Hex Maniac:''' You're definitely the leader type! Like the protagonist of a game or something!
* LetsMeetTheMeat: A variation in the Le Wow restaurant where a Skiddo comes out to greet you for one of the courses, this Skiddo being the source of the milk that made the cheese in the course. This turns out to be accidental, as the Skiddo rushed out to the table [[ExtremeOmnigoat appearing to be eating the note]].
* TheLoad: Played with. [[spoiler:Shauna ''thinks'' that she has become this for Calem and Serena by the time you infiltrate Team Flare's base, even though the game never makes her come off as annoying, useless, or holding anyone back at any point in the story. You reassure her that she isn't and never was]].
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: Although there are only 69 ''new'' Pokémon, there are still a plethora of Pokémon from previous games to be found; the most out of any Pokémon game yet.
** And far more variations of the same Pokémon, with Vivillon alone having ''18'' different forms
* LonelyPianoPiece: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uj2lzEUVto AZ's theme]], reflecting his tragic past.
* LongSongShortScene:
** The many pre-battle tracks are actually rather long. Not that you would know, since you have to sit there without doing anything to listen to them.
** The theme for route 1, the shortest route in the game (with just a few paces between Vaniville Town and Aquacorde Town), is surprisingly long. Again, you have to sit there without doing anything to listen to it, since it only appears for exactly that route.
** Another LongSongShortScene: Battle! ([[spoiler:Successor Korrina]]), which only plays during the battle against [[spoiler: her while she's teaching you how to use mega evolution]]. Said theme is [[spoiler: [[BossRemix a rather epic remix of the gym leader's theme]]]], but that's the only place where you get to hear it outside of multiplayer battles. And said battle's rather short, so again, [[RuleOfThree you have to sit there without doing anything to listen to it]].
** The gate theme also qualifies. It plays only when you go through the various gates of the cities, and since you'd most likely to zip through the gates to get to the other side, [[RunningGag you have to sit there without doing anything to listen to it]].
* LostForever: Like the 4th and 5th generations, there are periodic events allowing players to acquire rare Pokémon and/or items, although you are actually allowed to trade them outside of the global trade center; the first XY event is a special Torchic with its hidden ability ''and'' possessing the item needed to unlock Blaziken's Mega Evolution (which is otherwise unobtainable in-game). Just like with most event Pokémon, many players are trading the Torchic to another game copy, then starting the game over to stockpile more and more Torchics with the Mega Stone.
* TheLostWoods: Route 20 definitely functions as this, being a forest maze with paths that don't always match up with one another, and the [[WhenTreesAttack ghostly tree Pokémon]] you might encounter there.
* LuckBasedMission:
** Restaurant battles can have Pokémon with Protect. Unless you have a really strong Pokémon with [[ArmorPiercingAttack Feint]] or use Taunt, if Protect is used on the turn you need to finish the battle on, there goes your perfect record, requiring you to try again if you want the star. They can also have Pokémon with Dig and Fly, two-turn attacks which make most attacks used on them between the skill being used and it hitting automatically miss, unless you have something with the [[AlwaysAccurateAttack No Guard]] ability or you're faster than them. (There are a few moves that can hit digging or flying opponents, like Earthquake and Thunder, and they tend to be rather powerful, although the first can hurt the Pokémon's partner in a two-on-two match, and the second isn't very accurate.)
** Making beds on level 4 of the Hotel requires you to hit all 4 beds in under 55 seconds. The time itself isn't that big of an issue, but in the first room to the right, there is an NPC who likes to move [[NPCRoadblock in front of the doorway]], only moving when he damn well feels like it. You will lose most of your time just waiting for him to get out of the way so you can enter or leave the room and move onto the next one.
** Finding rain when trying to evolve a Sliggoo.
** In contrast, trying to speed up EV training with items and Pokerus and hoping it ''doesn't'' rain if you need to use Sweet Scent.
** The Inverse Battles are like this. Your opponent's Pokémon are chosen at random from about three dozen possibilities, it isn't easy, considering that [[DamnYouMuscleMemory the Type Chart is completely backwards.]] He even has a Shedinja in his pool of available Pokémon, which is invulnerable unless you use a Super Effective move, due to its Wonder Guard ability; that means moves that would knock a Shedinja out instantly anywhere else won't even scratch it here. Even worse, not only do you have to win in order to get a good prize, you have to get a good score, meaning you have to inflict a lot a Super Effective hits and not take many. (Which means, if you do ''too'' well and win by a CurbStompBattle, you'll score low and get a poor reward.)
** The Battle Institute can be this. While you're allowed to pick your Pokemon (minus a few that are banned, including most Legendaries), you're only given three slots for Pokemon (four during the Double Battle test), inevitably meaning that your team will have a few holes in it. Since all Pokemon are set to Level 50 in that test, you'll likely get thrown against a team that has no weaknesses to, or is strong against, everything in your roster. [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules And that's not factoring in the possibility of them using those aforementioned]] [[OlympusMons banned Legendaries,]] which will often result in a total CurbstompBattle. Battle Points are rewarded based on how well you do during the five battle gauntlet, and even one bad matchup can result in a serious deduction of the rewards.
* MenswearGhetto: While male and female characters have access to roughly the same number of articles of clothing, the options for female characters are significantly more diverse.
* MercyKill: [[spoiler:Lysandre want to erase all Pokemon from existence so that they are never used as tools of war and theft by other humans]].
* MeteorMove: Dragon Rush's new animation involves jumping into the air and crashing down on your opponent while engulfed in flames from reentry.
* MinMaxing:
** Finally no longer a GuideDangIt situation, as Super Training lets players see their Pokémon's Effort Values and adjust them through minigames instead of having to look up which wild Pokémon pay out which stats and grind them for hours on end.
** Although Individual Values are still just as obtuse as they ever were, there are so many tricks to obtaining Pokemon with near flawless Individual Values from the get go that even this has been mitigated somewhat.
* MiniGame: Once you can access the north side of Lumiose, you can work three part time jobs a day there to make cash, which are sort of like this. The Room Service Job is a memory game; the Lost and Found Job is like a scavenger hunt, and the Bed Making Job is a race with a time limit. After you complete each job/game perfectly, the money you can earn for each increases on subsequent days, but so does the difficulty.
* MissingSecret: After beating the Pokémon League, in Lumoise City an NPC mentions that there's a Lava Dome Pokémon in Jaune Plaza. What Heatran has to do with the place is currently unknown, and bringing Heatran to that place has no effect.
* MistakenForSpecialGuest: A visitor in the Le Wow restaurant talks about how he's so nervous from being there that he can barely eat. A waitress near him takes it for him being a food critic eating very thoroughly.
* MoneyForNothing: Zigzagged. It can be relatively hard to get the money you need when you start the game, but the farther you advance, the more money you obtain, to the point that you'll most likely have more than enough money to buy whatever you like by the time you reach the Elite Four. ...If you stick to battle-related items, at least, because some of the stuff you can do or buy in Lumiose City are ridiculously expensive.
* MontyHaul: It's amazing how many useful items [[GoodSamaritan are just handed to you]], no strings attached. You probably didn't even ''want'' a bicycle! In fact, you even get a ''Lapras'' in this game as a gift, a Mon that is usually notorious for being rare in previous games. (And technically, this one is no exception, other than the gift; wild ones appear in encounters about 2% of the time.)
** If you eat at the Lumiose City restaurants, and have an Amulet Coin equipped to one of your party members and have a Level 3 Prize Money O-Power active, you will actually gain more money than you spend - even moreso when you sell the VendorTrash mushrooms you get as a dessert. That's right - in Kalos people will pay you to feed you food.
* MookMaker: In some Super Training regimens, the Balloon Bots summon Bit Bots (balloons) that attack alongside them.
* MortonsFork: [[spoiler:No matter which button you press, Xerosic will activate the ultimate weapon despite Lysandre's promise to not activate if you choose the correct one. Admittedly, [[EvenEvilHasStandards Lysandre acknowledges this and apologizes]] if you did pick the right one.]]
* MultiformBalance:
** Mega Pokémon gain large bonuses to certain stats but cannot use held items (due to already holding the Mega Stone that enables this form). In addition, each trainer can only have one Pokémon Mega Evolve at a time.
** Notably, most Mega Evolutions are weaker than their [[CastFromHitPoints Life Orb]] or [[DifficultButAwesome Choice Band/Specs]] wielding normal forms, but usually make up for it with boosted defenses and the new abilities.
** There's also Aegislash, who sports a StoneWall Shield Forme and a GlassCannon Sword Forme. Taking hits in Shield Forme, dishing the damage in Sword Forme and then using its SecretArt to change back to Shield Forme is one strategy with it.
* MundaneMadeAwesome:
** Every battle, no matter how insignificant, is 3D, has a flashy cutscene at the start, and when you decide on your move, an epic split screen displays both Pokémon. And that's not even considering the plot-relevant battles yet.
** Changing outfits. After selecting clothes for fitting, it always involves winking at the "camera", some sparkles, a pose and a camera flash.
* MundaneUtility: Some of the news reports give information on various moves, including how they could be used in real life. The "practical" uses tend to be rather less thrilling than they are during battles, such as using fire moves to light candles on a birthday cake.
* MyRulesAreNotYourRules: In the Battle Institute, the [=NPC=]s are, on occasion, given access to Pokemon that the player is banned from using there, [[OlympusMons including Legendaries.]]
* MythologyGag:
** Mega Venusaur seems to be based on the [[http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/c/c4/Spr_1g_003.png sprite]] from ''PokemonRedAndGreen'', in which Venusaur was apparently being crushed beneath its enormous plant.
** Youngster Keita loves shorts the same way a certain Youngster from ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' loves them: they're comfy and easy to wear. There's also a youngster named Keita in Generation 5.
** One of the first trainers you encounter on your journey is Youngster Joey. Worry not, he doesn't have a Rattata and isn't going to call you up at the most inappropriate times just to brag about how his Scatterbug is "Top percentage".
** Just like in the Kanto games, there's a cave called the Unknown Dungeon[[note]]Cerulean Cave was sometimes referred by this name in Generation I.[[/note]] that can only be accessed after beating the Champion [[spoiler: And just like in the Kanto games, this is where Mewtwo is hiding.]]
** [[spoiler: The Kanto legendaries']] battle music is a remix of the original ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' Wild Pokémon battle music, complete with the chiptune-esque medley.
** The Lumiose gym is a quiz-based gym. The questions asked? [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} "Who's that Pokémon?!"]] Naturally, the first answer is Pikachu.
** An old lady in the Ambrette town hotel mentions a hot spring next to the Pokémon Centre in her home town. She's talking about Lavaridge Town in [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Hoenn]].
** A guy in the Stone Emporium in Lumiose City tells you, "Oh, I adore the ores!" then quickly adds, "Okay, you're supposed to laugh now." This is a reference to the weird guy in the Gen V games who would buy anything that was mineral-based from you for a better price.
** [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Dawn's]] outfit from Platinum can be found in the Laverre City boutique.
** A guy in the lobby of an office building in Lumiose City asks you, "Have you seen the Riches? I'm looking for Master Miles." This refers to a family of wealthy trainers who appeared in Undella Town in ''Black and White'', but moved away sometime between the events of that game and the sequel to it.
** A Fairy Tale Girl that you meet on Route 14 quips, "I can't wait to read the rest of Shauntal's latest novel!" after you defeat her; Shauntel is the Elite Four member from Unova who uses Ghost Pokémon who's always in the middle of writing when you speak to her, and who was working on a novelization of the events of ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Black and White]]'' when the player challenged her in [[VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2 the sequel.]]
** It's not the first time in the franchise that a big war involving humans and Pokémon was mentioned, though ''Film/PokemonLucarioAndTheMysteryOfMew'' had a [[GreatOffscreenWar great, barely shown, war]]. Lt. Surge in Gen I also mentions having fought in a war alongside his Pokémon. There's also ''VideoGame/PokemonConquest'', in which waging war and conquering all of Ransai in order to unite the region was the main focus of the game...
** The player has to navigate Lysandre Labs by using warp tiles, just like how you get through the Silph Co. building in Generations I and III. The lab also has some tiles that force you to spin in specific directions, similar to the ones in Team Rocket's Celadon hideout and Giovanni's gym.
** A meta example: an NPC in Couriway Town says how she loves the story of the Magikarp who climbed up the waterfall. The reason why Magikarp goes from being a pathetically weak Pokémon to the powerful Gyarados is because its whole concept is based off a Chinese legend of a carp that swam its way all the way up a waterfall and was transformed into a dragon when it reached the top.
** The fact that you can battle the regional professor. This was intended as soon as Generation I, but never implemented yet.
** The song that plays in Coffiure Clips salon is actually an instrumental remix of the Gen III anime opening theme, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGiaBPAI5sw Advanced Adventure!]]
** The opponents in the Virtual Training [[ATwinkleInTheSky blasting off]] after every victory should look all but too familiar to who knows [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} Team Rocket]]'s routine.
** When viewed in the overworld, the Green Fedora looks exactly like [[{{Anime.Pokemon}} Nando's]] hat.
* {{Nerf}}:
** The updated type chart has Steel lose its resistances against Ghost and Dark. This equals to Beldum and Bronzor lines (as well as Jirachi) gaining two new weaknesses. On the other hand, they get a resistance to and are Super-Effective against Fairy.
** Grass-types were made immune to all spore-based attacks, nerfing the best sleep-inducing attacks not exclusive to Darkrai (Sleep Powder and Spore).
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJIydIvSSQU Sand Stream]], Drought, and other weather abilities are now reduced from indefinite duration to five turns (just like their corresponding moves), eliminating their biggest advantage over weather altering attacks.
** Several moves have had their base powers lowered. Notable examples include many 120 BP moves such as Thunder and Hydro Pump (now 110 BP), and Hidden Power (which now always does 60 BP damage). The InfinityMinusOneSword Elemental Beams (Ice Beam, Flamethrower, Thunderbolt) got dropped from 95 to 90.
** The Hidden Power change is kind of a mixed bag. While it was ''capable'' of having a base power of 70, in practice, it tended to only do this for the [[TheMunchkin power players]] who either spent ungodly amounts of time breeding the perfect Pokémon, or just put one together in a simulator. Hidden Power's potential was limited in-game and it's now much more accessible overall... at the cost of its competitive battling potential, since even 70 power was already considered rather weak for a move that doesn't have [[ActionInitiative priority]]. However, Pokemon with Technician (raises the power of base 60 or less moves by 50%) welcome this change, since Hidden Power is now reliably boosted.
** Substitute no longer blocks against sound-based attacks like Supersonic, Hyper Voice, or Boomburst. It also won't protect the user from Pokémon with the Infiltrator ability.
** Critical Hits now deal 1.5x the damage instead of 2x. On the other hand, boosting the critical hit ratio can potentially allow a 100% crit chance. In short, critical hits were made weaker, but frequent enough so that it can be used viably without being a game breaker.
** A non-battle example: Balm Mushrooms now only sell for around 6000 as opposed to 25000. This is because they're available in large numbers from Restaurant Le Wow, getting an instant 500,000 would be ridiculous.
** Minimize not only has its [=PP=] slashed in half, but a few moves have joined Steamroller in being able to do double the damage to those who use it such as Dragon Rush, Flying Press, and Phantom Force. The nerf here isn't exactly the above, but the fact those moves are now ''guaranteed'' to hit the target if they used the move. Unless it's a fairy, not many things can eat a 200 Base Power Dragon Rush.
* NeverBareheaded:
** ''Enforced'' for the player characters - you can remove the accessory sitting on your hat, or replace it with a new one, but you can't have your hero go hat-less.
** There is ''one'' time when you can remove your hat - when you go to the hair salon in Lumiose City to get your hair cut and styled. (It ''would'' be kind of silly to think that the beautician could do her job with you wearing it.)
* NeverSayDie: While death is a rather heavy theme in these games (especially in Y), in most cases death-related words are replaced with euphemisms without changing the meaning, although the words "death" and "die" are used very rarely (by one NPC and from old Pokédex entries).
** Yveltal is a case where this trope [[RuleOfCool actually]] [[TropesAreNotBad works awesomely]]. In Japan, Yveltal's signature move is "Death Wing" -- which is translated in English as "Oblivion Wing". It's also called the "Destruction Pokémon" in both English and Japanese, even though "death" is a more obvious antithesis to Xerneas' "life" theme, and Yveltal's FlavorText makes it pretty darn clear that this Pokemon's signature trait isn't physical property damage but instead ''sucking the LifeEnergy from other beings''.
%% (Cubone's and Alakazam's Pokedex entries (i.e. that skull of its dead mother) are maintained from earlier games so they don't count as examples specific to X and Y.)
** [[spoiler:The plot appears to involve death and lots of it;]] still, it's phrased as "lives being taken" more often than "killed" or "death".
** When [[spoiler: [=AZ=] talks about all the Pokémon he murdered by trying to save Floette]], he uses the phrase "took the lives of..."
** When [[spoiler: Team Flare announce their plan to kill everyone who isn't part of their group]], the words "eliminate" and "wipe the slate clean" are used.
** Averted with [[spoiler: Malva]]'s comment in a post-game story; she explicitly says, "Be ready to face death if you go. Prepare well if you want a shot at surviving."
** The "small box" [[spoiler: that [=AZ=] receives after his Floette goes off to war and gets killed]] is pretty clearly a coffin.
** A minor one as well, but trying to name a Pokémon with "Kill" or "Murder" in it and the game says "you can't name your Pokémon that." "Death" is fine, though.
** There's an NPC in Anistar you can lend one of your Pokémon to to keep him company. Eventually, all that's left is the Pokémon and a letter saying how it enabled him to "keep going ... until the end".
** Again averted with Phantump's Pokedex entry in Y; it explicitly states they are the spirits of [[AdultFear children who died in the forest.]]
* NightmareRetardant: An InUniverse example. Your friends at one point in the game hype up a Spooky House and the scary stories that get told there. When you get there, you notice that it's just a regular dim house and the old man there tells a very anticlimactic story, to which your friends, and possibly the player will be disappointed in. He even asks them to tip him, which you can refuse if you want.
* NoIndoorVoice: A Hiker in the Frost Cavern keeps shouting in all caps, thinking he'll freeze if he doesn't.
* NoOshaCompliance:
** Forcing the player to scale up multiple climbing walls without a safety harness? Grant would be thrown in prison so fast if word got out of a trainer losing his grip and falling.
** Same goes for traversing a web or having to use roller skates to grind rails in other gyms.
** Averted with the grass gym where you have to swing across ropes. There's very clearly a net under the ropes that's even level with the ground, meaning there's no real reason to swing, just walk across.
* NorseMythology: The main legendary trio are all inspired by creatures that live in various parts of the tree of Yggdrasil.
* NoSell:
** Grass-type Pokémon are now immune to spore-based moves.
** Electric-type Pokémon are now immune to paralysis.
** Ghost-type Pokémon cannot be [[YouWillNotEvadeMe trapped]]. They also allow you to always run away from wild battles successfully, regardless of Speed.
** At high levels of affection, your Pokemon can survive attacks that would knock them out with 1 HP "to show you how tough they are for you." This happens if they're at 1 HP already or even twice in a row, pretty much meaning they just ''ignored'' that super-effective move because they love you so much.
** Dragon-type attacks don't even scratch fairies.
* NostalgiaLevel: Santalune Forest. It's Viridan Forest, with all its Pokémon, recreated in 3D!
* NothingIsScarier:
** Invoked with the Chamber of Emptiness. It's a cave with one room, no random encounters, and a single item: [[spoiler: Spooky Plate. And in the post-game, Banette's Mega Stone]].
** You'd expect the Sea Spirit's Cave in the middle of Azure Bay to be the lair of some dangerous Water Pokémon. Instead, if you visit it the first time you have a chance, it's even emptier than the Chamber of Emptiness; just a dark, eerie cavern with nothing but the sound of dripping water. However, [[spoiler: after you encounter Articuno, Moltres, and Zapados in the wilds of Kalos, you can find them here, and try to capture them.]]
** Also, the empty, deserted playground at the beginning of Route 14. After you battle your Rival, he/she and your other friends leave, and you're alone in this creepy place where the wind is howling and there's sometimes a cold rain, which has nothing except a rusty slide and jungle gym (and a sandbox that makes an ominous shuffling noise if you step on it) but nothing else. No Pokémon, nothing except [[spoiler:a Rare Candy behind the jungle gym]] in this creepy deserted playground.
* NoticeThis: Hunting Mega Stones in the aftergame? They'll appear as sparkles on the ground, and they're solid tiles. You will bump into them, should you try to walk over it.
* NPCRoadblock: It's a ''Pokémon'' game, folks! It wouldn't be right if these weren't all over the place.
** In traditional Pokémon fashion, a sleeping Snorlax blocks Route 7 and multiple [=NPC=]s standing guard at gatehouses, making sure you're not going to a new route before you've progressed the plot far enough.
** A Swimmer on Route 8 says she lost her fossil and wants to search for it... and for some reason your character takes this as a reason not to go that way.
** An NPC blocks a set of stairs for almost no reason at all in Shalour City. He's there solely so you don't mess up a certain EventFlag where Trevor and Tierno show up.
** Similarily in Geosenge Town, if you try to Route 11 without chasing the Team Flare grunt to the back of the town, the exit will be "blocked" off by a group of tourists who ''don't even notice you there''.
** A GenreSavvy example: one of the Team Flare grunts in [[spoiler:the Kalos Power Plant]] parks himself at the end of a one tile-wide path and refuses to move after you beat him, forcing you to go the entire way around and through every grunt in the building.
** One of the weirdest ones is a couple of trainers who stand in the doorway to Route 16, but don't necessarily block it. They're just chatting in it with visible space between them, saying to each other (not '''you''') about how only people cool enough to get through Route 15 can go to Route 16. Your character just backs off anyway. In a sense, it's the ''player character'' acting as the roadblock by simply not wanting to walk in between two people...
** Frankly, the roadblocks are really easy to spot. If there's a person standing in a narrow path or doorway and you haven't done everything plot-relevant in the previous area, [[ContinueYourMissionDammit expect this person not to let you through until you correct that]].
* ObviouslyEvil: Oh, come ''on.'' Only [[GenreBlind an]] [[TooDumbToLive absolute]] '''[[WhatAnIdiot imbecile]]''' wouldn't guess that [[spoiler: Lysandre]] is the BigBad the first time you see [[spoiler: him.]]
* ObviousRulePatch: WordOfGod confirms Fairy was introduced to make Dragon less overpowered. Although Dragalge, [[PlayingWithFire Mega Charizard X, Reshiram]] and [[ExtraOreDinary Dialga]] are the only known Dragons so far to be exempt from the weakness due the reveal that Poison, Fire, and Steel types resist Fairy, with Dragalge at least appearing to be designed as an anti-Fairy as well. Overall, the most powerful dragons still remain powerful but have been noticeably nerfed to varying degrees.
* OddlyNamedSequel: Instead of a color or a precious material, the versions are named after the X- and Y-axes, which is meant to symbolize different ways of thinking that overlap at points. The [[http://www.pocketmonsters.net/images/ib/60/1357647787007.png Japanese logos]] contain a DNA helix/Mega Evolution symbol popping out in the word. To a lesser degree, the English names of the games are "Pokémon X" and "Pokémon Y", and serves just like a LetteredSequel, rather than "Pokémon X Version" and "Pokémon Y Version", as previous generations would have called them.
%% No speculation about the third version please
* OldSaveBonus: Using the Pokémon Storage Bank, you can transfer Pokémon from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2''. Because of this reason, transferring Pokémon from anything in-between ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' creates a long and tedious process.
* OmnicidalManiac: [[spoiler:Lysandre]], the boss of Team Flare wants to ensure enough resources for all on Earth [[spoiler:by killing all Pokémon and all humans not part of or loyal to Team Flare.]] Unlike [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Cyrus]], whose plan was to reset all of existence (Galactic included), [[spoiler:Lysandre's plan basically amounts to ''genocide'' as he explicitly spells out that only Team Flare is to be alive by the end.]]
* OpaqueNerdGlasses: The male Scientists wear these. Also Clemont.
* OurFairiesAreDifferent: Debuting in this game is the 18th elemental type known as "Fairy", which is shared by (among many others) Sylveon, Flabebe, Swirlix, Spritzee, [[{{Retcon}} Jigglypuff, Marill, Gardevoir, and Mawile]], as well as X version mascot Xerneas.
* OxymoronicBeing:
** The Dark-Type has long been thought to be the polar opposite of the Psychic-Type, being immune to Psychic attacks with Dark attacks being Super Effective against Psychic Pokémon. Behold [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Inkay_(Pok%C3%A9mon) Inkay]] (and it's evolved form, [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Malamar_(Pok%C3%A9mon) Malamar]], the first Psychic/Dark hybrid. (Of course, this little guy seems to be all about opposites, called the Revolving Pokémon, with an ability called Contrary (moves that lower its stats increase it instead, and vice versa), and attacks with names like Topsy-Turvy and Switcheroo. The craziest part? In order for it to evolve when it reaches the right level, you have to hold the Nintendo 3DS upside-down starting from the moment you strike the final blow to your opponent.
** Mawile and Klefki might count too, being Steel/Fairy hybrids. Steel is a weakness of Fairy Pokémon (possibly reflecting how ColdIron hurts TheFairFolk) but Mawile has a huge iron jaw on its head and Klefki is ''made'' of steel. For further irony, their behaviour happens to fit TheFairFolk's traditional description well.
%% ** Volcanion, one of the few event-legendaries to not have been officially revealed, is rumored to be a fire-water type.
* PaletteSwap: Rising Stars, Ace Trainers, Sky Trainers, Veterans, and Psychics use the same 3-D model. This is most obvious with the male Veterans, who look noticably older and have a completely different hairstyle in their VS. art; the female Rising Stars, who look much younger in their VS. art and have a different hairstyle; and the female Sky Trainers, who have skirts in their overworld models but not in their VS. art.
* PaperThinDisguise: [[SarcasmMode Gee, who could those two Defenders of Kalos be?]] They have blonde and purple hair and white suits. Who are they? Furthermore, in the Japanese version, the female character is the only one in the game to address herself as あたくし[[note]]atakushi - a very uncommon and formal way for a woman to address herself[[/note]]. And Tierno certainly isn't fooled; from the nonchalant way he uses their real names, he apparently didn't even notice they were trying to keep their identities secret. When he does, they stammer and try to deny their identities. (In fact, in one scene, the player seems to tell them INeverToldYouMyName after they use it, and they make up a pretty lame excuse.)
* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: The Battle Chateau is one of the few places where players can battle [=NPC=]s infinitely. What's more, the trainers all give much higher payouts than other trainers their level, and there are several Furisode Girls who only use [[PinataEnemy Audino]]. This makes it a very good place for grinding money and levels, especially if one uses Writs to fight richer or stronger trainers, O-Powers to increase the rewards, and items to boost them even further.
* PinkMeansFeminine: A good number of pink-colored clothes are classified under the "Feminine" fashion style. There are, however, a couple of exceptions, usually being more sporty than girly.
* PokemonSpeak:
** Pikachu's cry has been changed to this (just like in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Yellow]]'').
** Whether it's intentional or just a coincidence, Oddish's remastered cry actually sounds out "[[{{Mondegreen}} Aww-Dsh]]" quite clearly.
** Staying in fashion with the previous games (like ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2''), some Pokémon when talked to will say random noises, while others will sound out parts of their names. Mewtwo, for example, shouts "Mew!" when engaged and at one point Korrina's Lucario says "Carr...", while Pokémon such as Mimi the Espurr will hiss and growl instead.
** Even zigzagged ''within the same species''; the player character encounters two Lucario and Abomasnow during the story, and one has PokemonSpeak in its speech bubbles while the other has regular growling onomatopoeia.
* PoliceAreUseless: Once again, it seems Looker is only good for telling the player what to do.
* PowerCreep: Surprisingly seems to be ''averted'' at least for the new Pokémon, most of whose stats are fairly average compared to the last generation with only a few select (such as Aegislash) standing out. Even Fairy-types have most of their strongest players in older Pokémon through {{retcon}}s. Played straight with the Mega Evolutions, as many have stats on par with or exceeding [[OlympusMons Legendaries]].
* PowerEchoes: Mega Evolved Pokémon let out an echoed cry after their transformation, when defeated, or when sent out of their Pokéballs after having already Mega Evolved before.
* ThePowerOfFriendship:
** Mega Evolution is supposed to invoke this, drawing on the bond the player has with their Pokémon. [[GameplayAndStorySegregation However, the Pokémon's friendship value doesn't affect its ability to Mega Evolve in any way; it can hate your guts and will still transform]].
** O-Powers are powers given to you by friends that can help you somehow in battle. Nothing is more heartwarming than having difficulty catching [[spoiler: Mewtwo]] and suddenly all your friends send you Capture Power.
* ThePowerOfLove: Petting and playing with your Pokémon in Pokémon-amie will enhance their battle performance. It gets to ''severely heartwarming degrees'' at later points when your bond from the Amie is so strong, your Pokémon will ''refuse to faint'' because it wants you to see it's best side in battle, or dodges an oncoming attack because it ''loves you so damn much''.
* PoweredByAForsakenChild: [[spoiler:AZ's machine, which can revive the dead, and can also be basically used as a nuke. "The lives of many Pokémon were taken" to power it.]]
* PowerPerversionPotential:
** The Pokédex allows you to freely rotate the Pokémon and view them from any angle. This allows players to look up Gardevoir's or Hitmonchan's skirt if they want. There's nothing to see up there.
** How many people rubbed their Pokémon in inappropriate locations? [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar And how many of them liked it]]?
* PowerUpMount: {{Averted|Trope}}. You get to ride Ryhorn, Skiddo, Gogoat, and Mamoswine in specific locations.
* {{Pun}}: This generation is much, much punnier than any previous. The first notable example comes from a backpacker inside Parfum Palace:
-->Don't try to sleep in the king's bed. It's ir-regal! Ha ha! [[LamePunReaction Hey! Are you trying to use Mean Look on me?]]
* PunctuatedForEmphasis:
** Shauna's response after watching the fireworks is "That. Was. AMAZING!"
** The girl that gives you the TM for Bulk Up talks in this manner.
--->Bulk Up! [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment Bulks up!]] The body! To raise! Attack stat! And Defense stat!
* PuppyDogEyes: A new Fairy-type move called Baby-Doll Eyes. It has [[ActionInitiative increased priority]] and lowers the foe's attack.
* RatedMForManly:
** Mega Garchomp is not only a dragon-shark-jet like its original form, but it also has a rougher design, has scythe blades for hands and looks like it's wearing a ripped jacket.
** Pangoro likewise looks like a gangster with a BadassLongcoat and has the very manly Dark/Fighting types.
** Mega Scizor looks like a mecha straight out of TengenToppaGurrenLagann
* {{Railroading}}: Everywhere in the main game. Until you do whatever the plot wants you, there's always something preventing you from going too far off the path.
* RecruitedFromTheGutter: The entire postgame sidequest featuring Looker revolves around this trope with Emma, who was living as an orphan in the streets of Lumoise City. At the end of the storyline [[spoiler: [[ButNowIMustGo Looker has to move on]], but purchases the agency building for her to live in and lets her keep the expansion suit so she can fight crime as Essentia.]]
* RecruitTeenagersWithAttitude: Seeing as you have ''four'' Rivals in this game (two more than the previous record of two in ''Black and White'') and all four are your allies, it seems you ''do'' have a small team in this game, so the Trope does apply. (Although, like all Pokémon games, no-one "recruits" the heroes, unless the being drawn into a mess by circumstance counts as being recruited.)
* RestartTheWorld: [[spoiler: Team Flare's ultimate goal is to destroy all the people not associated with Team Flare and all Pokémon.]]
* {{Retcon}}:
** Meta examples. For example, [=ViceGrip=] is now Vice Grip (even though there was never reason to format it as such), while Faint Attack and Hi Jump Kick are now correctly spelled as Feint Attack[[note]]Which was its spelling in TCG[[/note]] and High Jump Kick. This also applies to species (such as Ogre Scorpion instead of Ogre Scorp), items (such as X Sp. Atk instead of X Special) and Abilities (Compound Eyes instead of Compoundeyes)
** There's also acknowledgement of the newly introduced Fairy type of Pokémon, which effectively retconned numerous Normal types.
** Some Pokémon had their stats increased in this game, usually in a single stat by 10.
** Fairy-type has been added to several Pokémon, and in some cases outright replaces a former Normal-type.
* RhymesOnADime: The greeter at the start of each gym will greet you with a rhyme themed for that gym.
-->How's the bout, little sprout? You got it figured out yet, Champ? Yup! Old man Ramos' Gym is all about Grass!
* RiddleMeThis: [[spoiler: The Lumiose Gym is made up of five floors; on the first four, Clemont's sister gives you a silhouette, and tells you to identify it by going to one of three trainers that matches. (It's a {{Homage}} to the anime's "Who's that Pokémon?" quip.) The correct trainer is much easier than the other two, and getting it right can get you to Clemont faster, but while the first two are easy, the third is harder (it's one of the three elemental monkeys), and with the fourth, she gives you ''three'' silhouettes that look very much alike (all are Pokémon that look like moths) and tells you to choose which is one is the one she names.]]
* RightOnTheTick: One of the most economical healing items in the game is the Lumiose Galette, a cookie you can buy from a vendor in Lumiose City. It does everything a Full Heal does, but only costs 100 Poké Dollars, and if you buy enough of them, the vendor lowers the price to only 80. However, she tends to sell out fast, and to be assured that you can get a lot of them, you have to be at the stand when they make a new batch, which they do at 3AM, 9AM, 3PM, and 9PM. On top of that, if you get there when they're fresh, you get a Moomoo Milk with your galette for free.
* RobotMaid: Julia in the Battle Chateau talks like a robot in a loud monotone voice, detects you as a threat, and activates her defense systems. She "WAS ONLY CREATED FOR BATTLE..."
* RollerbladeGood: Rollerskates debut as a new form of fast transport, obtained as early as the second town. They also allow for movement off of the 8 directional grid of normal movement. The Shalour City Gym is also a roller derby, right down to having to collide with opponents to battle them.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:S-Z]]
* SaveScumming: Like with all encounters with legendaries and uncommon Pokémon like Snorlax, it is recommended that you save right before the encounter in case something goes wrong and you can't capture it. Since legendaries are guaranteed to have 3 31 [=IV=]s now, it's easier to do.
* SceneryPorn: This trope was a big theme of Kalos's design--[[MeaningfulName "Kalos" is even the Greek word for beauty]]. Photo spots and strategically-placed benches (which will change the camera angle to something more appropriate if sat in) emphasize notable examples. The official map artwork even appears to be Impressionist instead of realistic.
* ScunthorpeProblem: All text inputs (Pokemon nicknames, your Trainer name, etc.) have built-in wordcensors that test your input against not just what language you're playing language, but ''all'' languages the game includes. This means you can't use names like "Spike"[[note]]("pik" = Dutch for penis)[[/note]] or "Viola"[[note]]('viol' = French for rape)[[/note]] -- the latter is especially noticeable because ''it's the name of a Gym Leader''. Similar filters are applied when transporting Pokémon from previous generations -- you're informed that the nickname was blocked and it gets reset to the species name.
* SelfImposedChallenge: Aside from the traditional Nuzlocke run, some options in this generation:
** Turning off the Exp. Share. It's a borderline GameBreaker when on, but when switched off, X and Y's difficulty is actually on par with previous entries.
** Alternatively, using only the new Pokémon introduced in this generation. Your limit of choice in Pokémon then goes from a whopping 450 to a measily 69-70, many of which have JackOfAllStats. Good luck.
* SerialEscalation: A rollerblader at the bike shop wonders if she'd go even faster if she rode a bike ''while'' rollerblading.
* SequelDifficultyDrop:
** An unfortunate(?) side effect of all the AntiFrustrationFeatures, it's surprisingly common to go through the game at your own pace and still end up with your 10-20 levels above the enemies in the area. Though bear in mind this only applies to regular gameplay; online battles are still as competitive as ever. It almost seems like the main game is really meant to prepare you for online.
** Same for the Battle Maison challenges, which operate by the same rules as online battles.
** Barring a few Breeders and the [[OnceAnEpisode requisite six Magikarp trainer]], there isn't a single trainer with more than 3 (and ''very'' rarely 4) Pokemon before the endgame, and even than only the Champion has six, so even without over leveling the game isn't particularly difficult.
** The Trainer Card. The DS era games had five objectives for you to accomplish to getting it to the highest colored rank, all of which came with completing the game and the National Dex, along with some that involved the side quests and a few other time consuming ones. Here, however, you only have three objectives before you get it to Gold rank, which is the highest: complete the game, defeat ''one'' (not all) of the Battle Chatelaines in the Battle Maison in the Super mode at 50 battles, and see all the Pokémon in the Kalos Dex and get the Oval Charm. XY's Trainer Card is by far the easiest to max out.
* SequelHook:
** A Backpacker that stays in the various hotels around the game mentions that he loves the Kalos region, but where he comes from is pretty cool too. He starts to describe one city, but quickly changes his mind, saying that "You'll see it soon enough."
** Along with this he will give you the [[http://serebii.net/xy/strangesouvenir.jpg "Strange Souvenir"]] if you talk to him enough, Which depicts the supposed legendary of that region according to the item's description, talk to him later on and he will say outright that it's not [[http://serebii.net/xy/region.jpg Kanto, Johto, Hoenn, Sinnoh, or Unova.]]
** An [=NPC=] mentions that there is a region somewhere that has a waterfall that flows backward.
** After you complete [[spoiler: the Looker missions, it is said that while your part is done, their story is just beginning.]]
** A strange "Hex Maniac" (who may be an actual ghost) at one point [[JumpScare accosts you]] in a Lumiose City building and says that you "aren't the one".
** The official X and Y Guidebook says "In addition to the thirteen Berries that can only be cultivated through mutation, another fourteen Berries do not appear in Pokémon X and Pokémon Y and can be obtained only by trading them from other regions.", which seems simple enough at first, you'd just send them with a Pokémon through the Pokémon Bank, right? ''Wrong'', as the Bank doesn't allow Hold Items, hinting at further regions on the 3DS.
** Zygarde's X Pokédex entry states that when Kalos' ecosystem falls into disarray, it appears and reveals its secret power.
*** Heck, Zygarde's existence in general. You find it randomly in a cave with only an NPC saying a "monster" is rumored to lurk inside hinting where it is. Just like how you find Giratina in Diamond and Pearl, and Kyurem in Black and White.
** At the beginning of the post-game, Shauna says she's going to a faraway region.
** In the house where the old man talks about the box legendary after capturing it, a girl speaks about a separate group who inquired about it several years back.
* SequentialBoss: Some of the boss battles in [[spoiler:Secret Super Training consist of fighting multiple balloon bots in a row, usually its evolved forms.]]
* SeriousBusiness: Aside from the Pokémon battles themselves:
** Just go to a random Cafe in Lumiose City and you will find people who treat photography, Pokémon-Amie, Super Training, poetry, loneliness, Furfrou haircuts and even tipping to be Serious Businesses.
** Other than Cafes, Berry Juice making is definitely Serious Business.
** Stylishness in Lumiose, enough to get you barred from certain restaurants and shops until you are "stylish enough"... and later get discounts just because you've got it.
* SharpDressedMan: Team Flare may be a NebulousEvilOrganisation with a lot of FacelessGoons but they sure have spiffy uniforms. And they [[SeriousBusiness take it seriously.]] At the PokéBall factory, your snarky rival is able to make a female Grunt ''very'' angry by asking if she's there to "work a part-time job to pay for that dumb suit."
* ShopliftAndDie: If you don't have the cash to pay their fare, taxi drivers attack you.
* SiblingTeam: One of the Double Battle trainer classes is "Mysterious Sisters" (A Hex Maniac and a Fairy Tale Girl).
* SidetrackedByTheGoldenSaucer:
** The Super Training mini-game can pretty much distract the player from the main quest.
** The three Pokémon-Amie minigames (berry matching, twitch-reflex yarn juggling, and jigsaw solving) are also quite addictive, and reward you with Poké-puff to feed your partners.
** Wonder Trade is even more like gambling than the Game Corner. It can be incredibly addictive trying to get rare mons from it, or breeding large quantities of rare ones and distributing them to lucky traders.
** The PR Video Studio can become this. You'd be surprised how much time you spend editing together a video filled with various poses, backgrounds, musics, sound effects, and special effects for you and/or your Pokémon of choice.
* SilkHidingSteel: Marchioness Fiona in the Battle Chateau admits that she's a bodybuilder, hiding a "tapestry of muscles" underneath her elegant [[UsefulNotes/{{Kimono}} furisode]].
* SleepCute: Two Skiddo can be found sleeping together in Lumiose City at night. More sleeping ones be found on the ranch on Route 12. (Along with a few that are wide awake, which you can ''ride''.)
* SmallNameBigEgo: Compared to the dialogue of those with the Duke/Duchess and Marquise/Marchioness-ranked people in the Chateau, a large deal of the Barons and Viscountesses are rather boastful and arrogant of their status even though they're saying this to [[UnderestimatingBadassery the Player Character, who can potentially be a Grand Duke/Grand Duchess]].
* SnakeOilSalesman:
** A Magikarp Salesman appears in this game, and he's ''even more crooked'' than any others. [[spoiler:After you talk to a hiker that you meet in the hotels enough times, he offers you a "Super Special" Magikarp in exchange for a Gyarados. It's nothing but a plain old Magikarp, and only Lvl 5, lower than one you could catch yourself. (If you knew that the guy's name was "Caveat" and that the Magikarp's name was "Carpe Diem", it might tip you off, but you only learn that if you trade it.) The only compensation is that the Magikarp has an Adamant nature (which lowers Special Attack to boost its Attack) and has a perfect IV in Attack.]]
** In fact, that might make you suspicious of a similar trade involving someone in a hotel, involving a maid who also makes an offer after you speak to her enough times, [[spoiler: but in this case, ''you'' might feel bad for ripping ''her'' off. The Mon she offers is a ''female'' Eevee with a Docile Nature (for a Mon as mutable as Eevee, that's good) and she throws in a Rare Candy for free. Even better, she'll accept any old Mon for it.]]
* SocializationBonus:
** In addition to the usual trading 'mons between people, there are O-Powers. Working similarly to the Pass Powers of ''Black'' and ''White'', you can use them on yourself or others to gain various buffs, like a temporary stat boost, healing, or increased prize money from trainers. The energy cost for using them on other people is less than if you use them on yourself, and you earn higher-level powers by using the lower-level ones, so naturally using powers on others will get you there more quickly. The Energy charges up faster if you have more steps for the day in your 3DS.
** The Friend Safari makes two Pokémon of a certain type available based on the friend codes on your 3DS system (three if the person has Pokémon X/Y and has defeated the Elite Four in said game). They're guaranteed to have at least two maxed out [=IV=]s on random stats, and the Pokémon also have a chance of having their Hidden Ability.
** Pokémon Miles are earned by either [=StreetPassing=] another player who has played Pokémon X or Y, or through battles and trades (including Wonder Trade) with other people particularly on the internet. Miles can be exchanged for various recovery items and PP Ups either in-game at the Lumiose south Pokémon Center, or on the Pokémon website.
* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' (especially ''[=HeartGold=]'' and ''[=SoulSilver=]''). The sheer number of Kanto exclusives in Kalos[[note]]the Kanto starters, Mewtwo and the bird trio[[/note]], along with the small number of brand-new species and new Eeveelution with a new type, gives Kalos a very Johto-ish feel, as if ''X'' and ''Y'' are part of a trilogy with the aforementioned two sets of games.
* StandardPowerupPose: Most Mega Evolutions do this while transforming.
* StockDinosaurs: Tyrunt and its evolution Tyrantrum, the ''TyrannosaurusRex'' Pokémon. Amaura and Aurorus subvert this - although sauropods are quite common in media, ''Amargasaurus'' isn't as commonly depicted as ''Brachiosaurus'', ''Apatosaurus'' and the like.
* StopPokingMe: Like with the BerserkButton entry above, your Pokémon will get angry if you keep poking them, by repeatedly tapping the screen in Pokémon-Amie.
* StrawHypocrite:
** [[spoiler:Lysandre]] is just as bad as Ghetsis, and you find this out earlier. He tells you how disgusted he is with the greed shown by humans (his ancestor specifically) before giving you a King's Rock, supposedly to show how generous he is. Not a minute later, you can discover - if you speak to a girl in the café - that it costs ''five million'' Pokédollars simply to join Team Flare (and she's eagerly trying to earn it). Even if you don't talk to her, you find this out later when the Admin tries to convince the owner of the Poké Ball factory to join (she calls the entrance fee a ''donation''.) [[spoiler:A few of them believe that it's the price of being spared when the Ultimate Weapon is unleashed, but exactly what use anyone would have for money after that is questionable. But hey, they have to get the resources to repair the thing somehow.]] It's also implied that the whole ''reason'' they were trying to take over the place was out of greed, not just to avoid having to pay for PokéBalls themselves, but to sell them for hugely inflated prices.
** The biggest irony is, [[spoiler:Lysandre]] is either sadly deluded by his [[PoliticallyIncorrectVillain elitist assumptions]] or a BadLiar. As the MontyHaul entry says, Kalos is actually a place where {{Good Samaritan}}s are everywhere; greed would be almost nonexistent here if Team Flare never showed up.
* StringyHairedGhostGirl: Hex Maniacs invoke this to some degree. There's also the ''actual'' ghost in Lumiose that uses the same model.
* SuperMode: Mega Evolution gives new forms to certain Pokémon. Once it's activated via a button, they gain more powerful abilities (and in some cases new types) along with stats apparently on par with legendary Pokémon. Mega Evolution's weakness is that only lasts in-battle and only while holding Mega Stones, preventing use of regular items. In addition, only one Mega Evolution can be used per trainer per battle.
** TheSameButMore[=/=]DiscardAndDraw: Some Megas get new abilities or stat boosts that supplement their roles while for others the changes make them play completely different.
* SurpriseCreepy: The Kalos region takes great pride in how beautiful the locations are, how friendly and generous the people are, and its great history. [[spoiler: Then you find out about the various bloody wars it had in that history. One of these wars was so violent that it only ended because someone built an equivalent to a nuke and set it off, destroying virtually everything. The villainous team also wants to set off the same weapon once more.]]
* SurprisinglyGoodEnglish: The English the tourist speaks [[KeepItForeign in the Japanese versions of the games]], seen as Japanese in the English and French versions, is a pretty flawless, grammatically correct translation of what she says in Japanese, likely provided by the English localization team.
* SwordOfPlotAdvancement: As with Zekrom and Reshiram in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', you are forced to catch Xerneas or Yveltal to proceed with the game and can use it in the final battle against [[spoiler:Lysandre]].
* TankControls
** Rhyhorn and Mamoswine can only move forward, backward, and turn left and right at 45 degree angles to cover the 8 main directions. They can't turn and move at the same time like the player can.
** Speaking of the player, when maneuvering around Lumiose City's wide boulevards, left and right rotate the camera/player, while up and down move the player forward or back. (But once you start walking, you can freely walk all 8 directions). Lumiose City's tight alleyways (and Glittering Cave's similar narrowness) are another matter, where pressing left or right rotates the player by 90 degrees, and down causes the character to make an about-face.
* TestosteronePoisoning: The lines from core training when your Pokémon has a special bag to hit.
--> "Double it. Double it ALLLLLLL!"
--> "It’s time to bloom! Let’s boost our bond—with MUSCLES!"
* TheTeam[=/=]ColorCodedCharacters - A FiveManBand between the two player characters and three friendly rivals from Vaniville Town. The [[ChromaticArrangement colors of their]] [[PinkMeansFeminine outfits and speech bubbles]] further drive it home. A first for the series and aversion of its usual two player characters and one rival PowerTrio dynamic.
** Calem/Serena - TheLeader ↔ TheLancer[=/=]Blue (Calem's) and Red (Serena's). Their place in the team depends on who you choose to play with.
** Tierno - TheBigGuy[=/=]Yellow
** Trevor - TheSmartGuy[=/=]Green
** Shauna - TheChick[=/=]Pink
*** {{Lampshaded}} at the end of the game with the parade of the "Five Heroes of Kalos"
* ThirteenIsUnlucky: Route 13 is full of mons that appear and chase you even with Repel active, and most of them have abilities that prevent you from running away! To say Route 13 is ThatOneLevel is an understatement.
* TooAwesomeToUse: The Master Ball, as usual. Though, many will probably use it against [[spoiler:Mewtwo, since it knows [[HealThyself Recover]]]].
* TookALevelInBadass:
** Anything that got a Mega Evolution thanks to the Base Stat Total increase of 100 along with other cool toys.
*** If Mewtwo wasn't badass enough already, it also becomes a Fighting-type that seems to use martial arts moves when it becomes Mega Mewtwo X. On top of this, Both Mega Mewtwo X and Y have a complete base stat total of 780, making them more powerful than '''Arceus''' himself.
**** Lucario, who gets a sizable boost to offence and speed, and more powerful STAB moves thanks to Adaptability, including Bullet Punch to seriously hurt Fairy-types.
**** Kangaskhan, whose Parental Bond ability allows it to attack twice in one turn, with the second hit being half as powerful as the first. However, this also means that secondary effects have ''two'' chances to activate, and if you use Power-Up Punch which has a 100% chance of increasing the user's attack...
**** Absol, who gets a massive boost to Speed and Special Attack in addition to an Attack boost, as well as the coveted ability [[AntiMagic Magic Bounce]], which reflects all non-attacking moves back to the attacker.
**** Gengar gets 130 Speed and 170 Special Attack on top of '''[[YouWillNotEvadeMe Shadow Tag]]'''.
**** Aggron becomes a pure Steel (shedding his crippling 4x Fighting and Ground weaknesses), gets a very decent Attack boost and an utterly monstrous Defense boost (tied with Shuckle for the highest in the game), and the Filter ability, which reduces ''all'' super-effective damage by 25%, turning him into one of the most ridiculous physical walls in the game. Add his survivability to the fact he can learn Rock Polish [[LightningBruiser and...]]
**** Banette gets 165 base Attack, which is beaten out by only a ''very'' small amount of others, all of whom are either Megas or Legendaries. It also gains Prankster as an ability, thus making it one of the rare Prankster users who can fight back ''hard'' when the need arises.
**** Pinsir gains a 4x Stealth Rock vulnerability, but makes up for it with impressive defensive boosts, a wonderful Speed boost, and an offensive boost that gives it a base Attack that is five points higher than Groudon and Zekrom. It also gets Aerilate, which boosts the power of all Normal-type attacks by 30% and makes them Flying-type, giving him ridiculously powerful STAB Returns and Double-Edges.
**** Abomasnow, who halves his Speed for huge boosts in everything else, which is a blessing in disguise by way of pretty much guaranteeing that weather teams will always get blocked, and being one of the most terrifying Trick Room beneficiaries in the game.
**** Charizard gets two mega forms. In its X form, it gets a new, black-and blue color scheme highly reminiscent of [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Zekrom]] and a secondary Dragon type, along with a new ability that powers up its contact moves. In its Y form, it gets a more intimidating, more aerodynamic design, and the fabled '''[[WeatherControlMachine Drought]]''' ability.[[note]]Which was sadly nerfed to last only five turns, but it still benefits in a big way from the ability. With ''159'' Special Attack and Drought automatically boosting Fire attacks, it hits like a nuclear bomb.[[/note]]
**** Mawile was [[RetCon Ret Conned]] into a Steel/Fairy, and the new type-chart is very beneficial to it overall. Its new typing nullifies its weakness to Fighting, as well as the two weaknesses of the Fairy-type. Plus, it can get STAB from Fairy-type attacks, which are super-effective against Dragon and Fighting-types! To top it off, it gets big defensive boosts and its Mega Evolution has Huge Power, which outright ''doubles'' attack.
**** Blastoise gains nice defensive boosts, a solid Attack boost, and an absolutely jawdropping 50-point Special Attack boost, along with the Mega Launcher ability, which gives a 50% boost to Aura and Pulse moves[[note]]Accompanied by the addition of Aura Sphere and Dragon Pulse to its moveset[[/note]]. All of these have helped it go from a lackluster wall and Rapid Spin user to a monstrous tank capable of surviving an awful lot of trauma while blowing holes in anything that gets testy with it and destroying any Ghost stupid enough to spinblock it with a boosted Dark Pulse.
**** Venusaur gained Thick Fat, effectively losing two weaknesses, as well as a whole lot of bulk and offensive muscle. Good luck even trying to move this thing without opening yourself up to the rest of its team.
**** Medicham gained more of everything, possessing both the second-highest Attack in the game (only Mega Mawile surpasses it) and improved Speed that now allows it to outrun a lot of the things that previously kept it from returning to its Gen III glory days.
**** Houndoom got nice offensive boosts and Solar Power; statwise, it is ''the'' strongest user of that ability in the game by quite a long shot, and anything on the receiving end of a boosted Fire Blast is not getting up from it.
**** Gardevoir gained the Fairy-type and all the resistances it brings and a Mega Evolution. Along with the standard stat increases, its ability Pixilate ups the damage of Normal-type moves by 30% and turns them into Fairy-type moves. This makes Hyper Voice hit like a dump truck that can't be stopped by Substitutes since it's a sound move. On top of this, Mega Gardevoir has the highest base Special Defense of all Mega Evolved Pokémon.
** Some of the Abilities got better too:
*** Infiltrator now allows the user to hit through Substitutes.
*** Keen Eye also ignores the foe's evasion boosts now.
*** Overcoat also protects the user from powder moves like Sleep Powder.
*** Oblivious now also protects the user from Taunt.
** Some of the moves have been improved as well:
*** The move Knock Off. It's been buffed from 20 to 65 power (that's over 3x), and it deals 1.5x damage if the foe is holding an item. We now have a Dark move with ''almost'' 100 power that also removes items.
*** In addition, several other moves have had their power beefed up. Notably, [[CriticalHit Frost Breath and Storm Throw]] went from 40 to 60, Fury Cutter went from 20 to 40, Struggle Bug went from 30 to 50, and all three Pledge attacks went from 50 to 80.
*** Before Gen VI, Defog only removed entry hazards on the opponent's side, making it a liability. Now, it removes entry hazards from ''both'' sides of the field. Unlike Rapid Spin, it's ''unblockable'', has a useful secondary evasion-lowering effect, and is much better distributed[[note]]For starters, it's available to anything that can fly in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Pokémon Diamond, Pearl and Platinum]]''. Even though it's an HM move there, it can still be transferred through ''[[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver HeartGold and SoulSilver]]'' to the Generation 5 games, and then through the Pokébank.[[/note]] This is something of a double-edged sword, however, in that it also removes ''your'' entry hazards.
*** Focus Energy still only increases the Pokémon's critical hit rate by two, but changes to the critical hit formula means using it will now cause all of your attacks to have a 50% chance of being critical hits. Combined with a Scope Lens or a high crit move, this causes ''all'' of the Pokémon's attacks to become critical hits.
*** Facade users no longer suffer from burn's Attack drop.
** While critical hits only deal 1.5x more damage now, they did get a buff that causes some Pokémon to become much more powerful. The critical hit formula was changed so that attacks with a critical hit rate increased by two will be critical 50% of the time, while attacks with a crit rate increased by three become critical hits ''all the time''. This allows Pokémon with a Scope Lens to always land critical hits after using Focus Energy or getting maximum Affection from Pokémon-Amie. As critical hits ignore the user's attack drops, this allows Pokémon like Kingdra and Hydreigon to use Draco Meteor with no drawback, and Pokémon with the Sniper Ability become ''devastating.''
** A number of Pokémon actually managed to get their base stats altered this gen. For example, Scolipede and Beautifly got buffed from 90 to '''100''' Attack and Special Attack respectively, and Jumpluff and Alakazam got their Special Defense buffed to 95.
** The Poison-type did this as a whole, but especially from an offensive standpoint. In previous gens, it was a ''terrible'' offensive type, doing nothing other than hitting Grass for super-effective damage (which is done already by a lot of other, better types), and being resisted by four types and negated by one. Defensively, Poison was far better in this regards, having only 2 weaknesses, the uncommon Psychic and the omnipresent Ground, in exchange for having a useful Fighting and Bug resistance. Poison-types are also masters of spreading and resisting status ailments through Toxic, Toxic Spikes, and poison status immunity. In short, the type is quite solid from a defense standpoint, but its abysmal offense means that it is very easily set up for unwinnable situations due to their generally lackluster movepools. Now that Fairy-types exist and are weak to it, Poison shot up to an in-demand offensive type, and a better defensive type due to its ability to both resist and badly hurt a very powerful type with multiple popular and dangerous representatives, particularly Azumarill, whose Water/Fairy type removes a weakness to Steel. In addition, if a Poison-type uses Toxic, it's guaranteed to hit the target. ''Even if they use Fly or Dig.''
** Several elemental types get new bonuses: Ghost types are immune to trapping moves (Mean Look, etc.). Grass types are immune to spore- and powder- based moves (sleep-inducing Spore, Poison Powder, etc.), and Electric types are now immune to all forms of Paralysis.
** In Super Training, [[spoiler:the Scatterbug Balloon from the tutorial returns to enact revenge in a Secret Super Training level, complete with "evolution"[[note]]In other words, in addition to facing said balloon, you also face the Spewpa Balloon and the Vivillon Balloon right after one another.[[/note]] in an attempt to get an upper hand]].
** As far as humans go, the Gym Leaders, Elite Four, and [[spoiler: Diantha]] are already pretty Badass, but they're even tougher when you meet them at the Battle Chateau, with stronger Pokémon teams, stronger yet if you use Writs to attract trainers (which makes ''all'' the trainers their tougher; how much depends on which type of Writ you use).
* TookAShortcut: [[spoiler:Malva]] tells you to hurry to your next destination while she continues to lounge around in her chair. When you get there, she is already waiting for you, but actually gives you kudos for getting there so fast.
* TransformationIsAFreeAction: Literally, as Pokémon can Mega Evolve and attack on the same turn. The Mega Evolution itself happens [[ActionInitiative before anything else in that turn]], although the Pokémon who just Mega Transformed will still utilize their regular form's speed stat for that turn.
* TransformationTrinket: In two parts. The [[GreenRocks Mega Stone]] needed to Mega Evolve a specific Pokémon and the Mega Ring the [[KidWithTheRemoteControl trainer]] uses to activate it.
* TruckDriversGearChange: "Kiseki", the song that plays during the ending credits, features lyrics in both English and French for players to sing along with. It also changes key while repeating the refrain halfway through the song.
* TurnsRed: In the Super Secret Training, four balloons use this strategy. The Aegislash balloon starts attacking rather slowly, but once you've hit a certain score and enough time has passed, its attacks and movements will speed up dramatically. The Roserade balloon inverts this; its movements and attacks are lightning-quick, but once you hit a certain score and enough time has passed, it slows down greatly. Both the Mega Tyranitar balloon and the Mega Aggron balloon start off in their powered-up state to signify that they're stronger than the Tyranitar balloon and the Aggron balloon. They all turn a bright magenta when in their powered-up stages.
* UncommonTime: The Victory Road theme in ''X''/''Y'' is in 7/4 time.
* UnitsNotToScale:
** The boats in the marina in Coumarine City appear to only be large enough to fit one person to drive it.
** Even with 3D models, the game has no choice but to scale down huge Pokémon like Wailord during battle. It's not much longer than how Onix and Steelix are usually represented, and none of those three are represented at the 47 feet, 28 feet, and 30 feet tall that they respectively should be. More comparable to the 5 foot Greninja when it stands up.
* UnusuallyUninterestingSight:
** Mega Evolution. You'd think other NPC trainers and gym leaders would be wondering how you are transforming your Pokémon.
** [[spoiler:Lysandre publicly announcing to everyone over holo-caster that he will be wiping out Kalos, then levels half of Geosenge by activating a gigantic crystalline flower of death]]. Surely, something like this should've caused panic among the public and be all over the TV and holo-caster news.
** The girl in Cyllage City who gives massages. When she ends up massaging Arceus, you'd think that would draw attention. Also the random NPC's who comment on the first Pokemon in your party. None of them find it strange that you have "God" in your pocket.
* UnreliableIllustrator: Early on in the game, a Snorlax falls asleep in the middle of the road as an homage to the BrokenBridge in [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original games]]. Just like before, the player has to use the Poké Flute to wake up the Snorlax and fight it. Unfortunately, while the game insists that the Snorlax "opens its eyes wide", the model's eyes remain closed.
* TheUnreveal: As part of the plot, you'll see the Pokémon world from space. [[spoiler: Everything but Kalos is covered in clouds.]]
* VersusCharacterSplash: Even regular trainers will get these before battle. Story important characters like Rivals have detailed (Read, less SuperDeformed) 3D models in the splashes while normal trainers have static artwork.
* VideoGame3DLeap: While the previous two generations of games had a SpritePolygonMix (specifically, 2D sprites rendered in a 3D world) and home console spinoffs like ''VideoGame/PokemonColosseum'' had already been in full 3D, this is the first main series handheld game to feature everything constructed with 3D models.
* VideoGameCaringPotential:
** Taken UpToEleven with Pokémon-Amie. Your team is no longer a static companion, as you're able to interact with them like pets. The battle text also changes slightly as you bond with them, such as being reassured by your presence, eagerly awaiting your next action, or the trainer saying some very encouraging words back to their Pokémon. It pays off too. Pokémon with a high affection love you so much that it gives them the strength to shake off status effect like Burn or Paralysis, [[NormallyIWouldBeDeadNow enduring an attack that would normally KO them]], score more critical hits, and other benefits. Having a high affection is just plain beneficial all around.
*** Aside from what's affected by Pokémon-Amie the messages during battles make a lot of effort to try to tug at your heart strings and make you care for your Pokémon in general. Like for example if your Pokémon gets to low health, and the health bar turns red you'll see a message that says it is ''" in a bit of a pinch. It looks like it might [[TryingNotToCry start to cry.]]"''
** You can give tips to certain [=NPC=]s that do services for you to make them happier. There's no indication that this benefits you in any way, so this trope would have to apply for you to do it in the first place.
** You can use O-Powers on other people to help them out. While O-Powers are cheaper to use, and thus easier to grind, when used on other people, there's nothing stopping you from using max level O-Powers to help people anyway.
** Wonder Trade can result in this if you decide to give something rare away, whether it be a Pokémon with perfect [=IV=]s and Egg Moves, items, or even Pokérus.
*** It is even invoked frequently by groups within the Pokemon community by hosting mass events to wonder trade certain Pokemon. Often times, adding items to them is encouraged to make this trope even more present.
* VideoGameCrueltyPotential:
** You could be a greedy jerk by only giving away ComMons on Wonder Trade. Just know that you'll probably be getting ComMons back.
** The game has a built in profanity filter which prevents players from giving offensive and obscene nicknames to Pokémon. However, some players bypass the filter by giving pokemon insulting names and trading them away on Wonder Trade. It is possible to insult people in this manner.
** For all this talk about caring, you can also be a JerkAss {{Troll}} on Pokémon-Amie. You can wave a Poképuff in front of the Pokémon and drop it, while they're hungry. You can induce StopPokingMe reactions too. Just don't expect your Pokémon to be happy about it.
*** [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking You can also play the face game and then tap the screen just to make them sad]].
** [[http://archive.foolz.us/vp/thread/14770771/#14770771 As demonstrated in this thread]], you can be mean to the taxi drivers of Lumiose and deliberately take rides when broke just to upset them into battling you.
* VideoGamePerversityPotential: Despite Nintendo's implementation of language and content filters, players will find a way.
** There's a group of wags deliberately editing their PR videos with amusingly [[ImmodestOrgasm inappropriate]] dialogue.
** A minor example comparatively, but Shauna, Tierno, and Trevor try to nickname you. You then get an option to have them call you by a different nickname. Have them address you as something like 'Master' or 'Milord' for a bit of a dom feel, especially with Shauna [[ShipTease addressing you]] as 'Master'.
** Pokémon-Amie allows a player to pet their Pokémon on pretty much ''any'' part of the body -- ANY part of the body, even where NonhumansLackAttributes should logically apply.
** Tying together with VirtualPaperDoll below, if playing a female player character, you could deliberately wear revealing clothing like the Halter Tops paired with miniskirts.
* VirtualPaperDoll: Player characters are now [[http://www.serebii.net/xy/customisation.shtml customizable to some extent]]--there are three different hair color/skintone combinations (brunet/pale, blond/even paler, and brunet/dark) for either gender. You can also buy clothing at boutiques within various cities, and even change your hair color and style. At the Trainer PR studio, you can even acquire contact lenses to change your eye color, and a makeup artist can change your skin tone. (It's worth noting that girls have a wider variety of hairstyles than guys, whose hairstyles range from shaggy to crewcut.)
* VocalEvolution: Pikachu's old in-game cry has been replaced with its anime voice[[note]]Since, being the SeriesMascot, its the only one that has stayed consistent throughout all dubs of Pokémon media across the world[[/note]]. Every other Pokémon has received an upgrade to their game cries to better fit the 3DS sound. Compare [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EHKkSb5AnY Mewtwo]] to [[http://youtu.be/vBANW2avk2o?t=16s Mewtwo]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtZbmMxFtKE Exeggutor]] to [[http://youtu.be/A5H9fIHFp5s?t=3m50s Exeggutor]]. You'll notice they're not nearly as harsh sounding as they were.
* WaistcoatOfStyle: One of the women's clothing choices is this. Hope you can spare 120,000 bucks for one though!
* WakeUpCallBoss:
** Viola can catch quite a few people by surprise, that are expecting to solo a Bug-type gym with Fennekin. Her first Pokémon is a Surskit (a Bug/''Water''-type), [[GenreSavvy who not only carries a Water attack but a move that weakens Fire-type moves]].
** While not too difficult, it is possible to come in unprepared for the first two gyms. This especially applies to those who didn't overlevel.
** And for those who didn't get the memo, there is also Rock-type gym leader Grant. His two Pokemon are decently bulky, and hits hard for this point in the game, so even super-effective attacks may only do scratch damage. They also got movesets to lower your speed and make you flinch. Finally, both are dual-types, and one of them is a previously-unseen Dragon/Rock dual-type, so you can't just bring out a Grass or Water-type Pokemon, unlike [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Roxanne]] or [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Brock]].
* WhamLine: "In reality, those stones that line Route 10 are [[spoiler: the graves of Pokémon.]]"
** "There was a man and a Pokémon. He loved that Pokémon very much. A war began. The man’s beloved Pokémon took part in the war. Several years passed. [[spoiler:''He was given a tiny box.'']]"
** Before both of those, this line kicks off the finale of Team Flare's story as it's broadcast loud and clear from their leader:
-->[[spoiler:'''Lysandre:''' Team Flare will revive the ultimate weapon, eliminate everyone who isn't in our group, and return the world to a beautiful, natural state]].
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse:
** During the beginning of the game, it is suggested that Tierno and Trevor receive starter Pokémon, but none of the three Kalos starters ever appear on their teams.
** During the selection of the Kanto starters, dialogue suggests that Calem/Serena choose a Kanto starter of his/her own. Yet regardless of which Pokémon the player chooses, neither of the other two appear on his/her team at any point in the games.
** When choosing either the Jaw or the Sail fossils in Glittering Cave, Calem/Serena receives the one that you didn't choose. Neither the Tyrunt or Amaura lines appear on your rival's team.
* WhoWantsToLiveForever: Comes up a few times:
** [[spoiler: [=AZ=]'s Floette]] was killed in the GreatOffscreenWar, and later resurrected and given {{immortality}}. However, the resurrection required the death of numerous Pokémon, making them regret being brought back to life.
** In X, shortly before you fight Xerneas, Team Flare threaten to give you eternal life so you will eternally regret failing to stop them. Oh and in the post-game? [[spoiler:Sycamore straight up says you were exposed to the energy the machine gave off. You and your FiveManBand ''could be'' immortals]]. Also, [[spoiler:Lysandre, who was directly hit by the Ultimate Weapon's beam in X. Let's hope for him that he was crushed before the beam's effects made him immortal. Because if not, [[AndIMustScream seeing as he's]] BuriedAlive...]]
* WolverinePublicity: With the reveal of its Y Mega Evolution, Mewtwo almost became the Lucario/Zoroark-type "mascot" of the generation. However, possibly due to the unexpected AudienceReactions to the Mewtwo from the [[Anime/PokemonGenesectAndTheLegendAwakened 16th anime movie]], Charizard ended up taking its place, and found its way into all sorts of gratuitous appearances (especially as Mega Charizard X).
* TheWonka: Probably the case with the "very elusive" manager of the Hotel Richissime, a very classy, very expensive hotel in Lumiose City, who you only see if you do well enough at the part-time jobs to earn 50,000 PokéDollars per job; [[spoiler:she's one of the Punk Girl trainers.]]
* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds:
** [[spoiler: AZ. Being so distraught about the death of his Floette in war that he ''built a nuke and gave all of Kalos the holocaust treatment'' to revive it definitely makes him that.]]
** [[spoiler:Lysandre]] as well, as from what can be gathered about him from various [=NPC=]s is that [[spoiler:he went insane because nothing short of "kill a lot of people and Pokémon and use your erstwhile terrorist cell to rebuild the shattered remains of the world" was proving to be viable in solving the matter of limited resources and he felt responsible for being descended from royalty.]]
* XMakesAnythingCool: ''Pokémon X''. ''Pokémon Y'' is an aversion of YNot (or [[JustForPun Wynaut]], as the case may be)
* YouCantThwartStageOne: It doesn't make much difference that you beat Team Flare's Grunts, Admins, and Scientists at the Power Plant or Poké Ball Factory - they still completed enough of their objective to continue with the next phase of their plan all the same.
* ZergRush:
** A new form of RandomEncounter called Horde Battles have your one Pokémon face against 5 wild Pokémon at one time. Hope you have {{Herd Hitting Attack}}s -- or that your Mon is strong enough to endure multiple hits (potentially with side effects) per turn. Fortunately, ConservationOfNinjutsu is in effect; horde Pokémon are roughly half the level of other Pokémon in the area, and/or appear in their unevolved forms.
** There are benefits to encountering Hordes. First of all, one of the five Pokémon might have its Hidden Ability (although finding which one isn't easy, and there's no guarantee any of them will have it.) Second, defeating a Horde gains more Effort Value in one (or occasionally two) areas than defeating regular wild Pokémon. (Which area depends on the Horde.) Third, in a mixed Horde, the odd one is always a Mon that is ''very'' rare individually in the version you're playing, and Hordes are easy to attract using Honey or the move Sweet Scent. Of course, this causes other problems. As stated above, in some mixed Hordes, the other four will gang up on the odd one, and in others, the other four will help it.
[[/folder]]

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