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[[caption-width-right:350:[[{{Tagline}} Less addictive than TV Tropes!]]]]
->''"I have heard [Gabriel] suggest that the game is crack, but it's [[GiveAManAFish more like all of the ingredients and equipment that you need to make crack]], which I'd say is worse."''
-->-- '''Tycho''', ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'', [[http://www.penny-arcade.com/2010/9/17/ describing this game]]
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'''''[[http://www.minecraft.net/ Minecraft]]''''' is a cross-platform, block-based sandbox game. It was originally intended as a SpiritualSuccessor of the free game ''Infiniminer'' and is inspired by ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' as well, even to the point that someone developed a program to convert ''Dwarf Fortress'' maps into ''Minecraft'' landscapes.

Currently ''Minecraft'' has two main branches: "Classic" and simply "Minecraft" (previously "Beta"; "Alpha", "Infdev", and "Indev" before that), with the latter further sub-divided into "Survival", "Creative", "Adventure", and "Hardcore" modes. It is currently priced at 19.95 (US$26.95, 17.20), Classic is free to play, but has fewer features than the full release, plus the multiplayer mode of Classic was discontinued.

''Classic'' is a simple sandbox mode that can be played either single or multiplayer. Players can place or destroy blocks as they see fit, and can switch between various kinds of blocks. For the most part, it's focused solely on building, and can be used to easily make very large structures or pixel art. Many players have compared it to playing with {{LEGO}}[[note]]Incidentally, LEGO is [[http://www.brickset.com/news/article/?ID=1982 now offering Minecraft-themed sets by popular demand]], though one must wonder how they'll differ at all from their normal Creator packages[[/note]], and the visuals definitely carry that vibe. Classic is free to play, and a good way to introduce someone to the mechanics of ''Minecraft'', but it is extremely basic when compared to the full game's more varied and complex features.

The full version features four modes: Survival, Hardcore, Adventure, and Creative.

'''Survival''' adds myriad features, such as a crafting system, a day/night cycle, and hostile monsters, and unlike Classic, the player must collect blocks manually. Players are dropped into an empty world with absolutely nothing but the clothes on their back. At night, [[EverythingsDeaderWithZombies zombies]], [[DemBones skeleton archers]], GiantSpiders, [[ActionBomb exploding Creepers]], and [[HumanoidAbomination teleporting]] [[TheSlenderManMythos Ender]][[CaptainErsatz men]] roam the land (unless you're playing on Peaceful Mode [[note]] prevents violent mobs from spawning; you don't get attacked, but on the other hand you can't get any of the neat items they drop[[/note]]). The player is forced to scrounge for supplies, building up a base to protect from the nocturnal beasts while also mining deep underground for valuable materials. The landscape is also populated by more docile animals, like cows, that can be killed for their meat (which fills your [[WizardNeedsFoodBadly food meter]]) and other useful items. Even after its official release, the game is constantly updated with many new features and tweaks, and players who have already paid for the game receive these free. For more details about Survival mode, refer to the [[Analysis/{{Minecraft}} analysis section]]. '''Hardcore''' mode is similar to Survival in most respects, but the difficulty is permanently locked at hard, and [[FinalDeathMode the world is deleted upon death]].

Another game mode, '''Creative''', removes the health bar[[note]](although you can still die in the void to prevent lag)[[/note]], gives the player infinite access to every item/block in the game, lets the player spawn nearly every kind of mob[[note]]Ender Dragons can't be spawned due to their ability to destroy virtually every block, which could ruin maps[[/note]] and gives them the ability to fly. It is, in essence, a more full-featured version of Classic.

'''Adventure''' mode is much like Survival, but without the ability to break most blocks without specific tools. This mode is generally meant for user-created maps that focus on storylines or exploration.

Notable for its [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Version_history frequent updates]] and very involved creator, Notch (now working on other projects, having turned ''Minecraft'' over to Jeb_). The full game was released on November 18, 2011 (originally slated for November 11, but due to [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim some other game]] launching that day, Notch pushed it back a week). The game also exists as a mobile version for the Sony Ericsson Xperia Play and two official Android apps (one free and one paid version - both of which roughly correspond to the Classic and gold versions, respectively). An iOS version of this was released on November 17, one day before the computer version left Beta. A version for the {{Xbox 360}} is also available. A version has also been announced especially for the Raspberry Pi computer, based on ''Minecraft - Pocket Edition''. XboxOne, PlayStation3, PlayStationVita and PlayStation4 versions have also been announced; both the Xbox One and [=PS4=] versions will be available at the launch of their respective consoles.

Worth mentioning, one of the splashes that can pop up at the title screen is [[TvTropesWillRuinYourLife "Less addictive than TVTropes!"]] Although since there happen to be several unofficial Troper servers, you can have both at the same time...

It also features music by Music/{{C418}}!

The GameModIndex has a ''Minecraft'' section which has pages for various mods and maps. There is also another page reserved for fan-made [[VideoGame/MinecraftAdventureMaps Adventure Maps]].

The official wiki can be found [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Minecraft_Wiki here]], which you will absolutely need if you want to get anything done.

See also ''VideoGame/{{Minicraft}}'', a spin-off game made in 48 hours by ''Minecraft'' creator Notch, as well as ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'', the most popular of several games with a similar "blocky sandbox survival" genre to ''Minecraft''. Mojang's following game was ''VideoGame/{{Scrolls}}'', which is currently in open beta.

----
!!Minecraft provides examples of:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: A-C]]
* ThreeDMovie: The game has an option for red/cyan anaglyph. You can also download fan-made addons that allow for differently colored glasses, stereoscopy and other 3D options.
* AbandonedMine: As of the Adventure update, you can now find these around the world.
* AbnormalAmmo: The game lets you uses dispensers as turrets. While they can "fire" out anything you stuff into them, most of it just falls down harmlessly. Though you can have them fire arrows, [[KillItWithFire incendiary ammunition]], potions of all kinds (including [[HealingShiv healing ones]]), snowballs, and [[EdibleAmmo eggs]]. Eggs which may spawn baby chicken upon hitting the ground. Most of these can also be thrown by hand.
* AbsurdlySharpBlade: A Diamond Sword enchanted with Sharpness V (or a similar tier) is one of the deadliest things a player has at their disposal, especially in PvP when opposing players are very likely wearing good armor and a little extra oomph is needed to pierce it.
* AcceptableBreaksFromReality: A common argument on why ''Minecraft'' should stray far from realism.
* AchievementSystem: The game has it's own system of achievements that are unlocked in a chain and kept per single player world or per player in a server and follows a prerequisite pattern (meaning an achievement for killing an enemy will require a prerequisite achievement of crafting a wooden sword).
* ActionBomb:
** Creepers' are plant-based creatures with no arms that drop gunpowder when killed. Their only method of attack is to explode as near to you as possible.
** The Wither explodes upon being created.
* AesopAmnesia: Admit it. How many times did you flood your cave/underground base before you learned to just leave that wall alone? Alternately, how many times did you nuke your own establishment for the same reason (replace 'water' with 'creepers')?
* AIBreaker: The game, for a long time, had enemy AI be very simplistic. If a monster was chasing you, all you had to do was stand in front of a pool of lava and watch the mobs walk straight into it. The AI was coded to walk in a straight path to the player when they spotted them, regardless if there was a lava pit or a cliff in the way. The update to 1.2 enhances the AI to have better path finding so if the player is being chased by a zombie for example, the zombie will attempt to look for alternative paths to the player as long as it doesn't hurt itself. Skeletons were also made smarter by rushing at the player and flanking them should the player hide by a corner of a wall. Enemy mobs can also see through glass and will try to get to the player if they see them through the glass, whereas in the past, glass acted like solid blocks for mobs, thus they couldn't see through it.
** Endermen also have an exploit in their AI that can be abused if used right. Endermen take damage from water and if an Endermen is hostile towards you, exposing it to water will cause it to be neutral and stop attacking you.
** Endermen also have issues with enclosed spaces. Because they are three blocks tall, while players are only two blocks tall, endermen simply can't fit into areas where players can hide, nor can they harm players in such areas. Their AI will lead to them teleporting toward players that look at them, even if they can't hurt that player, as long as the Enderman doesn't encounter water. Simple Endermen traps thus consist solely of a roof.
* AirborneMook: Ghasts and Blazes in the Nether, bats in the Overworld. The latter isn't hostile, thankfully.
* AlienGeometries: ''Minecraft on LSD'', the combination of 2 mods. Youtube it. Everything is still the same but looks extremely... peculiar. A straight line looks like a coiled rope, and then you imagine that these are supposed to be blocks doing this, but curving. And then you see the distance going on the ceiling... Although it's all visual (but can often feel like you're walking on a circular world and not a flat one) for now.
* AlienSky:
** The End has a dark, starless, cloudless sky that looks like TV static.
** [[PlanetHeck The Nether]] doesn't have a sky, but [[VoidBetweenTheWorlds the Void]] is red rather than black like outside the Overworld.
** Several Mods are examples of this as well: In VideoGame/TheAether it's always noon [[spoiler:until you kill the Sun Spirit]], and after that the day is still three times as long as in the Overworld, while in VideoGame/TheTwilightForest it's always dusk.
*** Mods that let you visit the Moon (including Solar System and Galacticraft) have the Earth featured prominently in the sky.
** There are also several Texture Packs that do weird things to the sky, mostly making the sun and/or moon large and/or a weird colour, and some that have ''two'' suns.
*** There's one Pack that has ''five'' suns, and one where [[UpToEleven the "suns" are technicolour vortexes connected by streams of energy]].
* AllDesertsHaveCacti: Cacti can grow in any sandy area, but they're most common in the Desert biome.
* AllJustADream: [[spoiler:The End Poem says that basically everything you've done up to defeating the Ender Dragon was just a dream.]]
* AllNaturalGemPolish: Diamonds and emeralds only require a modicum of processing if you mine their ores with a Silk Touch tool, otherwise the ore breaks into gems fully ready to use. Justified because you're not using diamonds as jewelry, you're using them to cut your way through anything you need to.
* TheAllSeeingAI: The hostiles are like this, but only after they've already spotted you the normal way. Then they can track your movement through any kind of wall and even [[ActionBomb explode]] from behind a thin wall. Results in ArtificialStupidity in that transparent blocks like glass count as walls, so mobs cannot see you through glass unless you've already been spotted through just air.
** Played straight with Spiders and their poisonous relatives Cave Spiders. They can sense you through walls.
* TheAloner: You are this in single player mode. It's just you and a world (potentially) eight times the size of the planet Earth, populated with eerily abandoned structures and filled with hostile monsters. The few [=NPCs=] you meet serve only to emphasize how alone you are, as they are clearly not human.
* AlternateWorldMap: Three, in fact: The Overworld, where players start; the Nether, a dangerous LethalLavaLand; and The End, which is essentially a FinalBossNewDimension.
* AmazingTechnicolorWildlife: Through the use of dyes, sheep can become this. Even better, dyed sheep retain their new color if sheared, and pass that color onto their offspring. And for some reason, naming a sheep [[CreatorCameo jeb_]] makes it oscillate through the whole spectrum. It still gives its original color when sheared, though.
* AmbiguouslyHuman:
** In keeping with the theme of the game, the player character is a very blocky man named "Steve?" whose body is composed various shaped cubes and rectangles. Yes, that's "Steve?", with a question mark.
** Averted with the [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin "You are]] the [[DemonicSpiders Creeper"]] mod, in which you are a Creeper. Literally. Played straight with the 'enemies' you face, however.
** Villagers look closer to Neanderthals (or [[WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants Squidward]]) than anything else.
* AnachronismStew: Thanks to the almost limitless creativity on display, the game may have a single world in which you can find the [[Franchise/StarTrek USS Enterprise]], a medieval castle, and a village of dirt huts right next to each other, with a transportation network consisting of footpaths, minecart tracks, portals to Hell and space-warping command blocks.
* AndIMustScream: Soul Sand is made up of screaming faces, presumably the "Tortured Souls" of [[FireAndBrimstoneHell the Nether.]]
* AngelsDevilsAndSquid: The extra dimensions: the (former) Sky Dimension, the Nether and the End. The Nether is a FireAndBrimstoneHell, and the End is a WorldInTheSky where it is AlwaysNight, the terrain is flat save for huge towers of obsidian, and the only inhabitants are [[Franchise/TheSlenderManMythos Slender Man]] {{exp|y}}ies and a giant, nigh-unstoppable dragon.
* AnnoyingArrows: Averted, a fully charged arrow from a Bow will deal more damage in one hit than a (un-enchanted) Diamond Sword; if enchanted for maximum damage it will even [[OneHitKill one-shot]] a player armored in anything worse than Iron! Mostly played straight with Skeleton arrows, which deal minor damage (especially with armor) but they fire them decently fast and the damage can add up quickly. Opening your inventory shows arrows still stuck in you, meaning you can eventually [[HumanPincushion walk off the damage from 20 or more arrows]].
* AnotherDimension: The game has the Overworld, the Nether, and the End.
** The Nether is useful for being a quicker way to travel across the land. One block traveled in the Nether is equal to eight blocks traveled in the Overworld. The player can utilize this by constructing a portal in the Overworld leading to the Nether, travelling a certain distance within the Nether, and then constructing another portal leading back to the Overworld. When the player returns to the Overworld, they will have travelled eight times the distance traversed in the Nether.
* AntidoteEffect: Drinking a bucket of milk will remove any status effects, including poison.
* AntiFrustrationFeatures:
** Nether Portals used to be ''much'' more random in the rules they followed for portal generation. To wit, players emerging from their portals frequently risked spawning 50 meters above anything, spawning right near lava, or, worst of all, ''in'' lava. The game now follows better guidelines in finding a spot to spawn from and adds extra Obsidian onto both sides of the portal if there are no nearby blocks, a minor safeguard against taking one step then plummeting into a lava lake.
** 1.8 revamps the Villager trading system to be less annoying overall. Previous professions have been split up into sub-professions so the odds of getting the trade you want from a particular Villager improve (provided you know which of the new professions sells, say, Arrows) and the trades offered are now less randomized. For example, Shepherds will reliably spawn both buying Wool and selling Shears (Tier 1 trades) and will unlock Tier 2 after you make one of these trades, and so on.
* AnvilOnHead: The Anvil item is mainly used to repair enchanted items, but it can also be used as a weapon by placing it next to a hovering block and having gravity make the Anvil fall. It does a ton of damage to any player or mob that gets hit by it.
* ApocalypticLog:
** You can find a broken, dusty record. If you play it, it details the [[spoiler: final moments of someone being chased by an unknown mob and he cries out suddenly as the record ends.]] It only raises the question, ''[[UndeadAuthor who recorded it]]''?
** Players may write their own version of these in books and leave them for others to find.
* AppliedPhlebotinum:
** Redstone. Putting dust on the end of a stick makes an infinite power source (unless you short it out). It's also magnetic, given that it's used to make the Compass, and, as of 1.0, can be used as an ingredient in brewing potions, extending the desired effect's duration. With 1.5, enough Redstone can be turned into a Redstone block, which is similar to a torch but impossible to shut off.
** The Crafting Table, despite being rather humble in origin and nature (it's just a work bench made from 4 Wood Planks). Once built and placed, you can do almost ''anything'' using it without any further tools. It's essential to do anything in this game.
* AprilFoolsDay:
** The 2011 April Fool's Day featured a massive parody of ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' with the [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Locked_Chest Steve Co. Supply Crates]]. They were found randomly in newly-generated territory and glowed at night. They were indestructible (except by TNT). When clicking on them, a sign pops up that says it requires a key to open, and had a link to the [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/File:Minecraft_store_april_fool_1.png Store]]. In the store, after placing $10,000 worth of silly items in the cart, [[spoiler:the site would start displaying flashing colors, and a velociraptor popped up and moved across the screen. After a warning, of course. On April 1, an "April Fools Day" sign moved across the store page, along with a rearrangement of [[{{Rickroll}} "Never Gonna Give You Up."]]]] Sadly, the store page no longer exists.
** April Fool's 2013 saw the release of the joke update Minecraft 2.0 that contained, among other things, a pink, friendly Wither, redstone "bugs" which were retextured Silverfish, and an [[LetsPlay/EthosLab Etho Slab]] which is a half-block of TNT. It also contained more serious and useful things like Blocks of Coal and Dyed Glass, the former of which actually [[spoiler: made it into the 1.6 update]]. Not to mention the latter [[spoiler: became stained glass and was added in the 1.7 update]].
** On April Fool's Day 2014, [[https://mojang.com/2014/04/minecraft-is-experiencing-some-problems/ the villagers apparently turned sentient and took over the game]], leading to all player skins changing into those of villagers. The sounds in the game [[UnsoundEffect were also affected]], due to the game's minor inclusion of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yG_Y52bK6Ec Element Animation Villager Sounds Resource Pack]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEsGqPgwvpM&index=5 It's hilarious .]]
*** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gv0yqkl4q0I A fake snapshot]] was also released on that same day, with ridiculous features such as witches leaving a trail of cakes, all mentions of [[UrbanLegendOfZelda Herobrine]] [[UpToEleven being removed]] (even on signs!) and Website/{{Twitter}} being "intergrated" into Minecraft.
* ArcNumber: 11, usually whenever horror is involved. The music disc that plays a man running away from things until it suddenly cuts out is named "11". Endermen were the 11th mob in the game. Herobrine was removed 11 times. The only update in the Herobrine removal period that didn't have him being removed? 1.1. Music Disc 11's disc id is 11 and it's length is 1:11. Hell, Minecraft 1.0 was released on 11/11/11!
* ArmlessBiped: Creepers technically have four legs but their vertical bodies make them resemble armless bipeds more than the other quadrupeds in the game.
* ArmorOfInvincibility: The game has armor crafted from diamonds. However, you'll need a ''lot'' of diamonds; even basic boots will take four diamonds to make, let alone breastplates or pants.
** The 1.0 release had a bug where damage reduction from armour was applied twice, making a player wearing a full suit of diamond practically invincible. This greatly impacted on the strategies employed during the first reddit "race for wool" tournament as obtaining diamond armour or denying it to the other team would often decide the match.
** ''Industrial Craft 2'' (which is also part of ''Tekkit'') features Quantum armor. By spending the time to get several lapis power gems that require diamonds, iridium plating that requires an immense power source for a matter generator and Nano armor requiring carbon fiber and power gems, you can get a full set of armor that allows you to run extremely fast, jump really high, your hunger never goes down and damage is negated to the point that you can ''swim in lava'' as long as the power source lasts. It's easy to charge as well if you have several HV Solar Arrays connected to a MK-3 Charging Bench.
* ArrowsOnFire: Bows can be enchanted so the arrows they fire will set mobs on fire if struck. A similar effect can be achieved by shooting an arrow through fire or lava. As of snapshot 12w34b, these flaming arrows can be used to ignite TNT.
* ArtificialBrilliance:
** Creepers deliberately wait to ambush you by hiding in alcoves until you pass by.
** Pigmen group into tribes. Just look at the [[http://www.minecraftforum.net/viewtopic.php?f=1016&t=71196 research!]]
** Tamed wolves will follow the player down stairs rather than leap off ledges. They're also smart enough to not attack creepers.
** Peaceful mobs run away when they take damage, including when they're attacked by wild wolves.
** Endermen get hurt by touching water. To avoid this they teleport away as soon as they touch water.
** Endermen teleport away from approaching arrows, even if they're trapped in a minecart.
** Endermen teleport away from approaching players, if they are in combat with them, to avoid melee attacks.This can be nullified by wearing a pumpkin helmet.
** In the 1.2 update, mob AI was significantly upgraded. Mobs can now follow players around corners and obstacles. [[http://youtu.be/htBo75pHW7Q This]] is the result.
** Witches will be able to run away from primed Creepers.
* ArtificialStupidity: There is even [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMQkXoQaZgE a song about their stupidity]].
** Enemy mobs were quite stupid back in the early days of the game. Prior to the 1.2 enemies had effectively no path-finding - meaning they would gleefully jump into bottomless pits, walk through lava, and drown in order to reach the player. The path-finding was basically only "run at player, jump when you reach a block in your way". Enemies will only attack if there's a direct line of sight to the player. They were programmed to do nothing more than walk in a straight line to reach the player and jump whenever a block stood in the way. This meant you could lead the infamous creepers to their deaths by tricking them to walk off a cliff or into a lava pool. This results in awkward scenarios when groups of Creepers cluster atop a glass ceiling, unable to explode due to the completely transparent material blocking their view. At Minecraft Con 2010, Notch said he intentionally made them stupid. This is usually acceptable to Minecraft players; if creepers could explode no matter what was between them and the player, it would be [[NintendoHard damn near impossible]] to construct a good shelter. A patch enhanced the mob AI and they no longer have their quirks.
*** Zombie Pigmen still did this until 1.8.
*** Even after the [[ArtificialBrilliance AI update]], enemies will still drop from a ledge above you if that's the quickest (or only) way to reach you, even if that drop is enough to injure them.
** In earlier versions of the game, Ghasts wouldn't aim their fireballs at the player character himself, but instead ''at the camera''. Normally this wasn't an issue, since the game is played in first person view by default, but players are able to manually toggle into third person mode; thus, an easy way of dealing with Ghasts was to simply pop into third person mode whenever you saw one and laugh while their fireballs sailed harmless over your character. This has since been corrected, though.
** If the player is inside a house and a spider spots them, the spider will climb up the wall in an attempt to get to the player. However, due to a quirk in the programming, the spider will ''drop'' off the wall if he climbs higher than your character. Thus, if your house is built high enough, the spider will repeatedly damage himself through fall damage each time he drops.
** The tameable wolves update got a ''lot'' of flack when it was first introduced for the stupidity of the wolves. They would frequently get lost and de-spawn, or decide the shortest route between two points was a straight line right into a pool of lava.
*** Tamed wolves like to play in water, but used to have trouble [[TooDumbToLive telling the difference between water and lava]]. They still have a problem with fire and recognizing it as a Bad Thing.
*** While them not being able to use ladders is in all ways logical, tamed wolves will just jump after the player if they go down a ladder, no matter how long the descent is. Time to go looking for a new dog...
*** Wolves also have a hard time getting through open doors. It's usually a better idea to make them sit and then push them into the house through the doorway, or perhaps build them a dog door their own height immediately adjacent to your door.
*** Wolves who are standing up will teleport to the player if they move too far from them to prevent them from getting lost or killed. However, there is a glitch in which a wolf which is sitting down will stand up and teleport to the player by themselves. Now imagine that you're deep underground, climbing along narrow ledges over lava pits and suddenly your wolf who's been sitting in your living room at home suddenly teleports right over to you.
** In the rare event in which there is an above-ground lava pool, neutral mobs (which spawn in light patches at night) can be seen almost ''ceremoniously'' throwing themselves into the lava. Bats, in their random flights, make no effort to avoid lava as well.
** If an Enderman manages to catch fire, it will teleport itself into water. This would be perfectly logical, if not for the fact that water kills Endermen.
* ArtisticLicenseBiology: The trees that grow apples are referred to in-game as oak.
* ArtisticLicenseChemistry: You can't name a more reliable and valuable defense in Minecraft than the diamond armor. As debunked by [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KuH0-994Hk Game Theory]], though, real life diamond armor would be [[AwesomeButImpractical just as incredibly overpriced as it's actually worthless to be used as armor.]]
* ArtisticLicenseEngineering: The game doesn't so much have an artistic license as it has ''[[ToonPhysics entirely separate laws of physics from reality]]''. On one hand, sand, gravel, and most living things will respect the laws of gravity while most other blocks ignore it entirely, enabling [[FloatingContinent floating continents]] and [[OminousFloatingCastle fortresses]] to be built and naturally generate with a little effort. Yet on the other, most anything electronic baring mods follow the laws of electronics mostly swimmingly (well, minus the fact that [[PerpetualMotionMachine redstone torches]] produce seemingly infinite power.)
* ArtisticLicenseNuclearPhysics: The mod Industrial Craft 2 has nukes and nuclear reactors. The explosion from a nuclear reactor is actually bigger than that of a nuke. Also, due to interaction with vanilla Minecraft's poisoning mechanics, you can cure radiation poisoning by drinking milk.
* ArtStyleDissonance: The game looks like a harmless children's toy at first glance, until you play Survival mode. [[WizardNeedsFoodBadly Constant threat of starvation]] as well as brutal [[NightOfTheLivingMooks undead creatures]] and [[DemonicSpiders otherwordly monsters]] out for your blood that are ''far'' more threatening than their blocky, cartoonish designs could ever suggest are what awaits in this bright and colorful Lego Land. Needless to say, if ''Minecraft'' is a playground, it's an ''evil'' playground that [[DeathWorld shows no mercy and wants you dead]].
* AscendedGlitch:
** The [[ActionBomb creeper]]'s model was that of a failed pig model. The model failed due to Notch attempting to make the pig model longer horizontally, but he botched the coding and it made the model grow longer vertically instead, which also made the legs look weird in that position. Notch liked how creepy it looked and decided to work with it to create the Creeper.
** When the pistons were added, people soon realized that they sometimes got stuck in an incorrect state and need to be "updated" to make then snap back to their expected state. Ingenious people managed to transform this glitch into so-called block update detectors that significantly expanded the the ways redstone mechanisms can interact with the rest of the game world. Another, unrelated glitch with the pistons made it possible to propagate redstone signals arbitrarily far within a single tick (0.1s). This enabled the players to circumvent the intended 150m/s limit. This later capacity will be expanded in the next update, making it significantly easier to transmit instantly both edges of the signal.
** The Far Lands, a glitchy area players could see if they go far (''really'' far) enough in one direction of the map. [[FanNickname The Far Lands was named this by the fans]] and became popular. Even Notch liked the idea of finding a buggy area that had blocks and terrain spawn with weird results, so he decided to leave the bug in on purpose for players to find. Sadly, this glitch was accidentally fixed in the Beta 1.8 update when the coding for terrain generation was updated.
* AscendedMeme:
** Endermen can be seen as this applied to Herobrine (see UrbanLegendOfZelda below) - like Herobrine, they have glowing eyes, shuffle around blocks to make strange and unnatural formations, and aren't really aggressive by default but don't take kindly to being watched.
** Every single patch since around Beta 1.7.3 except 1.1 has had "Removed Herobrine" in its patch notes.
** Version 1.5 of the ''{{Xbox 360}} Edition'' (aka [=TU12=]) includes in its tutorial world a hidden [[LetsPlay/AchievementHunterMinecraftSeries Tower of Pimps]] (four gold blocks stacked on top of a block of obsidian), a trophy made famous by the crew at Creator/AchievementHunter.
* AsteroidsMonster: Slimes come in three sizes, which can withstand and dispense proportional amounts of damage. If you kill a larger slime, it will split into two to four slimes of the next size down. The smallest size slime will still chase you around but can't hurt you (unless it pushes you off a ledge or into lava). In the Nether, Magma Cubes are similar.
* AtlantisIsBoring: This varies depending on the player, though generally leans more towards a straight example rather than an aversion. While it is possible to create an epic underwater base and ruins, for the most part it fits this trope perfectly, with only [[EverythingsSquishierWithCephalopods one unique mob]] and no ocean-exclusive blocks. [[http://notch.tumblr.com/post/3095374159/notch-is-still-out-of-the-building Apparantly, Notch wants to fix this.]]
** Some players take advantage of this by building bases underwater ''[[InvokedTrope exactly because they're boring to be around]]'', and hence rival players are less likely to loot it.
* AttackAnimal: Once you tame a wolf by feeding it, it will follow you unless you command it to sit, and it will attack mobs that attack you.
* AttackBackfire: Throwing a Splash Potion of Instant Damage at a zombie or skeleton will heal them. [[ReviveKillsZombie Likewise, throwing a Splash Potion of Instant Health will hurt them]].
* AutomaticCrossbows: ''Minecraft'', for most of the pre-release period, took this even further by having a fully-automatic ''longbow''. If you had enough arrows stored up, you could just point at a horde of enemies, hold down the right mouse button, and mow them down like you're wielding an assault rifle. And as an added bonus, missed shots didn't waste arrows because they could (and still can) be gathered up and reused later. Beta 1.8 finally retooled the bow to behave more like a traditional video game longbow (i.e. hold the button in to pull back slowly, release to... well, release; damage and accuracy increases based on how far back the bowstring was drawn) but also do more damage if used properly.
* AutomatonHorses: Horses can pretty much gallop and jump indefinitely once saddled, only needing food if they take damage. This particularly stands out since the player himself has a hunger bar and loses stamina as he runs and jumps.
* {{Autosave}}: The game uses a single save state that overwrites itself persistently and upon quitting.
* AwesomeButImpractical: In ''Minecraft'', there's nothing telling you what to do or how to do it. However, there ''are'' several types of building materials, crafts, and projects that by-and-large are not considered worth it considering how little use they are or how much effort they require.
** Note blocks. It takes huge redstone circuits to make even small songs using them, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qG9SPywEGm4 like this for example]].
** Composite blocks made from ingots and/or gems (iron, gold, diamond, emeralds). On one hand, they're great for storage, turning nine items into one that you can easily convert back. On the other, it takes nine pieces to make a block, so in Survival you have to mine a massive amount of ore if you want to use them as building material. If you want to make a [[PyramidPower power pyramid]] for Beacons, you absolutely need these, 164 in total for full effectiveness. Did we mention you have to kill the Wither for a Nether Star (which itself requires finding 3 Wither Skulls) in order to make the Beacon in the first place?
** Enchanted Golden Apples. They give five minutes of damage and fire resistance, plus minor health regeneration and hunger benefits. They require ''eight gold blocks'' to make. That's ''72 ingots'' or ''648 nuggets''. This used to be the standard for Golden Apples, which healed all health, but the effect was changed to a five-second regeneration effect and the cost was reduced, while the enchanted version uses the old recipe.
** Obsidian. It's the strongest block in the game that can still be mined and is explosion-proof. That's where the good ends. It can only be mined with a diamond pickaxe, which takes about ten seconds. Obsidian is only created when water runoff hits a lava source block, converting the latter into obsidian. Lava usually only appears far below the surface, forcing you to trek into hostile territory just to find some. Once down there, if you're lucky, you'll stumble upon a lava lake. You need to use water to convert that into obsidian, then try to mine it without the obsidian falling into the next lava layer (of which there tend to be at least three). This can be circumvented by dropping a water block behind you, creating an instant conversion process. Then, after you've strip-mined an entire lake, you'll have just enough for a tiny house (though more than enough for crafting), meaning larger projects will take several trips. On the plus side, once you have enough for building purposes, whatever you make will be almost indestructible, and the Nether has so much lava that you'll never run out, though it's annoying to collect. An alternative to mining it is to collect it in buckets and use other blocks to create molds (this is an extremely useful method of getting to the Nether without diamonds), but lava buckets don't stack so this takes a while. On ''top'' of all this, it's a rather ugly building material for most types of projects and on many multiplayer servers making something entirely out of obsidian is actually a bannable offense because of how hideous a bunch of all-black structures are, making it pointless if you were hoping to make your project griefer-proof this way.
** Any type of brick block is impractical due to the smelting needed to make them (unless your pickaxe has the silk-touch enchantment), but red brick blocks (made of actual bricks) take the cake. Brick is smelted from clay, which is usually under a one-block layer of water, meaning you need to find lakes to find it. Each block drops four balls when mined, which must then be smelted into four bricks to form a red brick block. In other words, it takes four times the fuel to make red brick blocks than it does other similar blocks (except Nether Brick Blocks, which can be found naturally), and having Silk Touch doesn't let you get around it. Even then, its only benefit is appearance; it is functionally identical to other types in terms of resistance. Finally, version 1.6 added hardened clay, which is basically the same except that it's created from a clay block instead of clay balls, in a way similar to other materials; now there's no reason to make bricks when hardened clay is four times cheaper. Besides, hardened clay can be dyed, making it at least a good choice for decoration, whereas bricks can't. At least now Stone Bricks are more feasible due to being Craft-able from Smooth Stone and can be mined as-is with any Iron or better Pickaxe (no Silk Touch required).
** Exploiting a glitch by sprint-jumping on a low ceiling can almost double your speed, but this drains your hunger meter ''extremely'' fast.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbrd7WuwSi0 Cool, but Impractical]] [[CoolTrain piston trains]].
** Golden Armor and tools. The tools are the fastest in the game, gold armor can hold better enchantments than anything else, and they all look really cool, until RealityEnsues and we find out that Notch opted for the realistic structural density of gold, rather than the JRPG version, leaving you with what amounts to some [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation "slightly tasteless evening wear."]] Gold tools create the best enchantments of any material and mine even faster than diamond, but they're even less durable than wood and can't mine any ore except coal and quartz.
** The majority of contraptions involving excessive amounts of TNT. TNT falls under a similar problem. Endless fun for rigging up minefields, self-destruct systems, and even artillery cannons. Almost always requires great caution and planning to set up anything more complex than a basic pressure plate mine. In addition, restocking on TNT requires hunting down considerable numbers of [[ActionBomb creepers]] for the required gunpowder. And if that isn't enough, TNT remains one of the only artificial blocks Endermen can still pick up and place. For general use, TNT is good to destroy a wall or the like if you are mining, but the explosion radius is quite large and items caught in the center of the explosion are destroyed so if you are not careful, you can wind up destroying the rare diamonds or the even rarer emeralds.
** Buckets of lava/water, mushroom stew, and potions all have their awesome purposes, but their use is diminished heavily due to the fact that those items don't stack and they take up a lot of space as a result if you carry a lot of them. Food used to have the same problem in the beta days until they were made to be piled in stacks (cookies were the only food item back then that could be stacked).
** Diamond hoes may be the single least practical item in the entire game regarding input cost to output reward, as hoes see very little use nor do they increase in anything except durability with different materials, and you rarely need to replace your regular stone hoe, if at all. But there's no better way to say "[[ConspicuousConsumption I'm so rich I use diamonds for mundane tasks]]" than to walk around carrying a Diamond Hoe.
** Protection 4 diamond armor makes you pretty much invincible from everything from explosions to lava. However, the amount of diamonds it takes to make a full suit, as well as the amount of exp grinding required to enchant them all, and the fact that the armor will just break eventually, just makes them not really worth it. The exception to this is on [=PvP=] servers, where you need as much protection as you can to survive the onslaught of other players with their enchanted swords. The addition of the anvil and enchanted books does mitigate this to a degree, though.
** Glowstone as a light source. Deposits are scattered and small, you get back less than you mine without silk touch, and the light level it provides is matched by a jack-o-lantern, the latter being a lot easier to make in large quantities. Glowstone is much more useful as a potion ingredient.
** Carpeting; you get a few carpets from combining 2 of the same colored wool blocks, they take up the same space as a half slab would and does not catch fire, but aside from that there is no other use than aesthetics.
** Horses outside of [=PvP=] matches. Sure, they look good both with or without armor, but donkeys and mules are just as fast, just as strong and can actually carry items. Given that outside of battle gaming, inventory is crucial throughout the entire game, and you hardly need to protect your rides from mobs, the horse takes second place to their long-eared brethren.
** Any project in Survival mode that involves large amounts of lava permanently placed, ''especially'' one's home base. Yes, it looks awesome to have a skull fortress weeping lava-falls, but it's highly dangerous and one misstep can potentially kill you and melt all your valuable gear. Even if you build very carefully and never fall in by your own devices, you can still get knocked into it by hostile mobs (skeletons firing arrows, for example) and anything that compromises the integrity of your structure like Creeper explosions or Endermen removing just a single block can cause an escalating disaster. You can build fortifications and defenses to keep most mobs far away, but Endermen can teleport in whenever they please, even when you're not there to fend them off.
* AwesomeYetPractical:
** Wood. Trees are never hard to find, and they drop saplings that can be instantly grown to a full-size tree with a few bone meal, meaning you can grow new trees from the trees you harvest (ad infinitum). Jungle trees are even better, being 2 x 2 and absolutely giant. Wood is essential for workbenches, chests, and tools, but also makes doors, pressure plates, boats, fence posts, stairs, bowls, signs, and even charcoal for torches once you construct a furnace. It's also a decent starting material for a shelter, being a step up from dirt (provided you don't accidentally burn it down, though that's been nerfed for a while).
** The update which added dye to the game also added the ability to dye sheep. Not only is this endlessly amusing, but it is somewhat more efficient than manually dyeing wool blocks, as shearing sheep has the potential to give more than one block of wool, they regrow their wool in the same color that you dyed it, and give birth to colored babies. Plus, if you breed different-colored sheep, their offspring will be a mix (if one exists on the palette) of the parents. E.g., a white sheep and a black sheep will breed a gray sheep. On the Xbox 360 version, this will result in a sheep the color of one of the parents, at random.
** If you have a bunch of paintings, a metal door, and a switch, you can get a very useful set up where the metal door is behind a painting and you can still walk through it when the door is open. It's possibly handy for Survival Multiplayer, if you want/need to hide the entrance to something important.
** When enchanting tables were added, bookshelves became this -- having bookshelves nearby whilst enchanting will increase the maximum enchantment level, meaning better abilities and, if you're very lucky, multiple ones. This works to a maximum of 15 bookshelves. While later updates have nerfed the enchantment system, books themselves can be enchanted with a random power, allowing you to pick and choose what powers you want your weapons and armor to have instead of it being randomized.
** Iron tools, due to having a pretty good cost-to-use ratio. While weaker than [[TooAwesomeToUse diamond tools]], they're still relatively efficient and iron itself is far more abundant, making it more cost-efficient than diamond (which is only necessary to mine obsidian). They also enchant better than diamond tools.
** For general maintenance, stone tools are a better idea than iron, mostly because stone and wood are renewable resources. You'll go through them faster, but any player will find themselves swimming in cobblestone before long so you can always make them in bulk.
** Ender Chests. These take a large amount of effort to craft but unlike other advanced items they are completely worth it, even for more casual players in Survival mode. Storing items in one makes those items accessible from ''any'' Ender Chest, even across dimensions, making them extremely useful to effectively increase inventory slots and to have access to your valuables from all outposts. The catch is that each one requires 8 Obsidian and one Eye of Ender: the former isn't too bad once one reaches the point where lava and diamonds can be found, while the former requires Enderman Pearls ''and'' Blaze Rods... or from [[BoringButPractical just trading for them with Villager Priests]].
* AnAxeToGrind: The axe, though primarily a tool for chopping wood, can be used as a weapon. It deals more damage than a pickaxe or shovel, but less than a sword.
* BaconAddiction: ''Minecraft'' players sometimes refer to the pork chops as "bacon".
* {{Badass}}: The player character. He fights some of the most formidable enemies a miner could deal with, including cave-ins with sand and gravel, Creepers and [[DemonicSpiders Spider Jockeys]] and everything else, and for what? Some minerals to expand his homebase and allow him to better protect it. Also, he can use obsidian to create a portal to [[FireAndBrimstoneHell The Nether]], where has to deal with big falls, Ghasts that shoot fire, lava, Zombie Pigmen (if he provokes them), and the screams of the damned.
* BadassAdorable:
** Wolves, when tamed. They follow you, sit when right-clicked, have cute little puppy-dog eyes, shake themselves dry when getting out of water, tilt their heads to the side and beg when you pull out food, and murder anything that you attack with melee. [[GenreSavvy Except creepers]].
** Cats also become this for being able [[WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes to ward off creepers]]. Bonus points when using a texture pack to make them look like [[Franchise/MetalGear Revolver Ocelots]].
* BadassNormal: Steve?. While his clothing and name suggest coming from some kind of civilization, he can swim up waterfalls, beat zombies to death with his bare hands, craft explosives, and survive without food or sleep indefinitely (in Easy and Normal modes). [[UpToEleven And that's not even half of it.]]
* BadWithTheBone: Although entirely cosmetic and it gives no boost, you can hold a bone while punching enemies.
* BagOfSharing: Subverted with ender chests. Each occurrence of those chests have the same inventory (for the same player). So two players opening the same chest see different inventories, but each player can open any of those chests anywhere to see the same inventory in all of them. This inventory is still safe, even if the very last chest is destroyed. Highly useful for servers where theft can be an issue.
* BanditMook:
** Endermen have the ability to steal certain kinds of blocks. The variety was greater at one point, but 1.0 nerfed it to a small selection of naturally-occurring blocks. You also cannot recover the block even if you kill the Enderman that stole it, unless you wait until he puts it down somewhere.
** Snapshot 12w43b introduced this trope to zombies, skeletons, and zombie pigmen. Any items that are dropped can be picked up by these mobs and used against you. This means any undead mob that kills you may walk away with your stuff if you don't get back there quickly. Alternatively, they will become an ImprobableWeaponUser like this [[http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b141/Djinnhunter/Minecraft/2012-08-26_123533.png zombie trying to beat you down with a door.]]
* BarrierBustingBlow: If the difficulty is set on Hard, wooden doors won't stop zombies, just slow them down. Iron doors will keep them out.
* BatOutOfHell: Solidly averted by the bats, which are completely harmless and incapable of attacking the player.
* BatScare: Lighting torches sometimes triggers this trope, but they're harmless outside of accidentally startling a more flinch-y player into falling off a steep drop or onto lava.
* BattleTrophy: Wither skeletons have a rare chance to drop their skulls upon defeat. You can keep them as a decoration or even wear them or use them to summon the BonusBoss, the [[EldritchAbomination Wither]].
* TheBeastmaster: You can tame wolves and ocelots, who will follow you around loyally. Wolves will attack most mobs that you're attacking ([[ArtificialBrilliance except Creepers]]) and ocelots will [[WeaksauceWeakness scare the Creepers away]], making it well worth your effort to seek out and tame both.
* BeatingADeadPlayer: If you died but haven't respawned yet, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhcT2K2mrOk#t=09m40s monsters will keep trying to attack you.]] This is more significant than one would expect; creepers attacking your corpse will still explode, destroying your items and potentially damaging nearby structures.
* BeautifulVoid: At least in single player Survival mode. For all the beautiful scenery and the wonderful monuments and castles you can build it still doesn't change the fact that you're alone, the only sapient being on a world eight times the size of the Earth. Oh, and there are horrible monsters that come out at night.
** Two of the enemies are the zombies and the skeletons, which are both types of monsters that traditionally ''used to be people'', suggesting that there were once people, but they've all been killed or turned into horrible monsters and ''there are no other signs of civilized life ever having existed'', which is quite jarring [[FridgeHorror when you think about it for too long]].
** By ''Minecraft'''s release, updates had removed this with [=NPCs=] and Villages. A lot of the fanbase had not been happy about it either...
*** But the option to remove structures at worldgen restores the ability to play in an uninhabited world.
* BehindTheBlack: Hostile mobs can seem to advance in an endless tide from a stretch of unlit cavern... until you light it up with a torch and reveal a dead end not even five blocks away.
* BeneathTheEarth: One of the main draws of the game.
* BenevolentArchitecture: Even though you can dig and build ladders, you don't really need them to climb the mountains. They're rather short and at least one of the sides will always be a slope climbable by mere jumping.
* BerserkBoardBarricade: While not always using boards, one can build a wall very quickly to keep a monster away.
* BerserkButton: Endermen are normally passive unless you look directly at them, which seems to make them fly into a murderous rage.
* BigBulkyBomb: The Creative mode lets you make some truly terrifying piles of TNT. Big enough to crash the game when set off if you have the patience.
* BigCreepyCrawlies: Spiders and silverfish. The latter may be the smallest mob in the game, but they're still ''huge'' compared to real-world bugs.
* BigElectricSwitch: One can be made. Where as buttons create a quick burst of electricity to a nearby object, and a pressure plate can be activated with any weight, a lever can be used to keep the electricity at a constant flow.
* BilingualBonus: On the title screen, there is a random splash. One such splash reads "Bread is Pain", and pain means bread in French. Other splashes say hello to various countries in the local language.
* {{Bizarrchitecture}}: The game allows players to build structures that fit into any category. Big Objects are common as megaprojects, while Unlikely Foundations (or No Foundations At All) are made possible by the fact that only a few blocks are affected by gravity. Place one block on top of another, then knock out the bottom block, and the first block will remain suspended in midair where you placed it.
* BlackoutBasement: Lighting is a vital game mechanic to pay attention to, as hostile mobs will generally spawn in areas with low or no light. Since a good chunk of gameplay involves going underground, players are advised to carry plenty of torches.
* BlatantLies: One of the title screen random splashes claims "Absolutely no memes!" Aside from the fact that Minecraft has spawned a good dozen memes, it does make its own fair share of references in other title splashes.
** [[http://minecraft.net/game/howtoplay "First, the tall green things like to be stroked. Try that later for a nice surprise."]]
* BlingBlingBang: The game, after much hullabaloo from the fanbase, finally added in picks, swords and armor made from gold. Huzzah! Gold axes and swords do, in fact, swing sunuvabitchin fast and can plow through blocks at nearly diamond speed. To many folks' dismay, Notch [[ShownTheirWork was also aware]] that gold is a relatively soft metal. Thus, [[AwesomeButImpractical the durability of gold implements are in the toilet.]]
** Golden armor may look pretty, but as [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] found out, gold armor in terms of durability and longevity is barely better than leather armor.
** Diamond weapons themselves are also a pretty good example, except they're much more durable.
* BlingOfWar: You ''can'' go around sporting golden armor and swords in PvP, it's just not a great idea considering how many players will have better equipment. You're better off with Iron equipment if you don't have enough Diamonds to make a full set. The exception is Gold ''horse'' armor, which weirdly has better protection than Iron and has infinite durability, making it more practical.
* BlobMonster: Slime enemies, which split into smaller ones if you hit them.
* BonsaiForest:
** This varies between biomes. Pine trees in the cold biomes can grow quite large. The standard biomes other trees appear in can also grow to great size at random. It is not uncommon to see a grove of small trees around a much larger tree or two.
** The jungle biomes generally invert this. The trees soar in them, forming a huge, high canopy.
* BonusBoss: To fight the Wither, you will have to gather up four blocks of soul sand and three Wither Skeleton skulls [[CreateYourOwnVillain to construct it]], both of which are found in the Nether. One of the paintings even shows you how to put it together.
* BoobyTrap:
** Desert pyramids have treasure rooms with a pressure plate in the middle of it. If the plate is stepped on[[note]]including by mobs which spawn inside the area due to its low light level[[/note]], it triggers the TNT buried below and will blow you to hell, along with the loot. Jungle temples have tripwires that, when activated, makes dispensers nearby fire arrows at you.
** The player can also create their own booby traps out of the various redstone devices to use against other players or mobs, from simple to very elaborate.
* BookcasePassage: One of the most popular inventions since the piston was added, and often new piston inventors' first creation.
* BoringButPractical:
** Cobblestone. Not very fancy, but it's durable, incredibly common (all your stone automatically turns into it upon mining), and very important when it comes to crafting. As a building material, it's relatively durable. As a crafting material, it's abundant. Outside of massive super-projects, you'd be hard pressed to be at a loss as all the stone you mine turns into cobblestone. It's also one of the materials (all derived from wood, water, plants, and monsters) that [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Renewable_resource can never run out]] as you can always create more through a combination of lava and water. This same property also allows you to construct simplistic shelters out of basically nothing so long as you have at least one bucket. Even better, it can be smelted into much nicer-looking stone blocks. Once you're sick of having boatloads of the stuff around, just make more tools out of them, players practically guzzle pickaxes when mining and you'll always get the Cobblestone back that you spend on the Stone tools if you don't manage to find any Iron.
** In general, literal farming of crops and livestock. Farming isn't the most exciting thing to do in ''Minecraft'' (as opposed to going around slaughtering pigs and cows), but with a reasonably-sized, well-lit, and hydrated farm, you can easily produce enough wheat to constantly feed yourself with bread, at a fast enough rate that you'll never starve to death again (unless you by chance allow Creepers or Endermen to wreck your farm). It takes a while to set up and longer to get going (and routinely harvesting/replanting isn't the most exciting thing to do), but necessary to keep a reliable source of food going since mobs with edible meat spawn very slowly. Having a good population of farm animals has other benefits too, including leather for books (to enchant) and feathers for arrows. Breeding animals then slaughtering them is also an efficient way to figuratively farm for EXP to enchant anything.
** Blocks of dirt. You can't craft it into anything, but it's vital to farming of any kind. It is also excellent for temporary platforms, since you'll never run out of it, and can be used for makeshift barricades if necessary. It can even serve as housing at the start of the game, until you've gathered the necessary supplies to build something more sturdy.
** Water is as plain as it can get. It may slow you down and you can drown in it, but when combined with the humble bucket it is your absolute best friend. It puts out fires, solidifies lava, provides irrigation for farming, can be turned into a makeshift elevator to [[SoftWater break your fall off a cliff]], [[GiveAManAFish allow infinite food via fishing,]] or be used as a trap. Water can also be used as an elevator by swimming up waterfalls.
** Light sources. Light not only lets you see, but prevents monsters from spawning at certain light levels. It's also crucial to accelerated plant growth.
** Composite blocks, as long as you're not using them for anything, are great for storing large amounts of items. One block is composed of nine individual items (in most cases), letting you store nine times as much of it. This is especially true of redstone and coal (but not charcoal, due to technical issues); both substances are one of the most abundant products of mining short of cobblestone and dirt. They even have fringe benefits on top of being easy storage. A redstone block acts as a power source, and a coal block actually lasts longer as fuel than the coal used to make it.
** "[[DoubleEntendre Getting wood]]" is a meme for a reason, everyone. Wood is by far one of the handiest materials in Minecraft, serving as construction material, tool-crafting material, and fuel. And it's renewable, since the foliage of the trees you punch for wood contains saplings you can replant for more trees.
* BossRoom: Arguably the End, which is essentially one giant arena to fight the Ender Dragon.
* BottomlessPit: The Void. In the Overworld and Nether, it's blocked off by indestructible bedrock, but "indestructible" doesn't mean anything to a player in Creative mode. The End, being a series of floating islands, has a bit more of it to deal with.
* BottomlessMagazines: A bow with the "Infinity" enchantment doesn't actually use up any arrows in your inventory. You still need at least one arrow in your inventory to fire the bow, though. Also, the bow is limited by durability, but that's still the equivalent of six full stacks of arrows--which you can further extend through repairs at an anvil.
* BowAndSwordInAccord: Players who elect to wield a bow alongside their trusty sword. Early on in Survival an effective way to conserve both durability and arrow count is to shoot mobs once then swing at them when they approach, though this still works even past the stage where one is very strained for resources.
* ABoyAndHisX: Thanks to the tameable wolves and ocelots.
* BraggingRightsReward:
** Once you go through all the trouble of farming Endermen for their pearls, farming Blazes to get blaze powder to convert those pearls into Eyes of Ender, using said eyes to find an End Portal (which you then must activate with up to 12 eyes), and defeating the Ender Dragon in The End, you're rewarded with... a [[spoiler:dragon egg]]. It literally does nothing, and is annoying to even collect because it teleports if you try to touch it. But hey, at least you can say you got it.
** Similarly, a Beacon requires a Nether Star from killing the Wither (which itself requires quite a bit of Wither Skeleton farming) and many, many mineral blocks to achieve an appreciable effect. As awesome as the boosts and the PillarOfLight are, the effort needed to make a beacon pyramid just shows how little you needed one in the first place.
* BreadEggsBreadedEggs: The game has, among other enemies, skeletons, Spiders, and skeletons RIDING spiders.
* BreakableWeapons: All weapons, tools and armor have a [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Item_durability fixed number of uses]] before breaking. Bows are somewhat unique in that they lose durability when fired, but not when used to club things over the head; unfortunately, they are no more effective in this manner than fists[[note]]unless you combine it with a Sharpness enchanted book at an anvil, though it doesn't make it much better than a wooden/stone sword with no blocking capabilities[[/note]].
* BreakingTheFourthWall: The ending directly addresses the player. The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VWsq1JXVWY End Poem]] you get after defeating the Ender Dragon, addresses you directing, even using your username a few times. ([[SentientCosmicForce And what it has to say to you]] is, well, [[MindScrew interesting]].)
* BreakoutMookCharacter: Variation: The "You Are A Creeper" Mod. In which, yes, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin you are a creeper.]]
* BubblegloopSwamp: One of the biomes. It has flat terrain and shallow pools of water containing lily pads able to support your weight. Edible mushrooms are more common here, and trees are overgrown with vines hanging to the ground. The water was originally very dark, but this was changed after players complained that it was too ugly. It also features an abundance of slimes.
* BuildLikeAnEgyptian: Desert Temples.
* BuiltWithLego: More like it's made out of [=DUPLOs=]. The entire map is built out of large blocks that you can mine and craft into more blocks.
** [[http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/38942/Mojang_Working_On_Official_Minecraft_Lego.php And now Mojang is working with the LEGO group to make Minecraft-themed LEGO sets.]]
* BullfightBoss: The Ender Dragon's only attack is ramming you.
** The Xbox 360 version introduces an additional attack for the Dragon, Ender's Acid.
* CallToAgriculture: There are all kinds of flora and fauna you can farm, including wheat, carrots, potatoes, pumpkins, watermelon, cocoa, sugar cane, mushrooms, trees, chickens, cows, pigs, sheep and so on. In fact, unless you want to spend half your time fishing, establishing farms to grow wheat and livestock is essential for a reliable food supply, since animals don't respawn in large numbers, so hunting and gathering will prove inadequate before long. Even after you've accumulated enough food to last you for the rest of your playtime (or more), farms are still great sources for Villager trading fodder, as they buy most foodstuffs for Emeralds.
* CameraPerspectiveSwitch: The game allows the player to toggle into 3rd person view.
* CanineCompanion: Wolves can be tamed with bones, and will follow you around and fight for you.
* CannotCrossRunningWater: Endermen take damage if they step in water or get rained on.
* {{Cap}}: The majority of items/blocks have a maximum stack of 64. A few have a maximum stack of 16, and before the release of Beta 1.8, food had a max stack of 1. This is slightly different than most examples, as instead of being a maximum holding capacity for a particular item, you can carry as many stacks of the item as will fit into your inventory.
* CaptainColorbeard: There's a fan-made custom map titled "The Treasure of Captain Rainbowbeard".
* CatsAreSuperior: Creepers are the bane of any player's existence. But Creepers know better than to mess with cats.
* CatsHateWater: Played With and Averted: The adult cats decide to swim along with you when you swim and don't avoid water when you are standing and water is near. The ocelots in the game don't swim in water like the cows, sheep, chickens, pigs, wolves, dogs, and spiders would though.
* CaveBehindTheFalls: The game lets you build your own. You can also use lava for this, [[AwesomeButImpractical but you'll need another way in]].
* ChandlersLaw: Stay too long in one place in the newest version on Hard difficulty and more monsters, with better armor and potion effects, will spawn at night.
* ChargedAttack: A game mechanic for the bow, introduced in the Beta 1.8 update. The longer the bow is charged, the more damage the arrow does and it will fly faster and farther.
* ChekhovsGun: One of the decorative paintings in-game shows a 4-block T of Soul Sand with a Wither Skeleton Skull on each of the three top blocks. This is the formation that spawns the Wither boss, whose exclusive drop is crucial to crafting a beacon.
* CherryTapping: [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lLI8rYIwtI Someone has defeated the Ender Dragon]] with ''chicken eggs'', which do so little damage that it doesn't even hurt mobs with regular health bars.
* ChestMonster: Silverfish start out as a special type of stone block that mines curiously fast if you don't have a pick, and if attacked will summon their brethren to come out of hiding automatically. Once they start spawning, the best strategy is to just get the hell out of Dodge and wait for them to go into the surrounding blocks, which when mined will start the whole thing over again. With some updates, players have the ability to place these types of wall masters in creative mode wherever they please, which is most likely for people creating custom maps with traps. In survival mode, if you mine these special blocks with the silk touch ability in your pickaxe, you can harvest the booby trapped block and place them anywhere else as traps for your friends. The item is even called "Monster Egg" in the inventory.
* CityOfCanals: This is currently the only way to build a city with streets that can be driven on freely without using mods.
* ClothesMakeTheSuperman: With the enchanted armor.
* CluckingFunny: There's a very rare chance that a Chicken Jockey spawns in place of a zombie. It's pretty hilarious seeing a tiny zombie riding on a chicken.
* CobwebJungle: In the Abandoned Mineshafts that can be found, cobwebs are omnipresent, and rather tough to break without a sword.If they suddenly thicken, [[OhCrap you just found a lair of venomous cave spiders]].
* CobwebOfDisuse: Poisonous spiders have webs in abandoned mine shafts. Cobwebs also show up in libraries within strongholds, though this scenario doesn't guarantee spiders.
* CollisionDamage: Most mobs do this to you when they turn hostile. The only mob that doesn't use the trope is the Creeper.
* ColorCodedStones: Emeralds are a conventional green, Diamonds are light blue.
* CombatByChampion: Markus Persson, creator of ''Minecraft'', combined this with TrialByCombat when he proposed to settle a copyright dispute between his own company Mojang and rival company Bethesda... by means of a ''{{Quake}}'' match between each company's three best players. Alas, Bethesda rejected.
* CombatPragmatist: Everyone on an "every man for himself" Survival multiplayer server. At the minimum everyone has their home base ''very'' well protected or just puts up a decoy base while their real one is hidden somewhere. On particularly ruthless servers, expect people to use every dirty trick in the book: TNT landmines, lava traps, trap doors of death, hidden walls of Dispensers, and so on. Ever see a Chest or conspicuous vein of ore that no one seems to be touching? Odds are it's booby-trapped.
* CommonPlaceRare:
** Apples used to be incredibly rare. Rarer than diamonds. Apples were so rare that, without hacking or using mods to get apples, the only legit way to get an Apple was to kill Notch if playing with him on a server. It wasn't until the 1.8 patch that added strongholds with chests that have a chance of carrying an Apple or more. Since the full game was released, apples fall out of trees when you cut them down or destroy the leaves, but they only have a 1/125 chance of falling from any given leaf block.
** So are leather saddles (which you can't craft from leather found commonplace).
** Clay was also rather rare in the earlier days of the game, only available on coastal areas. Make a boat and get to searchin'!
*** As a matter of fact, Clay was a strange example of this, as it was rarer than diamonds, but easier to find: decent amounts were grouped near water, but only near water. Diamond is just really really deep and spread out. The addition of biomes such as the Swamp (which has clay lining many of its marshes) and Mesas (made almost entirely of multicolored clay) makes clay much more common.
** Cookies were this for a long time, to the point that they became a sort of trophy. This changed once cocoa beans became farmable and could be easily found in jungle biomes, instead of just in dungeon chests.
** As mentioned in the Yahtzee quote, making a cake is a highly elaborate process: you must build a furnace and a stone or better pickaxe, find nine iron ore, smelt them into nine iron ingots, make three buckets, milk cows, grow or find wheat, gather sugar cane and make it into sugar, and find an egg laid by a chicken, then put them all together. That said, once you get to the point that you can produce ''one'' cake, it becomes fairly easy to make ''more''.
** Carrots and potatoes are also pretty hard to get ahold of: you can only find them growing in NPC villages (which themselves are rather rare) or as a RareDrop from zombies.
** Name Tags, the only legit way to give any mob a unique name outside of creative mode, can only be found inside chests located within a dungeon.
** Pumpkins can be this on the XBox360 version of the game, since it's a finite space rather than the PC's nigh-unlimited world. If a cluster of pumpkins--usually around four or five at best--spawns, you will have to search far and wide to locate them. They end up being more rare than diamond ore. And even in the PC game, wild pumpkins can sometimes be hard to come by.
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: Skeletons will spin and shoot you with pin-point accuracy and a reaction time no human could ever achieve. Particularly obvious with the Beta 1.8 update, which introduced bow pull-back. The longer you hold the bow back, the more powerful the shot. Your movement speed is also slowed to a crawl when you pull it back. Unfortunately, skeletons seem to be immune to this.
* ConcealingCanvas: One of the easiest ways to hide a treasure stash is to make an adjacent room and hide it behind a 12x12 painting. Preferably you'll have an iron door behind it and the room itself blocked with obsidian, [[OpenSecret because this technique is so old it's pretty much the first thing people think of when they see said giant paintings.]]
* ContinuingIsPainful: When you die, you'll drop all the items you're carrying, and all but six levels worth of your experience points are LostForever. This penalty can be softened by having fewer than six levels of EXP, causing you to lose only half of them, and if you can find the place where you died, you can run back and retrieve all your stuff. If you happened to die by falling in lava though, kiss all your items goodbye! Also, zombies can loot your belongings, so don't be surprised if you encounter a zombie dressed like you that you'll need to kill to get your armor and sword back.
** Taken UpToEleven with Hardcore mode. Fall into lava? Had a super-fortress, farm, ''and'' several sets of diamond equipment? Yeah, you're going to have to re-make all of that from scratch if you want to continue ([[RageQuit and no one's blaming you if you don't]]).
* ContractualBossImmunity: The game has the Ender Dragon as the only boss mob in the game and it's immune to all negative potion effects. It can still be [[ScratchDamage damaged by snowballs and chicken eggs]] of all things.
* ConvectionSchmonvection:
** Not only can you cross lava pools with nothing more than a bridge you made of gravel or sand, you can scoop it up with a bucket and carry it around with you.
** You can stop the flow of lava with blocks of snow. It doesn't even melt!
** Wood and other flammable blocks do catch fire up to three blocks away from lava. Players and enemies are still unaffected unless they touch the lava, however.
* ConveyorBeltODoom: A natural variant can form when flowing water goes into a lava pool. It's an especially frustrating way to die since your dropped items get washed into the lava too.
** Player-built mob grinders usually have one to get the monsters to the killing mechanism.
* CoolButInefficient: Because of how open-world Minecraft is, players are free to build whatever they please however they please. However, some projects or items are inefficient given the amount of resources put into them or exist solely to look cool. For instance, it's possible to make a RubeGoldbergDevice out of redstone tinkering to do something like move items from one chest to an adjacent chest for the hell of it when a single Hopper would do the same job (or just manually moving them).
** Gold anything. As in real life, gold is treated as a soft malleable metal meaning that, at best, things made from gold were no better than the wood versions. Gold ''was'' really only useful for decoration and making watches, though presently they can mine through certain materials faster than even diamond... except they're just as fragile as they always were.
*** Golden booster tracks were introduced to defy this, but they didn't work until a glitch exploit that allowed for even faster boosting was removed. The removal of the bug, incidentally, was the ''other'' reason booster tracks were added.
** [[UselessUsefulSpell Throwable negative effect potions]]. Unless you're trying to cure a zombie villager (itself a difficult task which may fall under this trope), there's nothing they can do to monsters that [[BoringButPractical whacking them with a sword]] can't accomplish just as easily. Splash potions can, however, be more effective in multiplayer [=PvP=], though ineffective at sword-swinging range (unless you don't mind hitting yourself too) and can cause problems if your allies are in the splash radius too...
** [[AnvilOnHead Anvil traps]]. There are a lot of traps made possible by redstone circuitry, but anvils need to be dropped at least nine meters to be lethal, and they have to land directly on their target, making them inferior to lava traps, TNT traps, and long drop traps. Making it worse is that, to prevent a duplication bug, they can't be moved by pistons -- to drop them, you need to use a sticky piston to pull out the block underneath them. If you manage to pull it off anyway, though, it is just as hilarious as in the cartoons.
*** They are made a bit more practical with traps utilizing deep holes and dispensers, though.
** TNT Cannons. It's loads of fun to lob explode-y death at your enemies, from a few pieces of TNT to dozens of blocks of it (if particularly ambitious) but they require the target(s) to be standing right in the blast zone to be of use, since they're immobile, and people are going to avoid the blast zone and/or work to dismantle your cannons when they realize you have them. Even the basic ones take time to build, so building one in the open is vulnerable to outside interference as destroying even a single block can render it useless. Thus, it's not too feasible to build these out in the open as an anti-fortification weapon (if you're ''very'' unlucky a flaming arrow or Fire Charge thrown your way [[OhCrap could set the TNT off early]]). Pulling it off successfully ''can'' be DifficultButAwesome though.
** Beacon Pyramids. They look pretty darn cool (especially with the PillarOfLight) and provide some useful boosts, including movement speed, mining speed, and health regeneration. That said, these bonuses only apply within a somewhat small radius; getting the maximum 50 blocks of effect area requires a whopping 164 mineral blocks (''1476'' ingots and/or gems) plus a Beacon, requiring that you kill enough Wither Skeletons to get 3 skulls ''and'' defeat the Wither for its Nether Star ([[BraggingRightsReward so by making a pyramid you basically prove you didn't need one to begin with]]). You could have one as a power nexus at the center of your base, though having that much Iron/Gold/Emerald/Diamond in one place just screams "please steal me" to bandit players in multiplayer, making it a liability unless very well protected.
* CoolGate: With Obsidian, you can make yourself your very own PortalNetwork, assuming of course you don't mind literally walking through Hell every time you use it.
* CoolHorse: The 1.6 update (starting with snapshot 13w16a) added horses and donkeys to the game. First you have to tame them by riding them without a saddle (feeding them certain items will speed this up) until they stop tossing you off, after which they can be saddled. A saddled horse is about as fast as a saddled pig led by carrot, with the added bonus that you can armor the horse to give it extra protection. Horses can jump, too, and you can even use weapons while riding them. Donkeys are similar, but can be given a chest for mobile storage and the two types can be bred to make mules. Like sheep, they come in various colors and breeds.
* CosmeticAward: The Dragon Egg. You get it by killing the [[FinalBoss Enderdragon]] and it serves no purpose whatsoever, although WordOfGod has stated this might change...
* CouchGag: The splash text in the title screen is randomly selected from among 320. Every time you open Minecraft, a different phrase is across the title. Though between the first Beta release and Beta 1.2_01, all it said was "Finally Beta" as well as "Merry Xmas!" and "Happy New Year!" for those holidays. It also wishes Notch a happy birthday.
* {{Counterattack}}: The Thorns enchantment allows you to send some damage you take from mobs and other players back at them, but at the cost of your armor wearing down faster.
* CowboyBebopAtHisComputer:
** [[http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/10/01/s-inspired-minecraft-takes-online-gaming-world/ This Fox News article]] states that ''Infiniminer'' was made by Notch as a prototype to ''{{Minecraft}}''. While Notch was inspired by it, ''Infiniminer'' was actually made by Zachtronics Industries.
** A [[http://www.klkntv.com/story/23928921/8-year-old-faces-felony-charges story]] claims that an 8 year old is facing felony charges after charging $800 to his grandmother's credit card. Minecraft itself costs around $30, has no in-game store, and even if you are talking about the Xbox 360 version, has nowhere near $800 worth of skin packs to purchase. Guilty of this trope are: the grandmother, the boy's father, the police, and the (non-gaming/tech) news outlets who are repeating the story.
* CrapsaccharineWorld: The Overworld is a lovely place filled with friendly animals, beautiful natural wonders, and peaceful villages populated with simple agrarian people... who are forced to cower in terror in their homes every single night, desperately hoping that the endless hordes of undead horrors won't break down their doors and eat them and their families. If the village is extremely lucky, their resident Iron Golem may, [[PoliceAreUseless half the time]], check the zombie threat of a given night before half the population is wiped out. Their only hope of salvation, really, is the demigod-like Steve?, should he decide it's worth his trouble to fortify the village into a well-lit, walled, safe haven. Unfortunately, he is probably just as likely to steal everything in sight save the buildings themselves. [[note]]though if Steve? is in the early game, he may just decide to steal those, too.[[/note]]
* CrapsackWorld: Just about every humanoid thing is out to kill you along with every humanoid thing that isn't you that doesn't want to kill you. The only peaceful people live in constant fear of a zombie attack and the player themselves can never outright exterminate the plague of undead.
** This [[http://www.deviantart.com/art/Minecraft-262995153 picture]] particularly shows it.
* CrazyPrepared: Any player with a sufficiently comperehensive inventory is this. It helps that essential items have many uses each, though the exceptionally prepared will carry around the materials to build a small, secure base while exploring ''just in case''.
* CreatorCameo: Naming a mob either "Grumm" or "Dinnerbone" flips it upside-down. Naming a sheep jeb_ makes it rainbowy.
* CreepilyLongArms: Endermen were partly inspired by the Slenderman mythos, and thus also have very long arms.
* {{Creepypasta}}: ''Minecraft''[='s=] own [[http://creepypasta.wikia.com/wiki/Herobrine Herobrine]].
* CriticalEncumbranceFailure: Averted. You can't carry more items once your 36 inventory slots are full, but you'll never slow down or stop moving because of it.
* CriticalExistenceFailure: The game essentially plays this straight. Your character can fall many meters to the point where your legs would be shattered and you're fine, but a single punch and you die. The same goes for mobs, even the bosses. The Wither plays a variation of this; when it gets to half of its health, it's immune to ranged weaponry.
* CriticalHit: In a melee attack, your normal damage can be buffed by up to 50% if you attack them while you're falling.
* TheCrocIsTicking: All the monsters make their own distinct noises that warn you when they're near. Of all monster noises, though, the most dreaded is the Creeper's hiss. This is because Creepers don't hiss (or make ANY noise, for that matter) until they're right next to you, and they only hiss for a second and a half before they explode. [[note]]Not a snake's hiss, by the way. It's actually the sound of the Creeper's fuse burning.[[/note]] So when you hear a Creeper's hiss, you usually only have time to think "OhCrap" before the Creeper detonates and kills or severely injures you.
-->sssssssssssssSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS-*BOOM*
* CrouchAndProne: The game has a "sneak" function, which prevents the player from falling off the edges of blocks, stops you from sliding back down ladders and vines, and won't trample crops down (so you can get that damn pig off your lawn). In multiplayer it also prevents other players from seeing your name through walls. It used to make your character crouch slightly, but this was purely cosmetic as it has no effect on your hitbox or low-doorway clearance.
* CuteKitten: The game has kittens made of blocks and they are ''still'' adorable. They are also one of the game's only defenses against the kamikaze [[DemonicSpider creepers]] which won't go within 16 metres of one.
* CuttingTheKnot: Jungle temples have a three-switch puzzle that needs to be solved in order to open a secret room containing potential treasure... or the player can just knock a few cobblestone blocks off the wall, reach in, and grab the goods while ignoring the puzzle entirely.
** The game actually seems to encourage this; doing so rewards you with one of the rarest blocks in the game, which only spawns in jungle temples at a rate of 3 per temple.
* CycleOfHurting:
** Falling into the Void at the bottom of the map is a one-way trip to a place of the game where ''items and entities cannot logically exist'', and the player takes damage continuously.
** A glitch in the potion that allowed you to walk in lava made it so that you would still build up falling damage while swimming in it, meaning that a player that was in it for more than a couple seconds would either burn up once the potion's effect was gone, or die instantly as soon as he touched a flat surface.
** Being surrounded on all sides by Bedrock at least two blocks tall, with no blocks to use as steps, leaves no other choice but to spend all your energy until you starve to death.
** Being stuck on a tiny deserted island with no access to wood or food usually means either a quick death in ten minutes from the enemies that spawn during the night, a significantly slower death from starvation, or taking your chances by swimming across the open ocean where, if you don't find land that can actually support you, you run the risk of drowning or (again) starving.
** Expect this if you Aggro a Zombie Pigman, also recent updates now allow for Zombies to call for backup if they are injured.
** This is very likely to happen if you're being attacked by a Skeleton while in a large body of water without a ranged attack of any sort. Their arrows prevents you from approaching it since you can't swim the distance of their arrow's {{knockback}} between attacks.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:D-F]]
* DamnYouMuscleMemory:
** Do not try to play ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'' after playing the similar yet 2D ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}''. In ''Terraria'', you use the left mouse button to place items. In ''Minecraft'', this is used to attack things. You will also get into the habit of pressing Esc to open your inventory. A lot.
** Even worse; in ''Minecraft'', opening a chest and then shift-clicking an item or stack in your inventory will place that item/stack in the chest. The same action is used in ''Terraria'' to PERMANENTLY DELETE items.
** The default buttons for walking and 'toss whatever is in your hand' button are right next to each other. It is normally a simple inconvenience until you accidentally throw your diamond pick into lava. It also happens to be the same button that is commonly "Previously selected weapon" in a great deal of PC first-person shooters. Fortunately, you can change the Drop button to something harder to reach, but most people don't bother until after it's already caused a big enough problem.
** Just try going back and forth between Minecraft and any game that requires multiple presses of the attack button in order to perform multiple attacks. Neither will end well. At least, not if you want to actually collect wood.
** Going the other way, holding the shift key lets you sneak. This reduces your speed, makes enemies less likely to notice you, and most importantly, allows you to walk right up to the edge of a cliff without falling off. It's not uncommon for someone who plays a lot of Minecraft to eventually take this for granted and subsequently fall to their death in some other game where sneaking/crouching lacks that functionality.
*** Similarly, [[JumpPhysics crouch-jumping]] in Minecraft will only cause the player to fall miserably short of his target (often causing him to plummet to his demise) instead of allowing him to jump higher/farther.
** Sprinting movement in other FPS games is completely swapped in Minecraft. The shift key, usually used for sprinting, is used for sneaking around in Minecraft. Additionally, players usually would have to double tap the W key in order to make small adjustments with ordinary player movement... guess what double tapping forward does in Minecraft?
** Many multiplayer servers have commands you can use to teleport, which are often used to warp away from trouble. Have fun going back to an unmodded single player world and trying to type /home when you're being mobbed by [[ActionBomb Creepers]].
* DareToBeBadass: A strange example of this is [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2hRmhFUhlw Minecraft's ending]], in which the apparent creators of the ''Minecraft'' universe praise your accomplishments in the "dream" of the game, and command you to do it again, in the real world this time.
* DarkIsEvil: Enemies spawn in any dark areas (whereas non-enemy animals spawn on grass in the light).
* DarknessEqualsDeath:
** Enemy mobs spawn at night or in the dark.
** Tunneling through bedrock in creative mode and falling into the pitch black void results in relatively instant death.
* DarkWorld: More specifically the Nether.
* DaylightHorror: Most enemies spawn in darkness and burn in direct sunlight, with the exception of two mobs. The first is the giant spider, which becomes passive and stops attacking the player without provocation after the sun comes up. The second exception, [[DemonicSpider The Creeper]], is an ActionBomb which combines several annoying traits. Its body is mottled green, so it blends in rather well with trees. It's completely silent except for a hissing sound it makes right next to you moments before detonating. Its [[ArtificialBrilliance AI is advanced enough]] that it can ambush the player, hiding in alcoves or around corners waiting to catch you by surprise. And most importantly for this trope, sunlight neither harms nor pacifies creepers, so when you leave your shelter in the morning, they'll be waiting for you.
* DeadCharacterWalking: Mobs have a glitch where if you kill them, and exit quickly and on return they will be alive and moving around in whatever position in dying animation they were in when you exited.
* DeadlyDodging: The only way to get a record for the record player (other than being really lucky with [[RandomDrop dungeon chests]]) is to get a skeleton to kill a creeper with its arrow.
* DeathFromAbove:
** On Hard difficulty and now on Normal, mobs will take fall damage [[SuperPersistentPredator if it means reaching you]]. Creepers can also explode immediately upon falling next to you, a literal "dive bomb".
** Being on the wrong end of a cave-in, or accidentally flooding a corridor with water (or lava) can result in this for the unlucky player.
*** An update made lava in the nether flow a lot faster than it does in the overworld, which means if you got lava falling on your head, you have very little time to react, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZNUIBYwBBk&t=25m59s as this poor guy found out]].
** An update added anvils. Which can be dropped on enemies. Ouch.
** Some players make deathtraps for other players involving TNT. However, since lit TNT has a time delay and makes a distinctive hissing noise before exploding, certain trap designs drops the TNT from high above so that by the time the player becomes aware of the explosive it will already be too late to run.
* DeathMountain: Can [[{{Pun}} crop up]] anywhere, but especially common in Extreme Hills biomes. Usually several blocks tall, with sheer cliffs or precipitous overhangs. The EXTREME biome setting cranks the trope UpToEleven where the mountains go beyond the clouds and they even have snow past a certain height.
* DeathOfAThousandCuts: It's completely possible to take down the Ender Dragon (200 HP) with snowballs (1 damage each).
* DeathTrap: The game has tons of these, such as bomb-ridden rooms, arrow shooters, pitfalls, drowning traps, one-way doors...
* DeathWorld: Similarly, ''Minecraft'' can easily be regarded as a Death World. Sure it's pixelated and only domesticated farm animals seem to be the most of your troubles at first, but once the Sun sets or you start exploring you realize this seemingly serene world is trying to kill you in every way possible. The terrain is littered with random cliffs, deep drops and pits of lava one could easily kill themselves in and random forest fires happen a lot. At night armies of undead zombies and skeleton archers along with kamikaze creepers and gigantic spiders will track you like heat-seeking missiles if they see you while the almost 3 metre tall Endermen will wipe the floor with any unprepared player does as much as glance at them. Meanwhile booby trapped ruins experiment with different ways to creatively end you; from housing nests of huge poisonous spiders to being able to blow you and all the treasure to bits or having tripwires primed to shoot any trespassers. Even seemingly "safe" mobs like the wolf will descend upon you in packs if you hurt any even by accident. It even has the Nether; it's version of Hell, home to it's own collection of death-toting enemies from huge fire-shooting [[EldritchHorror Eldritch Horrors]] to 2.5 metre tall sword-welding skeletons that will cause you to literally wither away. At least with a Hell you'd think there would be a Heaven right? WRONG. It's just another Hell, where bottom void surrounds the one tiny island and Endermen are everywhere; if that's not enough there's also an almighty [[InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons dragon]] that kills anyone on the island.
** And if you are playing on a server, sometimes other players will be yet another thing you have to avoid if people are after you for your blood and gear.
* DefendCommand: Swords let you do this.
* DeletionAsPunishment: Be wary playing Hardcore Mode, as dying in this HarderThanHard mode results in your entire map getting deleted.
* DemBones: There are arrow-shooting skeletons among the many enemies.
* DesertedIsland: Popular start locations for {{Self Imposed Challenge}}s.
* DestroyableItems: If items come in contact with fire, cacti, lava, or an explosion, they are destroyed.
* DestructibleProjectiles:: The fireballs launched by ghasts can be [[TennisBoss reflected]] by hitting them.
* DevelopmentGag: One of the most iconic enemies, the Creeper, was originally meant to be a model for a pig. However, the model was botched but to date, it is kept in the game as aforementioned Creeper.
* DiagonalSpeedBoost: Minecarts travel diagonally over curved rails. If you place rails on two adjacent diagonals, you get a zig-zagged track, which you can travel over as if it were a straight diagonal. This results in a speed boost.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Any player that manages to fight and kill the [[FinalBoss Ender Dragon]] or [[EldritchAbomination The Wither]]. To a lesser extent, the first time a new player manages to slay an [[HumanoidAbomination Endermen]] without dying (especially if they were terrorized by them earlier in the game).
* DieChairDie: The game is a peculiar example of this. Apart from the usual mining and gathering chores that require "destroying" (i.e. hitting a block with your fist or tools until it breaks), every block or placeable item, except for Bedrock, which is indestructible, has to be destroyed and re-picked up as resource if you wish to carry it.
* DiegeticInterface: You have to craft your maps, and they only update if you're holding them.
* DifficultButAwesome: Redstone mechanisms. Building anything much more complicated than a light switch requires understanding of logic gates, BUD switches, monostable circuits, etc. All of this information can be looked up on wikis and YouTube, but applying that information to build and debug your own mechanisms can be extremely challenging. It's also incredibly rewarding when you show off your automated farm, smelter, mob trap, or [[StuffBlowingUp TNT cannon]].
* DigitalPiracyIsOkay: Notch has has said that he is with some people pirating MineCraft, also is a member of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirate_Party Pirate Party]]
** Though Mojang's stance on piracy has changed since the new launcher for the game now checks to see whether or not you are a legit user.
* DisadvantageousDisintegration: Traps that blow up, set fire to or bring cacti into uncomfortably close contact with enemies, while fun, will also generally destroy whatever items they drop. Weapons enchanted with Fire Aspect or Flame also run the risk of disintegrating whatever loot that the mob dropped (the exception being raw meat, which it just cooks).
* DisappearsIntoLight: The Enderdragon's death animation. It's repeatedly skewered by beams of light and eventually it completely dissolves into nothingness.
* DiscOneNuke:
** With the right strategy, it's possible to obtain a few diamonds within minutes of spawning. [[MemeticMutation That'ssss a nice diamond sword you got there...]]
** Finding a NPC village also counts, as you get a safe place, a source of food and a way to get rare items all in one.
* DisneyVillainDeath: It is quite possible to knock mobs, or other players, off cliffs to their deaths. It is also common to make traps to invoke this trope.
* DontGoIntoTheWoods: At least not for the first few nights. Wandering around an unlit forest at night can be one of the most dangerous things for a player starting out, given how many blind spots there are for monster ambushes. Even worse, a Creeper could be lurking behind every tree...
* DontLikeDontRead: Happens on the forums all the time. Generally, it follows a pretty recognizable pattern: First, someone will complain about a play style or technique they don't like and demand that Notch overhaul the game mechanics so that said play style no longer works[[note]]No RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement here; they almost always demand that Notch actually change things to their liking[[/note]]. Then, some people who either use that play style, or have realistic expectations about the amount of attention Notch is paying people who are complaining about how people arrange dirt, come along and invoke this trope, pointing out that in singleplayer games, it's not actually affecting other people, and in multiplayer servers, it's considered bad form to destroy other peoples' creations, so the best they can suggest is finding/creating a server where those playstyles are houseruled out. Sometimes it stops there, but if the original poster and their supporters are feeling ornery, ''they'll'' come back and invoke this trope right back, claiming that if you don't agree with the OP, you don't have any place contributing to the [[strike:circlejerk]] discussion.
* DontLookAtMe: Looking directly at one of the Endermen (as in, moving the reticule in the center of the screen over them) causes them to freeze and turn to face you. The moment you look away, they attack, moving very fast and teleporting if necessary to close the distance. They also make a creepy growl/scream sound.
* DontTouchItYouIdiot: In a somewhat inverted example (in that when you place a sign, people will generally do the opposite), in online servers, if you put up a sign on your house that says "Do not grief", chances are, you will be one of the first ones to be targeted for griefing. Of course, if you're [[TooDumbToLive dumb enough]] to believe that [[TemptingFate posting a sign would actually convince a griefer to not grief your house]], you probably somewhat deserve it.
** In a straight example, many death traps have a sign that says "Do not push this button" or "Do not try to steal from this treasure chest." Guess what people do?
* DoubleEntendre: Punch trees, [[MemeticMutation get wood]].
* DreamLand: [[spoiler:The entire game, according to the endgame text -- and it also states that ''the real world'' might be this, if it isn't meant metaphorically]].
* DualWorldGameplay:
** The game has the normal world and [[FireAndBrimstoneHell the Nether]], accessible through obsidian portals when lit on fire. (This is creates an inconvenience in SMP - survival mode multi-player - where having two maps hosted on the same server can be a major memory strain.) The Nether is smaller than the normal world, ten meters in the Nether is eighty meters outside. This makes it convenient for fast travel, [[EverythingTryingToKillYou assuming you can travel safely]].
** As of full release, Minecraft has a third world, called "The End". It's a floating landmass, full of Endermen and one of the game's bosses. To get there, you need to fix an enderportal, found in a Stronghold (found in the main world), with items obtained in the Nether.
* DugTooDeep:
** The bottom z level of every Classic mode map is nothing but lava. In the full game, every map has a rough layer of unbreakable bedrock (which can be revealed in Classic with water); if you somehow get past ''that'', you'll find an endless void that quickly kills you.
** In Alpha 1.2.0, the rules changed so the deeper you dug, the more light you needed to prevent enemies from spawning, until eventually they could spawn even in direct sunlight. However, Notch reverted it back to the old light rules in 1.2.1, saying it was too annoying and he'd have to come up with a better way to carry out this trope.
** There has been discussion about the addition of megabeasts, sea monsters, and prefix mobs which may make this trope a greater reality.
** It has always been possible, using external editing tools to remove the bedrock layer of the map and literally ''fall out of the bottom of the world'', but the Adventure Update made it both easier and significantly creepier. Easier in that Creative Mode allows you to destroy any block with a single hit, up to and including the otherwise-indestructible bedrock. Creepier in that [[EldritchLocation The Void]] is now a pitch-black... well... [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin void]], glittering with the same particle effects used for the Endermen. And it kills you. (For comparison, the pre-1.8 void still killed you, but it was at least the color of the sky.)
** As of Beta 1.8, the immediate area above bedrock level has a peculiar fog that precludes seeing much beyond twenty meters, so bedrock-level branchmines and caverns are rather difficult to navigate, with the reduced viewing radius, and the reduced viewing distance might hide hostile mobs... Placing more torches doesn't seem to help, either. The "fog" effect slowly fades the farther you get from the bedrock layer, and once you get above y-30, the effect goes away completely. The fog effect also does not apply when a player is standing in sunlight.
** The "don't dig straight down" applies doubly in the Nether, where the geography doesn't even try to make sense. It's possible to dig down in one spot and have a 10+ block buffer of Netherrack then have the next spot lead ''straight'' into the endless sea of lava below after mining just one block. Beware!
* DummiedOut:
** The game had several items that were present in the game during alpha and beta and it took years for most of the items to have any purpose. Over the course of development and the various betas, lots of items appeared in the game before they had a function, such as milk, eggs, fishing rods, slimeballs, bookshelves, and dragon eggs. More traditionally, sponge blocks and chain armor are in the game files but there was no way to acquire them in Survival mode until patch 1.3 introduced NPC vendors. The most well known dummied out item is the quiver, which probably would have allowed the player to hold more arrows than normal, but even to this day, the item is never used and still exists in the game's files.
** The Ender Dragon and the Wither were implemented into the game before they had any purpose. The Ender Dragon appeared in the 1.9 beta, but it could not be spawned at all unless you used a mod to do it for you. Likewise, the Wither was planned for version 1.4 and was going to be in one of the test versions for players to try out, but the developers had to dummy out the mob since spawning him would [[GameBreakingBug crash the game.]] The next test version of version 1.4 rectified it.
** The game also had several status effects implemented once potions were introduced, but many of them went unused and buried in the game's code. Apart from the status effects available through potions or golden apples, several status effects are present in the game's coding, but there's no actual way to use them other than through console commands or with modding. Effects include nausea (CameraScrew via wobbling/distortion), haste (break blocks faster), mining fatigue (break blocks slower), jump boost (higher jumps), health boost (increases maximum health), saturation (replenishes the hunger meter) and blindness (reduced visibility and prevents sprinting and critical hits). Haste and jump boost are actually possible to get with a beacon, eating a pufferfish gives you nausea (along with hunger and poison), and the nausea and blindness effects (to an extent) are implemented as well with the Nether Portal effect and fog effect, respectively. Several of the unused effects were eventually put back into place, but a few others still remain dummied out without mods.
* DungeonBypass: Since bedrock is the only thing in this game you can't mine, there's nothing stopping you from tunneling through the walls of basically any structure to get to where you want to go. Strongholds have Silverfish hidden in the walls which will punish you for trying this, but in all likelihood this is how you will ''find' said Stronghold in the first place, since the only reliable way to locate them is to search above ground then dig down.
** The reason that Adventure mode severely limits the blocks that adventurers can destroy, so people can build elaborate dungeons or labyrinths and not have to worry about people just tunneling under them.
* DynamicDifficulty: A feature introduced with 1.6 is escalating difficulty in a region the more time the player spends there. Spend enough time at your home base and start expecting Zombies and Skeletons to come better equipped, escalating to even Enchanted Gold gear!
* DynamicLoading: The game has Dynamic Loading ''and'' Dynamic Map Generation: Parts of the world literally don't exist until the player gets close enough. And only the chunks near the player are being simulated. This can cause Dynamic Loading Failures if the player uses means of travel faster than walking like teleporting or full-speed minecarts. The world itself usually loads up in time, but animals and enemies take some time to spawn.
* EarlyGameHell:
** Entire guides have been written on how to survive the first full day, and what you should set about doing immediately. For the uninitiated, this is because the game starts you with nothing. No weapons, no tools, no food, and no real idea or explanation of how to get them. Just you, dumped into a random landscape, with ten minutes before nightfall, when the monsters appear. In that time you need to prepare some form of defense, even if it's just a basic shelter. The game gets much easier once you have a shelter, some cobble weapons (at least), and have learnt a few ways to craft all the stuff you'll need to survive against the enemies.
** This has been mitigated somewhat. Somewhat. The game now has a loose tutorial in the form of achievements. Although they are more like waypoints. You can check achievements at any points and they will generally point you to the next level, such as, from the first real one that requires you to get wood, it will encourage you to make beginning tools, and then more complex branches of each, like killing a monster for the sword or upgrading the pickaxe for the mining. This does remove some confusion about it, on the other hand even if you know what you're doing you still might not be able to get materials needed for an easy first day.
** Where you start in a new world can also make or break players. Started out in a forest with cows and pigs nearby? You'll have an easy time gathering supplies. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jyy56AsVYNI Started out on a lone island in the middle of the ocean with no trees or animals]]? Good luck!
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Compare today's ''Minecraft'' with how it was in Indev, Alpha, and even early Beta. A lot has changed since then thanks to its frequent updates. Early ''Minecraft'' almost feels like a different game compared to current ''Minecraft''.
* EarnYourFun: Certain useful items are only available infrequently (if at all) in Peaceful Mode, whereas they become much more common as random drops from hostile mobs on higher difficulties. These include gunpowder (used to craft TNT, dropped by creepers) and string (used to craft bows, dropped by spiders), among others. The 1.6 update will scale the effectiveness of enchantments and items with difficultly level.
** More generally, it has been speculated (by [[ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] and others) that this is one of the reasons Minecraft is so mind-meldingly addicting compared to other sandbox construction games. In Survival mode, the player has to spend time collecting all the resources themselves in order to build anything, so there's a greater sense of investment in any given project. This attachment is why most players will risk death fighting off Creepers (and griefing players) to defend their creations rather than just scrap the project and start over.
* EasierThanEasy: Peaceful difficulty, which gets rid of hostile monsters and grants regenerating health. Falls and lava remain dangerous, though. Creative Mode removes your health bar altogether, making you otherwise invincible, but you can still die by falling into [[BottomlessPit The Void]].
* EasterEgg:
** If you look in the splashes.txt file, you'll see that the deja vu splash is listed twice.
** Renaming a mob to Dinnerbone or Grumm (Minecraft developers) with the Name Tag item will flip the renamed mob upside down.
*** Similarly, renaming a sheep Jeb_ (underscore required) will cause its wool to oscillate through the color spectrum. Shearing it will give you the true wool color.
** The tutorial world of the ''Xbox 360 Edition'' has [[spoiler:a hidden [[LetsPlay/AchievementHunterMinecraftSeries Tower of Pimps]][[note]]The Tower of Pimps is a stack of four blocks of gold on top of an Obsidian block. It is located in the top floor of a sandstone pyramid in the southwest sector of the map.[[/note]]]]!
* EasyExp: The game, since version 1.3, had bonus XP when you mined/smelted items depending on how they dropped. The higher the item value, the higher the XP they drop such as diamonds dropping more than coal. Iron and gold do not drop but they reward XP when their respective blocks are smelted. 1.4 introduces XP for farming and fishing as well.
* EdgeGravity: The game plays this interestingly, you have no edge gravity during normal movement, but if you crouch down it is impossible to fall, and you can even move a few inches beyond where you would normally fall from.
** What makes this weird is that if you release the crouch key while being a few inches beyond the block you're "''standing''" on, [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou you'll simply fall down, often to your death.]]
* EenieMeenieMinyMoai: Word of Notch says this is what the villagers are based on. There's also the Iron Golem, which appears to be a robotic villager.
* ElaborateUndergroundBase: You're only a few well wasted hours of digging away.
* EldritchAbomination: The Wither is a powerful, three-headed black skeleton... ''thing'' that floats around and shoots at you with skulls that inflict an effect like poison but deadlier. Each head fires its own projectiles, so the Wither can attack three opponents at once. Oh, yes, it also eats through walls to reach you (including obsidian), can see you when you're invisible, is immune to fire and lava, has more hit points than the Ender Dragon, and becomes immune to arrows when its health falls to the halfway point. [[http://media-mcw.cursecdn.com/a/aa/Wither.png Here's a picture.]]
* EldritchLocation:
** The [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Far_Lands Far Lands]] used to be an example of this. At very great distances from the origin point the game glitched out, distorting structures, preventing blocks from being placed or even staying put, generating immense lag, and all in all making the game unplayable. The game's creator said that he hadn't intended for this to happen, but left it in because he liked the idea of physics breaking down at the "edge" of an infinite map that was virtually impossible to reach without cheating. However, the terrain generator overhaul in Beta 1.8 accidentally [[DummiedOut Dummied Them Out]].
** The Nether. Compasses, maps, and clocks don't work properly there, and beds [[MadeOfExplodium explode]] if used there. The 1.5. update made lava flow at twice the speed and hid pockets of lava in the walls.
** And now thanks to a glitch in the Adventure update pre-release, we have abandoned mine systems. They are generated procedurally underground in small chunks, but because of a bug in their code, any new chunk created while leaving a mine shaft will be another mine shaft. This leads to endless, labyrinthine catacombs that [[AlienGeometries may not have existed at all if you had tried to tunnel into them from above first]].
** The realm known as "The End." The sky is grey TV-static style, it has a dull green ambiance to it, the world is nothing but floating islands in a black void, and giant obsidian pillars dot the otherwise featureless landscape, with a black dragon called the Ender Dragon flying above. It's also [[CaptainObvious home to Endermen]]. And once you enter The End, the only way out is killing [[FinalBoss the Ender Dragon]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPe8nb3EV4M Here's a video of this place.]]
* ElementalCrafting: Played straight, except see the entry below for RealityEnsues.
* EliteZombie: The game has standard shambling zombies, who are the game's weakest enemies. Later updates added three elite variations, all of which have a rare chance of randomly spawning. The first is the soldier zombie, which is a zombie that spawns with armor and a sword, increasing its health and attack damage. The second is the baby zombie, which is very similar to the standard zombie, except it is much smaller and faster, making it more of a pain. The third type is the spawner zombies, which only exists on [[NintendoHard Hard or Hardcore mode]]; it looks and acts just like a standard zombie, but it will [[MookMaker randomly spawn two or three or more zombies]] when near death.
* EmeraldPower: [[DemonicSpiders The exploding Creepers]] are green.
* EmergencyWeapon: Axes, picks, and [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Weapon#Dealing_damage (most)]] shovels deal more damage to mobs than bare hands. That said, they were not intended as weapons, and will break twice as fast as swords.
* EmpathicEnvironment: When you summon [[BonusBoss a]] [[EldritchAbomination Wither]], the sky darkens and turns to a [[RedSkyTakeWarning redder shade]].
* EmptyRoomPsych: The game has caves that branch out into several paths which, most of the time, can lead deeper underground where diamonds and redstone ores can be found, lead to the surface, or even lead to underground structures like dungeons and mine shafts. However, since it's [[RandomlyGeneratedLevels procedurally generated]], some of the cave branches simply lead to a dead end with nothing in them other than the usual stone and dirt. Caves may also have an unnaturally large and circular-like room; supposedly this is where the cave generation starts behind the scenes, but it's certainly no use to ''you'', unless, of course, you decide to make it the centerpiece for your new ElaborateUndergroundBase.
* TheEnd: The End is a realm populated by Endermen and the Enderdragon. After defeating the Enderdragon you have officially "completed" the game, though you are still free to continue playing. Guess what the achievement for beating the game is called?
* EndlessGame: Before Minecraft 1.0 came out, there was no ending to the game.
* EnemyMine:
** The player and Zombie Pigmen when confronting Ghasts.
** Any mob hit by a skeleton's arrow will stop attacking you to deal with its aggressor unless you hit it again to focus it back towards you (and once that mob hits the skeleton, the skeleton will ignore you to attack them!)
* EquipmentBasedProgression: Your character's baseline health and physical abilities never change. You can gain levels of experience, but you spend them to enchant, merge, or repair equipment. Your strength, health and ability to interact with or shape your environment entirely depends on the type and quality of the items you own or use.
* EssenceDrop: Enemies drop flashing green-and-yellow experience orbs upon death. These orbs also appear when you breed animals and collect ores (either mining or smelting, depending on the type).
* EternalEquinox: Day lasts ten minutes, night lasts seven minutes, and they're separated by an intermediate period 90 seconds long. Though the moon has different phases, the moon always rises as the sun sets and vice versa, behavior typically associated with a full moon.
* EverythingBreaks: All tools have durability which eventually wears out, and even using an anvil to extend their life requires more and more experience with each repair (which itself will break given enough uses). All blocks except a scant few necessary for game mechanics can be mined. Command Blocks are also unbreakable due to them needing to be around so that they can affect the map properly when needed.
* EverythingFades:
** Blocks and items mysteriously disappear when dropped and left on the ground for a few minutes. Averted if the player moves far enough until the area the items are in vanishes, to which they can stay in the game indefinitely until that area is loaded again.
** Mobs (including players) leave no corpse, merely falling over and vanishing in a puff of smoke.
** Waterfalls and running water from a spring vanish the minute you plug up the water source or scoop it up in a bucket.
* EverythingsBetterWithCows
* EverythingsCuterWithKittens: The jungle biome contains ocelots. Ocelots can be domesticated into cats. Cats can be bred to make kittens, which are the first kind of baby animal whose head doesn't look disproportionately large. When they were initially added, they did nothing useful. It was just for the adorable. But it gets better: as of 1.2.1 [[spoiler:they are the only thing creepers fear]].
* EverythingsDeaderWithZombies:
** One of the earliest added, and least dangerous hostile mobs in the game; although as per usual with this trope, they can be a bit of a problem in groups. If they attack a village, they can turn villagers into more of them, though it is possible to cure infected villagers without killing them.
** Zombie Pigmen are even worse. They show up in groups, most often in the Nether, and attacking one will bring the entire group down on your head. And they are much tougher, faster and stronger than regular zombies.
* EverythingIsMessierWithPigs
* EverythingsSquishierWithCephalopods: Squids! They respawn far more frequently than other passive mobs (due to not being breedable) and drop ink sacs usable in dyeing.
* EverythingTryingToKillYou: The Nether. Difficult to explore terrain, frequent sudden drops, and ''lots'' of lava everywhere. The mobs are a step up from the Overworld too, with Ghasts fire-bombing you frequently from the get-go and Zombie Pigmen who'll ZergRush you when provoked and hit you for ''more'' than half your health in Hard Mode (assuming no armor). There's Blazes and Wither Skeletons too, though at least you (usually) have to enter a Nether Fortress to run into them. Even trying to sleep in a bed will blow it up and possibly take you out if you're close!
* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: You Mine stuff and you Craft stuff. That's essentially the entire game, right there.
* ExperienceMeter: The game has a EXP meter below the [[LifeMeter Health Bar]]. Rather than making you stronger, experience levels are used to enchant tools and armor.
* ExperiencePoints: The game has [[ExperienceMeter experience orbs]] that you get from [[RPGsEqualCombat killing monsters]]. Unlike other games that use EXP, the only use for EXP in this game is [[SpellBlade enchanting weapons]] and tools. These enchantments range from [[CriticalHit higher critical hit rates]], extra damage to the undead and [[FlamingSword adding fire damage]]. Some [[GameMod mods]] add more uses for EXP, as well.
* {{Expy}}: ([[SlenderManMythos SL]])Enderman.
** Certain other-dimension mobs can be seen as this for Overworld mobs. Skeletons have Wither Skeletons in the Nether, Slimes have Magma Cubes, Zombies (and pigs) have Zombie Pigmen, and Silverfish will have Endermites as the occasional product of End teleportation (Enderman teleports or through Ender Pearls)

* EyesAlwaysShut: Ghasts open their eyes for one reason - to make your life as miserable as humanly freaking possible.
* FallingDamage: Falls deal 1 point of damage for block (meter) fallen after the third, so a 23-block fall will kill you. However, landing in [[SoftWater water]], vines or spiderweb cancels the damage, and Feather Falling-enchanted boots will reduce it.
* FantasticMeasurementSystem: Many tech mods make up their own units of measurement for energy.
** [=IndustrialCraft's=] electricity is measured in [=EUs=].
** Buildcraft's energy is measured in [=MJs=] which, in this particular case, stand for Minecraft Joules.
** VideoGame/{{Thaumcraft}}'s magical energy is measured in Vis points. Or Aura and Flux points, as of Thaumcraft 3.
** Equivalent Exchange measured items' worth in EMC points.
** All these mods tend to measure time in "ticks", with rates of production or consumption being defined in tooltips as "# per tick". A tick is one pass through the master loop of the game engine that updates everything, the ticking clock of the simulated world itself, and the shortest unit of time that makes any sense.
* FantasticReligiousWeirdness: [[http://www.minecraftforum.net/topic/141365-rules-of-islam-and-other-religions-in-minecraft/ This fascinating thread]] about following the rules of Islam while playing ''Minecraft''.
* FantasyAxisOfEvil: There are:
** Savage: Creepers, the now-deleted giants
** Eldritch: Endermen, Ghasts
** Humanoid: Zombies
** Fallen: Skeletons
** Crafty: Slimes, Spiders
* FantasyGunControl: A major debate in the fan base hinges on this trope. Half of them want guns to be added and half of them think that guns will contrast with the setting, falling into this trope.
* FarSideIsland: Not unusual in ocean biomes.
* FastForwardMechanic: The bed feature which can skip the night-time portion of a day cycle. Nothing that depends on the passage of time will benefit from the skipped hours, but since DarknessEqualsDeath...
* FastTunnelling: It helps that a player has a large amount of space in pockets to store all the blocks gathered by mining.
** The Haste effect speeds up how fast you can mine blocks and putting the effect to high levels can make mining ridiculously easy. Having the Efficiency enchantment on your pickaxe will achieve a similar effect.
* FilkSong: Most of them are usually accompanied by music videos.
** One of the most notable being [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIhs8_m5qPc "In Search of Diamonds"]]
** [[Machinima/YogscastMinecraftSeries I AM A DWARF AND I'M DIGGING A HOLE! DIGGY DIGGY HOLE! DIGGING A HOLE!]]
*** Also, "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqELqRCnW6g Screw the Nether]]".
** Also, "Safety Torch" and "I Can Swing My Sword" by {{Creator/Tobuscus}}.
** It had to happen sooner or later... [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhKrSt9ybfM&feature=share&list=UUoN7uFCtrST7mll9ig8p-_A Minecraft Style!]]
*** Sadly, it got ScrewedByTheLawyers.
** Filk songs are actually rather common in the Minecraft fandom. Just google "minecraft song" and you'll get a lot of them.
* FinalDeath: The game has Hardcore mode, where you are stuck on Hard difficulty and dying means your save for that world ''gets erased from your computer!''. Not recommended for players who want to build and/or explore.
** Hardcore mode extends to multiplayer as well should the server admin allow it on. Anyone that dies on the server automatically gets kicked out and banned.
* FinalDeathMode: Hardcore mode. It's locked on the hardest difficulty, and [[FinalDeath death is permanent]] -- in single player your world is deleted, and in multiplayer you're automatically banned from the server.
* FinalBossNewDimension: The Ender Dragon makes its home in the End, a separate third dimension.
* FireAndBrimstoneHell: The Nether has a strong ressemblance to this, being filled with lava, fire, netherrack (the game's equivalent of brimstone), sand made out of souls (with faces on it), and monsters such as the Ghast and Zombie Pigman.
* {{Fireballs}}: Ghasts shoot devastating fireballs that can destroy most blocks. Blazes shoot fireballs that will set you on fire. You can make a harmless version by throwing snowballs through a lavafall. You can make a considerably more powerful version by combining blaze powder, gunpowder, and coal, and loading the result into a dispenser.
* FirewoodResources: The game may not be a RTS but it does avoid this trope. Breaking a tree gives you "log blocks" which have no other real purpose than to be crafted into four "plank blocks".
** Later on, the ability to smelt wood into charcoal was added.
* FirstPersonGhost: The game lets you see only your arm and if you are holding an item, you only see the item itself while your arm is nowhere to be seen (unless you are holding a map, which both of your arms are shown then).
* FishEyes: All passive (harmless) mobs. Since eyes are only two pixels wide by one pixel tall, it was either that or crossed eyes, which ''are'' used for the default player character skin and for wolves and ocelots, to make them look more intelligent.
* FishingForMooks: Literally done. You can use a fishing rod to pick up enemies and have them suffer fall damage.
* FishingForSole: As of the most recent updates, catching worn leather boots is possible. So is catching raw leather, bones, poisonous pufferfish, and enchanted artifacts, as well as actual edible fish.
* FishingMinigame: Fishing rods are used for two purposes. One is to pull mobs; the other is to fish. All bodies of water, even ones you make yourself, contain fish; you fish by throwing out your line and waiting for the bobber to go down. Once you have fishing rods, water, and a suitable supply of sticks and string to replace your rods, your food problems are solved. Version 1.7.2 ("The Update that Changed the World", released October 25, 2013) greatly expanded fishing by adding in multiple types of fish as well as making it so that the player can fish up treasures (such as enchanted items) or junk (like a pair of leather boots).
* FlashOfPain: Along with a brief MercyInvincibility, on both the player and mobs.
* FlatWorld: The entire Overworld.
** In a more literal sense, the super flat option when creating a new world. You won't find any hills, caves, dungeons, or anything else. You get nothing but grass, two layers of dirt underneath it, and the bedrock layer after that. This feature was added in version 1.1 to help players that want to build something without having to clear away the landscape first. It also gives them about twice as much vertical space to build in, since the surface of the ground is so much closer to the bedrock. Note that this only applies to the Overworld; the Nether and the End generate independently of whatever settings are used to generate the Overworld. Version 1.4 added additional types of Flat Worlds. If you know how to create a preset code (a line of text that determines what layers will be), you can even make your own.
* FloatingContinent:
** The End consists of this, floating in a black void.
** Depending on the generation of the terrain, you may sometimes get small islands floating in the air. You can also create your own floating landmass, but it will take a ''lot'' of building and terraforming.
** In the old Indev version, there was an option to create the world as a "floating" type, resulting in a floating island.
* FloatingPlatforms: You can make some, too.
* FloatingWater: In past versions, water not only floated, but duplicated itself infinitely to occupy all space below the highest point of water. Nowadays, water still has very strange physical properties. You can use a bucket to pick up a water source block and place it somewhere else, where it will create an endless flow of water that travels a limited distance horizontally.
* FollowTheLeader: The lack of a console version of the game at first led to clones coming out of the woodwork. See TheMockbuster below.
** ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'' is usually described as "[[RecycledINSPACE 2D]] ''Minecraft''", but its gameplay is largely different -- more like a platformer/RPG set in a Minecraft-ish environment.
** Then there's ''VideoGame/DontStarve'', an isomorphic game based around surviving in a randomly-generated, flat environment. More generally, [[Creator/TheCynicalBrit TotalBiscuit]] has noted that survival as a game mechanic seems to be getting more popular, even in big-budget retail games like ''VideoGame/FarCry3'' and ''VideoGame/TombRaider2013''.
** ''Minecraft'' itself was a successful result of ''Infiniminer'' clone wave.
* ForebodingArchitecture: Th game has this for its dungeons. Do you see a wall of cobblestone or moss cobblestone within a cave? That's a dungeon with a spawner ready to spit out monsters when you approach it.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: One of the random paintings you get from placing a painting depicts three dark gray skulls on a T-formation of Soul Sand. Replicating this pattern nets you a front seat ticket to the summoning of [[BonusBoss The Wither.]]
** The 2013 April Fools 2.0 had several incomplete features in it which where later added into 1.6. These include:
*** Blocks of coal.
*** Chickens would spawn back-up when hit. Zombies now have that feature.
*** Tinted glass and stained clay.
*** Horses were added as a new mob, hinted at by the re-textured pigs and cows.
* ForScience: Redstone dust + various mods = [[Film/BackToTheFuture "Great Scott!"]]
* TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou: Ghasts shoot fireballs at your character... if you're in first-person mode. In third person, it becomes clear that they're targeting ''the camera''. This was actually a bug, it's been patched out.
* FromClonesToGenre: This is happening to ''Minecraft''. While the concept of building blocks in a video game was not new by any stretch of the imagine (in fact, ''Minecraft'' was largely inspired by ''{{VideoGame/Infiniminer}}''), ''Minecraft'' put it together in such a unique package that it was bound to attract imitators, such as ''{{FortressCraft}}'', to games clearly inspired by it, such as ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}''. However such a plethora of games with similar concepts but large twists are coming out now (''{{VideoGame/Ace Of Spades}}'', ''{{VideoGame/GunCraft}}'', ''{{VideoGame/Mythruna}}'', etc), that it is far too many to count, and many of them are standing up on their own merits.
** Even ''VideoGame/DontStarve'' arguably counts as one; it's all the survival and crafting aspects of Minecraft with the world-made-of-building-blocks part taken out.
* FungusHumongous: As of Beta 1.8, these can be found occasionally growing in the wild, as well as grown by the player via sprinkling bonemeal on a normal mushroom. [[YetAnotherStupidDeath Just don't stand *on* the mushroom as you grow it or you might suffocate yourself]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:G-I]]
* GagNose: The NPC Villagers are known for their Squidward-like hanging noses, enough so that many players simply refer to them as "Squidwards" and even Notch, the creator of the game, acknowledges that they look like "cavemen Squidwards".
* GainaxEnding: [[spoiler: After beating the Ender Dragon, you get an 8 minute long scroll of confusing text. It seems to be a pair of sentient cosmic forces discussing '''you''', the player at the keyboard. The conversation implies, among other things, that {{Minecraft}} was AllJustADream, life itself is a much longer dream, all the monsters you've been fighting are fragments of the darkness in your heart, and humanity is the universe's attempt at understanding itself. This is probably a ShoutOut to the [[{{Creepypasta}} Herobrine Mythos]] [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/User:Kizzycocoa/Herobrine]], a persistent UrbanLegendOfZelda about a stealthy, undocumented {{NPC}} changing the environment (similar to the later-introduced Enderman mob), and one of whose propagators also posted a hidden message very similar to the ending scroll in content.]]
* GameBreakingBug: Even though the game has ([[PerpetualBeta officially]]) gone gold, Mojang still outsources the majority of update beta testing to the playerbase, just because there's so damn many of them. Nearly every release contains ''something'' that just doesn't work, though it's generally fixed very quickly.
* GameMod: ''Minecraft'' has a large and enthusiastic modding community for everything from texture changes to full-blown gameplay overhauls. Go [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Mods here]] for a comprehensive list.
* GameplayAutomation: The game doesn't have any built-in automation, but it's easy for the player to build their own automatic or one-button devices to collect certain resources, up to and including "mob grinders" that spawn monsters, kill them and collect the loot all by themselves.
** Automation is a frequent feature of many mods; Buildcraft, for example, provides machines to mine resources and pipes to transport those resources to your storage.
* GangUpOnTheHuman:
** Mobs will not attack other mobs unless they hit each other, which can only happen when a ranged mob tries to hit the player. Even when this does happen, the mobs will wait until there are no players nearby before attacking each other.
** On multiplayer servers, mobs still prioritize players over other mobs, but once they begin following a player they will not switch targets as long as that player is within range. This can lead to large groups of mobs following one player and completely ignoring others.
* {{Gaslighting}}: Endermen move blocks around at night.
* GemstoneAssault: Diamond swords are top-tier weapons. Other diamond tools (axes, picks, etc.) can also be used as weapons, with varying degrees of effectiveness.
* GenreBusting: It's like Legos, but with 3D 8-bit first-person graphics, ambient classical music, and vaguely survival-horror elements.
* GenrePopularizer: Is very much like ''{{Doom}}'' in that while it was not the first sandbox cube building game, it was the first to make it big and inspire numerous clones and 'clones'.
* GentleGiant: The Iron Golems. They are neutral by nature and will go apeshit if anyone attacks them or a villager, but can be occasionally seen giving villager children a red rose.
* GeoEffects: The game has various weather effects and day cycles. When it rains, the sky grows dark enough for some monsters to spawn in the middle of a field and the rain also extinguishes wild fires. Thunderstorms do the same thing, but make the sky darker and the lightning bolts can strike mobs for damage (including you), set flammable blocks on fire, change pigs into zombie pigmen, or make a creeper super charged for more explosive damage to everything. When it is daylight outside, monsters can't spawn and zombies and skeletons catch on fire from the sunlight. When night falls, all the baddies come out to play, making exploration in the fields more dangerous.
** Similar to ''FinalFantasyTactics'', the landscape can be a hindrance or an advantage to the player. With enough height, you can strike mobs below you while they cannot reach you. If there's a huge drop off nearby, you can attack a mob and push them off a cliff for major damage or outright kill them.
** Endermen simply hate the water. If they are outside when it is raining, they will teleport all over the place trying to seek shelter. Rainstorms are good if you want the Endermen to stay away.
* GetBackHereBoss: The Enderdragon flies away from you as soon as you LOOK at it. Good luck trying to shoot it with arrows...
* GhibliHills: The vast majority of the Overworld is absolutely pristine wilderness (at least until you start developing on it), and the player is encouraged to explore it as much as possible. The terrain generation algorithm can often produce some quite picturesque scenes.
* GiantMook: [[ShapedLikeItself Giants]] are zombies that happen to be 12 blocks tall, have 50 hearts of health, and can one-shot unarmored players on ''Easy'' difficulty [[note]]13 hearts of damage to be exact. On hard it's a staggering 37.5 hearts, enough to one-shot someone in full Iron Armor[[/note]]. Thankfully they were removed from most modes, but remain in the game's code (they can be spawned with the /summon command) so it's possible that they could be re-implemented.
* GiantSpider:
** One of the mobs. It's about half as tall as you, but they're the fastest mobs in the game, can often be found in groups, and are able to climb walls.
** Cave spiders are less than half the size of the other spiders, but at twenty inches tall, they're still giant by real-life standards. Smaller is not necessarily better though, since their hitboxes are smaller (and they poison you on hit, so missing is painful).
** [[https://twitter.com/#!/jeb_/status/168020164120543232 Jeb_]] posted a [[http://i.imgur.com/2qQon.png screenshot]] suggesting we may end up with bigger spiders, too.
* GiveAManAFish: Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll stand at the top of a cliff, whisk pigs off the ground, and snipe them out of the air.
** On the subject of how incredibly addictive ''{{Minecraft}}'' can be:
-->''"I have heard [Gabriel] suggest that the game is crack, but it's more like all of the ingredients and equipment that you need to make crack, which I'd say is worse."''
--->-- '''Tycho''', ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'', [[http://www.penny-arcade.com/2010/9/17/ describing this game]]
* GlobalCurrency: Emeralds are accepted at all Villages, which is odd considering how Emeralds ''can'' be mined in Extreme Hills biomes, but Villages spawn in several other biomes, so where did they get them in such large quantities? In multiplayer, servers rarely bother to designate an official trading currency (unless it's a roleplaying server) due to inflation and the fact that players will just trade goods for goods anyway.
* GlowingEyesOfDoom: Spiders have glowing eyes in the dark, as do Endermen.
* GodMode: The creative mode is sometimes referred to as "God Mode". You can fly and have access to the complete inventory including things you can't get in survival, like eggs that spawn mobs. In addition, the only way you can die is by falling into the void and even then, you can survive if you enable flying quickly enough.
* GoldMakesEverythingShiny: Subverted: Sure, you can make a sword out of that gold you just mined. It'll be roughly as effective as one made of ''wood'' and break about as quickly. On the other hand, using [[BoringButPractical iron]]...
** Of course, a gold pickaxe can [[FastTunnelling bore through stone at an incredible rate]], but only stone. And it still breaks easily.
** Gold armor looks pretty and shiny, but the protection they give is not much better than leather armor and it breaks just as fast. However, gold armor is still better than having no armor at all.
*** Gold armor and gold swords have their weaknesses compensated by having a much higher chance of getting strong enhancements compared to other tools made out of other materials, making gold based items a GlassCannon.
** Three words: gold-plated food. Golden Apples are [[TooAwesomeToUse one of the most coveted items in the game]], being used to make horses breed, cure zombie villagers, or give the player not only several drumsticks' worth of hunger satisfaction, but also regeneration for a short time. A twice-plated ("enchanted") Golden Apple also grants fire resistance, damage resistance, and a limited feather-fall effect. Golden Carrots are also used to breed horses, or give the player regeneration, and are used in potions of night vision. Glistering Melons are pretty much only used in potion-brewing, and aren't edible.
* {{Golem}}: The game has iron golems and snow golems that the player can build. A snow golem looks like a snowman with a jack-o-lantern for a head, and it distracts enemies by throwing snowballs at them. Iron golems can be found in large NPC villages, where they defend villagers from zombies at night.
* GoodBadTranslation: You have the option of translating the text into almost any language. The languages are named only in that language (Spanish is Espanol, etc.) and only in that language's alphabet. The languages are listed in alphabetical order of said names. This is where the problem comes in. The Hebrew word for Hebrew transliterates as "Ivrit." However, Hebrew is listed under "H" in the list, and it instead says "Anglit," which, besides not starting with "H," is the Hebrew word for [[EpicFail Eng]][[HilarityEnsues lish]].
* TheGoodKing: Flashbacks in the ''Minecraft''-inspired music video [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-sH53vXP2A The Fallen Kingdom]] establish that the protagonist was TheGoodKing. He would have died fighting to protect his kingdom, but fate left him alive.
* GrandfatherClause: When it was announced that version 1.8 would drastically overhaul the villager trading system, it was also mentioned that any pre-existing villagers with more than one trading offer unlocked would retain all of their offers.
* GrapplingHookPistol: The fishing pole isn't meant for this purpose, but it has the ability to stick to mobs and when you yank the reel back, the mob is dragged to you, making it extremely handy to drag flying mobs like Ghasts and Blazes to you so you can whack them with your sword, or hook the line to a mob across a cliff and yank the line to make them fall in the abyss or even a lava pit.
* GRatedSex: Breeding in Minecraft differs a lot from breeding in real life.
* GraveRobbing:
** The game lets you rob treasure from pyramids in the desert. Pyramids spawn in sand biomes; they have treasure inside them. Each pyramid can contain things like gold, iron, diamonds, bones, and rotten flesh, but they're also guarded by TNT traps that trigger if you step on the pressure plate. Doing so will destroy all the treasure and kill you.
** Ditto jungle temples, taking a page from ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk''. Jungle temples have arrow traps that are triggered the moment you walk through the linked tripwires or destroying the wire itself. The only safe way to disarm the trap is to use shears to cut the wire. Luckily, you can just stand on one side of the hall to avoid the arrows and just loot the dispensers of their arrows. Jungle temples also have chests that contain similar treasure from the pyramids.
* [[GravityIsAHarshMistress Gravitational Cognizance]]: Sand and gravel sometimes forget to have fallen down in freshly-generated terrain. Until you disturb the underside. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4PPtwN-y-A Purty!]] [[AwkwardZombie Also shown]] [[http://www.awkwardzombie.com/index.php?page=0&comic=032711 here.]]
* GravityBarrier: Subverted: sheer face cliffs exist that are impossible to traverse...that is, until you mine some steps in them, or use a water bucket to make an impromptu elevator out of a waterfall.
* TheGreatestStoryNeverTold: Single Player is essentially this, until a new update anyway, when there are actually mobs that recognize your deeds.
* GreenHillZone: The default map theme.
* GreenRocks: Redstone, a red dust that's commonly found deep underground. It can be used to make a compass, as well as a clock. Mix some into a potion and it lasts longer. Not to mention the fact that it can be used to make a wide variety of logic gates and digital circuits.
* GreenThumb: Step 1, get a skeleton bone. Step 2, create bone meal. Step 3, watch as bone meal turns a 2x2 square of jungle tree saplings into a thirty-block high tree instantly.
* GridInventory: Actually an important part of gameplay, since the Crafting system uses a 2x2 grid (self) or 3x3 grid (Crafting Table).
* {{Griefer}}:
** Game focused on creation plus [[{{GIFT}} multiplayer]] equals obvious. Some servers will allow it, maintaining that it is up to the player to protect their own creations. Those that don't nearly always ban the placement of TNT or magma and the usage of flint and steel, for their heavily destructive power.
** Creepers themselves are an in-universe griefer. Their only purpose in life is to kill you or at least destroy the structures you put a lot of effort into building.
* GuideDangIt: ''Minecraft'' in general. The game deliberately contains no instructions. You aren't told how to make tools or other crafted items, nor are you told using a bed changes your spawn point after you die. Without an external guide, you are left to stumble around, randomly trying combinations of things in the hope that some of them produce a useful item. Fortunately, the Minecraft wiki covers everything you could think of and then some. The mobile and console versions dispense with the crafting grid and simply show you everything you can make, the Xbox 360 version eases this slightly by show you what items are needed to craft other items and what their functions are; they still don't tell you what you are supposed to do, though. Some mods add in-game recipe books and similar guides.
* {{Hammerspace}}: The items in your inventory, and where items placed in an Ender Chest go.
** The grid inventory allows the player to carry (and swim with!) up to 2304 cubic meters of stone, or 44'470 metric tons of gold, which equals 1.7 times the weight of the ''Titanic''.
** Even more if you consider the fact that chests can store just as much as the inventory. You can tear down a mountain and carry half of it with you, then stash the other half in a chest that takes up less than a cubic meter of space.
** Taken UpToEleven with the Ender Chest. Ender Chests even work across dimensions, making it possible to transport items from one realm to another and destroying the chests won't destroy the items! Any item that is placed in one of these chests can appear in another Ender Chest no matter how far away the chests are or they're in completely different dimensions! On top of this, even if every Ender Chest placed in the world is destroyed, the items will still be in the hammerspace of the chest once you make a new Ender Chest. And if you carry an Ender Chest in your inventory...
* HarderThanHard: Hardcore mode, which is the same as Hard mode, but when you die, your world is permanently deleted.
* HardModePerks: Harder difficulties increase the frequency of monster spawns. This also means increased frequency of RandomDrops, allowing you to gather materials such as gunpowder from Creepers, bonemeal from Skeletons and Ender Pearls from Endermen faster than otherwise.
* HaveAGayOldTime: Inverted. On the console versions, the text entered onto signs is run through a profanity filter and if anything is detected, the whole sign is censored. For some strange reason the words "hoe", "shaft", and "monster", while having dirty modern connotations, will still censor out the message even though these are common innocuous things in the game.
* HaveANiceDeath: Dying on a multiplayer server produces a humorous announcement on how you died, such as "[player] blew up" and "[player] fell out of the world".
* HeadPet: The mod Mo' Creatures includes bunnies that will hop onto the player character's head if the player character approaches them.
* HealingPotion: These can be made with some water, netherwart, gold, and watermelon. Another variety made with ghast tears will steadily regenerate your health.
* HeartContainer: The Health Boost effect, which increases your maximum health by 2 hearts per tier level. The effect is only temporary; once the effect wears off, all the extra hearts vanish.
* HeartsAreHealth: Very Zelda-esque. This (in combination with HyperactiveMetabolism) is made fun of with logos like "I [porkchop] Minecraft."
* HeartSymbol: These can be seen after taming a wolf, or when farm animals breed.
* HeavilyArmoredMook: Sometimes hostile mobs spawn in partial or full sets of armor that can vary in material[[note]]from most to least likely: gold, leather, chain, iron and diamond, the latter having a ridiculously small probability of happening (but still possible)[[/note]], and [[BanditMook they can sometimes pick up and wear ''your'' armor if you drop it for whatever reason]]. If they already had armor, chances are good that it'll be enchanted with a spell or two. Getting it from them is quite a RareDrop without a Looting weapon.
* {{Hell}}: The Nether. In fact, the Nether was originally called Hell.
** If you press F3 in the Nether, the biome is listed as "Hell".
* HellGate: With a 4 x 5 obsidian frame and a fire to activate it, you can build a portal to the Nether.
* HelloInsertNameHere:
** With the Anvil and the use of spawn eggs in Creative mode, you can give any mob a unique name.
** The 1.6 update also added Name Tags (which still have to be given a name via Anvil), which give the same effect as the above method, can be used on any mob without the need of a spawn egg, and the item can only be found inside dungeons.
* HiddenDepths: If one trope could be used to describe Minecraft as a whole, it would be this (and no, not because there are literally hidden chasms in it). Everything looks pixelated and blocky and simple. Everything ''is'' simple, until you realize what you can do while playing around with things and there's several systems that add new depths to the game once discovered (Enchanting, Brewing, Minecart rail systems, Nether networks, etc.) ''Especially'' when it comes to stuff like all the things you can do with such simple devices as those powered by redstone.
* HideYourChildren: The game lets the player kill not just villagers, but villager children and baby animals as well. You can even sic zombies on villager children so that they become children zombies!
* HitAndRunTactics: Before sprinting and knockback-enhancing enchantments were added, the standard way to kill a creeper with melee weapons was "hit it, then step back out of it explosion-triggering range for a few seconds, then repeat". It's then become possible to run at them, knock them out of range, the do it again without much fleeing.
* HitboxDissonance:
** The Ghast's hitbox is much smaller than it seems.
** Chickens' hitboxes are strangely shaped for swords, but it works just fine for arrows.
* HoistByHisOwnPetard:
** It is possible to harm yourself with your own arrows, either by firing them upwards, having them recoil off an enemy currently experiencing MercyInvincibility, or simply ''outrunning your arrows'', which got much easier when bows became hold-to-charge instead of instant-fire.
*** Furthermore, tamed wolves will fight to the death against any creature that harms you. You yourself are not exempt from this rule if you manage to shoot yourself with an arrow, they'll try to kill you. Talk about adding insult to injury (and also, a whole shit load of additional injury).
** This can happen to the skeletons as well, if you have another hostile mob in the way, the skeleton will be attacked by it if its own arrow hits the mob. Skeletons can even duel each other if one were to shoot another. It's also the only way you can get records.
** Ghasts love to fly out of range of your arrows and shoot fireballs at you that aren't affected by gravity. It's possible to kill them by hitting their fireballs back at them. There's even an achievement for it called "Return to Sender."
** One GameMod introduces the ability to use elemental arrows, such as Ice Arrows, Exploding Arrows, Fire Arrows, and Lightning Arrows. Lightning can supercharge Creepers. Do the math.
** Or, for a more literal take on this trope, if you set off TNT and don't get far enough away from it, you may be blown into the air.
* HolidayMode: On Halloween, zombies and skeletons may spawn wearing pumpkins on their heads. During Christmas, chests and large chests [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/File:Xmas_chest.png have different]] [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/File:Xmas_large_chest.png appearances]].
* HollywoodDarkness: Mostly averted. The player can technically make out shapes in even the darkest of underground caverns without torches, but only just. However, the light during the nighttime never drops below full moon brightness, even after the update that gave the moon phases.
* HollywoodTorches: Aside from lighting a limited range, torches play this straight. They burn indefinitely, and the smoke is purely cosmetic, posing no risk of fire, suffocation, or smoke discoloration. Torchlight can even be used to help crops grow.
** As of Beta 1.8, you can find torches in ''abandoned flooded mineshafts'' that still burn nicely.
** Keep in mind it's one of the AcceptableBreaksFromReality, as it was originally planned for torches to go out and for lasting light fixtures to be more complicated, with all existing torches planned on being converted to the new item on patch.
*** The joke Version 2.0 previews created for AprilFoolsDay 2013 implemented the torches burning out as one of the many "features". Each torch would go out after a random, ''short'' amount of time and could be relighted with Flint and Steel or taken down and replaced.
* AHomeOwnerIsYou: On the condition that you build the house with your bare hands first.
* HomosexualReproduction: Naturally, since every mob in the game is a OneGenderRace. WordOfGod [[http://notch.tumblr.com/post/28188312756/gender-in-minecraft points it out explicitly]].
* HorseJump: Horses are being added in version 1.6, and have been available for testing in the weekly snapshots. With the right horse, it is possible to jump gaps and obstacles previously unthinkable without much effort. It's only a matter of time before equestrian events are designed and organized.
* HowDoYouLikeThemApples: The game sports both regular and golden apples; the latter will heal you fully and grant regeneration for half a minute.
* HumanlikeAnimalAging: The game features calves (baby cows) with large heads and stubby legs.
* HumanoidAbomination: The Endermen are very much this.
* HumanResources: The game has a subtle example: Zombies and Skeletons both drop useful items. Skeletons in particular drop bones, which are useful as fertilizer, while Zombies drop Rotten Flesh, which is less than ideal for proper meals but is useful in a pinch. Both of these are implied to have once been human, especially the Zombies, which have an appearance that's almost identical to the default character skin. Additionally, Rotten Flesh [[HorrorHunger gives the player a temporary Hunger effect]] when eaten.
* HumansAreCthulhu: In the Fanfic [[http://www.worldofminecraft.com/node/8772 "Diary of a Creeper"]], humans are depicted as alien monstrosities capable and willing to slaughter everything in the world.
* HyperactiveMetabolism:
** Before the Beta 1.8 update, all consumable food instantly restored your health. Even now, having a near-full hunger meter causes fairly quick regeneration.
** Sheep now eat grass to recover their wool nearly-instantaneously. Baby animals (especially lambs and calves) can also munch on grass to grow faster than normal.
* HyperspaceArsenal: It's possible to make a cube of 13x13x13 tiles (2197 cubic meters of material) from the blocks you can carry around and still have more than a hundred to spare.
* HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace:
** The Halloween update allows players to build a portal to "The Nether", a hellish underworld where every step you take translates to eight steps in the normal world. If you enter through one HellGate and leave through another, you'll find yourself displaced eight times further than you traveled within The Nether. It's a very useful shortcut, if you don't mind the fact that the place is full of steep cliffs, lava lakes, and [[DemonicSpiders ghasts]]. Where the terrain isn't covered by lava it consists of either a red rock that readily catches on fire or a quicksand textured with ''screaming faces''. The entire dimension is inhabited by herds of zombie pigmen and flying jellyfish who spit exploding fireballs that tear up the landscape and set the rock on fire.
** A later update adds another portal which leads players to another dimension called "The End", a dark world which consists entirely of a single FloatingContinent suspended over an endless void, inhabited solely by Endermen and a single Ender Dragon.
*** Notably, the End becomes a lot less scary once you realize that 1) a simple bow with a sufficient quantity of arrows will keep you safe from the Dragon as you gradually reduce his health, 2) Endermen are effectively inert if you're wearing a pumpkin, 3) you can farm them in very efficient structures that'll level you from zero to level 30 in less than a minute.
* ICallItVera: Snapshot 12w41a introduced the enhanced item repair system that has naming your tools, armor, and weapons possible at the expense of several experience levels. This can also apply to non combat based items.
* IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels: When in its [[TalkLikeAPirate pirate speak]].
** "Smooth Sailin' (Peaceful)"
** "Deckswabber (Easy)"
** "[=RegulARRRR=] (Normal)"
** "True Pirate (Hard)"
** "Aimless Sailing (Creative)"
** "Swashbuckler (Survival)"
** "Captain ([[FinalDeath Hardcore]])"
* IfYouDieICallYourStuff: When you die you drop all your stuff. This means that somebody around you can pick it up, and keep it for themselves.
* IHaveTheHighGround:
** Partially [[InvertedTrope inverted]], it's easier to hit in melee if your opponent is higher than you are (your attacks come from nearer the top of your hitbox with a spherical range).
** Played straight in ranged combat, as it's easier to hit a target with an arrow or potion from far above than far below.
* ImAHumanitarian:
** If you're really desperate to restore your hunger bar, you can ''eat the rotting flesh of slain zombies''. It'll give you food poisoning, but it could still save your life.
** There's also an instance of indirect cannibalism when you use bone meal to grow your crops. That's human bone you're using.
* ImplacableMan: As long as healing crystals are intact, the Ender Dragon is unstoppable. If placed in overworld, it can fly right though anything that's not Obsidian, End Stone or Bedrock. Still feel secure in your cobblestone home?
* ImpossibleItemDrop:
** Creepers normally drop gunpowder, which [[ActionBomb makes sense]], but if they're killed by a stray arrow from a skeleton, they drop a music record. Guaranteed. Zombie Pigmen may drop Golden Helmets, despite the fact that they are never seen with the helmets on.
** Zombies also have a rare chance of dropping carrots, potatoes, or iron ingots, which makes a bit more sense if the zombie is an infected villager.
* ImprobableWeaponUser: While swords and bows (and tools) are the only practical weapons, it is theoretically possible to beat a monster to death with a torch, bed, or a pumpkin. [[UpToEleven or a '''block of dirt''']]. Best of all, items without durability don't even get damaged by using them as improvised weapons. See the ImprovisedWeapon entry below.
** To hell with theoretically; if it's in the game, it's been done.
** Even better is that the cactus blocks deal extra damage due to being a cactus...
* ImprovisedGolems: The game allows players (and sometimes [[EldritchAbomination Endermen]]) to build Snow Golems out of blocks of snow and Iron Golems out of blocks of iron, topped off with pumpkins for heads.
* ImprovisedWeapon: ANYTHING you pick up can be used as a weapon, even blocks of dirt and pork chops. Anything that isn't a pickaxe, sword, axe, or shovel does 1 heart of damage only, but you can still kill any enemy with any item obtainable in the game.
** If you're fighting a mob with anything other than a sword or bow, this is likely what you're using. You can beat zombies down with axes, mining picks, shovels, blocks of stone, blocks of dirt, blocks of sand, blocks of ''wool'', flowers, hunks of grilled pork meat, [[WithThisHerring fish]], doors, ladders, furnaces, minecarts, glass, mushrooms, diamonds, eggs, paintings.... Most of these are no better than your bare hands, but the standard tools do better (though not as good as a sword), and some of these are surprisingly effective against certain mobs, such as snowballs against Blazes.
** With the inclusion of enchantable books on 1.4.6, you can give literally any item any enchantment you want in Creative without extensive use of the console by combining it with an enchanted book in an anvil. It's very much possible to [[LetsPlay/{{Zisteau}} kill enemies with a sign]] [[VIdeoGame/SuperHostile enchanted with Sharpness V, Fire Aspect II, Knockback II and Looting III]] if you're so inclined.
** Zombies, Zombified Villagers, and Zombie Pigmen can pick up any objects floating on the ground to use as weapons. That piece of Rotten Flesh you threw away a moment ago? Another Zombie's here to bludgeon you with the flesh of his former comrade.
* IndustrializedEvil: Of course with "mob farms" or "xp farms", which are all centered around the idea of breeding, trapping, and ultimately killing massive waves of living mobs with little effort on the player's part so the player can gain experience and cool loot. YouBastard.
* InexplicableTreasureChests:
** Some madmen have put them deep under ground with a mob spawner. Of course, it's one of the few games where the player can put chests containing things in the most unlikely places.
** Chests can also naturally spawn in the hallways and libraries of a stronghold, which makes a bit more sense.
* InfantImmortality: Averted. Villager children can be killed, and can even be turned into zombies.
* InfernalRetaliation: As of the Redstone Update, burning Zombies will set the player on fire when attacking.
* InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike: One anti-SOPA splash screen reads "SOPA means LOSER in Swedish!"
** And AKTA[[note]]as in "ACTA"[[/note]] means "to avoid", and PIPA means "loud and squeaky sound". Both in Swedish too.
* InsistentTerminology: Notch has said via his twitter that the Minecraft default player's name is "Steve?," not "Steve."
* Instant180DegreeTurn: Fortunately, you can turn around quickly if you get attacked from behind. On the flip side, monsters can do the same.
* [[InstantAIJustAddWater Instant A.I., Just Add Pumpkins]]: The player can build snow or iron golems that wander around, attacking monsters. How do you get a pile of snow or iron to come to life and move independently? Give it a pumpkin for a head. [[RuleOfFun Sure, why not?]]
* InstantRoast: Any chicken, pig, or cow will become one or several cooked pieces of the appropriate meat if burned to death.
* InsurmountableWaistHeightFence: You can now build them yourself. They're the same height as a regular block, but you can't jump up on them without first using another block as a step. That's because they count as being 1 blocks high in character collision checks (yes, that also means you're half a block above the fence if you're "standing" on it), and you jump just less than that.
* IntentionalEngrishForFunny: Done intentionally by the achievement pop-ups. "Achievement get!"
* InterfaceScrew: The 'Wither' status effect acts as a more lethal (read: can actually kill you) but briefer poison effect, and also turns all your hearts black to make it much harder to tell how much you have left.
** Putting a pumpkin on your face does this by restricting your view of your surroundings to only the eyes and mouth on the pumpkin's face, and blocks off the rest of it. It makes for effective protection against Endermen - it mostly stops you from looking directly into their eyes and angering them.
** The "Super Secret Settings" for the 1.7 update also have these effects, which are picked at random. One such effect turns your screen upside down and laterally inverts it, another adds high-speed motion blur to your movement, and yet ''another'' inverts the colours of your surroundings on your screen.
** In the Nether and The End realms, Clocks will just cycle through day and night really fast due a lack of daytime cycle and Compasses will just have its needle spin around erratically due to a lack of spawn point. Maps will also not work in The End and just show static-like particles though they do work to limited degrees in the Nether.
* AnInteriorDesignerIsYou And, if you want to go that far, [[{{Terraform}} an exterior designer is you too]].
* InterruptingMeme: The [[ActionBomb Creepers]] have became popular as masc-'''''[[MostAnnoyingSound SSSSSSSSSSSSS]]'''''
* InTheDoldrums: All maps have an upper and lower Void. The upper Void is simply the sky in the overworld and the End, while in the Nether it's the open space 128 meters above the bedrock ceiling. The lower Void, in all dimensions, is an infinite drop into black oblivion that kills entities (including players) that go past y-64.
* InUniverseGameClock: [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Day/night_cycle One complete daily cycle, from sunrise to sunset to sunrise]], lasts for 20 minutes. This means that time is compressed at a 72:1 ratio (72 Minecraft days equals one real-time day). The time of day has dramatic effects on gameplay: nighttime is when the monsters come out. Daytime is when they burn. As you can imagine, being several miles away from your house at sunset is not a good idea. There are also moon phases.
* InventoryManagementPuzzle: The player has 36 slots for items (27 inventory slots and 9 hotkey slots), plus four for armor. While this may seem generous, you'd be surprised how quickly that gets filled during mining expeditions and such. Furthermore, part of your inventory will be dedicated to necessary survival equipment (food, light, crafting material, tools, etc.). A properly managed inventory can mean the difference between making safe trips back to base and finding yourself fighting off a horde of creepers and zombies with your bare hands.
* {{Invisibility}}: Potions of invisibility will make your skin invisible, but not your armor or any item you are holding. This means if you want true invisibility, you have to walk around naked so that mobs can't see you (but they will ignore items you hold). For PvP servers, invisibility also hides your name tag, making sneak attacks much more effective. And yes, you can also use the splash version of the potion on a Creeper for an invisible mad bomber.
* InvisibleAnatomy: When you're not using your fists to punch something, the item you're holding is just floating in front of you.
* InvisibleBlock:
** There are glitches and hacks that let you place two separate types of these. Invisible blocks work just like any other block, but you can't see them, playing the trope straight. ''Intangible'' blocks, on the other hand, only interact with other blocks while the player passes through them just like air. The second block type is very useful for making elevators and other special redstone machines the player must pass through.
** The game recently added the "Barrier" block, a completely invisible and indestructible block as a tool for mapmakers. Parkour maps just got a lot more trolly...
* ItemCrafting: With a drag and drop inventory, and a 2x2 or 3x3 craft slot depending on how you're doing it, you spend pretty much 11% of the time doing this.
* ItemFarming: The villager trading system. Villagers can sell better weapons and tools for you for Emeralds, you get Emeralds by trading items to them or mining. Wheat, paper and charcoal are the easiest to farm emeralds from, as they are derived from renewable resources.
* ItemGet: A nod to the {{Trope Namer|s}} exists. Every time you get an in-game achievement, the achievement pops up on the screen with the caption "Achievement Get!"
* ItsAWonderfulFailure: Death in Hardcore mode. The game doesn't automatically delete your world. It ''sits you at the game over screen until you manually activate the deletion process.''
--> ''You cannot respawn in hardcore mode! '''(Delete world)''' ''
* IWasToldThereWouldBeCake: In an attempt to focus public support, it was announced that cake would be added to the game if Minecraft won [[http://www.indiedb.com/games/minecraft Indie of the year.]] It did, and cake was added in the first update of 2011.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:J-L]]
* JokeItem: Any item can be held, though only tool help in a fight. It's not uncommon to "tickle" things to death with a feather for fun.
** With the enchantment system, you can turn any item into a LethalJokeItem. Want to attack zombies with raw fish enchanted with Smite V? You can.
** The golden sword and golden armor set plays the trope straight; the gold sword isn't any stronger than an iron sword and the gold armor isn't any stronger than iron armor, but the gold counterparts wear down twice as fast as leather armor and wooden swords. They, however, are the best for enchanting purposes.
* TheJoysOfTorturingMooks: With enough creative planning, you can make traps with water, lava, cacti, or natural gravity to kill mobs of all kinds, friendly or hostile, as you watch them helplessly flail about to their deaths. With a bit of trial and error, you can make a trap that leaves them barely alive so you can kill them with your bare hands and gain experience.
* JungleJapes: The Jungle Biome, added in the 1.2 update.
* JustAddWater: Crafting is a crude form of pixelated drawing with crafting materials. No actual labor required. Even complicated items like a clock can be made by merely putting the materials together in a vague clock-like shape. To put it simply, a clock and a compass can be made using the same configuration, except the clock requires gold whereas the compass requires iron.
* JustOneMoreLevel: Now with its own [[http://www.jinx.com/p/minecraft_one_more_block_premium_tee.html shirt!]]
* KaizoTrap: After defeating the Ender Dragon, it's still possible to be killed by any nearby Endermen or falling off the edge of the dimension.
* KillerRabbit: the Endermen, sometimes. Its ability to pick up certain blocks means that eventually you will find one carrying a flower. With both hands, like it's afraid it'll damage it. [[SchmuckBait Just don't look it in the eye . . .]]
* KillItWithFire:
** This is an effective tactic to kill mobs from a distance, lighting the ground on fire and having them walk into it.
** You can also place blocks of wood or, even better, coal to use this tactic in places that aren't normally flammable, such as caves.
** Flint and Steel can ignite enemies. If they were already damaged or not near water, they will more than likely die. If you want to kill non-hostile spiders without them retaliating, you can ignite the ground below them, and they'll take damage without recognizing you as the source. Fire as a whole is more or less lethal, unless you conveniently dug into water and lava at the same time.
** Inverted with the Ghast: It's immune to fire and will in turn kill ''you'' with exploding fireballs that [[TennisBoss you can reflect]].
** When livestock is killed in this fashion, the meat it drops will already be cooked.
** Blaze powder, gunpowder, and coal can be combined to make a fire charge. This item can be used like flint and steel to start a faster-spreading fire, or you can load it into a dispenser to launch fireballs.
* KillItWithWater:
** Endermen are, in addition to fire and lava, weak to water. Leading them to a pool of water or exposing them to a rainstorm will damage them, though they're not stupid enough to keep standing there after taking one hit.
** Prior to 1.8, this was the standard way to farm slime balls; since slimes couldn't swim, a drowner trap was very effective against them.
** Also four doors arranged around a block of water suspended above a stone pressure plate, topped by any solid block. Mobs walking on the plate will cause the doors to lock them in. Trapping them with their head in the water, unable to get out. Once they die the pressure plate is released and the trap reopens to visitors.
* KleptomaniacHero: Being a game with simular gameplay mechanics as ''{{Terraria}}'', it shouldn't come as a surprise that stealing whole structures is doable here. Certain types of blocks can only be optained through either Creative mode or mining them from pre-generated exisiting structures.
* {{Knockback}}:
** A small amount with every hit from a weapon. A large amount if you were sprinting. There's also an enchantment to make it even greater.
** Iron Golems produce this in ''spades''. Anything they hit is flung into the air high enough to take fall damage, in addition to the heavy damage the attack itself does.
* KungFuProofMook: Zombies and skeletons are weak to the sunlight, but if they are wearing any kind of helmet, then the sun doesn't do anything to them. You have to kill them yourself.
* LadderPhysics:
** Ladders are subject to all kinds of weirdness. They seem to simply slow your fall when you occupy the same square as them, and move you upwards at the same rate when you move against them. This means, among other things, moving into a ladder square while falling at terminal velocity will instantly slow you, and it's possible to mine a block while facing away from the ladder you're on. This reaches ridiculous levels when you realize, with a bit of luck, you can place a ladder segment while in freefall, and instantly cancel your momentum with it.
** Also, neither water nor lava can exist in the same space as a ladder, leading to shenanigans where a ceiling made of lava lights up a room, but won't actually fall down into it because it's afraid of invading the ladder's personal bubble.
** [[GiantSpiders Spiders]] can climb up vertical walls, but any overhangs can stop their progress. Ladders, which barely have any width at all, can block a spider's climbing as well as a 1x1x1 cubic meter stone block can.
* LamarckWasRight: When dyes were added, you could colour sheep and recieve more wool (see Awesome yet Practical above). Breeding two sheep will pass on their (dyed) colour to their children and will even regrow dyed colours of wool. Since the colour passed on to the child is selected at random, you can use one lapis lazuli to create an entire flock of blue sheep, since Minecraft animals have no set gender and can reproduce with any other animal that isn't juvenile. Say goodbye to hoarding your lapis!
* LampreyMouth: The squid has one of these. It's much toothier than would be realistically expected, although the squid itself is completely harmless.
* LandMineGoesClick: TNT + pressure plate = landmine. And if you want to get complicated, you can even rig trees so that they set off TNT when cut down.
* LastNoteNightmare: The game actually features one of these. In the record "11", all that can be heard is the sounds of what could be a man loading a gun, or simply shifting around in his chair. For the most part, it's a quiet song, devoid of any music and comprised absolutely of ambiance. Near the end, however, the music abruptly shifts to the man walking down a path, then breaking into a run. As the music builds, we hear some type of inhuman noise roar at the man before it abruptly cuts out, switching to a soft beeping noise before going completely silent.
* LavaAddsAwesome: You can collect and use lava in constructions, either as an exotic light source, a trap for intruders, or an incinerator for junk. If you're not careful, it can easily kill you or ignite wood nearby.
* TheLavaCavesOfNewYork: Due to the randomly-generated nature of the game, it's fully possible to encounter an NPC town with a cavern full of lava just underneath or an open lava lake right next to it.
* LavaIsBoilingKoolAid: The game has lava flow much more slowly than water to simulate its greater density. Lava's not fatal if the player can escape quickly enough, but it is ''very painful.'' However, even more pain occurs when one dies in lava: everything you had on your person is [[ContinuingIsPainful irrevocably incinerated.]] It also causes any wood in short distance from it to start burning and ice to melt, but it can (or at least could) be blocked by using snow blocks. It provides natural light as well.
* LavaPit: Mostly underground, but occasionally one boils up to the surface.
* LedgeBats: Skeletons; be especially careful when fighting them near pits...
* LegoGenetics: Minecraft's dyes are so powerful, they can re-sequence sheep DNA. Dyeing a sheep causes it to permanently produce wool that color, and pass the color to its offspring.
* LeParkour: The game has entire adventure maps centered around this, up to and including at least one ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' themed map. You can also try it during a normal game, though it's [[LavaPit not]] [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou recommended]].
* LethalJokeItem:
** Continuing the proud tradition of fishing rods in this role is, well, the [[ShapedLikeItself fishing rod]]. [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Normally, it's used for just that]]--casting out into a body of water and flinging in a fish when it bites (or, if the rod has the Luck of the Sea enchantment, maybe something else more valuable). Most players wouldn't even bother using it for anything else. But suddenly, a whole new world of possibility opens up when the astute player realizes that it doesn't just reel in fish, it reels in ANY creature. With practice, a player atop a wall can heave up monsters into sword range and with a quick switch, slash the unfortunate on his way back down to fall-damage town. The cherry on top? Even Ghasts are affected, which can be used to pull the elusive flying buggers closer so they can't avoid your hail of arrows.
** Snowballs can be thrown at mobs to knock them backward, but don't actually deal any damage, except against blazes and the Ender Dragon. Even then, they're much weaker than arrows, and the faster rate of fire is offset by the short range. Most people wouldn't even consider bringing snowballs into the final battle against the high-flying boss, whose immense health is daunting even to players with diamond swords. However, the snowball's knockback actually stuns the Ender Dragon for longer than it takes to throw another snowball. As a result, one of the easiest ways to defeat the Ender Dragon is to lure it into its normally unstoppable charge, then pelt it with a steady stream of hundreds of snowballs.
** Snowballs can also be immensely useful on certain challenge maps that consist of nothing but an island or two in the sky. Throw a couple, and suddenly that creeper's plunging off the edge to its death.
*** Chicken eggs also provide the same effect as the snowballs, minus the ability to harm the Blaze.
* LethalLavaLand: The Nether. There are full-blown oceans of lava, lava falls coming from the ceiling, more lava falls sprouting from random walls, and with the 1.5 updates there are even pockets of lava hidden in the walls, just waiting for you to stumble upon them. Oh, and the same update doubled the flow speed of lava in the Nether. See OhCrap further down on this page.
* LetsPlay: If the autocomplete feature is any indication, this is the most popular game to LP on Website/YouTube - and that's not counting tutorials, walkthroughs, demonstrations of building projects and servers, etc.
** It's also one of the most popular games to stream, to the point that 1.7.2/1.7.4 introduced Website/{{Twitch}} streaming support.
* LevelGrinding:
** Experience gained by killing mobs gives experience levels. Although these are pointless for the first part of the game, once the player obtains diamonds they can make Enchantment Tables. These allow weapons, armor, and tools to be enchanted with special abilities, such as reduced damage from use, extra damage when attacking monsters, protection from certain types of damage (explosions, fire, water, fall, etc.), and increased item drops. The problem is that experience gained from monsters is worth much less at higher levels, and dying makes the player lose almost all their experience. As a result, even with structures built specifically to spawn and damage mobs automatically, it can take days to get enough experience for the best enchantments. Made worse by the [[RandomNumberGod Random Number God]] deciding what enchantments are received, which can absorb large amounts of exp only to give a common, less useful enchantment or even ''ignore up to one quarter of the experience'' (but still take it) when calculating which enchantment will be given.
** This has been rectified by recent updates, as now far more activities (such as farming, mining, smelting ores, cooking food, and fishing) all reward the player with experience, and books can now be enchanted, and anvils can be used to fix items without the loss of the enchantments, and merge enchantments. In addition, villagers now sell experience bottles, and books with enchantments can be found in dungeons. Of course getting some of the enchantments is still a LuckBasedMission but at least you can avoid spending 30 levels on a diamond pickaxe only to get Unbreaking I.
* LevelMapDisplay: There's a Map item which you can craft to keep track of the world you explore.
* LightningCanDoAnything: Lightning will turn pigs into [[CameBackWrong Zombie Pigmen]] and villagers into witches, and massively power up the explosion of a Creeper. It also ignites inactive portals.
* LikeABadassOutOfHell: When the player enters the Nether and leaves alive, moreso after fighting his way through many Nether mobs.
* LikeCannotCutLike: Singular example: Golden Pickaxes cannot mine Gold Ore - all other non-wooden pickaxes can mine the ore they're made of, but gold, true to RealLife, is exceptionally weak.
* LilyPadPlatform: Lily pads can be collected from water in certain biomes. They count as a half-block like slabs, making them excellent for covering water source blocks in farms and such.
* LiteralGenie: The game's creator falls into this occasionally. Fans begged Notch for a way to ride animals, so he created saddles, which can only be found in dungeon chests. This saddle can be placed on a pig, allowing you to ride it. Unfortunately, due to Notch's sense of humor, the pig continues to wander around aimlessly, since most of the fans were asking for a way to ride animals, but didn't specifically say anything about being able to control them. Fortunately, Jeb later introduced a method to steer pigs with the carrot on a stick.
* LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading: Zig-zagged. Loading the game itself is pretty quick, barring any updates, but the time it takes to load a map is proportional to how much of it has been explored and the overall size. There's also loading times when switching between dimensions.
* LoopholeAbuse:
** Understanding how the game is coded (as documented by many inquisitive individuals) can lead to this. For example, Village population counts depend on how many houses (with doors) a village has. Since the game defines a "house" as a door exposed to sunlight that has the interior (side the door leads into) one more block covered than the exterior, you can just place a door then a block of dirt on its interior side and [[ArtificialStupidity the Villagers will treat it as a house]].
** Iron Golems are coded to attack players that harm Villagers using anything that's held in the hand, including bare fists. However, this doesn't include Villagers hurt by "natural" causes, so it's possible to just kill them by suffocation, drowning, or falling without repercussions from their protectors if you want new Villagers for their offers ([[VideoGameCrueltyPotential or just feel like being a terrible person]]).
** Collecting the Ender Dragon egg requires exploiting the behavior of certain items and gravity. You cannot touch the egg directly without it teleporting, but it is affected by gravity, and a torch will convert any block that falls onto it into a collectible item. Pistons work, too.
* LostForever:
** Killing the [[FinalBoss Ender Dragon]] nets you a lot of experience and the [[BraggingRightsReward purely decorative]] Dragon Egg. It can only be collected in a certain and rather tricky way, and if accidentally touched it will teleport in a spot at random, potentially falling off the floating terrain the fight took place on and being destroyed by the [[BottomlessPits Void]]. You can't fight the Ender Dragon again.
** Many [[http://www.minecraftwiki.net/wiki/Renewable_resource guides]] stress the role of [[GreenAesop renewable resources]], as while it's possible to expand one's range of exploration to find more non-renewable resources, they will eventually run out if the player stays in the same zone.
* TheLostWoods:
** Forest map setting in classic, obviously. Likewise, the Forest and Taiga biomes in the full game.
** The Halloween Update introduced the forest biome, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, as well as the rare rainforest biome. True to the trope, undead creatures will take refuge from the sun by hiding in the shadows of the trees during the daytime.
** And now with the new biomes the Roof Forest plays even more into this trope, with giant Black Forest-inspired oak trees, little sunlight on the ground, and giant mushrooms!
* LowFantasy
* LuckBasedMission:
** Enchanting. You place an item and are given three lines of gibberish representing your options. The more levels you spend, the better the enchantments may be. Adding bookshelves (to a max of 15) raises the level requirement but also improves the enchantments you get. However, the basic mechanics aside, the actual ''results'' can vary from awesome to extremely disappointing. You can put in one item and get three nice enchantments, only to put in an identical one and get a comparatively useless one. You can't control what enchantments you get, only increase the likelihood of said enchantments being ranked higher.
** The enchanting system was made more practical/less annoying with the addition of enchanted books in 1.5.1. However, enchanting books is not any less random, and in fact, gives an even wider range of enchantments because they can be used on any tool. Luckily, you get to choose which weapon/tool/amour gets buffed by whichever enchanted book you own.
** Trading with Villagers: Depending on how Lady Luck favors you could end up with a bunch of Villagers offering some terrible trades, some decent ones, and some really good ones (items that are otherwise very rare)... or just a bunch of terrible ones. Some get a Priest to start selling Eyes of Ender after only a few trades, some have 8 Priests running around their village that still don't offer the darn things.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:M-O]]
* MacGyvering: All the player has at the beginning of the game is their bare hands and the clothes on their back. They can fashion a crafting table after chopping down a tree and processing it into planks with their bare hands, use that table and those planks to make makeshift wooden tools, use those tools to gather cobblestone, which they can then use to build a furnace and upgrade to makeshift stone tools, which they can use in turn to gather coal and iron ore... and so on. With the right raw materials and a crafting table (which can be crafted on the spot in a pinch), the player can make whatever they need almost instantly.
* MadBomber:
** Creepers. Pretty much all they do is silently sneak up on you, hiss for a second and a half, and explode. Even on easy, the explosion can kill you instantly (sans armor) if you can't get away in time. It also destroys most types of blocks, which can allow other monsters to invade your shelter.
** Ghasts (found only in the Nether), which shoot fireballs at you, which not only punch a hole in the terrain but also sets it on fire.
** If you have MadBomber tendencies yourself, you can blow stuff up with TNT or Fire Charges. Incidentally, to make these explosives, you need to get gunpowder by killing Ghasts or Creepers, the other two {{Mad Bomber}}s in the game.
* MadeOfDiamond: Wearing a full suit of Diamond armor grants 80% damage reduction, which is quite a lot, though not enough to qualify. Having Protection V on all pieces of armor increases this to ''96%'' reduction, which makes the wearer [[NighInvulnerability impossible to kill]] by most means.
* MadeOfExplodium:
** Creepers. ''Literally'' made of explodium if [[http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lne4ewTV5l1qzwtdlo1_r1_500.jpg the T-Shirt]] is canon. They even drop gunpowder when you kill them, which can be used to craft your own TNT.
** Time is irrelevant in the Nether. Clocks malfunction. Compasses pick up multiple magnetic poles. And beds? Well, beds just plain ''explode'' when you try to use them.
* MadeOfIndestructium: Bedrock is immune to explosions of every size and cannot be mined with any tool. Only in creative mode can it be removed in any way. Obsidian, too, is immune to explosions and can only be removed with a diamond pick, or by spending over four minutes to remove a single block.
* MagicCompass: A compass points to the world's player spawn point.
* MagicMap: Is [[ItemCrafting crafted]] from a MagicCompass and in multiplayer, it'll show the positions of other players, if they happen to be holding their own copy of that map at the time.
* MagicMushroom: Though there's not too many magic properties besides some potion possibilities, the mushrooms are mostly just used for food. They can however grow to unusual size, which is pretty magical, [[BodyHorror they can infest cows too.]]
* MagicTool: The furnace. Stove, smelter, kiln, and steam engine all-in-one combo pack! The Crafting Table also qualifies, considering the sheer number of things it lets you do (like forge swords without an anvil).
* MagnetHands: It is possible to climb ladders with a block of sand in your hand. With your back to the ladder.
* MalevolentArchitecture: Standard. Though there are some "canon" examples in the randomly generated structures (eg. both types of temples), the most prominent ones occur on multiplayer. In a vanilla Minecraft server, there is no protection against someone murdering you, stealing your stuff, and razing your base or house, making you a noob again. Though many servers have mods to prevent this, some don't or make you donate (pay) to use them. So what are you to do? Why integrate as many traps into your house as possible to kill any would be thieves of course! Nearly every serious player's house will have many traps and decoy treasure rooms, and they will have to go through great lengths navigating their own traps every time they want to deposit or withdrawal so much as an iron ingot from their horde. However, in ''Minecraft'' you can always mine blocks so there is no trap that can't be successfully or destroyed, so expect lots of obsidian to try to RailRoad you into forcing to go down the trapped paths an make you solve the puzzles. Many players even go a step further and, taking a page from every super villain, rig their buildings to self destruct with TNT upon command, so no one benefits from stealing.
* TheManyDeathsOfYou: While there are no death animations, the message that appears after death varies depending on the manner. For example: was slain by /, tried to swim in lava, and blew up.
* MascotMook: Creepers are the most well-known of all the mobs.
* MassiveMultiplayerCrossover: Multiplayer sessions can be this, due to how players can make skins resembling characters from other franchises, which leads to 20+ characters all working together to build a house/civilisation and mine for diamonds. [[DownloadableContent Skin pack DLC]] in the Xbox 360 version invoke this with skins of characters from the likes of ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'', ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'', ''VideoGame/CastleCrashers'', etc.
* MeatMoss: Until it was {{Jossed}} by [[WordOfGod Notch]], Netherrack in ''{{Minecraft}}'' was thought to be this, or blood covered stone. It's actually just Red Stone with moss on it. Many custom texture packs still take that interpretation and run with it.
* MechanicalMonster: The Blaze mob in the Nether appear to be of this. There's nothing in between their rotating rods and their sounds, pain sounds, and death cries sound very mechanical instead of organic.
* MenuTimeLockout: The game averts this with its inventory screen, making inventory management very important to the game. It's played straight with the Esc pause menu but only in single player.
* TheMerch: There are now official T-shirts on sale and replica stone pickaxes incoming. [[http://www.minecraft.net/merch.jsp Store here.]]
* MetalSlime:
** Notch used to be one. Red Apples used to be very, very rare, and when you killed him on a SMP server, he would drop one. However, you can also get apples from trees by breaking their leaves.
** Before the final release, Slimes only appeared in first twelve layers of the world, four of which are full of unbreakable stone, spawn incredibly rarely, could only appear in one tenth of all chunks, determined on the world being generated, and frequently jump into lava or suffocate by spawning in spaces too small. The bigger ones also do enough damage to kill you very quickly if you have no armor, and [[AsteroidsMonster split in two every time they are hit]]. On the other hand, the biggest ones can split into up to 64 Tiny Slimes, which each drop up to two slimeballs. Slimeballs happen to be incredibly useful for making piston machines (almost all types of machines are much simpler with Sticky Pistons, which can retract blocks in addition to pushing them) and are used in making useful potions such as Fire Resistance.
* MindScrew:
** The game's ending "poem". [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/End_Poem Seriously.]]
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZ2YckuyQC8 Record 11]]. What the hell is happening?
* MinecartMadness: Normally it's a bad idea to make a rail system and not secure it so that you come under attack while you're riding in a minecart. Still, it's possible to make a [[RuleOfFun wacky, convoluted track that's just entertaining to ride]].
* MinusWorld: The [[http://www.minecraftwiki.net/wiki/Far_Lands Far Lands]], the result of going far, ''far'' away from the world's center. It would take 800+ hours of walking to reach them without cheating, and things get ''strange'' when you arrive. WordOfGod is that while it's possible to fix the strangeness of the Far Lands, Notch likes the idea of the world turning into an EldritchLocation at the extreme edges. It is mostly removed in version Beta 1.8, although there are still some strange glitches.
** Additionally, there is [[VoidBetweenTheWorlds The Void]]. It is an area of complete nothingness that stretches on for infinity, and can be accessed by either going below the bottom boundaries of the maps. It is completely black and has a starry particle effect strewn throughout it. You can only reliably access it in creative mode, which allows you to destroy bedrock, or with a map editor's aid. You will take damage at 4 hearts per second, leading to a quick death and respawn. It's also possible to access this deadly area via a bug in the Survival multiplayer mode, in which stepping on glitched blocks will cause a player to fall in.
* MirrorMonster: In the video ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdOeY-yC_lI One More Fright]]'', at one point Steve wanders into [[HumanoidAbomination Herobrine's]] own lair, and when he looks into a mirror Herobrine's reflection looks back and sneers.
* MisplacedWildlife:
** Pigs, sheep, cows and chicken can be found in almost any biome, as it'd be frustrating to starve for starting out in the desert. Squids can sometimes be found in small lakes, and bats and spiders can be found in any dark area. And as of 1.7, the player can pull creatures such as pufferfish and clownfish out of small ponds.
** As of 1.7.4, baby zombies can spawn riding chickens. The zombies can despawn, but the chickens can't (since they're passive mobs, and passive mobs never despawn), so this leads to chickens unexpectedly being encountered underground. A similar thing happens in ''the Nether''.
* MistakenForAnImposter: ''Minecraft'' servers often get players logging in, claiming that they are one of the game developers. This led to [[https://twitter.com/jeb_/status/315145846415032322 an incident]] where jeb_ joined a server, only to be told that he's "[[YourCostumeNeedsWork not the best fake I've ever seen]]".
* MixAndMatchCritters: The Mooshroom mob, which is a red-and-white half-cow, half-mushroom.
* TheMockbuster: If you go on the {{Xbox 360}}'s Indie Games section, you'll find several rip-offs of this game such as ''[=FortressCraft=]'', ''Total Miner'', and ''[=CastleMiner=]''. Mind you that those clones are actually the first three clones on the service (more have been released since, obviously), and for the most part they are still commercially successful well after the release of ''Minecraft: Xbox 360 Edition''.
* MoeAnthropomorphism: [[http://tinyurl.com/6n7xgoo "Creeparka"]], is a Japanese meme combining the Creeper and a Parka (which is more typically called a "Hoodie" in English slang). Specifically, this meme involves a cute girl wearing a Creeper-themed hoodie (and often little else) and generally looking cute and frustrated.
* MoneyMultiplier: The game has item enchantments that work like this. Weapons with the "Looting" enchantment increase the maximum number of items that can be looted from each monster, up to three extra. Tools like picks with the "Fortune" enchantment increase the drop rate of diamonds and lapis lazuli by up to 120%.
* MoneySpider: Averted. Mobs drop all manner of useful stuff that they would be expected to have, but never Emeralds (the closest the game has to a currency).
* MookMaker: Monster spawners.
* MoonLogicPuzzle: While the crafting process is generally fairly intuitive, there's the occasional recipe that only appears obvious in hindsight.
* MotivationOnAStick: You can make a carrot on a stick to steer a pig you're riding.
* MundaneUtility: Arguably, Steve? [sic], the ''Minecraft'' guy, can dig to a depth of around 80 meters using only his hands, can place physics-defying chunks of land for use as decoration, and can swim up a waterfall to get to the top of his house.
** Want to have an awesome looking fireplace that will never burn out like wood does? Get some Netherrack from the Nether, it turns out that the landscape features of hell itself make fantastic pseudo-firewood.
* MyopicArchitecture: Commonly seen. Someone will go through a ridiculous procedure to create an incredibly elaborate safe that takes a full 5 minutes to open and someone else will simply dig through the wall.
** Also, many adventure maps start with the player locked in a cell, with one wall made out of a block that the rules of the map say they're allowed to break (usually clay), allowing them to easily escape into the hallway or an unlocked neighboring cell.
* NarniaTime: Time only passes in a dimension if there's a player in it. In single player, this means time effectively stops when you change dimensions. Multiplayer requires every player to vacate a dimension to achieve the effect. This can be a good thing if you died in the Nether or the End and need some time to re-arm in order to re-enter and salvage your old inventory... but it also means that whatever killed you in the first place is still there, so it's possible to re-draw aggro the moment you leave the portal.
* NatureIsNotNice: In some ways, this is the heart of early gameplay. There is no real enemy or driving plot; it's just your struggle to survive in a hostile wilderness where the wild animals happen to be monsters.
* {{Nerf}}:
** Swords were quite powerful for a time, but their damage output was slightly reduced by the 1.0 release. This was likely to encourage players to use the Enchantment Table to power up their swords with various effects to compensate for the reduced damage.
** Cake used to be an extremely practical method of healing--just plonk it on the ground and right-click it whenever you need to heal, up to six iterations of 1.5 hearts. The 1.8 update turned food into stamina restoration rather than health restoration, nerfing it severely. A full cake restores six food points, and that restoration is very brief. Cooked steak, on the other hand, lasts significantly longer and restores four points a piece. Not to mention that cake requires a considerable resource investment, while cows can bred with much less effort.
** Golden Apples used to be extremely difficult to make, due to the fact the normal Apple was effectively dummied out of the game until Strongholds were introduced (unless you play MP with the game's creator) and you needed 8 Gold Blocks (72 Gold Ingots!) to craft. The 1.1 update made crafting Golden Apples a lot cheaper; instead of 8 Gold Blocks, you just need 8 Gold Nuggets (8/9ths of an ingot), which can be farmed from Zombie Pigmen in the Nether, and normal Apples can now be found in the leaves of a basic tree (the 1.6 nerfed them, though, by making the requisite 8 ingots). At the same time, the effects of eating a Golden Apple have been severely reduced; they went from restoring all health to restoring 5 units of hunger and granting health regeneration for 30 seconds, and now they only restore 2 units of hunger and the health regeneration only lasts a meager 4 seconds. Of course, 1.3 introduced an even more powerful version with the old recipe.
** Ever wonder why there aren't as many videos of people accidentally burning their house down anymore? That's because fire was toned down not long after, and it usually fizzles out on its own. Fire can still spread pretty quickly on higher difficulties, though.
** Tools and weapons dropped by skeletons and zombies are now randomized in how much durability they have, whereas they used to be dropped as a fresh item that was never used. This is to discourage people from farming the rare drops.
** Horse armor was also nerfed in obtainability. Before the nerf, horse armor could be crafted. Horse armor can no longer be crafted and they can only be found within dungeon chests now. This was because [=PvP=] matches boiled down to owners of armored horses automatically winning most of the time.
** As of 1.6, health regeneration now drains the food meter. Potions of healing and regeneration were also reduced in effectiveness.
* NeverTrustATitle: The ''Minecraft'' Pocket Edition contains neither mining nor crafting. And since it is also available for many tablets, the "Pocket Edition" part is not entirely true either...
* NightOfTheLivingMooks: Some enemies are classified as undead, what means they take extra damage from a weapon with the Smite enchantment and they catch fire under sunlight (although they aren't necessarily damaged by it).
* [[NightVisionGoggles Night Vision Potion]]:
** The game has a potion version of night vision goggles. The Potion of Night Vision makes everything around you instantly light up as if the sun was there, even in deep caves, and you don't go blind from bright light sources like torches or lava. However, this doesn't affect the actual light level in the world (just because you can see better doesn't mean the dark doesn't exist), which means monsters will still spawn as they normally do. The night vision effect also makes fog (especially in the Nether and the End) much more pronounced, which makes it more difficult to see at times.
** The Respiration enchantment acts like a smaller version of the trope; it removes the fog while you swim underwater, but you're still subjected to the diminished light levels since the sun can't fully penetrate water, unless you drink the Potion of Night Vision as well, which then gives you clear vision underwater.
* NitroBoost: Dash Pad variety is seen in powered minecart rails as the boost the mine cart when it rolls over the set of activated golden rails.
* NoArcInArchery: Averted; arrows follow parabolic arcs. They also can be slowed by water and do damage according to how fast they're moving.
* NoBodyLeftBehind: All mobs explode into a puff of smoke when killed.
* NocturnalMooks: Most Mooks only come out at night or in dark caves, and burn or turn passive in sunlight. It's made [[FromBadToWorse Worse]] by the fact that the game completely averts {{Hollywood Darkness}}. Notably though, [[ActionBomb Creepers]] are completely unaffected by sunlight and will attack you during the day.
* NoDamageRun: The game has a Hardcore Mode that ''deletes the entire game world'' if the player dies. Since the entire point of the game is to explore the world and shape it through building ([[CaptainObvious and mining, and crafting]]), this can be a very painful experience if the player has been working on a world for a while, and has grown attached to it. Hardcore Mode also locks the game on the highest difficulty setting, maximizing the amount of damage dealt by monsters, and otherwise making survival as difficult as possible.
** As an extra kick, the game forces you to press the button that irrevocably deletes your world ''yourself,'' rather than doing it automatically upon your death. It simply doesn't give you any other options.
** Hardcore Mode was eventually made available for multiplayer servers in addition to single-player gameplay. In multiplayer, Hardcore Mode means that a player is ''permanently banned'' from the server if they die.
* NoGearLevel: The game has you drop all of your items upon death, which means you're forced to endure the game without any weapons or tools when you respawn unless you are quick enough to get back to where you died or had stored extra items away in a chest. Many custom maps that take advantage of Command Blocks can also strip you of all your items if the block is programmed to do so.
** Can be subverted, though, as the game does include a command line prompt that prevents this. Again, use of Command Blocks can also enable this ability.
* NonCombatEXP: Since version 1.3 you can gain experience from mining and smelting -- specifically, you get experience for mining anything that drops a usable block (diamond, coal, redstone, lapis lazuli, emerald) and experience for smelting raw blocks (iron, gold) into usable blocks (iron ingots, gold ingots). Breeding animals also nets experience, as well as trading with Villagers as of the 1.8 update.
* NonHumanUndead: One of the five inhabitants of the Nether are Zombie Pigmen, which are ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.
* NoOntologicalInertia: Ghasts' fireballs vanish when they are killed.
* NoOSHACompliance: It's entirely up to the player whether they want to install precautions against momentary stupidity in their bases. Yes, adding fences as guardrails to your fortress of doom kind of ruins the look, but it's worth considering after falling to your death a few times.
* NoPeripheralVision: While the game can fall under this, surprise creeper attacks can be avoided by setting the POV slider to "Quake Pro."
** An incredibly popular places to hide traps are in the ceiling, usually just above a doorway. Its amazing how many people won't notice a giant vaulted ceiling of gravel kept up only by torches. Since pressure plates and tripwires are still the most common way to set off traps (the former must be on ground the latter tends to be), its a surprise people fall for traps at all, but most players won't pay any attention to what they are walking over.
* NoPlotNoProblem:
** The basic plot is "Wake up on a island. Punch trees, mine, build, kill monsters." Notch has however said that he wishes to include some type of plot in the game later.
** Make whatever you wish from the NPC villages, strongholds and abandoned mineshafts.
** Now there's a general structure to the game with a long sequence of tasks necessary to "finish" the game. First you learn to make wooden tools, then stone tools, then iron tools, then diamond tools. Then you use the diamond tools to build a portal to another dimension called The Nether. Then you find a Nether fortress and kill a bunch of blazes for their powder. Then you combine the blaze powder with Ender Pearls dropped by Endermen, and use the resulting item to locate a stronghold and activate a portal to another dimension called The End. Then you slay the Ender Dragon. Technically, all this is just an optional side quest, and the real objective of the game is to have fun, [[WideOpenSandbox whatever that means to you]].
* NoSenseOfPersonalSpace: Testificates in villages have an odd tendency to all crowd inside one house at night. Taken UpToEleven when it's a small, 4x4 house.
* NothingIsScarier:
** Any moment that is spent in a dark place when you are not fighting monsters. Reason? In the dark, monsters spawn. Monsters spawn anywhere. Everywhere. If you've just opened up a hole into a cave system and hear growling, hissing, or clacking coming from it, you may be scared to venture into it, knowing a zombie, spider, or skeleton could be lurking around any corner. If you hear ''nothing'', that's worse, because nothing is the sound that ''[[DemonicSpiders creepers]]'' make...
** You're at bedrock level in a nearby mine. Near pitch black darkness, a narrow hallway, limited weapons. No music, no sounds (with the exception of when you mine). And you know that there are zombies, skeletons and spiders waiting randomly around to tear you to pieces, but you haven't found them yet... Made worse by the fact that some enemies ''don't make sound.''
** Endermen may creep some people out, but on the whole they aren't too scary in and of themselves. Once you set one off, however, and it teleports out of sight, the suspense of waiting for it to just ''go ahead and attack already'' is what makes fighting them such a trying experience.
** There comes a moment while running around you hear one of the background sounds like lovely (terrifying) music but one of those sounds is very sinister. It's the same sound of an airplane flying over head, you look up to see it as a instinctual move and see... nothing. You are all alone. The sound can be heard [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PA2uLm8ups&t=1m09s here]].
*** That is called an ambience, and it happens when you are near a dark area that's large enough, as a sort of indication or warning, even if that area is underound or behind a cliff face nearby and you actually can't see it. Nothing indeed.
** Peaceful mode removes the mobs, no ifs ands or buts, but unless you turn off the game's sound, ambient soundclips will still play in deep caves, making you question if you're really alone.
* NotTheFallThatKillsYou: That is, [[SoftWater unless you land in water]].
* NotTheIntendedUse: Most craftable items are tools that are available to the player to use in any way they can imagine them. Discouraged with tools, since using them in unintended ways (i.e. chopping wood with a sword, killing mobs with a pickaxe, etc.) will eat up their durability twice as fast as normal. It's also worth noting that while using a fishing rod to snag a mob uses up three durability (versus one for fishing) but is generally considered worth it to wrangle mobs and to prevent pesky Ghasts from flying away.
* NumericalHard: For most of the game's development history, the only thing that changed between the 3 non-[[EasierThanEasy Peaceful]] difficulty levels was the amount of damage hostile monsters do. Mojang is slowly adding actual differences between the levels in new patches, though -- for an obvious example, zombies will ''try'' to break through wooden doors on all difficulties, but only on Hard will they succeed.
* ObviousBeta: The game started off as this for years until it finally became a full game at the end of 2011. The weekly snapshots (developmental versions of the game) published by Mojang play the trope straight since their only purpose is for players to test the planned features and/or bug fixes before they go live in the next major update.
* ObviousRulePatch: Usually averted, as Notch, Jeb, and the rest of Mojang are often impressed whenever someone figures out an unintended use for something newly implemented and want to keep the game open-sandbox. However, one deliberate {{Nerf}} was to mounted combat rules: it is impossible to deal critical hits on a horse because riders ran around PvP servers getting nothing ''but'' critical hits by exploiting the loosely defined conditions that the player had to be higher than the ground but not in the process of jumping up.
* OhCrap:
** ''You'', as you meet (or possibly don't meet) a Creeper and hear that iconic "Ssssssssssssssssssssssss". The fuse of the infamous DemonicSpider / ActionBomb, the creeper, seems to be perfectly calculated to give the player just enough time for one of these... before it blows up.
** Or do something to ruin your plans with one simple mistake. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOEb99_U9Pc#t=7m25s Case in point.]] Only .5 seconds between action and realization, but the aftereffects are hilarious.
** Let's not forget that moment of complete despair as you mine the block below you and realise that beneath that block is either a pool of lava of a room full of creepers.
** When you are in the Nether and suddenly falling.
** It happens sometimes that, when you build a nether portal in the Overworld then happily waltz into the Nether with your most expensive tools and items, the gate you arrive in the Nether... is fifty blocks up high, floating in space with no land near the gate... with a sea of lava right underneath the single block gate.
* OhMyGods: Numerous custom maps and {{Machinima}} that feature Churches or other real world-esque locales with [=NPCs=] or dialogue would replace "God" with Notch, the screenname of former lead designer Markus Persson. A good example would be ''[[Series/YogscastMinecraftSeries The Shadow of Israphel]]'' series.
-->'''Knight_Peculier:''' In ''Notch's'' name!
-->'''Xephos/Lewis:''' No, no Simon, I worship at the Church of Notch, like everyone else.
* OminousFloatingCastle: This is a somewhat popular model of base to build. Due to gravity not working on most blocks, it can be made out of dirt, stone, brick, wood, metal or even, theoretically, [[SerialEscalation water and ice]].
* OmnicidalManiac: The game brings us the Wither, which is essentially the ultimate griefer. It blows up everything in its path, and holds the philosophy that if something is alive, it must cease to be as such. [[ThatOneBoss It's also very good at this too]]. In-game griefers can be this as well, reducing server populations on death-ban servers to ridiculously low numbers.
* OneGenderRace: Practically every humanoid or animal species in the game. [[http://notch.tumblr.com/post/28188312756/gender-in-minecraft Notch elaborates on it here.]]
* OneHitKill: Since the 1.9 update buffed their explosion power, creepers can do this even to players whose armour is in a decent state.
* OneSteveLimit: An early Indev version of the game used to break it, with [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/The_Player Steve?]] and the since-removed [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Steve_(mob) Steve]].
* OnlyShopInTown: The game has an interesting version, where a player on a multiplayer server will often set up a place to barter items with other players (note that this is not specifically provided for by the gameplay). Most servers only have one, because when the niche is filled no one will found another.
* OnlySixFaces: Zombies, skeletons, blazes, and enderman use a re-colored version of Steve?'s face texture. And all the villagers have the exact same head and face, they are only identifiable by their clothes, which differ depending on their profession.
* OmnicidalManiac: The Wither, once summoned, attacks everything that is alive. Undead mobs are ignored.
* OnlySixHelmets: The game gives you the ability to create a player skin in which every pixel is custom designed. While the helmets aren't full-face, a full suit of armor means your face and hands are the only part of that skin you worked so hard on that can be seen, and for many texture packs, not even that. And even when not fully covered (either because you don't have a full set or because the texture pack you're using drew the armor to cover less), the armor often clashes with the player skin. Its unadvisable to fight mosters without armor, and certain resorces can only be gained by killing monsters.
* OrganDrops: Skeletons and their Nether counterparts drop their bones, as well as their heads. Zombies can drop their flesh, albeit rotten. Some passive mobs drop the appropriate form of meat, while cows additionally drop leather.
* OurDragonsAreDifferent: The Ender Dragon in The End, the final boss of the game. It lives in the End and has a the same appearance as Endermen put on the body of a Western dragon. It's mostly black with bits of gray on the wings and sporting purple eyes, but it looks pretty much the same as any western type dragon. The Ender Dragon doesn't have any attacks other than ramming into you to send you flying back several feet, but it has a TON of health (complete with its own LifeMeter) and is healed by the nearby Ender Crystals. It doesn't breathe fire (although a planned update for the Xbox 360 version will have it spit acid), but can fly and phase through terrain as it is nothing. It destroys any material not native to the End and is healed by Endercrystals. Killing it nets you 20,000 experience points and the Dragon Egg (which as of yet does nothing) and opens a portal to exit the realm. However, only one Ender Dragon can spawn per The End world.
* OurMonstersAreWeird: Creepers. Most of the other monsters are relatively normal, but creepers are just wrong. It's said that they came about from a failed attempt to make pigs.
** There are also [[DemonicSpiders Ghasts]], giant floating jellyfish-like creatures that spit fireballs.
** The monsters added relatively recently continue to be certifiably bizarre:
*** Blazes are floating heads surrounded by flaming golden rods that orbit them at high speed while shooting fire all over the place.
*** The Witherking is a massive, flying, desiccated three-headed torso that actually has to be constructed by the player out of skulls and soul sand.
* OurWightsAreDifferent: The Endermen bear a striking resemblance to [[TheLordOfTheRings Tolkien's]] description of a Barrow-Wight.
* OurZombiesAreDifferent: The ones featured here have the classic arms-forward walk, greenish-gray skin, and burst into flames when exposed to sunlight. They used to drop feathers when killed, simply because ''something'' had to drop feathers and zombies were introduced before chickens. Nowadays, they drop rotten flesh, which you can eat in emergencies, and the most you have to worry about is food poisoning. You can feed it to pet wolves to heal them without any downsides.
* TheOverworld: One of the three dimensions.
* OxygenMeter: When you're fully submerged under water, you have 15 seconds. If you run out of air, you'll start taking one heart of damage per second. Enchanted helmets of respiration can expand your oxygen meter ''and'' reduce the rate of damage once you run out.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:P-R]]
* PaletteSwap: Many blocks and items are the same models with different colored textures. The ores such as Coal, iron, gold, redstone, and diamond play this straight in respective colors, then Lapis ore subverts this, then the Emerald ore averts this completely. Gold and diamond, when condensed into solid blocks, have the same texture but different colors. Iron blocks used to have this texture too but it was changed to a more stacked pattern.
* PamphletShelf: After the 1.3 update, players can write their own, mostly due to the limited space per page and the 50 page total limit.
* PantheraAwesome: Ocelots are a mob found in jungles, can be tamed with raw fish, and [[WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes creepers are scared of them]].
* PatchworkMap: Biomes are all over the place. To start with, rivers [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/File:Deep_Oceans_Overview.png have estuaries at both ends and run in circles]].
** Originally, the game tried to simulate biomes according to wetness and temperature, therefore a change in either of them would mean a change of biome. This system was eventually abolished, and afterwards you could walk in rapid succession from a temperate forest, to a tundra, to a sandy desert, to a tropical rainforest (which for some reason, has livestock instead of the normal stuff). Without skipping a beat. The Beta 1.8 update changed that once more, biomes are significantly bigger now, so it's not as stark anymore, though you can see a desert that shares close boundaries with a very large, temperate forest and ocean. The introduction of the [[BiggerIsBetter Large Biomes]] option obviously makes these borders even less obvious/common.
** According to [[https://mojang.com/2013/08/minecraft-world-generator-update/ one of the snapshots for the 1.7 update]], biomes will be put into four main categories: snow-covered, cold, medium, and dry/warm. Biomes will be avoided getting placed next to a biome that is too different to itself. (Though this isn't completely foolproof yet, as mistakes will still happen occasionally.)
* PauseScumming: The game has a pause menu accessed by pressing the Escape key. One can change the game's difficulty to Peaceful (no monsters and perpetually regenerating health) if the player is assaulted by a monster while the player is at low health.
** Averted in Hardcore mode where the difficulty is locked to Hard at all times.
* PerpetualBeta: A TropesAreNotBad example: many players cannot ever foresee Notch, the creator of ''Minecraft'', ever letting his creation be truly "finished", even after the game [[https://twitter.com/#!/notch/statuses/136078211284090881 went gold]], and far, ''far'' after the game had become a stable experience.
** Notch he has stated that he wants to include a variety of base features, then release a finished game and essentially turn it over to the modding community. With Mojang announcing their next game, Scrolls, and ''Minecraft'' quickly reaching beta 2.0 status, some fans have speculated that this will happen sooner rather than later.
** ''Minecraft'' left Beta and went into its first "finished" version on November 18th, 2011, and it is ''still'' getting updates. Since the full release we have gotten Jungles, ocelots and cats, a new AI system with loads of new behaviors, [[WhyDidItHAveToBeSnakes creepers being afraid of cats]], a new type of golem, new blocks and items, upside down stairs and slabs and even a doubled build height and the ability to have ''thousands'' of different block and item types from mods. Mojang is gearing up to make life easier for modders and players who use mods.
* PCVsConsole: ''Minecraft'', a once PC-exclusive game, was announced by Notch (head developer of the game) that the game would also be released to the {{Xbox 360}} with Kinect controls. PC players ''exploded'' with fury at the news, saying that ''Minecraft'' would now be ruined by retarded ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}''/''Call of Duty'' fans who would muck up the ''Minecraft'' community with their trollish attitudes and would demand the game to have guns or other things, or were worried that the game would now have even less updates because of how split the development team would be between PC and the Xbox 360. This is after Notch has stated that A) a separate team would be working on the console port while he and his team would focus on the PC version, B) a standard controller would be an option to use should Xbox owners opt to not use Kinect controls, and C) updates were still coming regardless.
* PigMan: The Zombie Pigmen, residents of The Nether (and the result of an ordinary pig being [[LightningCanDoAnything struck by lightning]]). Unlike regular Zombies, Zombie Pigmen will not attack you without provocation. The game's creator plans to add regular Pigmen in a future update, and actually designed their character model quite a while ago.
* PillarOfLight: The Beacon Block does this.
* PinataEnemy: [[LegionsOfHell Blazes]] and [[NightOfTheLivingMooks Wither Skeletons]]. Blazes drop Blaze Rods, which are incredibly useful as a fuel source, crafting the brewing stand, and a potion ingredient, as well as for reaching [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon The End]]. Wither Skeletons have a very rare chance of dropping Wither Skulls- it takes three of these skulls to build the Wither, a boss monster that drops the Nether Star when it dies.
* PintSizedPowerhouse: The mini-zombies are even more powerful than their normal-size equivalent. Though their [[CollisionDamage attacks]] do the same amount of damage and they have the same amount of HitPoints, they're able to do so at a faster rate, and move at over three times the speed of normal zombies. They also aren't killed by sunlight.
* PlanetHeck:
** The Hell map setting.
** The Nether, as well.
* PlanetOfSteves: For some time after the post-release 1.3 update came out, ''Minecraft'' suffered from a problem where skins would break, causing everyone to look like Steve (the base player skin), causing this trope to be in effect for a while.
* {{Planimal}}:
** [[ActionBomb Creepers]] are actually some type of leafy plant monster.
** Mooshrooms are funganimals (half-cow, half-mushroom).
* PlayerAndProtagonistIntegration: The game borderlines between An Adventurer is You and You Are You. The playable character has absolutely no traits or personality and its appearance can be changed with a different texture to represent how the player wishes to be. Since there is no dialogue or any way to interact with the game's only [=NPCs=], the villagers, the player character is a pure blank slate. Things get more weird after you slay the Ender Dragon and leave The End realm. [[spoiler: Two unseen beings are talking to each other about your actions and know that you have evolved to the point where you can read their thoughts. They then start talking directly to you and discuss weird philosophies.]]
* PlayerHeadquarters: The player has to build everything from scratch: from a simple hole in the side of a hill, to a small house made of dirt, to a colossal castle. Which the player can outfit with beds to rest/respawn, crafting stations, storage, plantations and any mechanism the player can invent.Other than being a safe haven from the nightly monsters, of course.
* PlayerTic:
** Watching the sunrise and sunset is common as long as player is inside their safe zone.
** Gathering most every resource in sight, even when the player has it in abundance already. Be honest: when was the last time you saw coal or iron ore and NOT mined it?
* PlayerVersusPlayer: The game has player vs player on by default for servers, though it can be disabled by choice. The feature's uses range from every player for themselves or even clan battles.
* PleaseSubscribetoOurChannel: Some servers combine this and BribingYourWayToVictory by offering perks, access to certain tools, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking a different colored name]]. Though a lot of servers are fine (even some that do this are okay), many servers take it over the top.
* PointBuildSystem: The game has an experience points system that is used to enchant tools and pieces of armor. The more levels you spend, the stronger the enchantment gets and the higher the chances of having multiple enchantments will be. Placing bookshelves around the enchantment table will increase the chances of getting higher level enchantments.
* PointOfNoReturn: Once you enter The End, you can no longer return until you kill the [[FinalBoss Ender Dragon]] or die.
* PortalNetwork: You can make one with at least two Nether Gates, which require at the minimum 16 Obsidian blocks and a source of fire. Benefits: being able to get from point A to point B up to 8 times faster than Overworld travel. Drawbacks: walking through Hell each time you use it and the possibility of dropping straight into lava each time you make a new Nether Gate.
* PortalSlam: A semi-example: Ghast fireballs can disable Nether portals, and if you don't have a flint and steel, you're stuck in hell.
* PostModernMagik:
** Gunpowder can be added to magical potions to make them splash potions.
** It is also fairly common in multiplayer worlds to decrease the travel time of minecart public transit lines by using mystic portals to relocate them to [[FireAndBrimStoneHell the nether]].
** With the addition of the Hopper to the game, players are now able to create automated potion brewing factories, although this isn't particularly widespread quite yet.
*** The Hopper and the Dropper can be combined to create conveyor belts of indeterminate length (as opposed to previous attempts which were hampered by the 5 minute time limit imposed on item entities), which aid immensely in inventions like the automated potion factory.
* PowerCreepPowerSeep: The Endermen are going through a phase of this. Notch claims he nerfed them before the official Beta 1.8 release, and then complained that they're too easy, so the next major update gave their AI an overhaul, removed their vulnerability to sunlight, and doubled their health. It also limited the types of blocks they could move to the softer kinds. Time will tell how much of this stays permanent.
* PowerfulPick: You ''can'' use your pick this way, but usually it's better to stick to swords or bows, as using your pick as a weapon deals less damage than either of those weapons and you cannot block with it like you can a sword.
* PowerGlows: Enchanted tools and armor glow purple. While not necessarily more ''powerful'', enchanted items all have some sort of beneficial affect.
* PowerpuffGirlHands: The player's hand is a solid cube, yet able to hold and use items. (Although, if playing in first person, items [[InvisibleAnatomy float infront of you]])
* PowerUpMagnet: Experience orbs are naturally attracted on the player.
* PowerupMount: Pigs make great parachutes when you ride them via saddle.
* PreExplosionGlow:
** Creepers flash before blowing up.
** [[spoiler:The Ender Dragon has beams of light radiate from it before it disintegrates.]]
* PressStartToGameOver: In Hardcore mode, if you're unlucky or just clueless, this can take about ten minutes, which is the time it takes from the start of the game until sunset, when enemy mobs spawn. If you're ''very'' unlucky, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRzusZmAD7g&list=PLTvwKQHVid4aczd74zqkeMX1bcyj_Di0J&index=1 it can take less than twenty seconds]].
* PressurePlate: There are several types of switches you can create. They can be used to open or close doors, toggle redstone torches, switch minecart tracks, or detonate TNT. Stone pressure plates can be triggered by players and mobs walking or riding over them, while wooden pressure plates can additionally be triggered by arrows, dropped items, and minecarts. There are also pressure-sensitive minecart tracks, useful for triggering boosters. Pressure plates, when placed on top of a fence post, can also be used as an improvised table. Weighted pressure plates trigger stronger signals if lots of items are placed on them.
* PressXToDie: One mod allows you to make machines powered by electricity. You could use copper cables to route the power to these machines. Not using rubber to insulate the cables would cause you to get an electric shock. (Naturally, some savvy players use this effect to create an electric fence.)
* ProceduralGeneration: The game procedurally generates landscapes that are, for all practical purposes, infinite. There's an end, but it's about 30,000 kilometers[[note]](equivalent to 75% of the circumference of the Earth's equator)[[/note]] from your spawn point, which would take a minimum of 820 hours of gameplay to reach without cheating. The terrain randomly contains NPC villages, dungeons, strongholds, and abandoned mineshafts, as well as ten distinct biomes, including mountains, jungles, deserts, swamps, and tundras. This combines to create an immense world[[note]](the game is designed to support levels with more surface area than the Earth, although your system probably isn't up to the challenge)[[/note]] that you could spend your entire life exploring, if you felt like it. Furthermore, the game uses a special code called a seed to keep generated terrain consistent, and there are roughly four billion seeds to choose from, each of which can generate a unique world. The same seed can be used to generate the same world on any computer, and there are quite a few websites dedicated to sharing interesting seeds with other players.
* ProperlyParanoid: Most of the mobs create this feeling for players. All of the common ones like Skeleton Archers, Zombies, and Spiders can spawn ''anywhere'' that is large and dark enough, even if it's been previously explored. Creepers are especially dangerous: Remember to properly light up explored areas, or your character will suddenly come face to face with an imminent explosion.
* ProphetEyes: Herobrine, the ghost [[UrbanLegendOfZelda said to]] haunt the game, is described and depicted as looking like a normal player model, but with blank white eyes.
* ProtagonistWithoutAPast: The player character wakes up in the middle of nowhere and starts punching trees.
* PufferFish: One of the things you can fish up from the 1.7 Update onward. Eating these will cause bad poisoning, but you can brew them to make them into Potions of Water Breathing.
* PuffOfLogic: Due to the way terrain is generated, it is possible for certain blocks to be placed in ways the player could never replicate (floating sand or gravel, for instance), only to immediately obey the rules as soon as the player acts upon them.
* PunchedAcrossTheRoom: The Knockback enchantment gives your sword attack an extra kick by pushing your enemy backwards a lot farther than normal. At level 3, you can effectively push enemies beyond a 20 block distance from you, making it every effective to keep Creepers away from you so they don't explode or if you want to push enemies off a cliff.
* PurelyAestheticGender: The player character is intended to be a genderless representation of a human being despite WordOfGod saying his name is "Steve?" and has a human male-like appearance. Players can change the skin of their characters to look like anything imaginable including female characters but they will always retain the same blocky human shape and changing the skin doesn't affect anything else in the game.
* PurpleIsPowerful:
** Endermen are the most powerful, naturally spawning enemies in the Overworld. Their eyes glow purple, as does their particle effects.
** Obsidian is purple and is the strongest destroy-able block in the game, takes longer to mine even with the best pick, and is the hardest to obtain in the overworld.
* PurposelyOverpowered: Anything made of diamond. They're more durable and efficient than any other materials, and greatly outperform iron, the second-best material. The diamond sword, for example, can kill most enemies in three hits, and the diamond pickax can mine the widest range of blocks and lasts six times as long as the iron pickax before breaking. Diamond armor lasts more than twice as long as iron armor, and a new set can reduce damage by 80% as opposed to 60% for iron. However, all of this is justified because diamond is by far the [[JustForPun hardest]] resource to find.
** IIRC, a full set of diamond armor in 1.0.0 will allow the player to [[ConvectionSchmonvection swim in lava]] for an unholy amount of time.
* PyramidPower: The [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Beacon_Block Beacon Block]], when attached to a pyramid of blocks and fed a resource as power, buffs friendlies in the vicinity. Enlarging the pyramid extends its range and makes it possible to add more bonuses. Due to the way Beacon Blocks check their structure, it is possible to build a composite pyramid with numerous Beacons.
* QuicksandBox: Many people give up after finding that the game has has no plot. After The End was added, this intersected with UnpleasableFanbase as the plot seemed meaningless to many people. While there's also a lot of user created maps that have their own stories, a casual player tends to not look for such maps.
* RageQuit: Attempting to ragequit after dying in Hardcore mode will not work; PermaDeath still applies and you will still be forced to delete your game world.
* RainbowPimpGear: This can happen, although its generally not so much based on stats as what you can afford to craft. And additionally, the various armor bits can potentially clash not only with each other but with whatever outfit your player skin was drawn wearing. Most texture packs only exaggerate this trope further by giving each armor set a unique look.
** It gets worse when you start getting into useful-ability-granting one-to-a-set armor items added by mods like the odd-looking jetpack, batpack, and solar-helmet added by [=IndustrialCraft=] or the various garishly coloured magical armor items (and capes, and gloves) found in TheAether.
** The trope is more apparent when you start dying pieces of your leather armor with random colors.
* RainOfArrows:
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFUjulkzE7U With the help of some explosives.]]
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewFrgDPCgGA Another example, this one powered by a redstone circuit, that was featured on Notch's blog.]]
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cocXTSgzZDc&feature=related This video]] gives us enough flaming arrows to put the ''[[Series/MythBusters hwacha!]]'' to shame.
* RandomDrop: Almost every mob in the game, except for villagers and silverfish, have a chance to drop some sort of loot upon being killed.
* RandomlyGeneratedLevels: The entire world is randomly generated chunk by chunk (16x16x256 space) as you explore it. However, that being said, there are many rules the game follows to keep things a little evenly distributed (caves and ore veins) and the game chooses one of several rough pre-set patterns to form believable rivers, ravines, mountains, etc. Played straight with pre-generated structures though, as navigating an Abandoned Mineshaft or Nether Fortress without getting lost can be challenging (even if you've already raided several others in the past).
* RareRandomDrop: Most enemies have a chance to drop items they wouldn't normally, such as armor pieces, weapons, and consumables. The king, however, is the Wither Skulls dropped by Wither Skeletons, which barely ever drop even with max Looting enchantments and are required to summon the [[BonusBoss Wither]].
* RealIsBrown: The biomes introduced grasses with more "realistic" hues. The bright green grass ''does'' still exist, however.
* RealityBreakingParadox: Presumably the reason beds explode in the Nether when you try to use them. Beds can only be used at night (or during a thunderstorm), and reset the clock to sunrise. Since neither thunderstorms nor the day/night cycle ''exist'' in the Nether...
* RealityEnsues:
** Swords can be made of (in order of ascending rarity) wood, stone, iron, gold, and diamond. For the most part, the rarer starting materials result in stronger weapons, except golden swords are functional identical to wooden swords. In defiance of fantasy genre conventions, gold tools and armor, while effective, have extremely low durability and as such are almost useless except for looking cool. It came as quite a surprise when the players realized the second-rarest material made the weakest weapon, and a lot of people thought it was a bug... [[FridgeBrilliance until they remembered gold is one of the softest metals in the world]]; just like in real-life, gold weapons are only good for decorative purposes. They are, however, the best material for holding enchantments. However, gold is also used in conjunction with redstone in a number of craftable items that are considerably more useful, such as powered track. This is because while gold is a terrible material to make armor, weapons or blunt instruments out of it is well known as an integral component in precision electronic devices.
-->'''Ben 'Yahtzee' Croshaw''': Just before I hit bedrock, I finally found some gold, which I immediately crafted into a sword and armour set. "Ha! This'll give a hedge pause for thought before it kamikazes me!" But shortly afterwards I discovered that Minecraft goes for the realistic portrayal of gold, in that it's slightly less sturdy than the tinfoil around a baked potato.
** You actually can [[AnvilOnHead drop an anvil]] on someone's head. It's just going to damage them. A ''lot''.
* RecycledInSpace: ''Minecraft'' is ''VideoGame/{{Dwarf Fortress}}'' [-IN 3D!-]
* RedEyesTakeWarning: Spider eyes glow red. All eight of them. Wolves also gain red eyes when they turn hostile. Ghasts have red eyes and are a more extreme example of this trope, since they only open their eyes when they're spitting an exploding fireball at you.
* ReducedToRatburgers: You may find yourself reduced to poisonous zombie flesh if you don't have access to a source of fresh meat. This is a pretty desperate situation in the Overworld, though, given all you need for cooked fish is wood, stone, and spider silk. In the Nether, rotten meat dropped by zombie pigmen is the ''only'' naturally occurring source of food which can be eaten without extra resources, and is often the last resort of a lost traveler who has exhausted the food they brought with them.
* RefiningResources: Essentially how the crafting system works. Most recipes require some combination of wood, stone, and metal, either as part of the target item itself or to create the tools needed to make it. More literally, this is the main purpose of the Furnace: consuming fuel to refine raw resources into usable ones like Ores into Ingots, Wood into Charcoal, Clay into Clay Bricks, etc.
* RegeneratingHealth:
** Health works this way as long as your "food meter" is nearly full. When the food meter is completely empty, [[WizardNeedsFoodBadly the exact opposite happens]].
** Playing on Peaceful difficulty grants you regenerating health at all times. Potions of Regeneration and Golden Apples also grant temporary health regeneration.
** The [[spoiler:Enderdragon]] mob also has this when you fight one. However, this can be stopped by [[spoiler:destroying the Ender Crystals]], which actually HARMS it.
* RespawnOnTheSpot: The game is an interesting aversion: If you die, you spawn at a fixed (albeit changeable) point. Most multiplayer servers, however, have the /back command, which instantly teleports you to the point where you died. Quite handy given that your items are left behind.
* {{Retcon}}: Bamboo (AKA reeds [AKA papyrus]) is now sugar cane. Why? Cake. [[TruthInTelevision You can actually make paper from sugar cane,]] but it's still tasty literature.
* {{Retraux}}: The game has intentionally very low resolution textures to go with the gameplay of moving giant pixels around. Originally the intention was to update to more modern graphics but fans had already become attached to the faux-8-bit textures.
* ReviveKillsZombie: Beta 1.9 introduced several kinds of potions with beneficial or harmful effects. For every type, you can use it on yourself, or turn it into a splash potion to throw at friends or enemies. Zombies and skeletons are healed by potions of Poison or Instant Harm, but can be damaged with potions of Regeneration and Instant Health.
* ARiddleWrappedInAMysteryInsideAnEnigma: One of the title screen quips that appears after starting up the game is, "A riddle wrapped in a mystery!"
* RidiculouslyCuteCritter:
** Baby mobs. Just making the body smaller while leaving the head the same size should '''not''' produce such cuteness!
** As of the "Pretty Scary" update, bats count as well. They're small brown flying bundles with big ears that make adorable squeaks and hang on walls by their tiny little feet. Aaaw!
* RightBehindMe: Creepers have a nasty habit of doing this, being completely quiet until you hear that tell-tale hiss, which means it's already too late to flee. Endermen also have a nasty habit of appearing behind you during their TeleportSpam.
* RoarBeforeBeating: Endermen make a rather disturbing noise (at 0:35 in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYrv3Dl3c84 this video]]) should the player provoke them by "staring" at them (moving the crosshairs directly over their torsos or heads). Then they usually teleport directly behind the player.
* RobbingTheDead: The game lets you rob treasure from pyramids in the desert. Each pyramid can contain things like gold, iron, diamonds, bones, and rotten flesh, but they're also guarded by TNT traps that trigger if you step on the pressure plate. Doing so will destroy all the treasure and kill you.
* {{Robinsonade}}: When starting a new game, you're dropped in the middle of nowhere with only your bare hands and the clothes on your back and must survive using your wits and whatever you can harvest, scavenge, or craft. Sometimes the game will even dump you on a DesertedIsland.
* RocketJump: This is possible, but very tricky. Unless it's an adventure map, you'd be better off just placing a couple blocks and making a stairway. However, using a splash potion of harming can double your jump height and is much safer than the previously suggested TNT.
* RollercoasterMine: Thanks to the various track pieces, this can result from deliberate player designs. Sometimes players will use this as part of an elaborate transportation system.
* RPGElements: The game has this in the form of experience points, potions, and enchantments. Experience points are used to enchant tools and armor pieces for various effects, such as a sword multiplying the number of drops from a mob or a pair of boots that reduces fall damage. Brewing potions can get you various results, depending on what is used, and they can be made into a "splash" form that act like hand grenades. The fanbase is [[BrokenBase divided]] as to whether this constitutes GrowingTheBeard or JumpingTheShark.
* RubberyWorld: There's a GameMod that allows you to use GLSL shaders. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpksyojwqzE This shader]] literally bends the whole landscape in the distance back and forth, [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs like an acid trip]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwpxHVmNF1w This shader]] also makes the whole game world shake and wobble like jelly, ''including the very ground beneath the player character's feet''.
* RubeGoldbergDevice: While ''Minecraft'' 's physics do not seem to allow the construction of many mechanical devices, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooTS9Z6PFh0 this video]] will show you how it's done.
* RuinsForRuinsSake: Multiple examples. Among others, Abandoned Mineshafts, Jungle and Desert Temples, Strongholds, and Nether Fortresses are all both clearly artificial and rather eerie.
* TheRuleOfFirstAdopters: ''Minecraft'' and its gigantic penis monuments in Creative mode.
* RunningGag: Notch for the past several patches, including the release of version 1.0, has stated he [[UrbanLegendOfZelda "removed Herobrine"]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:S-U]]
* SavageSetpiece: The Zombie Pigman will even walk right up to you ''and look at you'' without attacking. When you attack him, not only does he attack full-on with his sword, but any other Zombie Pigmen in range come in swinging. It's worth noting that they deal the most damage per hit out of any monster (aside from creepers), and one blow can easily take off a quarter of your maximum health on easy. Wolves behave similarly to protect their own pack, but they can also be tamed, at which point they'll defend you from monsters. Endermen can be considered this as well, but they disarrange the environment and even consider ''looking directly at them'' a hostile act.
* SaveScumming: the only way to have incremental savegames - quit the game, alt-tab out, copy save folder, reenter game, reload save.
* ScareChord: The "ambience" noises in unlit caves could count as this.
* SceneryPorn:
** The map generator cranks out breathtaking views by the dozen and can make scenery porn like no other, however, [[http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/images/10/sept/mine4/mine41big.jpg this]] is quite a great example.
** Minecraft is unique in that despite its famous pixelated blocky graphics, it can still create some truly breathtaking scenery. And the nature of the game basically makes it a do-it-yourself scenery porn generator. Just type "minecraft scenery" or "minecraft creations" into a Google Image search and see what you get.
*** Check out some of [[http://www.youtube.com/user/Vareide/videos?view=0&sort=da&flow=grid Vareide]]'s early videos for good natural and artificial examples.
*** Many entries in the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKfZIoXRSOM&list=ELijLTKdkGOPY&index=12 Best Minecraft Creations]] series qualify for this. Everything past the first in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAaYGY1MfIw this video]] are some of the best examples ever. See also [[http://techland.time.com/2013/05/23/the-15-best-minecraft-creations-and-wildest-destinations/ here]], and [[http://mashable.com/2013/02/13/amazing-minecraft-creations/#_ here]].
** Plenty of VideoGame/MinecraftAdventureMaps are loaded with this. Just look at the trailers for the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=OC7a2uk_4qY Survival]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8gLS7Sr2S0c Games]], for example.
** The sweeping vistas of ''The Wizard Burgmund'', the awe-inspiring architecture of ''The Pharaoh's Curse 2'', the labyrinthine interior of the vast castle from ''Monarch Of Madness'', the eerily beautiful ruined city from ''Chronotide''... any Adventure Map worth its salt has at least some of this.
*** If you're playing one of the ''Super Hostile'' maps and you're not busy [[NintendoHard dying]], it's because your busy gawking at the gorgeous landscapes. Even the maps designed to resemble ''Hell'' look beautiful.
*** The Temple from ''The Redmurk Mystery'' is a brilliant example, especially when you first see it (skip to about 11:30 in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkPMIVDTM7U this video]]). It only gets better from there. Similarly, seeing ''The Sunken Island'' for the first time as you topple over the edge of a cliff is an extraordinary sight.
*** ''The Fall Of Gondolin''. ''The whole thing''. It's based on ''Lord Of The Rings'', so what did you expect?
*** Many maps are entirely made of Scenery Porn, such as ''The Tourist'', ''Rise Of The Rebellion'', and OH MY GOD ''DEEP SPACE TURTLE CHASE''.
*** ''Herobrine's Return'' deserves special mention for turning [[FireAndBrimstoneHell the Nether]] into [[http://img.youtube.com/vi/aqjzWQ_lXxg/hqdefault.jpg Scenery Porn]].
** Many mods deserve mention as well, such as the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=2EFU55eXTBs#! Twilight]] [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=yMSAq6dFFME Forest]] and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QSse8vCEo4 the Aether]].
** ''Lord Of The Rings'' has Scenery Porn. ''Minecraft'' has Scenery Porn. Put them together and you get [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4lSMzN1i5Q this]].
** Finally, absolutely everything the [=VoxelBox=] has made. Ever.
* SchmuckBait:
** If playing on an "anything goes" server, beware this. Unwitting players will wonder why no one is touching a vein of ore that's right out in the open, only to wander over to it and get dropped into a lava trap. It's also common to rig buttons labelled "DO NOT PUSH" with copious amounts of TNT or to bait griefers with decoy houses rigged to blow up by marking them with something along the lines of "Please don't grief my house, thanks."
** Mystcraft, a mod for ''Minecraft'' can have books such as this too. Fail to create a book linking to the Overworld before jumping into an Age you've created will, more often than not, cause you to be stuck in that Age. Alternatively, certain Age symbols that you use to write Ages carry with them a hefty toll. Good luck mining all that extra ore in that Age when the entire world is falling apart at the seams.
* ScoringPoints: On death, a score is displayed that is determined by the amount of experience points you accumulated before dying. However, the scores currently do nothing, although the experience points can be spent to enchant equipment. Its only value is in hardcore mode where death causes your world to be deleted.
* SeeWater: In addition to the general blue overlay and particles floating around, water gets darker the deeper down you go, making it impossible to see more than a few blocks down.
* SeldomSeenSpecies:
** Name another video game with ocelots in it. [[Franchise/MetalGear No, humans with "Ocelot" in their codename don't count.]]
** Minecraft also includes many types of seldom seen flowers such as bluets, peonies, and allium.
* SelectiveGravity: Only certain types of blocks (sand, gravel; partially, fluid blocks) are affected by gravity. Other block types are not, allowing them to float in midair.
** Sometimes the blocks that aren't supposed to float might still do so if they were generated that way. Such floating blocks typically fall [[GravityIsAHarshMistress as soon as you do something affecting them]], though.
*** Basically, if these blocks are generated as floating when they're not supposed to, then breaking those blocks will cause their sister blocks to fall down as normal and can cause a chain reaction.
* SelfImposedChallenge: ''Minecraft'', aside from avoiding the monsters, has no goals and would get boring very quickly if players didn't keep thinking up insane megaprojects to do.
** Players also do self-imposed challenges with their gameplay style. In reality, a safe shelter can be made by digging 3 blocks straight down and capping off the hole made in the process. However, "How to survive your first night" tutorials usually show much more complex solutions, ranging from a simple hole in the cliff to a small house. The other parts of the gameplay style is also often self-imposed. It's easy to put treasure chests everywhere to minimalize the loss of items after death. Usually that's not done.
** Some of the challenges players make are more unusual. There's "undercity challenge" where player spends only the first day above ground and rest of the time under ground.
** Some have actually succeeded in completing the challenge of slaying the Enderdragon in Hardcore Mode, a mode that deletes your save file should you die, so this becomes a no death run. Getting TO the dragon is a challenge in itself, requiring lots of materials, time, and patience, even by normal game playing.
** There's also the Skyblock challenge, in which you're spawned onto a small island in the sky with one tree, and must complete certain objectives (make a tree farm, make a stone generator, etc) being compounded by even MORE self-imposed challenges.
** Basically, any Player-created map that is listed under Survival is an example of a challenge. Along with "No WorkBench" (only use the 2x2 crafting slot you have and not the 3x3 that the workbench gives you) "No chests" (You carry everything with you, nothing that can store items like Dispensers, furnaces; do not place blocks down for storage) "No shelter" (Open air campsites are okay, buildings/anything with walls and a roof is not.)
** One enterprising Muslim gamer wrote [[http://www.minecraftforum.net/topic/141365-rules-of-islam-and-other-religions-in-minecraft-pic-heavy/ an extensive topic]] on following Islamic dietary and behavioural restrictions as closely as the game allows.
* SentientCosmicForce: [[spoiler:Addresses you at the end of the game. Not just your character, but '''[[BreakingTheFourthWall you]]'''.]]
* SequenceBreaking:
** Although the game has no preset sequence to break, it does have a tech tree that's fairly linear. Normally, making an obsidian portal to enter the Nether requires a diamond pickaxe with which to break obsidian. However, since obsidian is formed when water flows over a lava source block, it's possible (through clever use of buckets) to make a mold, fill it with lava, and solidify it into a portal with water, no diamonds needed. If you're really bloody-minded, you can even find a natural lava pool and destroy all the lava that's not in the portal shape by replacing it with dirt, then opening a hole to a pond/ocean above and let nature do its work, no iron (for buckets) needed either. Hope your stone tools are good enough to fend off Ghasts and Blazes!
** To a lesser extent, trading with Villagers will get you offers for all sorts of different types of gear; [[LuckBasedMission if you're lucky]] (or just damn persistent) you can get access to quality equipment you normally shouldn't have at that point in the game, especially if you start near a Village and get your hands on Diamond tools before you even encounter Iron!. You can also get other valuable stuff like Enchantments, Saddles, Eyes of Ender, etc. without having to raid a dungeon or enter the Nether for them, though you'll have to grind for resources in order to get the requisite Emeralds. Finally, the Village itself will probably have Carrots and Potatoes to save you the trouble of waiting for a Zombie to drop one, as well as anything else like Chests you feel like stealing from them because you don't have one yourself.
* SerialEscalation:
** First, the map was large already. Then, generation of the level was made easier, so now we have an area 8 times larger than THE ENTIRE SURFACE AREA OF EARTH! Notch released a fly-over video [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NszGurDUlHc demonstrating just how enormous a small portion of that can be.]] To top it off, he then released [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=953XeQ3qwMM a flight covering even more area and this time with different biomes]].
** The height of the map used to be capped at just above the height of the clouds. This made it very easy to reach the top, as even a high hill can touch the top of the map. Then Jeb_ doubled the height of the world. And in effect, TRIPLED the amount of building space.[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLvNBB5kyY8]].
** The whole game is this trope when you think about it. You begin by punching down a tree with your bare hands, swim backwards up waterfalls to get around and eventually turn [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNXpjFwiFdk hell itself into your own personal highway]].
** So what the hell else can we build? Another mass mob holocaust? A mincart station that has hundreds of destinations? Another giant creeper statue? Replacing every block with TNT?
** The Youtube user [[http://www.youtube.com/user/kurtjmac kurtjmac]] is attempting to walk to the Far Lands. He's been at it for quite a number of hours now (if you take a look at the "Far Lands Or Bust" playlist, he started walking to the Far Lands in the 11th video). Coming just before his 100th episode, he has walked 292202 meters from his spawn (blocks are 1 meter in all directions) ~180 miles, this is about 2.3% the way to one edge. When he looked at his data again, he had a total distance of 699492 meters (434.64 miles) walked away from spawn.
%%Update this next when he presses f3 again.
* SeriesMascot: The Creeper.
* SetAMookToKillAMook: Enemies will switch targets if they are hit by another enemy, but will otherwise go for you. Handy if you happen to be chased by more than one enemy. Also, having a Skeleton kill a Creeper is how you get records. Easier said than done, since it won't count if the Creeper detonates or gets killed by anything else. It must be killed by a skeleton's arrow to drop a Music Disc.
* ShameIfSomethingHappened: According to MemeticMutation, that's what [[http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q289/Xander77_album/ssssssssssssssssssssss.png Creepers do]].
* ShareWare: The game is this now - unpaid users can play "demo mode", where a single map only lets you play for 5 in-game days before asking you to pay. After that, the map is locked until you pay.
* ShiftingSandLand: Deserts. That "shifting" bit is taken more literally than some cases, as Sand blocks, like Gravel blocks, actually obey gravity (barring those created at world generation, which will float until disturbed).
* ShoutOut:
** The [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Splash splash text]] on the title screen has more than a few:[[note]]these are not all of them.[[/note]]
*** [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas Follow The Train CJ]]
*** [[WillWright Reticulating splines!]]
*** [[VideoGame/{{Doom}} MAP11 has two names!/Phobos Anomaly!]],
*** [[Manga/TheEnigmaOfAmigaraFault Drr... Drr... Drr...]]
*** Not on {{Steam}}!
*** [[{{Persona4}} Switches and ores!]]
*** [[StarWars That's not a moon!]]
*** [[WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy Peter Griffin!]]
*** [[PeekABooCorpse A Skeleton Popped Out!]]
*** [[Series/TheColbertReport Made Of Truthiness!]]
*** "[[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Haley loves Elan!]]"
*** "[[TvTropesWillRuinYourLife Less addictive than TV Tropes!]]"
*** "CowTools!"
*** "[[{{Videogame/Diablo}} Stay awhile and listen!]]"
*** "Try ''[[VideoGame/MeatBoy Super Meat Boy]]'' / ''VideoGame/{{Terraria}}'' / ''VideoGame/ProjectZomboid'' / ''VideoGame/{{VVVVVV}}'' / etc."
*** "[[HomestarRunner Consummate V's]]"
*** "Kinda like {{Lemmings}}!"
*** "[[StarCraft My life for Aiur!]]"
*** " [[BobTheAngryFlower BTAF]] used to be good!"
*** "[[Music/DaftPunk Technologic!]]"
*** "4815162342 lines of code!"[[note]]4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42 are The Numbers that appear all over the television series {{Lost}}.[[/note]]
*** "AgeOfWonders is better!"[[note]]This splash attracted the attention of said game's dev team. During the ensuing discussion, it was arranged for Notch to fund a third installment in the series[[/note]]
*** "[[{{Main/Bjork}} All is full of love!]]"
*** "[[{{Music/Deadmau5}} Joel]] is neat!" [[note]]deadmau5's real name is Joel Zimmerman[[/note]]
** The randomly placed paintings include [[VideoGame/{{Kings Quest}} Graham]], 100M from VideoGame/DonkeyKong, and some of the maps from ''VideoGame/{{Counter-Strike}}''.
** The achievement for making cake is called [[VideoGame/{{Portal}} The Lie]]
** Persson compares the Endermen to [[TheRing Samara]].
** [[WordOfGod Word of Notch]] says that the Enderman is an obvious shout-out to the SlenderManMythos.
** The gibberish text in the enchantment table is the [[VideoGame/CommanderKeen Standard Galactic Alphabet]]. Among the possible enchantment ''words'' are "[[ColossalCave Xyzzy]]", "[[Film/TheDayTheEarthStoodStill1951 Klaatu Barata Niktu]]", and "{{Franchise/The Elder Scrolls}}".
** The Iron Golem, resembles the robots from ''[[Anime/CastleInTheSky Laputa: Castle in the Sky]]'', and if you watch closely, they occasionally offer a rose to villager children.
** In the language option [[LandDownUnder Australian English]], there aren't any villagers. Only [[Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus Bruce]].
** Version 1.6 added horse armor, which is a reference to the much-ridiculed horse armor DLC from ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion''
** An update to the ''Xbox 360 Edition'' hides away [[LetsPlay/AchievementHunterMinecraftSeries the Tower of Pimps]].
** A Halloween texture pack released for the ''Xbox 360 Edition'' turns the Endermen into [[TheSlenderManMythos Slendermen]]. As if the Enderman wasn't a big enough shout out to [[FanNickname Slendy]] on its own!
* ShovelStrike: In a pinch, you can use your shovel as a weapon, though it doesn't do as much damage as a sword, or even other tools like the axe or pick-axe.
* ShownTheirWork: This could be a just graphics bug, but when you look at lava flowing down through water you can see it surrounded by a hazy light-blue glow. This looks very much like steam that should be created by boiling water as lava is flowing through it.
* SickeningCrunch: The game replaced the long-standing "OOGH" damage sound with an absolutely spine-chilling set of crunching, cracking, and gibbing sounds. Some of these are even given titles such as "Hurt Flesh.wav". [[FridgeLogic Which also play for burning, drowning, poison, and other forms of damage]]...
* SillinessSwitch: Minecraft is available in a wide variety of languages: the default English, Spanish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Arabic... [[LordOfTheRings Elvish]], [[Franchise/StarTrek Klingon]], [[TalkLikeAPirate Pirate]]...
** Since 1.2, there's a chance the title screen logo will say "Minceraft" instead of "Minecraft."
* TheSimpleLifeIsSimple: Farming is much easier than in RealLife - for instance, you can make your crops grow on demand by adding bonemeal. Somewhat {{enforced|Trope}} in this as in other video games, since games are intended to be, what was that word again, ''fun''.
* SimpleYetAwesome:
** The fishing rod. Obviously used for fishing, but can also be used to yank mobs toward you (or off tall places), knock mobs back, reel in transports like boats and minecarts and (bizarrely) knock pictures off walls.
** Bone meal, when applied any plant, will grow it to full size immediately (it make take two tries, but rarely). This allows you to create full grown trees, harvest them, then re-grow and re-harvest a new tree from the saplings of the tree you just harvested. Wheat farms (to feed livestock) can be fast-tracked for a large surplus (this is the least efficient use of bone meal, however). Melon/pumpkin stalks can be grown to full size instantly, and once grown as such will grow new melons/pumpkins extremely quickly (this part can't be affected by bone meal, though). Grass can be spread quickly to gather wheat seeds and flowers. Finally, you can even grow a single regular mushroom into a huge mushroom that can be harvested for over a dozen more mushrooms. Best of all, skeletons will almost always drop a bone, and one bone is three bone meal, meaning one night of hunting can net you enough bone meal to last a good long while. It was nerfed in 1.5, requiring around two to seven bone meal on tree saplings and around two to three bone meal on crops to do the same job, but this is arguably still worth it for everything except large fields of crops.
** Torches. They are an absolute must-have when you go mining, and they're very easy to make. Not only does they help you see in the dark, they also decrease the rate at which mobs spawn. Falling sand and gravel can be broken by putting down a torch underneath them, thus preventing you from being suffocated, and therefore averting the Minecraft Safety Rule Number Two completely. Torches also melt nearby snow and ice, making them useful to keep skylights from being snowed over and lakes from freezing in snow biomes (only for a radius of two blocks, though). Placing a torch underwater helps to regain air while underwater, so you do not have to resurface for air and may even ''save'' you from drowning (the torch itself is destroyed upon being placed, though).
** Donkeys and mules are a golden example. Sure, they might not be able to fit that snazzy diamond horse armor you plundered from the dungeon/temple/stronghold/whatever, but they're just as fast and durable as horses and you can easily fit them with chests for extra inventory space. Besides, the only thing you'd really need to protect your mount from is other players in [=PvP=] servers - you can easily run past creepers before they even hiss, dodging skeleton arrows and leaving zombies and spiders in the dust.
* SingleBiomePlanet: The game averts this: there are several biomes available, with varying degrees of probability. If you start in an arctic biome and don't like it, just keeping walking until you find a biome you do like (note: may take a ''very'' long walk).
** It should be noted, however, that most of the biomes look alike. A grass block in one biome looks exactly like another in a different biome, only a different shade of green. Except for deserts, all biomes have grass; it is only the kinds and amounts of trees which separates them. And, since you can plant your own trees wherever you feel, you can create this in a limited area.
*** Except, y'know, that's how [[RealityIsUnrealistic ''real'' biomes work]]. And unless they can manage to simulate every possible variable, that's how it's gonna stay.
** A mod can create biomes so big they are effectively this. The same mod can also make them so small they are only a few blocks wide.
*** Before biomes were added to the game, however, the trope was in full effect.
* SituationalSword: You can end up with a rather specialized armor piece or tool depending on which enchantments you get on it, literally if enchanting a Sword. For instance, a Diamond Sword with Smite and Looting will be exceptionally useful for slaying undead and farming their Gold Nuggets and Wither Skulls, though average against everything else (then again, a Diamond Sword is still a Diamond Sword). A sword with Looting for farming Ender Pearls is better without Fire Aspect, since Endermen will teleport away as soon as they catch fire, making them more difficult to kill. It's a bit worse with armor, since it's possible to end up with a specific protection that's only encountered some of the time and it's faster to swap out weapons/tools than armor. Fire Protection and Blast Protection can be useful throughout all of the Nether though.
* SlashCommand: The game has these. For single-player, they are enabled by default in creative mode, enabled or disabled at world creation in survival mode, and force-disabled in hardcore. Servers have them enabled for all gamemodes, and server plugins can take them UpToEleven with commands that remove all entities, spawn things like spheres, or make new worlds.
* SlidingScaleOfLinearityVsOpenness: The game looks to be shaping up to be at level 6. Though [[WordOfGod Notch states]] that he wants a "climax" of some sort, he also speaks of "emergent" plot and gameplay; it would probably be a surprise if you ''had'' to try to "win".
** That "climax" you pointed out being the [[spoiler: Enderdragon]], but most of the game's fun comes from the amount of things you can do.
** Most custom Adventure maps tend towards 1 or 2 if they have an actual plot. Wool collection maps are usually 3 or 4.
*** There's actually Survival Maps made which basically follow the basic rules of Minecraft, but add some theme or twist, like being stranded on an island, or being stuck in the sky, or something along those lines. These maps tend to be anywhere from level 3 to 5.
* SlidingScaleOfUndeadRegeneration: The zombies and skeletons are both Type II.
* SlippySlideyIceWorld: You used to have a chance of this each time you started a new world. Snow fell 24/7 and water froze to ice. Now there are biomes that look like this, with frozen lakes and snow-covered terrain, and instead of raining in those biomes it snows.
* SlowElectricity: Quite a few contraptions end up working this way, but that's justified because it's difficult ''not'' to use a lot of repeaters in the not even electrical but "[[AppliedPhlebotinum redstone]]" circuits as the power gets further away from the input.
* TheSnackIsMoreInteresting: If combat goes on long enough, it behooves Steve? to eat something to boost his HealingFactor, whether it be a slice of melon, some bread, or an entire cooked chicken.
* SniperDuel: One of the achievements is called "Sniper Duel", and is awarded for shooting a skeleton from 50 blocks of distance. It's actually easier than it sounds, since most monsters can't detect players beyond 16 blocks of distance.
* {{Snowlems}}: You can build a golem out of snow with a jack-o-lantern for a head. It'll wander around, spreading snow on the ground. It also throws snowballs at nearby monsters. The snowballs don't deal any damage directly (except for some nether mobs), but they'll knock the monster back and distract it, which you can use to your advantage whether you're trying to fight, flee, or lure it into a trap.
* SocializationBonus: There's an achievement gained by tossing a diamond towards another player. Thankfully, this can be done in single-player mode as well, since tossing a diamond at any mob that can hold items also counts.
* SoftWater: Falling damage is proportional to distance fallen, but landing in a pool of water a couple meters deep negates the damage, even if you fall from the top of the world to the bottom.
* SomeDexterityRequired: Many things require lots of clicks. Thankfully, you can hold a button down to mine.
* SongParody: There are several popular ''Minecraft''-themed parodies of songs, such as "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPJUBQd-PNM Revenge]]" (parody of "DJ Got Us Fallin' In Love") and "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_XGxzMrq04 Don't Mine At Night]]" (parody of "Last Friday Night")
* SortingAlgorithmOfThreateningGeography: Starts off with the Overworld, then the Underground caves, then the Nether, and finally the aptly titled End.
* SoundCodedForYourConvenience: Nearly every enemy makes its own distinct idle sounds. Zombies groan, skeletons clunk, spiders skitter and hiss, ghasts... uh, impersonate the sound designer's cat, and so on. The only exception is creepers, who, as their name suggests, are stealth-based and [[ParanoiaFuel do not make any sound at all]]. Flowing water and lava also make sounds indicating that they are near.
** [[NightmareFuel Creepers do make that one sound...]]
* SoundtrackDissonance: The serene piano melodies that grace the game's audio only serve to make the tunnels to hell all the more horrifying. Even worse if your audio on the game happens to glitch horribly and distort.
* SoWhatDoWeDoNow: The [[MindScrew bizarre ending sequence]] has two entities speaking directly to the player, praising their accomplishments in the game and suggesting that maybe their next adventure will be to do great things in the real world, too.
* SpaceCompression: Although the map is theoretically infinite, the biomes are unrealistically small. The Large Biomes worldgen option changes this.
* SpaceJews: The Testificates, large-nosed merchants protected by {{Golem}}s.
* SpamAttack: Archery used to be this before the Adventure Update changed bows to the "hold to draw back farther" system, requiring players to pause and aim shots more. To compensate, bow durability got buffed.
* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''{{Infiniminer}}''.
* SprintMeter: Done somewhat differently. Your Hunger Meter (which can be refilled by eating) is made of ten muttonchops. If the top one is not empty, you'll slowly heal. If three or less are full, there's no way to sprint. If it's empty, you start to starve to nothing (in Hard [or ''HarderThanHard Hardcore''] difficulties only)
* SpritePolygonMix: The game uses billboarded sprites for dropped non-block items. Dropped block items are rotating 3D models of the blocks.
** Less so after 1.4.6., where all entities are 3D. Saplings and other fauna are still billboards, and don't rotate to match the player.
* SssssnakeTalk: While not a snake, the game has creepers which hiss when about to explode. Although it's more like the sound of a lit bomb fuse. [[MemeticMutation "Thatsssssssss a very nice example you've got there. It'd be a ssssssshame if something happened to it."]]
* StandardStatusEffects: With the introduction of potions, many status effects were put into the game, such as faster speed, slower speed, boosted attack strength, health regeneration, poison, etc.
* StarScraper: Thanks to the enormous building height, these can be built in anywhere between a few minutes or a few hours, depending on how elaborate you want them to be.
* StatusBuff: The game has several status buffs that are obtained from potions and using beacons. The stronger the buff, the more potent it is and they can be used on friends and foes alike:
** Regeneration: Restores health over time.
** Speed Boost: Walk and run faster.
** Strength: Damage output is boosted.
** Resistance: Increased defense.
** Fire Resistance: Immunity to fire and lava.
** Night Vision: All dark areas are lit up, though they are not actually filled with light, thus monsters can still spawn.
** Water Breathing: SuperNotDrowningSkills plus improved vision underwater.
** Invisibility: ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, except for items carried and armor pieces worn.
** Haste: Mine blocks faster.
** Health Boost: Temporarily increases your maximum health.
* StealthPun: [[MeaningfulName Creepers]] have an irritating habit of hiding behind corners, under ledges, and outside doorways to ambush the player.
** Creepers have a mottled green texture that, at a distance, can cause one to mistake them for cacti or the tops of trees. [[spoiler:The word "creeper" can also refer to various plants.]]
* StockFemurBone: Skeletons drop the classic femur bones.
* StuffBlowingUp:
** The famous Creeper, an enemy best described as a suicide-bombing leaf monster. On the players' side of things, it also features TNT blocks, which when placed in close proximity with one another (or triggered Creepers) can create chain reactions. Sufficiently large explosions have been known to crash the game and [[EarthShatteringKaboom break the current world's save file]].
** Beds violently explode in a fiery ball when used in the two alternate dimensions.
* SuccessionGame: The mod [[http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/07/mf_chainworld/ ChainWorld]].
* SuicideAttack: The Creepers are a race of hostile green creatures whose main battle tactic is to run up into your face and blow themselves up. Or to run up behind you, [[ParanoiaFuel silently]], and blow themselves up. This led [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] to label them "kamikaze shrubs" and "suicide hedges."
* SuperDrowningSkills: In the 1.4.2 update, slimes could spawn at night in swamp biomes. However, they can't swim, so it's quite likely that they will jump in deep water and eventually drown.
** This has been fixed in the 1.8 update, with slimes now being able to "swim" i.e floating to the surface of the water.
* SupernaturalIsPurple: The game has this. Nether portals are made from dark purple volcanic glass and are filled with some sort of purple glowing stuff. They also [[SuckingInLines suck in purple smoke]], as do Endermen, whose eyes glow purple. Their dimension is also home to the Enderdragon, whose eyes and mouth glow purple, and floating pink and purple crystals that heal the dragon.
* SuperOCD: The game tends to evoke this trope in the players. You WILL have a specific way in which to order your inventory for maximum efficiency, and you will cringe EVERY time you see a Let's Play that has a person who does not stack all of their items properly.
** Don't forget about misplacing a block or leaving behind unmined ore.
* SuperStrength: Zig-zagged. Players can fill up their inventory with feathers (a total of 4.6kg) and not carry any more... but they can carry up to just short of 50,000 tons (filling the inventory with nothing but gold blocks), without any difficulty whatsoever.
* SuperweaponSurprise: Villagers are incapable of defending themselves. The iron golems that patrol their villages aren't. Attack a villager and have a several ton golem bearing down on you like an enraged bear made of metal defending her cubs.
* SuperWeight:
** Type -1: Anyone under the effect of [[StandardStatusEffects negative Potion]].
** Type 0: Most neutral animals, Villagers.
** Type 1: [[PlayerCharacter Steve?]] [[BadassNormal in Hardcore]] [[CharlesAtlasSuperpower Mode]], Wolves, [[{{Mooks}} Zombies, Skeletons, Spiders]], [[GoddamnBats Baby Zombies]], Zombie Pigmen.
** Type 2: Steve? [[ResurrectiveImmortality in Survival Mode]], [[ActionBomb Creepers]], [[AsteroidsMonster Slimes, Magma Cubes]], [[EliteMooks Cave Spiders, Wither Skeletons]], [[MetalSlime Spider Jockeys]].
** Type 3: Steve? while using Potions and/or Enchantments, [[HumanoidAbomination Endermen]], Ghasts, Blazes.
** Type 4: Steve? in Creative Mode, [[EldritchAbomination the Wither]], [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the Enderdragon]].
** Type 7: [[spoiler:[[SentientCosmicForce The entities]] from [[MindScrew the End Poem]]]].
* SurvivalHorror: Is kind of what Minecraft is, due to the amount of NightmareFuel the game contains. It's especially evident in Hardcore mode, where you only have one shot; if you die, you can't respawn, and the world is deleted.
* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: This speech from Notch about Herobrine.
-->I've publicly told people there's never been any such thing as Herobrine, and that I don't have any dead brothers, and that letting too many animals die in lava is a fool proof way to summon him but that you don't need to be afraid of him. He only means well, he's looking out for you, trying to warn you of the dangers you can't see. There certainly are NO physical manifestations of Herobrine that will sneak out of your computer if you leave Minecraft running at night, looming over you as you sleep with his pale eyes inches away from your face, as he tries to shout at you to wake up. Sometimes you wake up with a jolt, and he's gone, and all that lingers is the memory and faint echo of his wordless screaming. Of course it was just a dream. There's no way a morally dubious ghost with a god complex could at any point decide to haunt the children who play my game "for their own good", as there is NO SUCH THING, etc, etc.
* SwampsAreEvil: Averted until the introduction of witches, which live exclusively on swamps, and slimes, which now spawn in swamps as well as underground. [[MostAnnoyingSound The slimes alone make the swamps evil.]]
* TacticalDoorUse: The game {{zigzag|gingTrope}}s this one. Wooden doors cannot be locked, while iron ones have one built in because they need power to open or close. Villagers can go through wooden doors at their leisure, sometimes making them TooDumbToLive. Zombies alone of the hostile mobs can use doors... as in, they'll break down wooden doors given enough time (and only on the highest difficulty at that).
* {{Tagline}}: ''Tons''; the page image's caption is [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Splash one of a set of many]], from which one is randomly pulled every time the game's title screen pops up.
* TakingYouWithMe: The creepers, which explode if you get too close. Though experienced players can get around them with bows and arrows, the strength of their explosions drive beginners insane and make miners paranoid.
* TalkLikeAPirate: The 1.1 Update has an option to change your language. Naturally, Pirate Speak is one of the options.
* TastesLikeDiabetes: The Wither in the (removed) April Fool's ''Minecraft 2.0''. It was pink, has a ridiculous smiling expression, and grows the heads on the left and right when fed with sugar. As it passed over grass, it had the effects of Bone Meal, growing grass and flowers everywhere. Its crafting recipe? A flowerpot on a pink wool block, and a (now-removed) Rose in the flowerpot.
* TastesLikeFriendship: You can tame wolves by feeding them bones, and ocelots by feeding them fish.
* TechnicolorDeath: While normally mobs simply fall over and vanish in a puff of smoke when killed, the [[spoiler:[[OurDragonsAreDifferent Ender Dragon]]]] starts to explode and disintergrate pixel by pixel while shooting out beams of light.
* TechnicolorToxin: Being poisoned turns your health bar a sickly green, and contracting food poisoning makes your hunger bar green. During both kinds of poisoning you also have green swirls appear around you.
* TeleportationSickness: The player can throw an Enderpearl (dropped by the {{Teleport Spam}}ing Endermen) in order to be teleported to where it lands - but it does 2 1/2 hearts worth of damage in the process.
* TeleportersAndTransporters:
** The game lets you create portals to a hellish world (called the Nether) which you use to travel back to the surface again in an alternate-reality way. 1 block in the Nether equals 8 blocks on the earth-like main world and so people are using them to travel large distances.
** There's a similar type of gate that takes you to [[spoiler:"The End," a floating island in a spooky black alternate dimension]]. These gates can't be built, though; you have to find one in the overworld and activate it with [[TwentyBearAsses a bunch of rare items]].
* TeleportSpam: Endermen are capable of this, as once they become aggressive, they can continually evade your attacks and teleport behind you. The ultimate example comes when it rains; as water damages them, they will teleport madly around until they either die or happen upon a sheltered location. On the good side, this also renders them harmless as they will not attack.
* TempleOfDoom: Of both desert and jungle varieties.
* TennisBoss: You can reflect Ghast fireballs with melee attacks, arrows, fishing rods, or even snowballs. Good thing, too, since they love to float out of range of your conventional weapons. Killing a ghast with its own fireball is the purpose of the achievement "Return to Sender".
* {{Terraform}}: Sort of-- planting lots of trees to ensure a healthy wood supply is an important part of the game, and if you're in a desert or a tundra it can come off as turning the wastelands into a forest. However, the weather patterns won't change, and creatures specific to your intended biome still won't spawn.
* TerrainSculpting: You can pretty much change everything you can touch, from creating a mountain, destroying it, then rebuilding it in the middle of the ocean. It's almost certain you'll end up flattening large portions of land to hold farms and such.
* TheTetrisEffect:
** Players of ''Minecraft'' have reported starting to see everything as cubes.
** When walking back out into the real world, one might wonder why trees aren't blockier.
** When one sees a tree stump, he might wonder why the person who cut down the tree didn't harvest the stump and left that good wood there.
** Also applies when you try to reach for the "F" key on a foggy day.
** Or if you happen to live in a hilly, tree-filled area and wake up early in the morning, just as the sun is coming up...and start scanning the horizon for creepers.
** Another, more entertaining example, is how some players have adopted the terms "Full Stack," "Half Stack," and "Quarter Stack" as an expression of the numbers 64, 32, and 16. It's usually a good indicator if someone plays Minecraft by whether they understand or use this phrase without a second thought.
** Spend enough time on large projects and you'll start to look at real life structures (anything from a chapel to a skyscraper) and you'll start picturing how long it'd take you to put together the Minecraft replica, if not mine and craft all the needed pieces too.
** Walk up behind a Minecraft player and make a hissing sound. Ideally you should be wearing a football helmet when you try this.
** Play or watch the game for half an hour. ''You will never take the real meaning of the word "creeper" seriously again, trust me''.
** Seeing something large enough to be made of blocks on a stand. "Why is there a stand there? I mean, it's not one of the gravity-affected blocks."
** Once you start dreaming in Minecraft blocks, it's probably time to step away.
* ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill: One of the achievements, "Overkill", requires doing eight hearts of damage with a sword (actually nine in practice). Subverted in that it's just a name, since eight or nine hearts of damage is not enough to kill Skeletons, Creepers, or Zombies (works on Spiders, though).
* ThingsThatGoBumpInTheNight: Hostile mobs will spawn outside at night, or in any area which sufficient shade to emulate nighttime light levels. You can mitigate this somewhat by lighting up your surroundings, but the only truly safe place is a well-lit and illuminated safehouse.
* ThirtyDayFreeTrial: Playing ''Minecraft'' on an account that hasn't bought the game yet will limit the player to 100 hours (5 in-game days) of gameplay on a preset world, after which their only options are to reset the world or buy the game.
* TimeLapse: A large portion of building projects are posted on YouTube as a time lapse.
* TooAwesomeToUse:
** Enchanted Golden Apples. 9 ''blocks'' of gold (81 ingots), while farmable and not all that useful for anything else, is still pretty hard to come by.
** Diamond tools and armor whenever you strike gold (metaphorically) in Enchanting. As awesome as it is to have a Diamond Pickaxe with max tier Unbreaking, Efficiency, and Fortune on it, it gets less awesome when you realize that repairing using an Anvil costs a stupid amount of experience each time (or even to re-name it). Repairing it will cost higher and higher until it exceeds 40 levels and cannot be repaired anymore, meaning it'll eventually break. Treasure it while it lasts!
* TooFastToStop: A glitch can create this. About a minute into [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiL2S9b1lBc&feature=related this video.]]
* TookALevelInBadass:
** Wolves fall under this once you tame them. A wild wolf has 4 hearts of health and low attack power. When you tame one to your side, its health is boosted to 10 hearts and gains a boost in attack power. It will also attack anyone you attack or attack anyone that strikes you first.
** Zombies and Skeletons received several upgrades that make them more dangerous to fight directly. Originally, zombies and skeletons had simple AI where they would walk straight at you no matter what pitfalls that stood in their way. A patch upgraded their AI to walk around pitfalls when chasing the player and skeletons will flank the player should the player try to hide behind a wall. Zombies and skeletons also had their AI upgraded where they will seek shade under a tree or jump in a pool of water should they catch fire from sunlight. On top of this, there's also a rare chance that skeletons and zombies will wear armor (from leather to even diamond material and also a chance those will be enchanted) and zombies may spawn in with iron shovels or iron swords to cause extra damage to you. Skeletons may also spawn with their bows enchanted for even more lethal power. These mobs have come a long way from being simple monsters to ones that can cause serious trouble on par with a creeper.
* TrainingThePeacefulVillagers: Well, more like Fortifying the Peaceful Village to prevent the zombie hordes from ravaging the place, as Villagers are completely incapable of defending themselves from anything.
* TrapMaster: This game sees a fair few automatic enemy-harvesting machines, too.
** Not to mention TNT rooms... some players are themselves [[TrapMaster trap masters]].
* TraumaInn: The game averts this trope by allowing sleep ([[BottomlessBladder if you want it]]) to pass time, but it won't heal even a single {{heart|sAreHealth}}.
* TreasureIsBiggerInFiction: Big enough to make a full suit of armor out of 24 diamonds.
* TrialByCombat: Notch, creator of ''Minecraft'', [[http://notch.tumblr.com/post/9038258448/hey-bethesda-lets-settle-this challenged Bethesda]] to a 3 vs 3 game of ''VideoGame/QuakeIIIArena'' to settle a legal dispute (referencing the above mentioned ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' series). Sadly, Bethesda chose to ignore this challenge.
* TrophyRoom: The addition of item frames allows you to build trophy rooms into your constructions.
* TunnelKing: The player ''will'' become this eventually. At the start of the game, it is actually one of the most practical means of finding shelter. Simply dig a small tunnel into a hill and wall the entrance up. You not only get resources for basic supplies, but a hideout that costs practically nothing to make. At the very least players will make one large mining shaft from the surface to bedrock where they'll reach diamond and lava, often times creating several more tunnels and caves in the process.
* TunnelNetwork: Elaborate tunnel networks are typically created by many players.
* TwentyBearAsses: Both boss fights have elements of this. The Ender Dragon can only be reached by looting enough Ender Pearls from slain Endermen to craft into Eyes of Ender with which to locate the Stronghold containing the End Portals (which the Eyes then activate). The Wither is even worse, requiring three Wither Skeleton Heads, which said skeletons only have a 2.5% chance of dropping (4% with maximum looting enchantments), not to mention the fact that you have to enter the Nether to find them and find a Nether Fortress where you also have Blazes to deal with.
* TwentyFourHourArmor: There is no reason to not wear armor if you can. It's better to sleep with armor on, in case a monster appears in your bedroom that night.
* UnbreakableWeapons: As of the official release, bows break after 385 uses, but for a long time, bows were indestructible to offset the fact that arrows vanish whenever they do damage.
* UndeadChild: Baby zombies. They are just like regular zombies, except that they are smaller, faster and make higher pitched sounds.
* UndergroundLevel: Miles upon miles of underground caverns, as well as Abandoned Mineshafts and Dungeons.
* UnderwaterBase: Constructing underwater structures is a popular activity.
* UnderwaterRuins: Due to the way Strongholds are created on a map, it's quite possible you'll end up with one or more in the middle of the ocean, buried a few blocks below the sea bed.
* UndyingLoyalty: Weird version with wolves. Your tamed canine friends will never leave your side for long (unless you command them to stay put) and won't even retaliate if you hurt them. However, due to their [[ArtificialStupidity linear programming]] to attack ''anything'' that attacks you, you [[HoistByHisOwnPetard can end up mauled to death by your own wolf-pack if you literally shoot yourself in the foot]].
* {{Unobtainium}}:
** Diamonds. You have to go near the bottom of the map, usually near lava, and even then it's terribly rare. They usually only appear in groups of four or so. If you can manage to get a Fortune-enchanted pickaxe, you can get more per block, but it's still not that much.
*** Emeralds are even worse. Emeralds spawn only in Extreme Hills biomes, in around one block per 16x16x16 chunk (if that) and drop exactly one emerald per block (more with the Fortune enchantment, as above). Their only use is as currency when trading with Villagers, but then doing anything else with them would be extremely impractical.
*** Diamonds and Emeralds can both be found as treasure in Temples, making them a little easier to get.
** Glowstone. Just to ''reach it'' you have to get enough diamonds to make a diamond pickaxe, then convert lava to obsidian so you can mine it, and finally form that obsidian into a Nether portal. Once you're there, you have to find a Glowstone deposit hanging from the ceiling, build a platform so you can reach it, possibly build another platform to capture the dust if it's over lava (which is '''everywhere'''), and then mine it while hoping that some Ghast doesn't show up and blow you up (along with your platform). Furthermore, without a Fortune or Silk Touch enchantment to increase the yield or just take the whole block, you'll only get an average of three blocks for every four mined.
** Obsidian, as mentioned above, takes quite some effort to obtain. You need a diamond pickaxe just to start. Obsidian is created when water flows over a lava source block (not to be confused with flowing lava, which creates cobblestone). While the properties of water let you infinitely reuse a single bucket to make as much obsidian as there is lava, lava is finite. Using it on a lava fall creates a single block. If you happen upon a lava lake, you can get a lot more, but lakes are several layers deep and you need to mine carefully to avoid losing the obsidian as you mine it, not to mention being careful not to accidentally kill yourself.
*** You can cheat your way around this if you have a large supply of redstone dust, which exists in much greater quantities than lava source blocks. Redstone dust becomes obsidian when exposed to lava and water flow, rather than their source blocks. The practical upshot is that entire machines can be built to transform redstone dust into obsidian using a single lava source block which is never extinguished by the process, making this method AwesomeYetPractical.
** Even worse, in a way, is the case of Cracked Stone Bricks. These blocks spawn naturally... but only in strongholds, and only a very, ''very'' small percentage of the stone bricks are the special kind. At least plain Stone Bricks are easily obtainable, and all other variants of Stone Bricks are all craftable as of 1.8.
** Somewhat ridiculously, ''melons'' are this. Melons don't grow naturally, and their seeds are only obtainable from chests in Abandoned Mineshafts (or by buying one from a villager). While this doesn't sound like too big a deal, melon slices are a required component of healing potions. The 1.7 update makes melons grow in Jungle biomes, alliviating this problem (although not much, since jungles are among the rarest biomes).
* UnSoundEffect: The 2014 April Fools Day joke was to add these (in a "durrrrr" tone) to ''every single action taken''. Even ambient noise became repeated ad naseum, with bubbling sound of lava being replaced with "LAVA!".
* UnusableEnemyEquipment: Skeletons use bows (possibly enchanted) and may wear armor, zombies can occasionally show up wielding swords or a shovel an may also wear armor, zombie pigmen use gold swords, and wither skeletons use stone swords. All of these items can be crafted by the player, but until the 1.2 update there was no chance that the aforementioned baddies would drop their gear for you to take. 1.2 added 'rare drops', making it so mobs would occasionally drop the equipment they use, though it's usually in poor condition (though worth repairing via anvil if it's a decent material with good enchantments).
* UnusualChapterNumbers: Alpha and Beta releases had version numbers in the format of 1._____, eventually culminating in 1.9 prerelease 5. The "final" version of ''Minecraft'' is simply numbered version 1.0.0.
* UnwinnableByMistake:
** In order to reach The End dimension, you need to activate the end portal, found in Strongholds, which only spawn 3 times per world. Generation bugs can cause the portals to be incomplete, and if all 3 portals are incomplete, you're screwed.
** Before the hunger bar was introduced, there's a possibility of getting stuck in a 2 block deep hole in Bedrock. Normally, if you have a supply of blocks this wouldn't be a real problem since you could create a platform under you to escape. However, if you for some reason fell into this hole without any blocks, you better hope there's an enemy mob nearby that can kill you because there's no way you can respawn without death and Bedrock is indestructable.
*** If you place lava on your original spawn point (the one not set with beds) and die, you will respawn on the lava, and die again, ad infinitum.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:V-Z]]
* VaderBreath: The game has blazes which breathe heavily.
* VendorTrash:
** Sugar cane can quickly become this if you have even a modest farm for it. For example, a 17 x 17 farm, using as much growth area as possible, produces nearly 7 full stacks of sugar cane (assuming you leave a one-block layer for regrowth). Once you've made enough paper to get 15 bookshelves and an enchantment table (a bit more than two stacks), the only other use it has is to make sugar, and you will still have a massive surplus. Excess paper, however, can be traded to an NPC Librarian for a decent sum once you've finished using it to make maps or written books (if you feel so inclined).
** In Minecraft, the only real buyers and sellers are Villagers, who'll buy some materials that you yourself can make practical use of, making this by and large averted, though some of them are abundant enough so that they can be worth more to you traded for Emeralds (Wheat being one example). It's also worth noting that ''no'' enemy drop is totally useless, no matter what it looks like at first. Bones? Make them into beneficial Bone Meal or tame wolves with them. Spider Eyes? Save them up and you'll thank yourself when you start Brewing. Hell, Rotten Flesh can be fed to dogs safely once you have one (and, as of the 1.8 update, some villagers will buy it of you have large quantities of it).
* TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon: The game [[spoiler:"ends" rather aptly, in The End, an EldritchLocation filled with nothing but endless expanses of air, a background that looks like TV static, making it very hard to see, tons of Endermen, massive Obsidian towers, and the Enderdragon.]]
* VideoGameCaringPotential:
** Tamed wolves. They'll kill for you. They'll die for you. It's in your best interest to keep their health up, especially since you can heal them with zombie meat (which serves no other purpose and is poisonous to the player).
** The same goes for cats, aka tamed ocelots. They're adorable, and also serve as a handy creeper repellent. You can get quite attached to them, as long as they don't drive you mad by holding sit-ins on your bed and crafting table.
** Befriending horses will gain you a very useful companion that'll let you traverse the overworld and scale hills and mountains ''far'' faster than on foot. Breeding them takes more resources than normal (you need 2 Gold Ingots' worth of nuggets for Golden Carrots just to get them in "love mode") but the resulting offspring can potentially be even better than their parents (i.e. more health, higher top speed, better at jumping, etc.)
** You'll feel very good after curing an infected villager. You're practically saving their life. As for villagers in general, you can go out of your way to fortify the place against zombie attacks and build more houses for them so they'll happily reproduce, something can be worth the effort as you get more villagers to trade with.
* VideoGameCrueltyPotential:
** The game has a lot of cruelty potential for the imaginative. Want to run around punching chickens, cows and pigs? You can. It's also very possible to build complicated traps to use against the mobs that come after you with enough time and resources, and once you've got the right materials, it's entirely possible, depending on the environment you're in, to start a forest fire that engulfs an area the size of a large city in flames. Assuming you can bear to destroy your own constructions, there's even more cruel fun to be had creating, and then setting off a self-destructing base.
** It takes a special brand of cruelty to log into a multiplayer server just to burn the place down, or leave crude designs and message everywhere, though most servers have measures against this kind of thing.
** There are also people who will build elaborate castles and the like for the sole purpose of filling them with death traps, with people under the impression that there is treasure at the end. Often times there is not.
** Recently in ''Minecraft'', Notch added the feature that if pigs die due to being on fire, they drop cooked pork. In his twitter he acknowledged this was probably bad.
*** 1.8 added for cows and chickens to drop their respective meats and cooked variants if on fire, the full release adds the ability to enchant weapons with [[IncendiaryExponent fire aspect]]...
** Taken UpToEleven with the advent of auto-generated NPC villages complete with villagers. There's also villages, populated by dopey, passive NPC villagers. The sadistic player can easily slaughter the inhabitants, burn the houses down, and if you're [[YouBastard feeling extra dickish]], you can even bomb the ruins. Feel like being a jerk? Rob them blind! Set their buildings on fire! Set ''them'' on fire! Pack every building with so much TNT that nothing remains but a smouldering crater! They don't care at all. Unfortunately, as mentioned below, their Iron Golem protectors [[VideoGameCrueltyPunishment do]].
*** Except, not since Iron golems, that protect the villagers, defend them when you attack them.
*** ...Which doesn't prevent you from confining all the villagers inside a tiny space, then building a special trap within the Iron Golems' spawning radius that kills them and allows you to harvest the iron they leave behind.
** Using flint and steel to clear leaves can result in massive forest fires. Bad for the wildlife and wastes saplings, but convenient if you want to eliminate hiding places for creepers.
** Making mobs, enemy or friendly, suffocate to death by making a block of sand or gravel fall on their head and prevent them from breathing. Death by suffocation is treated at the same rate as drowning underwater, i.e. very slowly, but nothing can be more pleasurable than watching a Creeper suffocate to death while being helpless. The player can also suffocate the same way but [[ArtificialStupidity would generally be smart enough to just get out from under it]].
** Though it's more pragmatic than cruel, one of the most effective ways to get a steady supply of material that can only be taken from farm animals is to herd them into a pen, breed them, slaughter most of them, then repeat. This is especially true of cows, which can be a lot harder to find in the wild and provide vital resources for enchanting in addition to the best cooked meat available.
** Beta 1.8 added Creative Mode, which allows you to spawn any item you want directly into your inventory, allows you to fly, and makes you invincible... except that hostile mobs can still spawn. Want revenge for all those times you've been killed? Now's your chance.
** That's just the tip of the iceberg; you can drop a kitten's parents into the void, then lock said kitten in a cell made entirely out of TNT and blow it to smithereens; you can place a chicken in a minecart, then proceed to push the minecart into a pit of lava; you can use piglets as target practice; anything to do with animals, especially babies, that doesn't fall under caring potential is usually this.
** The VideoGame/BetterThanWolves mod rewards the player with more dung, a resource in the mod, for locking their pet wolves in windowless cells, increasing the production rate.
* VideoGameCrueltyPunishment:
** Wolves never attack the player unless they are hurt first.
** Naturally-spawned Iron Golems will attack you if you harm them or a villager in their presence. This is generally a bad idea, because Iron Golems have tons of HP and do a lot of damage. Unless you make your ''own'' iron golems. Those will never attack you.
* VideoGameDemake: ''Minecraft'' users couldn't resist the temptation to remake maps from other games in cubed glory. [[http://technabob.com/blog/2011/01/27/halo-minecraft-fps-demake-of-the-day/ Here's an example]] with a multiplayer map of the first ''Halo''.
* VideoGamePerversityPotential: Even ''Minecraft'' has been hit by this. [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Golden cock and balls]], anyone?
** And some people have made naked character skins and have modded the ingame paintings into porn.
* VideoGameTime: A full day is 20 minutes. (8 of day, 2 of sundown, 8 of night (seems a ''lot'' longer...) and 2 of sunrise.) If you have two of one type of animal together, you can bop them each with a stalk of wheat, they breed and pop out a baby version in half a (in-game) day.
* ViolationOfCommonSense: Some aspects of Minecraft physics can create some of these moments for newer players. One example is fluid physics: you cannot scoop up lava/water from anywhere on the lava/waterfall, you need to remove a source block (i.e. a whole square of it, not just an incomplete one in flowing motion).
** Creepers can be forced to explode prematurely by using a Flint and Steel on them. Naturally, you can't get away fast enough to escape the explosion, but forcing a Creeper to explode can be handy to blow holes into the ground/walls without wasting your own explosives or tools.
* VirtualPaperDoll: The game allows you to dye your leather armor to any color you want, which can result in mismatched armor pieces or just something extremely tacky.
* TheVirus: Villagers attacked by zombies can become infected, if a village is close enough to the player, they may see them milling about with other zombies.
* VoidBetweenTheWorlds: Anywhere above and below the spaces you can place blocks on the map is called The Void. Normally you can't get to the Void below the map because of "unbreakable" bedrock, but if you manage to find a gap in the bedrock, you'll find that the void is rather plain-looking, and that if you jump into it, you'll die within seconds. And once you go in, [[PointofNoReturn there's no way to leave]].
* VulnerableCivilians: Villagers are utterly incapable of self-defense and are as good as dead if zombies come, moreso in Hard mode where they can't even cower behind wooden doors since the zombies will just break those down.
* WallMaster: Silverfish. They hide inside the wall blocks of Strongholds to discourage you from just tunneling through. Silverfish can also naturally spawn within stone blocks in the Extreme Hills biome, but they appear as frequently as Emeralds, i.e. very rarely. They're weak alone, but if you fail to kill one immediately, it may wake up other Silverfish nearby, resulting in a ZergRush that can easily kill you if they get a big enough swarm. (Note that it ''may'' wake up the other Silverfish. Don't assume you are now safe (oops).) Worse still, Silverfish blocks are visually identical to actual blocks. The only way to tell them apart is to try mining them by hand first, since Silverfish blocks mine much faster than a real block does. Alternatively, a Silk Touch-enchanted pick can take the block, but not the Silverfish inside.
* WallOfText: Due to the lack of usable books or notes (Until 1.3), most downloadable scenarios, public servers, etc. will leave introductory text written on signs attached to walls near the initial spawn point. This results in ''literal'' walls of text.
* WarpZone: The multiplayer servers generally have a warp zone at the spawn point providing easy access to player towns.
* WaterfallIntoTheAbyss: May appear on floating islands and can be intentionally created by the player using a water or lava "source block".
** However, both water and lava stop flowing when they reach the lowest layer of the created world, therefore it is advisable to build floating islands quite high for the best flowing effect.
* WaterIsBlue: Darker blue in this case. There are plans to implement a biome gradient similar to grass, so water will be a lighter shade of blue in areas with a higher temperature and/or higher rainfall. So far this has only taken the form of murky water in swamp biomes.
* WeakenedByTheLight:
** Skeletons and zombies are set on fire by direct sunlight, and torches can prevent monsters from spawning underground. Spiders become neutral during the day. Note that this is all determined by ''light'', not time of day, so thunderstorms, even at high noon, will be full of monsters ready to eat your face.
*** To clarify: Spawning depends on light level. Undead burning up, or spiders going peaceful depends on sunlight. Sunlight requires both time of day (technically sun above the horizon; some mods add worlds where this doesn't happen) AND exposure to the sky.
** Averted only for the Creepers and Endermen, who are ready to party at all hours, but only spawn in low light like other monsters. They become ''more'' dangerous in the daytime, because the player gets complacent when there's not supposed to be anything roaming around, and Creepers can blend in with the sunlit vegetation (though not as much as they used to; see RealIsBrown above). Thankfully, in the case of Endermen, they are typically neutral unless the player looks at them directly (i.e. with the crosshairs).
* WeaksauceWeakness:
** Endermen and water don't mix. Not only does it hurt them but they instantly teleport away from it and forget what they were just doing. This means that if the player is about to be killed by one, he only needs to dunk a bucket of water on it to make it go away.
** Creepers are afraid of cats.
** Blazes take a large chunk of damage from snowballs. Since you can throw snowballs like a machinegun, killing blazes becomes fantastically easy [[CrazyPrepared if you have a pile of snowballs in your inventory at all times]].
* WeaponOfXSlaying: The "Smite" and "Bane of Arthropods" enchantments make weapons more effective against undead and spiders, respectively.
* WeirdCurrency: Prior to the introduction of their ability of Apples and Cocoa Beans to be grown, Cookies and Apples were used as currency on many servers because their extreme rarity outweighed their usefulness as food items. Slimeballs, which were renewable but still difficult to obtain, were also sometimes used as currency simply because they had no other use until the introduction of Sticky Pistons.
* WeirdMoon: In the normal world, it's a square, it always comes up when the sun goes down and vice versa, and prior to Beta 1.9 it was always full. It was round for a short time (during a pre-release update). While moon phases occur, which show ''round'' sections of shadow moving across it (the one exception is the new moon, where only the outermost edge is visible - and about half as bright as on a full moon), the Moon is still always on the opposite side of the Sun, rising at sunset and setting at sunrise, behavior typically associated with a full moon.
* WeirdSun: Also a square. (Texture packs can change it to whatever the player wants.)
* WhaleEgg: In creative mode, any and all of the mobs can be spawned with eggs, even pigmen and ghasts and ''villagers''.
* WhenItRainsItPours: When the rainy weather comes, it rains intensely. Worse, if it rains during the daytime, monsters that would ordinarily die in sunlight don't, and can roam freely. ''Even'' worse, if it becomes a thunderstorm, it gets dark enough that monsters will spawn. The one good thing about it is that it renders Endermen harmless (if rather amusing[[note]]Until one teleports insider your house[[/note]]), as they will TeleportSpam in an attempt to escape from the rain. It also makes fish bite more frequently, though either fish in an artificial lake in a safe spot or watch your back if you're fishing out in the open.
* WhenTreesAttack: The [[MascotMook Creepers]] are mottled green, have multiple legs but no arms, and according to Word Of God their hide feels like leaves. This makes them strongly resemble mobile, [[ActionBomb explosive]] plants.
** Notch has said that, were they real, their texture would be "crunchy, like dried leaves", basically meaning they're supposed to be concussive walking topiaries.
* WhoForgotTheLights: The game does this ''[[TheyPlottedAPerfectlyGoodWaste intentionally]]''. As monsters spawn at lower light levels, the creator (Notch) wanted to encourage players not to simply blindly wander through the night or through dark tunnels, and to place torches as often as possible. A side effect of this is a generally scary atmosphere, especially outside Peaceful mode.
** Though there are instances where the lighting for various covered blocks fail to take full effect and make the space within at a light level of 0. This can be fixed by placing or removing a block next to the affected area, causing a chunk update.
** The brightness setting, which was added sometime later, can avert the trope. With the brightness turned up to the max, you can still see in caves with zero light, but it's still dark enough to partially cover up whatever dangers are lurking. You can also avert the trope completely by drinking a Potion of Night Vision, which makes everything bright as if the sun was up.
* WhyDidItHaveToBeSnakes: Creepers, perhaps the scariest enemies in the game, are afraid of [[EverythingsCuterWithKittens cats]].
* WickedWitch: The game added witches as a second ranged hostile mob in the Pretty Scary Update (version 1.4). They attack by throwing negative status effect splash potions (slowness, poison, damage, & weakness) at the player and use positive status effect potions (healing, fire resistance, & swiftness) to heal/protect themselves.
* WideOpenSandbox: A bit more literal of an example than most, which is half the appeal. Most sandbox games have some kind of goal, like killing monsters or scoring points, which guides the gameplay. For Minecraft, there's merely a handful of suggestions that hint at the different facets of the game. Everything is entirely optional, which means different people can do completely different things, and every style of play is equally valid. You can build huge castles or pixel art tapestries. You can explore near and far, by land or sea. You can grow wheat, melons, pumpkins, sugar cane, cacti, or various trees. You can mine for iron, gold, diamonds, redstone, or lapis lazuli. You can search for dungeons, either for the rare treasure contained therein or a chance to fight an endless stream of monsters. You can build machines with pistons and redstone circuitry. You can construct a sinister portal and invade hell itself, then turn it into your own personal network of roads so you can move quickly between each of your outposts. You can experiment with potions and equipment enchantments to give yourself an edge in battle or just make it easier to gather your favorite resources. There's even a dragon you can slay to get something resembling an ending, but you're free to keep playing afterward, and nothing really changes. You're invited to try your hand at all of it, and settle into whichever sort of gameplay personally appeals to you. And if that isn't enough, you can set up a server and play with your friends, whether you prefer to build cooperatively or wage war. And, of course, you can dig up an entire desert and make a literal sandbox stretching as far as the eye can see.
* WildWilderness: Almost the entire map, the only exception being the NPC Villages.
* AWinnerIsYou: For a long time, the game had no ending or sign of progression at all, living up to the true wide open sandbox name. When the game became a full version, players could go on a lengthy quest to gather materials needed to eventually reach The End realm and fight the Enderdragon. Beating the dragon got you 20,000 experience points and the player was left with a ''really long'' and pretty slow crolling text with two unseen beings talking to the player, having a ''very'' [[MindScrew surrealist dialogue about existence and reality]], followed by the credits.
* WitchSpecies: As of 1.4 witches are now in the game, they are aggressive mobs that most often spawn in witch huts which appear in [[SwampsAreEvil swamp biomes]] (although, as of 1.7, they can rarely spawn anywhere) they look similar to villagers but are a completely different mob. They have [[WickedWitch paler skin, pointed hats, a wart on their nose]], and use potions to hurt you and heal themselves. And [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential can be farmed]] [[GameBreaker for infinite glowstone, redstone, and other potion ingredients.]]
* WithThisHerring: You're plonked down into the middle of nowhere in a world that's going to be crawling with giant spiders, skeletons, and creepers in ten minutes with nothing but your bare hands and expected to survive. In a rather more literal interpretation of the trope, you can actually chop down trees with fish. It's no harder than chopping a tree down with your bare hands, which is one of the first things you're expected to do when you start playing.
* WizardNeedsFoodBadly: Starting with Beta 1.8, you have a food meter that gradually drains over time. If your food meter is at least 80% full, you regenerate health. If it drops to 30%, you become unable to sprint. If it reaches 0%, your health meter starts draining instead. With the difficulty set to easy, your maximum health is effectively cut in half. On normal, you become a OneHitPointWonder. On hard, you'll starve to death.
* WorldInTheSky:
** The End seems to qualify. It's a floating continent made of a type of white stone, with obsidian towers and is the home dimension of the Endermen.
** There's also the old fan-made map "skylands". No points for guessing why it's called that.
** ''TheAether'' mod adds a new dimension made up entirely of floating continents.
* TheWorldIsJustAwesome: The first thing most new players do is scale a mountain, and look around. At that moment, you realize just how tiny you are and how much space you have. According to the other wiki, the maximum limit of the game world generator can go to before it hits its technical limit is ''eight times the surface area of the Earth.''
* WorldLimitedToThePlot: Enforced in a meta sense. While the world is predefined by the seed it's given at the game's start, only those sections of the map that the player has already visited are actively generated and saved.
* WorldOfChaos: Endermen, given enough time, will inevitably turn the world into something along these lines with their block moving abilities. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJpGolhjwyE&feature=related See this video]] for the damage endermen can cause over a period of 3 years on a server.
* WorldOfWeirdness: Common gameplay elements include [[TheUndead zombies and skeletons]], [[GiantSpiders giant spiders]], [[TheSlenderManMythos (sl)endermen]], [[FunctionalMagic magic]], [[RuinsForRuinsSake ancient ruins]], and [[AnotherDimension interdimensional travel]].
* WorthlessYellowRocks: In Minecraft, the value of an item or material corresponds to how much use it has, meaning that Gold is regarded as fairly useless other than decorative purposes. New players are often surprised to see veterans valuing Coal and Iron Ore deposits much more than Gold Ore. A few multiplayer servers use Gold as an arbitrary currency for trading, though [[DidntThinkThisThrough inevitably massive inflation results from unlimited amounts of Gold Ore on a map and no way to enforce how much is mined/refined]] so players will just end up trading goods for goods instead.
* XMeetsY:
** ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' meets {{Lego}}.
** ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'' meets ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda''.
** Quoth the [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]]: "It's like ''Zelda'' meets ''Film/ThereWillBeBlood''!"
** Endermen are [[TheSlenderManMythos Slender Man]] meets [[Series/DoctorWho Weeping Angels]].
** Mike Rugnetta of [[http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsideachannel PBS Idea Channel]] has described Minecraft as "Legos meets TheSims meets NightOfTheLivingDead with a little splash of ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress''."
* XOnAStick: Crafting. A torch is coal on a stick, a redstone torch is a pile of crushed redstone on a stick, an iron sword is two ingots on a stick, and a diamond pickaxe is three diamonds on two sticks.
* YetAnotherStupidDeath: Deaths that can be easily avoided encompass half of the decisions with bad results (most of the other half is about trying to build fireplaces in wooden houses). Oftentimes lava, falling, or sand/gravel is involved. Sometimes it's a combination of the preceding. And when ''other players'' get involved...
** A persistent bug due to [[http://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Tutorials/Update_LWJGL out of date LWJGL]] involves randomly starting to walk in a different direction while walking while clicking. The way to fix it is by hitting that direction key. Which is the very most counter-intuitive thing to do. Cliffs and lava pools become an object of horror due to this bug.
** Rule number one of Minecraft: don't dig straight down. Rule number two: don't dig straight up. If you ignore these rules, it's only a matter of time before you die stupidly. If you dig the ground out from under you, you can tunnel down faster, but you run the risk of hitting a hollow cave, which can lead to falling damage and/or finding yourself surrounded by monsters you can barely see. Even worse, you may fall into lava with no way to climb out, guaranteeing a swift death and the total destruction of everything in your inventory. Digging straight up has its own unique risks. While blocks directly below lava and water now emit little warning drops (plus the fact you can hear lava bubbling or water even through solid blocks), nothing prevents you from striking sand or gravel, which can lead to a quick death by suffocation if you're not careful (and if you broke Minecraft Safety Rule Number Two[[TradeSnark ]], one assumes you aren't!).
* YouAllLookFamiliar: Many players don't bother to change the default player skin, making multiplayer servers full of identical [[InsistentTerminology Steve?s]]. However, players with an image editor can make their own custom skins.
* YourCostumeNeedsWork: ''Minecraft'' developer Jens Bergensten has [[https://twitter.com/jeb_/status/315145846415032322 tweeted]] an image showing him joining a server and being called "not the best fake I've ever seen".
* YourSoulIsMine: You can collect an item called Soul Sand, which is made up of screaming faces.
** Also popular {{Fanon}} holds that Enderpearls are the souls/life force of the Endermen. You can use them to teleport, expending the pearl in the process.
* YouWillNotEvadeMe: The Fishing Rod can be used to reel in mobs. It's especially useful against Ghasts, which love to shoot fireballs at you while flying out of your attack range. (The Fishing Rod doesn't hurt mobs, but you can pull them in close and slash them with your sword before running. You can also get creative with them, pulling them into damaging obstacles like cacti or lava.)
* ZergRush: Silverfish, if not killed fast enough.
** If you have multiple tamed wolves following you, they will rush any mob that you attack or get attacked by. Normally one wolf is enough to make quick work of a Zombie or Skeleton, but against a very strong enemy (like an Enderman or an Iron Golem) they will keep swarming it and suffer some casualties if it doesn't go down fast enough.
* ZipMode: The game has railroads, teleporting Ender Pearls, and Nether Portals. It's worth noting however that the Railroads have to be set-up manually, Ender Pearls need to be thrown and have a habit of teleporting you far above your intended destination causing fall damage, and Nether Portals mean you have to navigate through the Nether, a hell-like dimension. This can be utilised by setting two Portals in the real world first, and then trekking through the Nether, which is often more dangerous than just trekking through the regular world.
** Even this is not fast enough for some, and so enterprising mod developers have created addons that allow creation of portal networks and instantaneous teleportation to user-definable waypoints.
* ZombieApocalypse: This happens every night in villages, with zombies being spawned into the game just for this purpose. Luckily for the villagers, they can [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar repopulate]] and have an iron golem protector to counter this. Zombies are also infectious, and can create "testificate" zombies which are ''mostly'' functionally identical to regular ones. Zombie Villagers can be cured, though.
** Unfortunately, in the vanilla game, village population is determined by wood doors on the edge of buildings (approximation.). For every 3 doors, the village supports one villager. This means that most villages have a "target" population level of 2-3, and will probably be wiped out in two or three nights if you don't properly wall off/fence off the village by then (and, of course, make sure the village is properly lit). If you want a quick recovery from a zombie invasion, you'll need to build more houses ([[LoopholeAbuse and/or install more doors in existing structures]]).
** The 1.6 update added a wrinkle for Hard difficulty: every time you hit a zombie, there's a chance of another zombie spawning nearby. This chance is higher for armored zombies, who require more hits to kill. Combine this with the zombie's extended eyesight (they can see you long before you see them) and you can get overwhelmed pretty quickly.
** The 1.7.4 update added chicken jockeys (a baby zombie on a chicken). Although the zombie can despawn (or get killed by suffocation), the chicken can't, as it's a passive mob, so you can sometimes find chickens inside of caves. Chickens that can ''lay eggs'' indefinitely. Any zombie that picks up one of those eggs will no longer be able to despawn, what means more and more zombies will progressively fill the area, as new zombies are being spawned and they're prevented from despawning through eggs. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEynQohG-K4#t=13m34s This]] is an example of such a situation.
* ZombieGait: Zombies show that in action. Skeletons do it too, but it's probably [[JustifiedTrope because they carry bows]].
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