[[quoteright:200:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Minsc_and_Boo.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:200:[-Minsc and Boo, series mascot(s).-] ]]

->''"OK, I've just about had my '''FILL''' of riddle-asking, quest-assigning, insult-throwing, pun-hurling, hostage-taking, iron-mongering, smart-arsed fools, freaks, and felons that continually test my will, mettle, strength, intelligence, and most of all, patience! If you've got a straight answer '''ANYWHERE''' in that bent little head of yours, I want to hear it pretty damn quick or I'm going to take a large blunt object roughly the size of Elminster '''AND''' his hat, and stuff it lengthwise into a crevice of your being so seldom seen that even the denizens of the nine hells themselves wouldn't touch it with a twenty-foot rusty halberd! Have I '''MADE''' myself perfectly '''CLEAR'''?!"''
-->-- '''The PlayerCharacter'''

''Baldur's Gate'' is the first, original game of the ''Franchise/BaldursGate'' series.

It had an expansion pack, ''[[VideoGame/BaldursGateTalesOfTheSwordCoast Baldur's Gate: Tales of the Sword Coast]]'', and was followed by a sequel, ''[[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn]]''. The gap between the first game and the sequel has been announced, more than a decade after both were released, as the subject of a new, second expansion pack, ''[[VideoGame/BaldursGateSiegeOfDragonspear Baldur's Gate: Siege of Dragonspear]]''.

----
!!The game provides examples of the following tropes:

* AbandonedMine: {{Downplayed|Trope}}. It's mentioned that the lower levels of Nashkel's iron mine are all but abandoned, due to creatures killing the miners. The main reason you're there is to determine what's going on in said lower levels, comprising the first major quest of the game.
* AdventureDuo: Several sets of [=NPC=]s come in pairs, and you can't keep one in the party without the other unless you use an exploit. Of course, an available "exploit" is entirely natural -- let one of them die. It's easier than keeping them alive, really. Their companion will get over it easily enough.
** Jaheira and Khalid
** Minsc and Dynaheir (and [[RunningGag Boo]]!)
** Xzar and Montaron
** Eldoth and Skie, by far the least known pair, since both are only available comparatively late in the game.
* AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents: Theodon and Jessup, though adoptive parents rather than biological ones, still manage to be this in their one scene. Regale your friends with embarrassing facts about you as a baby? Check. Talk about one of your more ridiculous childhood antics (in this case, stealing the cape of Khelban Blackstaff for yourself and running around wearing it and nothing else)? That's a double check. Mention they have embarrassing baby photos of you, including one of you naked on a bearskin, and offer to show it to any of your party members who're interested? Check again!
* AmazonBrigade: A female PC can recruit any combination of Shar-Teel, Viconia, Alora, Jaheira, Dynaheir, Safana, Imoen, Branwen, Skie and Faldorn. Four Thieves, an Invoker, a Druid, two Clerics and two Fighters may not seem like much, but you can always slap a [[GenderBender Girdle of Femininity/Masculinity]] on a male character like Edwin or Kagain to balance things out. The Enhanced Edition adds Neera and Hexxat.
** Doing this will prevent at least one NPC in the first game from talking to you--Nemphre.
** Note that in order to recruit Jaheira, Dynaheir, or Skie, you need to have their appropriate male counterpart either join or in your party already when they join. Shar-Teel will not join your party unless there is a male fighter she can challenge. Safana will also not join your party if there are no males present. This leaves five recruitable women if you want an AmazonBrigade for 100% of your game and aren't going to gender bend anyone, however you will be missing the only two female fighters, a somewhat decent thief, and a fairly decent mage in doing so.
* ArcherArchetype: Bows are considered one of the best (if not ''the'' best) weapons in the first game; They deal as much damage as a Short sword, can be (obviously) used to attack from range, get THAC0 bonuses from high dexterity, and, especially, have, unlike just about every other weapon, two base attacks per round instead of one, which made them a veritable GameBreaker in the first game. As a result, party members who specialized in Longbows, such as [[ColdSniper Kivan]] or [[FriendlySniper Coran]] tended to end up top tier on NPC ranking lists.
* BattleCouple: From the first game, Khalid and Jaheira are a notable example.
* BearsAreBadNews: Actually, bears are one of the least fearsome enemies that can be encountered regularly, though for low level parties in the first game this only applies to Black and Brown bears. If you went to get Dynaheir for Minsc early on and accidentally wandered into one of the Mountain or Cave Bears in the South West of the Sword Coast then you're in for a nasty surprise, especially if you charge them head on assuming they'll fall as easily as the other kinds.
** [[spoiler:Then there's Wilson the Bear, a secret party member you can get in the Enhanced Edition by progressing in Neera and Rasaad's questlines. He's a bit of an odd choice, but his regeneration, massive constitution and high strength make him a viable enough party member.]]
* BeneathTheEarth: Significant portions of the plot occur in mines.
* {{Bowdlerise}}: In the original release of the first game, the opening cutscene shows the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Kmmggc6jH8 blood of Sarevok's first victim]] filling the depressions in the game's emblem, after which the eyes of the skull light up. In the [[UpdatedRerelease three-disc rerelease]] this is removed.
** Reversed by the opening sequence for the Enhanced Edition. The victim's blood is a huge pool that turns into Bhaal's symbol.
* BreakingSpeech: You get LOTS of these. Mostly from your EnemyWithin.
* BreakableWeapons: Non-Magical weapons will break without warning. The reason given is the iron plague upon the ore coming from the mines. It's annoying, but at least there's an in-game reason, rather than just some kind of poorly contrived added difficulty, and it applies to enemies as well as the player's party. Also, as soon as the iron plague issue is resolved, weapons stop being breakable.
* BrickJoke: In the prologue, you can encounter two would-be bounty hunters, after the price on your head. Five chapters later, in the city of Baldur's Gate, you can meet a woman named Sanadal Gwist, at an inn in the southeast section of the city, who says she's worried about her missing brother and cousin and asks if you can look for them. She mentions their names, and they're the same as the two guys who tried to kill you. No reason to feel too bad about it though, since she finally admits that she's ''really'' looking for them because they both owe her money and then asks you to smack them for her if you see them. (Way ahead of you, Sanadal.)
* BrokenBridge: The city of Baldur's Gate is closed off until you solve the ore problem -- it's even an actual bridge, the Serpent's Causeway.
* CainAndAbel: Played straight (unlike later in ''Throne of Bhaal'').
* CallBack:
** One notable example is the Temple of Umberlee; if you'd completed an (entirely optional) earlier quest for Priestess Tenya, then you can ask to summon her within the temple. She'll give you what you're searching for for nothing, while if you didn't meet her prior [[spoiler:or ended up killing her to help the fishermen]], then you have to pay the temple's high priestess 2,000 gold for it.
** Another happens with Thalantyr. Pick the right conversation options when talking to him and you discover that he dislikes people who want magical power without the knowledge to go with it. Bring Mellencamp to him and you'll find out he was once an adventurer that had something negative happen to him as a result of a magical item he found. He warns that not everything magical will be beneficial. In Nashkel, you will meet with Bardelan, Nalin and Volo, who will all tell you that Brage went on a slaughtering rampage after procuring a new sword. [[spoiler:It turns out the sword is magically cursed.]]
** When Minsc is tired, he will say he's getting a bad case of armor chafe. Much later in the game, you will run into Aldeth in Cloakwood and he may ask you to guard him against some druids. The response you give Aldeth if you decide to side with the druids is that they make an aloe vera mixture that helps with armor chafe.
* TheCallKnowsWhereYouLive: You can't hide at Candlekeep.
* CantCatchUp: Particularly in the this game, several characters can't be recruited until well into the game. Although they'll be leveled approximately equally to the PC if they're added to the party, their skills, weapon proficiencies, spellbooks, and/or HP will have been determined by the computer in a sub-optimal fashion. As a result, they're likely to be underpowered compared to characters who have been in the party for the entire game, and since due to the experience cap you can't level them further, there's no way for them to catch up. A human character who dual-classes can do this to themselves, dual-classing too late to ever level past their original class, and thus locking the abilities of that class permanently.
* CityOfAdventure: The city of Baldur's Gate itself, naturally.
* ClimbingClimax: Inverted in the intro, which has Sarevok chasing an informant up a tower.
* CluckingFunny
** At least two quests involve them.
-->'''[[HelloInsertNameHere CHARNAME]]:''' [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe Forsooth! Methinks]] you are no ordinary talking chicken!
** Alternatively...
-->'''CHARNAME:''' Unholy magics are afoot! This '''chicken is possessed'''! This '''[[{{Pun}} bird is FOUL]]'''!!!
** While Druids and Rangers have the option of using their 'charm animal' power to mentally enslave a chicken, [[VideogameCrueltyPotential they're not much help in a fight.]]
** There is a poultry store in the city of Baldur's Gate. Going inside leads to a fight with some rabid chickens.
* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: Some odd examples. The hobgoblin that has Joie's flamedance ring near the Friendly Arm Inn wears yellow, while all the others wear red. The two hobgoblins that carry Boots of Stealth (one south of Beregost and the other near the Ulcaster school) have dark blue skin instead of the usual reddish shade.
* CombatByChampion: Some gnolls west of Nashkel will demand a fee from the party. If you refuse, the gnoll leader will challenge your strongest fighter to a competition.
* CorruptCorporateExecutive: The Iron Throne in the first game pretty much consists of them.
* DudeWheresMyRespect: Justified, as the party's feats are ostensibly being hidden by the Iron Throne. That said, if you talk to the right citizens in Nashkel, Beregost, and Baldur's Gate in ''[=BG1=]'', they will thank you for what you have done (sometimes you have to leave town and come back later for it to work).
* EasingIntoTheAdventure: The game starts CHARNAME off in his/her hometown killing rats and incompetent assassins.
* EmptyRoomPsych: Some wilderness areas are like this. If you explore them thoroughly, you'll find you got nothing out of it besides some fights with a smattering of randomly generated enemies.
* EvenEvilHasStandards:
** Kagain sees a caravan of slaughtered women and children and realises he could make a lot of money from salvaging it, but decides it's not worth robbing innocents - as greedy as he is, he's a mercenary, not a bandit.
** Korgan is an AxCrazy murdering bastard, but he refuses to harm children.
*** This is also the reason why Viconia became a outcast. [[spoiler: She refused to sacrifice an infant for a rite of passage.]]
** During Nalia's second personal quest, you meet Barg a pirate who proudly boasts about how he and his crew smuggle all kinds of illegal items into Athkatla under the noses of its authorities for their employer, Isaea Roenall; however, he admits that they can't stomach [[SlaveryIsASpecialKindOfEvil slavery]] so Isaea employs a slave-trader separately.
** CHARNAME can be this if Evil-aligned, sugh as telling Imoen that they're interested in the power Irenicus was trying to unlock within them, but [[EvenEvilHasLovedOnes they won't let him harm her any further]].
* EverythingsBetterWithCows:
** One of the quests in the first game requires you to rescue a farmer's cow from Xvarts. Doing so grants you reputation, XP and a useful tip from her owner.
** An even earlier quest has you retrieving a potion to give to a farmer in Candlekeep to give to his sick cow.
* EvilerThanThou: Sarevok to Bhaal, since he plans to take Daddy's place, and an evil CHARNAME if they claim they're going to hijack his EvilPlan.
* EvilMentor: Winski Perorate for Sarevok.
* EvilSoundsDeep: Played straight with Sarevok, who was voiced by deep-voiced villain specialist Creator/KevinMichaelRichardson.
* EvilVersusEvil: You can get caught in the middle of a feud between [[invoked]] [[ChaoticEvil Umberlee and Talos]].
* EvilWeapon: You can acquire several weapons that are described this way, though only a few have this reflected in any way in their mechanics. Two are in the hands of [[CardCarryingVillain Dorn Il-Khan]].
** This is the entire reason for [[spoiler: Brage's out-of-character behavior. Talking to him or killing him will allow you to obtain his weapon, which turns out to be a Two Handed Sword of Cursed Berserking +3. Though it's easily the most powerful sword in [=BG1=], you would be insane to equip this on Minsc.]]
* FinalBossPreview: [[spoiler:Sarevok shows up in the introduction to kill your mentor]], though he's only identified as "Armored Figure" at the time.
* FlamingSword: Xan's Moon Blade is alight with blue flames, and gives him resistance to fire. (But since Xan is a very SquishyWizard, it won't see much use in combat.)
* {{Foreshadowing}}: The aptly-named Lord Foreshadow tells the player about how the city of Neverwinter will be opening up soon -- an in-game advertisment for ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights''.
* ForestRanger: Kivan fits this trope to a T.
* FriendlyGhost: Ulcaster. He will even swap his Cursed Vampiric Sword with you if you've got what he wants.
* GameMod: Lots.
** There's an "Unfinished Business" for ''Baldur's Gate I'', which restores a lot of [[DummiedOut cut content]] to ''Baldur's Gate II''.
** Because of the notable lack of joinable evil [=NPCs=], quite a few NPC mods have been made to make up for it.
* {{Geas}}: Lothander, a thief, is under a geas that forces him to do the Iron Throne's bidding. It results in a {{Sidequest}} for CHARNAME's party [[spoiler:after Lothander reveals that your rations were poisoned by his associate.]]
* GenderBender: There's a certain enchanted girdle in the first game that does this.
** And a sidequest for Edwin which doubles as a couple of funny moments.
* GenderNeutralWriting: The first game is written in an almost completely gender neutral fashion; only a small handful of conversations make reference to your character's gender. It usually works since many conversations are directed to your party as a whole rather than to a specific person. Sometimes it's rather jarring though, like your character getting mistaken for a local male human bounty hunter, even if you are playing as a female dwarf.
* GetBackHereBoss: Davaeorn, in the Cloakwood Mines. He '''loves''' teleporting around the place.
* GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere: Semaj, who unlike Sarevok's other "elite" minions (Tazok, Angelo and Tamoka) received no prior characterization or buildup and seemed to be at the final battle just so the bad guys had a wizard on their side.
* GirlsWithMoustaches: Only in the first game do female dwarves have beards.
* GlassCannon: The mage class. Small HP (mage can be easily one-shotted by critical hit), not many spells and very few means to protect themself. But in second game, when they gain higher level spells, mages become walking fortresses capable of both dealing great amounts of damage and withstanding huge amounts of punishment because of their protection spells.
* GoodScarsEvilScars: The only characters with visible scars are Ajantis, Montaron, and Shar-Teel. Ajantis has a single scar running neatly along his cheek, which almost adds to his dignity if anything. Montaron's face is heavily scarred, which goes along with him being intended to be an ugly character, and Shar-Teel has single scar on her chin which is barely visible.
* GossipEvolution: After clearing Nashkel Mines, this can be noticed among the commoners.
* GuideDangIt:
** You can find hidden items, such as rare armour or rings. You can find these items later on in the game, but since the items are hidden very early on (an extremely rare ring can be found as early as chapter one), they'll give you a major advantage. Shame said items are in the most obscure, out of the way places, where you would never think to look, and are small you'd have a hard time finding them even if you knew where to look. This is less of a problem with the game running on the latest engine; holding TAB highlights searchable areas - very handy for locating that said ring.
* HalfHumanHybrid: In addition to the usual, there are also half-ogres in [=BG1=], as well as the Ogrillon, which is a half-orc/half-ogre hybrid.
* HonestJohnsDealership: Borda, who's encountered in the middle of nowhere, sells cursed items, and then promptly disappears forever. [[JerkAss He's keeping the good stuff for himself]]. You can kill him without penalty and take it from his corpse.
* IFoughtTheLawAndTheLawWon: If the Flaming Fist guards of the first game confront you about a crime, fighting them almost always ends badly. Just run for it, okay?
* InTheHood: All thief and bard avatars have hoods, because the thief and bard classes use the same models.
* ItemCrafting: Taerom Fuiruim from the first game can craft a single item for you, ahnkeg armor. It's an incredibly light, strong plate mail armor that is one of the best in the game. The bad news? He will craft only one. (That said, you can actually find a second one [[PixelHunt lying around]] on the Nashkel fields.)
* {{Jerkass}}: It seems like there are many [=NPCs=] that are more than willing to insult CHARNAME or even start a fight for no reason. A few that come to mind are Marl (Feldepost's Inn, Beregost), Thalantyr (High Hedge), Gurke (Jovial Juggler, Beregost), Sendai, Alexander, and Delgod (the area south of Nashkel), Portalbendarwinden (North of Nashkel), and various noblemen wandering around. It's no wonder game players choose the sarcastic options when talking with other characters, especially the rude ones. Marl has an excuse in that he lost his son, Thalantyr is tired of people that want power without knowledge, and Gurke's excuse is that he's a dwarf, his cloak got stolen, and people are making fun of him for losing it in Cloakwood. Interestingly enough, choosing the kinder responses when talking to Marl nets more experience points than provoking him into attacking you, even though you'd be more than justified in beating the tar out of him.
* JokeCharacter: A few borderline examples, particularly in this game. Tiax and Quayle in particular are severely underpowered and seem to be around primarily for comic relief.
** The Extended Edition changed some of Quayle's stats and put magic clubs into the game, making him less useless.
* JokeItem:
** There's belt that does nothing when worn except immediately and permanently [[GenderBender change the PC's gender]].
** There's a letter that is very rarely dropped by monsters. All it says is "Why does a chair have arms and legs like a man but cannot walk or hold things?" It looks important, but has no use in the game. However, the philosophical musings of monsters seems to be worth something, [[VendorTrash as it can be sold]]. Oddly enough, this can be dropped by monsters that don't seem to have the capacity or intelligence to write, such as gibberlings, so where it actually came from is a bit of a mystery.
* KarmaHoudini: Neb, as far as the first game goes. Thankfully, he can get what's coming to him in the second.
* KissOfDeath: Shoal the Nereid.
* LampshadedDoubleEntendre: The thief Narlen in the first game:
-->'''Narlen:''' Swiped the Duchess' knickers once... if you know what I mean!
* LanguageOfMagic: A different chant will be used depending on what spell is cast. The language is unidentifiable.
* LaughingMad: Will happen if you choose to take Brage to the Temple of Helm instead of killing him for the bounty on his head; once the cutscene conversation is over, click on Brage to hear a sound clip of this mixed with him crying for all the people he slaughtered.
* LivingDollCollector: Bassilus.
* LordBritishPostulate: Drizzt was probably intended to be unkillable. A variable tracking whether you killed him carries into the sequel anyway. Technically, the second game just tracks whether or not you started the game with a piece of his equipment... which means that you can still get the same response even if you just pickpocketed his CoolSword instead.
* LoveTriangle: Skie, Garrick, and Eldoth can have this if they're all in your party.
* LoyaltyMission:
** Minsc joins your party on the condition you help him save Dynaheir. If you do so right away, the two of them join your team permanently (unless dismissed), but putting it off for too long makes Minsc leave the party after some time.
** Two pairs of characters (Jaheira and Khalid; Xzar and Montaron) will join you on the condition that you head for the Nashkel mines. Only Xzar and Montaron will leave if you take too long, though.
** Eldoth in the first game joins on the condition that you help him "rescue" Skie. They remain as party members after this. If you take too long, he will leave as well.
** Coran joins if you say you're willing to help him hunt down the wyverns, and putting this off was supposed to make him leave... if it weren't for a bug.
** Kivan wants you to find the bandit camp and destroy it so he can avenge his wife. While the bandits are connected to the problems at Nashkel, it's not until later that the player discovers Kivan's quest dovetailed nicely with 's quest to [[TheQuest find Sarevok]]. Due to a broken script in the original game, he never left no matter how long it took unless the player force-talked to him, making it seem like he was an inversion of this and his loyalty was unconditional (or that he was insanely patient) despite his initial request. As of the Enhanced Edition, though, he will leave if the player takes too long.
** The same thing happened with Safana. She was supposed to leave if the player took too long raiding the treasure caves, but she never would. As of the Enhanced Edition, her script now has her leave if the treasure caves aren't cleared out in a certain amount of time.
** Nearly every companion in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate II'' eventually approaches you for help with something and leaves if you fail to assist them. Jaheira has troubles with the Harpers, Anomen receives news that his sister is murdered, etc. Some companions, like Nalia and Valygar, can only be recruited ''after'' you complete their respective missions.
* MeaningfulName
** Early in the game, you meet one "Count {{Foreshadow}}", whose dialogue consists of plugs for the second game and for ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights''.
** ''Basillus''' likes to hang out with... No. You know what, never mind, if you can't guess.
** Noober, who acts like a total, well...
* MindRape: The greater doppelgangers specialize in this. In chapter six of the first game, a trio wearing the faces of Gorion, Elminster and Tethoril actually put together a half convincing case for your battles thus far in the crypts having been illusions, imploring you to stop this madness and to cease butchering your innocent friends as the monsters you only "perceived" them to be. They do this in such a manner that a player could easily be taken in, also dropping just enough information to let you think they're the real thing (the Gorion doppelganger even reveals Sarevok for you, and tries to justify evading his apparent death that night by putting together a story about Sarevok's blade being laced with poison). It takes a lot of skepticism and wordplay for CHARNAME to see through their tricks.
* MostGamersAreMale:
** Human female fighter types look to be wearing a revealing bathing suit; most female mages wear low-cut robes [[ShowSomeLeg with a slit up the side that goes to the hip]], and female clerics and druids also have low cut necklines. Female fighter types in plate armor may look covered, but the party avatar shows that the chest and breasts are not covered. Female elves and half-elves wearing plate mail or splint mail also have low-cut necklines, back ''and'' front. And there isn't even a paper doll inventory model of a female gnome or dwarf, though they may not have made it in due to deadlines. In contrast, the men of all classes and races are mostly clothed, and all have paper-doll inventories. Maybe not as much {{Fanservice}} as other games, but it's there.
** You can make it through the game with no problems if you want to have an all-male party. But what if you want an all-female one? Then you won't be able to recruit Shar-Teel at all, can't finish the "Arkion, Nemphre and Ordulinian" quest, as Nemphre will only speak to a male party member, and have to recruit Dynaheir, Jaheira, or Skie with their male companion first and then kill off the guy later.
** Safana. The comments she makes when you select her or command her are all flirtatious statements directed '''towards the game player themselves''', even if CHARNAME is a female of any species. Since Safana only verbally flirts with Coran and her biography states that she attempted to seduce the male captain of the ship, it's obvious she was written with a male game player in mind. In fact, some game guides note that this is the only reason to recruit Safana, since she's obtainable quite a bit later in the game, is one of many thieves you can recruit, and most of her stats are not that impressive - especially her constitution, which is the fourth-lowest in the game.
** When clicking on Garrick, he '''always''' calls you "sir". Never "miss" or "ma'am".
* MutuallyExclusivePartyMembers: Examples from this game include:
** [[VigilanteMan Khalid and Jaheira]] vs. [[TheSyndicate Xzar and Montaron]]
** Minsc and Dynaheir vs. Edwin
** [[StrawMisogynist Eldoth]] vs. [[StrawFeminist Shar-Teel]]
** Kivan vs. Viconia
** Quayle vs. Tiax (for somewhat unclear reasons)
** [[WeHelpTheHelpless Yeslick]] vs. [[LackOfEmpathy Kagain]]
** [[ForGreatJustice Ajantis]] vs. anybody who is evil
** [[ChurchMilitant Branwen]] vs. [[ReligionOfEvil Tiax]] (yet again!)
** [[WildMagic Neera]] vs. [[EvilSorcerer Edwin]] (contentious fellow, eh?)
** [[WeHelpTheHelpless Rasaad]] vs. [[TheSocialDarwinist Viconia]]
* NamedWeapons: Most named weapons were +2 or higher.
* {{Necromantic}}: Bassilus.
* NoSocialSkills: Taugosz Khosann, the leader of the Black Talons. By his own admission.
-->''"Taugosz Tenhammer has no need of people skills!"''
* AnOfferYouCantRefuse: Don't approach the thieves guild in the first game unless you intend to join them or are prepared for a fight.
* OverlyLongGag:
** "Are you gonna throw rocks at me?" "What about now?" "What about now?" "What about now?" Repeat about 20 times. Appropriately enough, the person saying this is named Noober. At least you get XP for putting up with him. And if you get sick of his antics and kill him, you won't even lose reputation for it.
** Slightly shorter example with Neeber in the sequel.
* PixelHunt: Played straight: some of the best equipment or a ton of money could be had early on if you knew what pixel to click on.
* PlotTriggeringDeath: Two. Both Bhaal and Gorion's.
* PreOrderBonus: In the UK, some pre-orders of the game came with a copy of VideoGame/{{Fallout 1}}.
* ProductionForeshadowing: The player can run into a passing "Lord Foreshadow" NPC who tells the player about how he once went to Neverwinter and still keeps in contact with it, recalling that the "nights" there were memorable, [[VideoGame/NeverwinterNights and how he hopes to go back someday...]]
* RedHerring: For a good portion of the first game you are led to believe that the local iron crisis is a plot to instigate a war between Baldur's Gate and Amn. Then comes TheReveal...
* RescueIntroduction: Branwen, Dynaheir, Viconia, Yeslick and Xan.
* ScrewDestiny: If you're very, very polite to [[JerkAss Portalbendarwinden]] when you first meet him (he's the naked guy north of Beregost), he will tell you that he can't see your future because "your coin is on edge". If you read ''The History of the Fateful Coin'' (a book required for a quest), it states that individuals whose coins landed on edge when they were born are free of the influences of both of the goddesses of luck and misfortune and can forge their own fates.
** Although you probably won't be very polite to him -- he is the one to whom speaking the Trope Quote ''is'' an option. He will still tell you about your coin being on edge anyway.
* SdrawkcabAlias: [[spoiler:Koveras? Never heard of him.]]
* SdrawkcabName: At the final fight in ''Baldur's Gate I'', there is a wizard named Semaj.
* SealedEvilInACan: Kahrk. A woman named Carsa located by the Firewine ruins has his jar.
* SelectiveCondemnation: Despite slaughtering your way across the Sword Coast, leaving large piles of butchered enemies behind you... and, if you so feel like it, being allowed to kill just about anyone else you meet with only a drop in reputation that can be fixed with a temple donation... you are charged with murder and labelled a horrible criminal only ''after'' the deaths of the Iron Throne leaders at Candlekeep. This, of course, even if you barged into their tower earlier in the game in broad daylight and massacred everyone in sight.
* SickeningSweethearts: Slythe and Krystin, a [[UnholyMatrimony married pair]] of [[PsychoForHire bloodthirsty assassins for hire]] whose entire pre-fight dialogue consists of gushing over one another.
* {{Sidekick}}s: Lots to choose from, most of them very memorable.
* {{Side Quest}}s: You can spend more time on these than the actual plot, easily.
* SidetrackedByTheGoldenSaucer: Incredibly common. The millions of sidequests available often take more time into account than the main plot does (and are often just as thrilling). It can be shocking just how much time you spent checking out the gravestones at the cemetery in Nashkel or gambling in the tents at the carnival.
* SingleStrokeBattle: High-level characters will be doing this quite often against weaker opponents by the end of both games.
* SimpleStaff: The only melee weapon that can be used by anyone. Like every weapon in the game though, there are magical versions with significantly more power.
* SpoonyBard: Many players find the first game's recruitable NPC bards, on the other hand, somewhat lacking -- Eldoth in particular might be the spooniest bard since the [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV original himself]]. Garrick lampshades this in ''Baldur's Gate II'' (where he makes a cameo appearance), admitting that he isn't a very good bard.
** In Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition a suit of Elven Chain Mail (allows spell casting and has an AC of 5) can be acquired, which means a bard doesn't really have to choose between spell casting and melee bashing anymore. A player created bard with good reputation can now fight up close, at range, cast spells, and be almost as good as a more specialized class at any one of these. While Garrick and Eldoth still aren't that great, a player created bard is one of the best classes to play, and quite good for solo work.
* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: "Never had rats. No siree!"
* TakeYourTime:
** If you want to recruit Jaheira and Khalid in your party at the Friendly Arm Inn in [=BG1=] and don't go to Nashkel post-haste, every day (or two or three) you'll get one of them whining about not having made it to Nashkel yet. There may not be any time limit on the mines quest, but going to Nashkel just to shut the two of them up may become a priority depending on how annoyed you become with it.
** Just don't try waiting too much with Xzar and Montaron, They will leave the party if you take too long.
** Not saving Dynaheir as quickly as possible will upset Minsc and Boo. And when Minsc and Boo get upset, buttkicking ensues. You have ten game days to save her, but if you haven't made any progress after a few days, Minsc will remind you. After ten days is when the buttkicking happens.
** Safana will remind you if you haven't gone to the treasure caves she told you about after a few game-days. She doesn't leave in the original game, but she will leave in the Enhanced Edition if the player takes too long.
** Coran will state that he has wyverns to kill if you delay that quest for too long - he's supposed to leave the party, but a game bug may prevent that from happening.
** The Enhanced Edition version eventually fixed Kivan's broken script, meaning the player must reach the Bandit Camp within 5 days or he will leave. He's one of the first [=NPC=]s who can be reached, but the bandit camp requires more than 5 days travelling time from where he is unless you have already unlocked it (by completing the storyline quests as far as Peldvale or Larswood). This means that you cannot take and keep him in the party from the beginning of the game anymore without cheating.
*** They later fixed it so that it is possible to keep him without cheating - the earlier the chapter you recruit him in, the more days you have, ''and'' if you recruit him in Chapter 3 (the chapter in which you get to the Bandit Camp) you have 7 days, which is enough to get to the Bandit Camp.
*** Actually, it's 20 days if you recruit him in Chapter 1, 14 if in Chapter 2, and 7 days in Chapter 3. However, the actual trigger to stop his timer is to talk to Officer Vai in Beregost with no bandit scalps in your inventory. Most players don't want to lose Vai until after the Cloakwood Mines are cleared, because she pays the most for extra wyvern heads. If that's your case, then the only way to stop Kivan from leaving is still through cheating.
** There is a quest that involves Samuel, a Flaming Fist deserter. Most of these timed quests give you about ten days, which is plenty of time. You have three days to get from the Gibberling mountains to the Friendly Arm Inn or he'll die. You have to go right there, no excursions. And you'd better hope you don't get into too many fights on the way, because you'll have enough time for one rest tops.
** When you reach Baldur's Gate, you will meet two thieves who tell you not to investigate the Iron Throne. One of them will approach you later and inform you that the entire party has been poisoned. You have ten days to find what he wants in exchange for his half of the antidote, then find his partner and get the other half from him, before the poison kills your entire party. There is plenty of time to do the quest, but if the player isn't familiar with Baldur's Gate, stumbling around the city trying to find where one needs to go can take up a lot of time.
* TakenForGranite: Branwen was turned to stone by Tranzig when she protested at him and his followers acting like common bandits; recruiting her requires the player to free her. There are a number of [=NPCs=] that have been changed to stone by basilisks in ''[=BG1=]''. Unfortunately, not all of them can be freed. Although Vail is the only one you are required to free in order to finish a {{sidequest}}, others can be freed to gain experience. The Unfinished Business mod adds in another NPC statue that is also optional to free, but gives experience if you do.
* ThereCanBeOnlyOne: Sarevok's plan.
* TooDumbToLive
** Telling a BloodKnight ChaoticEvil warrior woman that women are meant for "[[StayInTheKitchen making babies and baking cookies]]" is definitely not one of [[SpoonyBard Eldoth]]'s more brilliant moments.
* WakeUpCallBoss: Tarnesh is known to trip new players up.
* TheWarHasJustBegun: You have just defeated the BigBad, and the final cutscene [[spoiler:shows his essence descending into the underworld and into a statue of his likeness, which promptly crumbles to dust. Then the camera pans out to show that the statue was standing in an alcove inside an enormous room filled with hundreds of other statues. Sarevok was just a particuarly ambitious Bhaalspawn, there are still hundreds of them out there, many possibly unawares like you were.]]
* WithFriendsLikeThese: Xzar and Montaron -- to you and each other.
-->'''Xzar:''' ''(upon Montaron's death)'' Montarton!? I... I never loved you!
* WreckedWeapon: The Iron Crisis meant that most of your non-magical weapons would eventually break.
* WritersCannotDoMath: Referenced in-universe in the first game, in your journal entry for completing the side quest "A Rogue Ogre".
--> "One dead ogre equals 95 gold pieces. Unshey claims to be a writer, but it sure is hard to argue with her math."
* YouCantGoHomeAgain: Candlekeep. Actually, you can, once. After that, you won't want to.
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