''World of Mana'', also known as the ''Seiken Densetsu'' (''Legend of the Holy Sword'') series, is a group of (mostly) action [=RPGs=], most of which also tenuously share a setting. Most of the games center on a Mana Tree, the source of magic in the world, and the eponymous Mana Sword.

Games in the series include:
[[index]]
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' (1991, Game Boy)
* ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' (1993, Super NES)
* ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' (1995, Super Famicom; Japan only, though a fan translation is available via {{emulation}}; commonly nicknamed ''Secret of Mana 2'')
* ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'' (2000, [=PlayStation=])
* ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'' (2003, Game Boy Advance, [[VideoGameRemake remake]] of Final Fantasy Adventure)
* ''VideoGame/ChildrenOfMana'' (2006, Nintendo DS)
* ''Friends of Mana'' (2006, mobile phone, Japan only)
* ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana'' (2007, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMana'' (2007, Nintendo DS)
* ''Rise of Mana'' (2014, iOS/Android; only officially announced for Japan thus far, although the fact that a trademark has been registered under this name in Europe suggests that it may be released elsewhere as well)
[[/index]]

{{Manga}} in the series include:
* ''Seiken Densetsu Legend of Mana'' (2000, by Shiro Amano, based on the [[VideoGame/LegendOfMana game of the same name]]; later collected into a two-volume set in 2008)
* ''Princess of Mana'' (2007, five-volume work by Satsuki Yoshino, set 300 years after ''VideoGame/ChildrenOfMana'' and 310 years after ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana'')

Novels in the series include:
* ''Seiken Densetsu Legend of Mana - Amata no Tsuchi, Amata no Hito'' (2000, by Hiromi Hosae; a novelisation of ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'')

Unfortunately, to some extent the ''KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyCrystalChronicles'' series have usurped the place of ''World of Mana'' in the SquareEnix pantheon, with the aforementioned games featuring the 3D version of the three-character action RPG gameplay for which the ''World of Mana'' series was once known. This has caused SquareEnix to start scrambling to find a different genre for the World of Mana series, such as the RTS ''Heroes of Mana'' and pure action game ''Dawn of Mana'', the latter of which was extremely poorly received and criticized. [[http://www.siliconera.com/2012/09/07/report-circle-of-mana-trademark-filed-by-square-enix/ A trademark]] for ''Circle of Mana'' was filed in September 2012. As it turns out, it's a casual social RPG in the same vein as ''Final Fantasy X GREE'' and ''The World Ends With You Live Remix''.

The Square USA game ''SecretOfEvermore'' is sometimes confused for being part of the World of Mana, but while it was obviously inspired by ''Secret of Mana'' (it has a [[RingMenu ring-based menu system]]) it doesn't have any of the World of Mana story elements in it, and magic effects are based on alchemy formulas rather than, well, mana.

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!!Tropes include:
* AccidentalHero - ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' starred an escaped slave who gets caught up in a fight to save the world. The hero of ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' appears to be this--he originally only needs the titular sword to [[InsurmountableWaistHighFence cut tall grass]]--until his [[TheChosenOne identity]] is revealed.
* AwesomeButImpractical - [[ChargedAttack Charging your attack]] as of ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' onward.
** In ''Seiken Densetsu 3'' the attack charging is changed from holding down a button to filling up the meter by hitting the enemy with melee strikes. (As far as pure DPS goes, though, it's still much more practical to just use the first level charge.)
** In VideoGame/LegendOfMana, some charged attacks go into AwesomeYetPractical territory, as it's the only way to inflict MassiveDamage on the harder difficulty levels.
* BeneathTheEarth: Gaia's Navel.
* BittersweetEnding - If the ending to a game in this series isn't a DownerEnding, changes are good that it'll be a BittersweetEnding. ''Secret of Mana'' and ''Seiken Densetsu 3'' are great examples.
* BlackAndWhiteMagic - The Girl and Sprite from ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'', Angela and Carlie from ''Seiken Densetsu 3''.
* BlackMagicianGirl - Angela is a great example.
* BladeOnAStick - The Spear and Javelin in VideoGame/SecretOfMana; Riez wields one in VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3; the Spear is also a weapon type in VideoGame/LegendOfMana.
* BodyHorror - Amanda's fate in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'', and the effect of the Echoes in ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana''.
* BookEnds - A recurring trope.
* BrokenBridge - You ''have'' to pull the Mana Sword out to chop down the plant blocking your way back home in VideoGame/SecretOfMana; you similarly need the Axe to break through rocks and the Whip to jump certain gaps.
** In VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3, you can't even access the Moonlight Forest (where the Luna elemental is hidden) until you've gained Salamander, Undine, and Sylph, nor can you access where Dryad is hidden until you use the Luna elemental on the row of trees blocking your path.
* {{Cap}} - Every inventory item in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' is capped to four. In ''Seiken Densetsu 3'', you can hold up to nine of each item in the ring menu, with more storeable in an inventory menu that's only accessible outside of battle. What's more, the number of items in the ring menu is also limited.
* ChargedAttack - Characters in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' can charge their weapons up to their skill level with the weapon. Unfortunately, charging, especially to higher levels, takes a while, and also slows down your movement significantly, for an inconsiderable increase in damage. Some weapons inflicted additional [[StandardStatusEffect status effects]] when charged, making this useful in limited situations.
** Much more useful in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'', where you could level up how quickly the meter would charge, and could reasonably spam them in the final battle.
** In VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3 and VideoGame/LegendOfMana, the charge meter builds by successful attacks, and in ''Legend'' certain {{NPC}}s have synchronization effects that can help build said meter faster.
* ChildhoodFriendRomance:
** ''Dawn of Mana'' - Ritzia, who [[DistressedDamsel gets kidnapped]], used to [[ApocalypseMaiden unleash disaster on the world]], and [[spoiler: becomes the next Mana Goddess]].
** ''Legend of Mana'' - Matilda, Irwin, Escad, and Dana, the LoveDodecahedron that ends tragically for all involved.
** ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' - Dyluck, who [[spoiler:gets brainwashed by the bad guys and sacrifices himself to save the Girl]].
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' - Hasim, who [[spoiler:dies trying to protect the heroine (too bad she [[GameplayAndStorySegregation can't use her unlimited healing ability to save his life]])]].
* TheChosenOne - Also present in several iterations of the game. Its presence in ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'' is one of the major plotline differences between it and its original release.
** In ''Seiken Densetsu 3'', the chosen one is whoever the Fairy chooses to inhabit.
* CoolSword - Generally the Mana Sword, but other equippable swords in various titles are also pretty impressive.
* CoOpMultiplayer - ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' was the first RPG to feature a co-operative multiplayer gameplay mechanic where a second or third player could drop-in and drop-out at any time. ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' used the same form of co-operative multiplayer.
* CrowningMusicofAwesome - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8W1_UpBH6yw&fmt=18 Sacrifice Part III]] from Seiken Densetsu 3
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZplNAI3DVw&fmt=18 The Way This Heart Is]] from Heroes of Mana
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=226lyvZmNB8 Angel's Fear]] aka the Secret of Mana Theme. Yes, that's all done with a SNES chipset.
* DarkIsNotEvil - Shade, the Spirit of Darkness. While he may be a creepy floating bat-eyeball, and is the only one to actively pit the heroes against monsters to prove themselves, he is still very much on the side of good.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu - The FinalBoss of most games is generally a sufficiently terror-inspiring EldritchAbomination; in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' you fight ''eight'' God-Beasts and the final boss [[spoiler: absorbs all of their power, as well as that of the Mana Sword]]; and in ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'', you even have to kill [[spoiler: the Mana goddess' SuperPoweredEvilSide]].
* DoomedHometown - In ''Dawn of Mana'', the HiddenElfVillage where Keldy is raised gets invaded; the Girl from VideoGame/SecretOfMana hails from one of these as well, and in VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3 ''all six'' protagonists hometowns get invaded/taken over by bad guys at one point or another (the order thereof depending on who you picked to be your PowerTrio).
* DownerEnding - ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana''. Two of the three arcs leading to the endgame in ''Legend of Mana'' also end this way.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' also ends this way: [[spoiler: All of the hero's friends have been killed (with the exception of Lester, who the hero leaves behind in Jadd to mourn his dead sister...who the hero had to kill when she turned into a monster), and the girl he worked so hard to protect is giving up her existence to become the new Mana Tree.]]
*** And if you consider ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' to be the chronological sequel to ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'', [[spoiler: she ends up dying anyway when Thanatos destroys the Tree with the Mana Fortress.]]
* ElementalCrafting - The crafting system in the later games follows this trope.
* ElementalPowers:
** BlowYouAway[=/=]ShockAndAwe: Jinn
** CastingAShadow: Shade
** DishingOutDirt: Gnome
** ExtraOreDinary: Aura (only in LegendOfMana)
** GreenThumb[=/=]PetalPower: Dryad
** AnIcePerson[=/=]MakingASplash: Undine
** LightEmUp: Wisp (called Lumina in SecretOfMana)
** {{Lunacy}}: Luna (not present in LegendOfMana)
** PlayingWithFire: Salamander
* ElementalRockPaperScissors - Undine (water) opposes Salamander (fire), Sylph (wind/lightning) opposes Gnome (rock), Luna (moon) opposes Dryad (plant), Lumina (light) opposes Shade (dark) and vice versa. Some games also have the Aura (metal) element replace Luna as Dryad's opposite.
* EverythingsDeaderWithZombies - All over the place as minor {{Mooks}}
* TheEvilEmpire - Your main enemy in most of the games.
* EvilSorcerer - Generally TheDragon to the BigBad
* FighterMageThief - Your party in most games.
* FiveManBand: Your party in Heroes Of Mana. There are exactly five main characters.
* FloatingContinent - The Mana Fortress in VideoGame/SecretOfMana and the Holyland in VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3.
** You need to ride Flammie through a portal to reach the Mana Holyland. However, it's unclear as to whether the Holyland ''itself'' is airborne.
* GiantEnemyCrab - A boss battle VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure, VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3, VideoGame/LegendOfMana, and VideoGame/DawnOfMana.
* GlobalAirship - Flammie, in the games where you get him.
* GoForTheEye - The Demon Wall in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'', and the Full Metal Hugger boss in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' (although it had two eyes).
* GoodOldFisticuffs - The Fist weapons in VideoGame/SecretOfMana and VideoGame/LegendOfMana; Kevin fights like this in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3''.
* TheGoomba - Rabites.
* GottaCatchEmAll - Unlocking/restoring the mana stones in most games; getting all of the Weapon Orbs in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana''; collecting all of the artifacts and getting all of the Cactus Diary entries in ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana''.
* {{Gotterdammerung}} - Most (if not all) of the ''Mana'' games feature the destruction of the Mana Tree along with the loss of the world's magic (they both get better, eventually.)
* GuideDangIt:
** Good luck figuring out how to trigger some of the subquests in VideoGame/LegendOfMana or how to master ItemCrafting.
** Knowing which enemies to farm for the third job class unlocking item or the best weapons/armor in VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3 is also a massive pain in the butt even ''with'' a Guide.
** Unlocking secrets in VideoGame/DawnOfMana ''can'' be stumbled upon by accident if you explore every inch of the stage, but still just about impossible without a guide.
* HarderThanHard - "No Future" mode on VideoGame/LegendOfMana and "Ultimate" mode on VideoGame/DawnOfMana.
* HelloInsertNameHere
* HeroicSacrifice - So many times in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' that it gets to be [[PlayerPunch like a punch in the gut]]. Averted in the remake, which leaves some grumbling.
** Although over half the cast of ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'' still ends up dead.
** The player character in ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'' [[spoiler: turns himself/herself into stone weeping for the Jumi, thus bringing them BackFromTheDead; don't worry, DeusExMachina happens and they get better]].
** In VideoGame/SecretOfMana, [[spoiler: the Sprite so much as ''taking part in the final battle'']] is this.
* HiddenElfVillage - In ''Seiken Densetsu 3'', hidden in TheLostWoods; in ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana'', on its own remote island.
** There is one in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' as well: [[spoiler: the Sprite's [[DoomedHometown home town]], but sadly it's destroyed by the Empire just before you arrive.]]
* Creator/HirokiKikuta - Composed the entire soundtracks for ''Secret of Mana'' and ''Seiken Densetsu 3'', as well as scattered tracks from the post-''Legend of Mana'' games.
* HolyHandGrenade - Light magic is one of the elements, with the patron spirit Wisp; in most games it only has one or two offensive spells, focusing instead on healing and defense.
* HonestJohnsDealership - Niko/Niccolo, who sells overpriced items in most games and bilks quite a few people out of their hard-earned money (including the player character) in VideoGame/LegendOfMana.
** VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3 reveals that Niko belongs to a ''race'' of such vendors.
** VideoGame/ChildrenOfMana reveals the same about Niccolo.
* HumanCannonball - Cannon travel. Thank goodness your characters don't take fall damage!
* HyperspaceArsenal - Most obvious in VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3, where you have a second "bag of holding" that can hold quite a bit more than the main inventory, but all of the other games has your party carting around quite a bit of stuff. Even more so in VideoGame/LegendOfMana, where you can carry a ridiculous amount of VendorTrash, weapons, armor, instruments, and magical artifacts in your pockets.
* HyperactiveMetabolism: Various kinds of sweets serve as healing items in this series.
* ImprobableHairstyle - Quite a few of the characters. VideoGame/LegendOfMana [[LampshadeHanging hangs a lampshade]] if you choose the female protagonist.
* InexplicableTreasureChests - Where was the Rabite keeping that thing?
* InexplicablyIdenticalIndividuals - The unaccountably dancing, turban-wearing merchants. Presumably they are all part of a very powerful guild, because their reach extends across all time periods and dimensions.
* InstantAwesomeJustAddNinja - Recurring enemies in the series, and Hawkeye can become one.
* InsurmountableWaistHighFence - Bushes, rocks, or even just mildly rough terrain can prove impassable; in VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3, the entrance to the dwarf cave is blocked by an insurmountable ''optical illusion'' that cannot be bypassed unless you talk to an NPC and then use the Wisp elemental to remove said illusion.
* InterfaceSpoiler - in VideoGame/ChildrenOfMana with your empty weapon slots and to a lesser extent, the gems.
* InUniverseGameClock - VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3 has both a Day/Night cycle and a weekly cycle tied into character stats, types of monsters spawned, and which {{NPC}}s are active; VideoGame/LegendOfMana has a weekly cycle whose only obvious effect is which teachers are in session at the Geo academy and whether you can recruit Pearl or [[spoiler:Blackpearl]] in the Bejeweled City after you've finished the Jumi arc.
* KenjiIto: Composed the entire soundtrack for ''Final Fantasy Adventure''/''Sword of Mana'' and some of the tracks for the post-''Legend of Mana'' games.
* KillerRabbit:
** the BonusBoss in VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3
** on [[IdiosyncraticDifficultyLevels No Future Mode]] (the hardest level in the game) of ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'', ''every'' rabite (and [[EverythingTryingToKillYou every other enemy]]) is this.
** In VideoGame/DawnOfMana, you can encounter "rare" versions of enemies that have longer life bars and tougher to take town otherwise, and of course Rare Rabites can be found in certain areas.
* ItemCrafting - ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'' and ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'' both allow the player to forge much better weapons than they can buy in stores.
* ItsAllUpstairsFromHere - The tower in the City of Gold in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' and the Luna Tower in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3''; the Tower of Leires in ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'' isn't ''quite'' all going upstairs, but it may as well be.
* LaserGuidedAmnesia - Sprite from the VideoGame/SecretOfMana and [[spoiler: Pearl]] from VideoGame/LegendOfMana.
* LegendaryWeapon: The Sword of Mana. Even ''more'' legendary because it is [[IHaveManyNames ALL the legendary swords that have ever existed, just with different name on each occasion]].
* LightIsNotGood - Several of the games have light-elemental monsters, including Secret of Mana's, Dread Slime and Terminators, Seiken Densetsu 3's Full Metal Hagger and Lightgazer and Sword of Mana's Light Cyclops.
* LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards
* LostWorld: The Mana Holyland.
* LuckStat - Determines the appearance and quality of what RandomlyDrops, and also how many "safe" squares are present in a trapped box.
* MascotMook: Rabites are the series' signature monster, present in every iteration. A few others (like the Chobin Hood enemies) are recurring as well, and monster design in general is extremely consistent across the series.
* MookMaker - Eggplant Men have a tendency to summon zombies, whereas Slimes can reproduce and at least one boss in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' and ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana'' can summon {{Mooks}} to attack the party; several of the games also have destructible enemy spawn points.
* NatureSpirit - The Mana Sprites.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero - In ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'', releasing the sword from the stone on the waterfall spawns Rabites outside of town, eventually leading to the hero getting [[YouCantGoHomeAgain kicked out of the village forever]].
** In ''Seiken Densetsu 3'', once the heroes finally complete their goal of rounding up all eight spirits in order to open a gate to the Holyland, it turns out that their efforts [[spoiler: allowed the Mana Stones to be unsealed, opening a gate that ''every faction other than the heroes'' is able to use.]]
*** And then, after stopping an apocalypse by defeating the eight God-beasts, you realize that by defeating them, you released their power into the Sword of Mana. [[spoiler: Too bad you let TheDragon take the sword, hero.]]
** Keldy and Ritzia sneak into the ruins that they're not supposed to enter, and Keldy kills the GiantEnemyCrab guarding the area when it tries to attack Ritzia...and then Ritzia gets possessed by the spirit of an evil sorceress, who wants to unleash the Echoes of Malvolia onto Illusia. Oops.
* NewGamePlus - A feature in both ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'' (carries over items, levels, and equipment) and ''VideoGame/DawnOfMana'' (carries over earned badges and acquired pets).
* TheObiWan - Bogard in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' and ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana''.
* OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame - Except for the one in ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'' who wants to "quit" being a Dwarf. [[spoiler: He goes back to the mine in the end.]]
** The Mana series is notable, though, for having dwarves that rather than looking like short Scotsmen are pitch black and all wear cool looking war helmets.
* OurDragonsAreDifferent: The {{Chibi}}-looking dragons (to which Flammie is related) are helpful and friendly, whereas the scaly varieties as presented [[ReptilesAreAbhorrent as hostile and warlike]].
* OurFairiesAreDifferent: The sylph magic.
* OurLichesAreDifferent: The [[BigBad Big Bads]] of the 16-bit games.
* OurWerewolvesAreDifferent - Werewolves show up in most of the games. They are called Beast-Men in ''Seiken Densetsu III'' but they only look wolfish at night. During the day they resemble ''camels'' for some reason. Kevin, one of the playable characters, appears more human as he's a HalfHumanHybrid, but he can go full-on werewolf at night.
* PaletteSwap - Almost every early enemy has a harder palette-swapped version. The player characters themselves in ''Seiken Densetsu 3'' are usually palette-swapped for their class changes.
* PointOfNoReturn
** In VideoGame/DawnOfMana, you can backtrack to just about any point in any stage except for the last one, where a large, unclimbable drop keeps you from LevelGrinding for better stats before the second-to-last boss.
* QuicksandBox - In VideoGame/SecretOfMana and VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3 you could theoretically travel to any spot on the globe, but realistically it'd be a lot easier to take the path recommended by [[GuideDangIt online walkthroughs]] and there are multiple choke points where you can't get past unless you have the right kind of magic.
* RandomlyDrops - Several of the orbs necessary to power up the weapons on ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' can only be obtained by random drops from certain enemies in the final area. The items necessary to upgrade character classes in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' are similarly tricky to get.
** Meanwhile, in VideoGame/LegendOfMana, you can have a pet that, if you're synchronized with it, guarantees an enemy killed will drop something, but ''what'' gets dropped is still randomly determined.
* RapunzelHair - Just about every female character in all of the games; Hawkeye in ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3'' is a male version.
* RebelliousPrincess - Purim from ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'', (comes from a noble family, and is not actually royalty but otherwise fits perfectly,) and Angela (and to some extent Carlie) from ''VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3''.
* RecurringLocation: The Mana Holy Land, which is routinely blown to smithereens.
* RecruitTeenagersWithAttitude
* RespawningEnemies - Killing all the enemies on a screen in ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'' causes them to respawn after a few seconds. This is annoying, but can make farming random drops easier, and since the game has both a healing spell and a technique that lets you recover MP, it stops the player from completely recharging after every battle. In the other games, enemies respawn if you leave the area far enough and return, making LevelGrinding fairly easy for areas where you can just keep going in a circle, killing things along the way.
* RingMenu - a staple of the series since VideoGame/SecretOfMana.
* SaintlyChurch - The Churches of Mana
* SceneryPorn: The series as a whole sports a very unique art style and color palette. Load up a rom of SeikenDensetsu3 some time and boggle at how seamless the tilesets can be.
* SequelGap: [[VideoGame/DawnOfMana Seiken Densetsu 4]] was the first numbered game in the series in 11 years since VideoGame/SeikenDensetsu3. This isn't noticeable in the overseas ports since they exclusively used the [[IdiosyncraticEpisodeNaming idiosyncratic]] -Of Mana
* SquishyWizard - Most of the caster classes in all of the games.
* StandardStatusAilments
* TheStarscream - Fairly frequent in occurrence, in fact, as several games have one.
* SpiritualSuccessor - The ''KingdomHearts'' and ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyCrystalChronicles'' series.
* SummonMagic - the spells in ''Secret of Mana'' all involve calling up the respective NatureSpirit and having them blast the enemy or buff the party.
* ThematicSeries - Although the more recent games are tied together more closely, the first four games have little (if anything) tying them together.
* UltimateBlacksmith - Watts in most games; in VideoGame/LegendOfMana, he teaches the player character to be their own Ultimate Blacksmith.
* UnnecessaryCombatRoll - Both in super moves and as its own normal ability in Legend Of Mana.
** And in VideoGame/DawnOfMana, it might be marginally faster than running, so it's abused in {{Speed Run}}s; there's even a badge that lets you roll longer.
* {{Unwinnable}} - You'll need at least two InterchangeableAntimatterKeys to get through the final dungeon of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure''. If you don't have them, or use them in the wrong spot, then you can't advance to the FinalBoss.
** Until you realize some of the enemies there can drop keys.
** Additionally, if you didn't grind enough stat boosts before the save point before the second-to-last boss in VideoGame/DawnOfMana, you are probably going to have to restart the entire chapter.
* {{Vaporware}} - ''Seiken Densetsu: The Emergence of Excalibur'' was a Famicom Disk System game that started development in 1987. Its goals were too big for its britches, and the game collapsed under its own weight. A completely unrelated title named ''Gemma Knights'' was then renamed and released on the Game Boy as the series-starting game we're all familiar with; the creators thought the name Seiken Densetsu was too slick of a trademark to lose. More info can be found [[http://www.lostlevels.org/200311/200311-square.shtml here]].
* VideoGameRemake - ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure'' was upgraded into ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'', bringing it more in line with the rest of the series, ditching the carryover ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' influences for more familiar ''Mana'' references. (Chocobos replaced with cannon travel, for instance.)
* TheVirus - What causes Amanda's BodyHorror in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAdventure''; the Echoes in VideoGame/DawnOfMana have a similar effect.
* WorldTree - The Mana Tree in its various incarnations.
* YokoShimomura - She composed the music for ''VideoGame/LegendOfMana'', ''VideoGame/SwordOfMana'' and ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMana''. For ''Sword Of Mana'', she arranged KenjiIto's original compositions.
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