[[quoteright:256:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Spyro1_palboxart_5811.jpg]]

The first ''Franchise/SpyroTheDragon'' game, released on the PlayStation in 1998.

Gnasty Gnorc is a greedy fellow, and he has his eyes set on the massive gem hoard they keep in the Dragon Realms. So he swoops in, steals their treasure, and turns all the dragons to crystal! Well... All but one, that is. A young dragon named Spyro managed to survive the crystalization. Now it's up to him and his dragonfly Sparx to recover the gems, rescue the dragons, and defeat Gnasty Gnorc!
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!!This game contains examples of:
* HundredPercentCompletion: See EndgamePlus.
* ActionSurvivor: Of a sort. Spyro only avoids the crystalisation spell that gets everyone else because he's so small, the spell shoots over his head. He still jumps, however, even if there wasn't an [[JumpedAtTheCall actual call]].
* AndIMustScream: In the first game the dragons are frozen in stone but are still conscious and aware. Since some of the dragons' locations are pretty well-hidden, if Spyro is put in the hands of a less perseverant player... well, try not to think about it too much.
* ArtificialStupidity: While designed with diverse personalities, most of the Gnorcs are boiled down to "idle, approach Spyro, pause, attack, [[UnsportsmanlikeGloating gloat]], repeat".
* BackTracking: With open exploration comes the need to collect them all. Luckily, the inter-world balloonists allow Spyro to reach previous worlds at any time.
* BottomlessPits: When it's not liquids, it's this!
** BottomlessPitRescueService: High Caves; in this one level alone, falling into the one abyss with the supercharge ramp will cause a trio of fairies to rescue you and deposit you atop a supercharge ramp.
* {{Bowdlerise}}: In the North American and Japanese versions of the game, the tips of the horns on the bulls in Town Square are red, indicating blood. The blood is absent in the PAL version.
* BubblegloopSwamp: Beast Makers.
* CashGate: The balloonists ask for Spyro to collect a certain number of gems or eggs, or rescue a certain number of dragons. These goals are balanced to give the player a robust goal without needing HundredPercentCompletion right away.
* ChromosomeCasting: The game's vocal characters include 80 dragons, one dragonfly, and several hundreds of enemies -- many of them use recycled lines, but none are female.
** In fact, the only unambiguously female characters in the Dragon Kingdom are the mute fairies.
* CrapsackWorld: The Beast Makers world.
--> '''Bruno:''' Gnasty Gnorc is turnin' our swamp into an electrified ''junk'' heap! And it used to be ''so beautiful''...
--> '''Spyro:''' I'm sure was...
* DifficultySpike: The Beast Makers world has higher completion requirements than the previous worlds (50 out of 58 dragons). It's the second world that you cannot skip without playing though at least one level (the first world is the first). It also contains Misty Bog and Terrace Village, which contain aggressive enemies and few butterflies, as well as ThatOneLevel, Tree Tops.
* DisproportionateRetribution: Gnasty Gnorc enslaves all the dragons [[MinorInsultMeltdown because they called him ugly]]. To be fair, he was probably just [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity looking for an excuse to use that spell anyway]]...
** AllThereInTheManual: The manual gives a more fleshed-out version of the story; Gnasty Gnorc just kind of [[TheGrinch resented the dragons in general]], because they were happy, good-looking, productive members of society, and he didn't care much for their gems either. The intro cinematic kind of gives you an idea of the plot if you haven't read the manual.
* DungeonBypass: Sort of. Fully completing the Artisans' world and the Peacekeepers' home lets you access the Magic Crafters' world directly, completing the first two worlds as a whole lets you skip the third, and so on.
* [[FairyCompanion Dragonfly Companion]]: Sparx, while mute, is a more helpful companion.
* DreamLand: The Dream Weavers world.
--> '''Lateef:''' Welcome to the Dream Weavers, young one. While chasing Gnasty's minions in ''this'' world, you must expect the unexpected and prepare for what is not there.
* EasterEgg: If one waits long enough in any level, a new song, often a slow remix of another level's theme, plays in the background. This is to prevent musical monotony.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Aside from Spyro's voice, several elements from Spyro 2 and 3 were missing, such as Spyro's hover, extra life butterflies, and persistent [=NPCs=] beyond the balloonists and fairies. Bosses had no onscreen health meters when fighting them, and none of them were fought in proper arenas (see GetBackHereBoss below). Enemies were present in the home stages for each world, and there were also no minigames outside of the usual Speedway levels, and said Speedway levels were refereed to as "Flight" instead.
* EndgamePlus: Defeating Gnasty Gnorc lets Spyro unlock Gnasty's Loot once all the treasure, eggs, and dragons are accounted for.
* FollowTheMoney: The gems. Except Moneybags hasn't been created yet, so some of the balloonists are the best equivalent.
* FrogsAndToads: The attack frogs. They really are cold blooded killers!
* GetBackHereBoss: Every boss, to some degree at least. The most prominent examples are…
** Jacques, who spends most of his time hopping away from Spyro.
** Gnasty Gnorc, whose fight is essentially four chase sequences, one after the other. First Spyro has to chase down a thief holding a key. That key unlocks the door to ''another'' thief with a key, and that key lowers Gnasty Gnorc's platform so that finally ''he'' can be chased. After he's hit once, he's chased again across retracting platforms.
* GemHeart: Every enemy (besides fodder) drops gems upon death, leaving [[NoBodyLeftBehind their corpse to poof out]].
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: One of the bosses is named "Blowhard".
* GoofyPrintUnderwear: The large Gnorcs in Gnorc Cove who defend themselves with barrels are left in heart boxers and a tank top after you blow off their protective clothing.
* GottaCollectThemAll: Gems, frozen dragons and dragon eggs.
* GreenHillZone: The Artisans world.
* GrimyWater: There is purple stagnant water (possibly tar or oil) in most levels attached to the Peace Keepers home and there is a whole lotta green goop in Beast Makers home and its levels.
* JustEatHim:
** Misty Bog had evil trees that did just this.
** Not to mention the [[{{Hellhound}} hellhounds]] in Dark Passage.
* InvincibleMinorMinion: There are fools in the Dream Weavers levels that are unkillable and [[HarmlessVillain don't attack]], but turn into clocks for a few seconds when hit, temporarily opening up a platform. Dark Passage's fools temporarily disappear into their own lanterns this way.
--> '''Mazi:''' The fools you'll see in this world are invincible. But that does ''not'' mean they shouldn't be attacked.
* LifeMeter: Sparx the Dragonfly takes 3 hits before leaving Spyro to his own defenses. Health denoted by bright yellow, color-sparkle blue, and plain green. Sparx also lets Spyro pick up gems ''adjacent'' to Spyro, so his absence would make Spyro's job harder.
* MoneySpider: All the gnorcs in the game (and all the non-fodder fauna, oddly enough) release gems shortly before poofing away.
* {{Mooning}}: The Soldier Gnorcs in Peace Keepers Home will turn around and drop their pants if cornered in a tent (or just cower in fear; it's a 50/50).
* NitroBoost: Supercharge ramps (introduced in Magic Crafters) are placed on downward slopes. Charging allows Spyro to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin move faster]] and jump farther, reinforcing the idea of exploration.
* NoticeThis: Gems can [[AllNaturalGemPolish sparkle]], even at far distances, making the aforementioned BackTracking easier.
* NotQuiteFlight: For most of the game, Spyro can glide in place of a typical DoubleJump. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in-story by virtue of Spyro being a young dragon not yet able to fly unassisted.
* OffModel: A subtle example. When a Dragon conversation is played out, Spryo's cheeks become an odd shade of yellow, then return to purple once gameplay resumes.
* OneHitKill: Classic, baby. Both [[UseYourHead charging]] and [[BreathWeapon flaming]]. Some enemies don't go down ''as'' easily, though, including every boss.
** ... every boss, that is, except for Jacques, the boss of the fifth world, the Dream Weavers'. He makes up for his squishiness by being extremely mobile, forcing you on an extended chase sequence before you finally corner him.
* OurDragonsAreDifferent: Never before had there been a game with a dragon kingdom ''and'' a cute dragon protagonist.
* OurFairiesAreDifferent: Every save point is guarded by a fairy. Stationary fairies occasionally show up to give Spyro a supercharging kiss. They're all helpful to Spyro, though.
* PassThroughTheRings: 5 of the 6 worlds have a timed full-flight level (the 100% bonus Gnasty's Loot only employs the same full-flight ability with no time limit).
* PortalDoor: Archways are how Spyro gets from a homeworld to one of its levels. Spyro exits through them after reaching an exit platform.
* PreciousPuppies: Subverted in the Dark Passage level, some of the enemies look like sweet, adorable puppies at first but once the lights go out they turn into massive, frightening hell hounds.
* RecycledSoundtrack: The melody for the Lofty Castle level was reused from the 1996 comedy/drama film ''The Pallbearer'' (specifically, the track ("Bill is Dead"). Stewart Copeland composed for both properties.
** The Wizard Peak track was used for the theme melody of TheAmandaShow merely a year later.
** The Town Square track is using the bassline from the bridge of Stewart's 1978 song "Office Girls".
* RegionalBonus: In the NTSC version, the background music of the High Caves level is a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bcaYFMeH1Ts slow remix]] of [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcKr3KKNrZY Tree Tops's tune]], but the PAL version gets a [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuVWAVvYEbc completely different song]]. In addition to this, the PAL version also receives a new [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzbGqf6C2ds song]], one of the songs that does not play in one particular level, but occasionally plays in levels when the level's default song finishes.
* RespawnPoint: The dragons' platforms act as save points, watched over by fairies when the dragon is rescued.
* RunningGag: Dragons with decidedly badass names like Thor, Conan, and Asher failing to live up to the implied image.
* ShallIRepeatThat: The dragons' platforms also give Spyro the option to replay whatever the conversation was after being rescued.
* ShiftingSandLand: The desert world of Peace Keepers, including the sublevels Cliff Town, Dry Canyon, and Doctor Shemp.
* ShoutOut: "[[VideoGame/ParappaTheRapper Ya gotta believe!]] Heheheh..."
* ShrugTake: Considered subtly whenever story hints are dropped.
--> '''Gunnar:''' [[SoProudOfYou Well done, Spyro]]! Keep up the good work, and I know you'll fulfill your destiny.
--> '''Spyro:''' Destiny? [[BloodKnight I just wanna kick some]]--
--> '''Gunnar:''' [[CurseCutShort Just toast those enemies and collect the treasure]]!
* SpringsSpringsEverywhere: No springboards here, but there are plenty of platforms everywhere (powered by fairy dust) that lift Spyro to a high platform or gliding target.
* SuperDrowningSkills: Spyro can die from falling in a shallow aqueduct.
* TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything: There is an available cheat code that lets you [[SequenceBreaking skip to any level in the game, including the last hub.]] However, Gnasty's Loot will remain locked until every collectible in the game is found, code or not.
** In addition, the locked chest in Gnorc Cove can be either unlocked with a key or blown up with a knocked barrel. Both are valid, and both will render the key gone.
* TimeTrial: The flight levels. The best rewards, however, are dictated by first clearing in the given time rather than just fastest time.
* TreasureRoom: Gnasty Gnorc was "sloppy" with hording the exposed gems, so some levels could be considered prone to such a layout. Most notably, the top-most room of Gnasty's Loot has a gratuitous arrangement of fireworks that fill the room with purple gems.
** The entirety of Gnasty's Loot counts. All other levels have a mix of different colour and value gems, mostly at the low end of 1, 2, and 5, and have a level gem total of around 300-500 each. Gnasty's Loot deals exclusively in gold and purple[[note]]worth 10 and 25 respectively[[/note]], purples more common, and has a level total of ''2000''.
* VideoGameFlight: Self-explanatory flight levels. Outside those levels (and Gnasty's Loot), see NotQuiteFlight above.
** Oddly enough, Gnasty's Loot imposes a flight ceiling incrementally raised by collecting keys and jumping off higher platforms.
* WarpWhistle: The balloonists let Spyro travel between worlds he's visited before (and possibly the next world).
* WhenIWasYourAge: Dropped by a couple older dragons. Most notably, the dragon that introduces the (first exposed) flight level portal. Spyro responds with "[[ButNowIMustGo gotta go]]".
* WorldInTheSky: Virtually all the Dream Weavers levels (aside from Icy Flight). Some of the Peace Keepers and Magic Crafters levels may [[BottomlessPits arguably]] also go here.