[[quoteright:335:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/papersplease_2640.png]]
[[caption-width-right:335:[-GLORY TO ARSTOTZKA-] ]]
->''"Papers, please..."''
--->''"Here you go. P-please let me in, I've waited for hours."''
->''"Purpose of visit?"''
--->''"To read the article."''
->''"Duration of stay?"''
--->''"A few minutes."''


Papers, Please is a self-styled {{Dystopian}} document thriller game developed by Lucas "dukope" Pope. You play as an unnamed border inspector whose job is to defend the Communist nation of Arstotzka from smugglers, terrorists, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking anyone else who happens to have improperly filled out paperwork.]] You have a family dependent on your wage to keep them warm, healthy and alive. You can follow its devlog [[http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?topic=29750.0 here]].

After a shortened version of the game served as a beta for several months, the full game was released worldwide on the 8th of August 2013.

----
!!Glory to Arstotzka for containing examples of the following tropes:

* AdultFear:
** One man will beg you to help him avenge his daughter who was murdered by giving him information on the murderer.
** There's a couple fleeing a government from another country. The girl's papers do not tally like her boyfriend's.
** If you're personally familiar with life in the Iron Curtain countries from the Cold War era, this game will hit you right in the gut, especially if you've ever had to deal with a Internal Security officer like Vonel.
** Your family is constantly entirely dependant on your hard work to stay healthy and fed. Fail to keep up adequate living standards, and they will fall ill and die. If every family member dies, the game ends, as the position of border inspector is given to someone who can maintain a large, healthy family properly.
* AffablyEvil: What counts as evil is up for debate in a story so heavily mired in GreyAndGreyMorality, but in the sense that he's a criminal (and likely would be considered "evil" in any normal story), Jorji is definitely this. Sure, he's a drug dealer, a smuggler, and possibly a black market mastermind, but he's also the friendliest, most polite and most cheerful person you'll ever meet. The Inspector can also be this, if you play him correctly.
* AntiFrustrationFeatures:
** It is possible to re-load your game from any day from any play through. So if you get a NonStandardGameOver, it is a simple matter to pick up where you left off and not having to start the whole game over.
** You're notified with a citation within seconds of making a mistake, since it would be frustrating to not know until later.
** For those with bad aim, missing a shot when using the tranquilizer rifle still nets you a small bonus of 10 credits to compensate for the missed work.
* AntiVillain: You, if you play the game right and take the high moral ground on the occasions you can. You're an employee of a frankly hellish government, but you aren't malevolent at all and just want things to run smoothly and your family to be warm and fed.
* BadBoss: Dimitri. He insults the Inspector to his face if he got just ''one'' citation, demands that he do personal favors without pulling any strings to ensure he gets no citations while doing so, and doles out harsh punishments just for decorating the station. Pissing him off enough will also get you sent to the gulags.
* BeingGoodSucks: You can try to let in people with sob stories and improper paperwork, but the citations for not doing your job will catch up with you, get your pay docked and your family in dire straits.
* BeleagueredBureaucrat: You ''will'' feel the time pressure, especially in the late-game when each entrant needs three or four pieces of complicated paperwork to get in.
* BenevolentConspiracy: [[spoiler:However you interpret the group, you cannot deny that EZIC tries to take good care of you. When you accept their $1,000 gift, the ministry of income confiscates your savings and investigates you. When the EZIC gets word of it, they send an agent (whom you must approve entry of) to help 'take care' of that for you. You won't get your savings back, but at least you won't get into trouble, and they've learned from this and decided to keep their gifts modest from now on. In the ending where you help them, they stay true to their word all the time and even send a messenger to warn you about an incoming attack from their agents and asks you to hold your fire. If you do that and let them do their thing, which is to bomb a hole in the border wall, they happily accept you among their ranks and even provide you and your family a safer place to live.]]
* BlatantLies: Certain discrepancies, such as the weight of the applicant not matching up with the weight given on their papers or their being from an area flagged for special security measures, require the player to strip search said applicant. The reason given is that "You have been selected for a random search."
* BodyguardingABadass: After the player gets access to the tranquillizer gun, the guards, particularly Sergiu, will start relying on the inspector to keep them safe, despite their superior armament and Sergiu's promise to protect him. Saving Sergiu in the first attack causes him to admit to being part of a RedshirtArmy afterwards.
* BombDisposal: One of the scripted events sees a bomb delivered to the booth the player character works in, requiring the player to disarm it.
* BombThrowingAnarchists: The Kolechians who throw bombs at the guards.
* BribeBackfire:
** Detaining a man who offers a bribe, you say the line: "You cannot bribe an Arstotzkan Officer."
** The EZIC will attempt to buy your cooperation (or pay you for cooperating) by offering you a package of 1,000 credits. You have the option to burn it. [[spoiler: This is actually the *best* thing to do even if you do intend to cooperate with them, because the massive cash influx will cause internal affairs to audit you.]]
** Strangely, bribes include a guard agreeing on giving you a cut of his bonus for every immigrant/citizen you detain (and there is almost ''always'' a good reason to do so), and for whatever favors you do for others (such as selling a watch, or receiving money ''after'' you approve an immigrant who gives you money for being so kind).
* ButThouMust: You can't refuse to cooperate with [[spoiler:Corman Drex]]; if you don't give him his piece of paper the first time he comes through, he'll arrive and demand it later, and you won't be able to just detain him.
* CantGetAwayWithNuthin: The MOA can only do one thing right, and that's to send ''you'' a citation when you violate protocol.
* CheckpointCharlie: Working at one of these is the primary gameplay element.
* CloudCuckooLander: Jorji Costava does not seem to be quite there, as on his first attempt to pass through customs brings no documents at all, declaring instead that "Arstotzka so great, passport not required!", and on his second attempt presents a passport from "Cobrastan" crudely drawn in ''crayon''. No matter how many times you reject or arrest him, he remains upbeat about the whole thing. He happily proclaims that [[spoiler:he's smuggling drugs]] not once, but twice. And he's also [[spoiler:ultimately your savior if you helped EZIC at any point, as he provides a method of escape from the country.]]
* ColourCodedForYourConvenience:
** Each country uses different colors for its passports.
** There is a brass key for using a tranq gun, and a silver one for a sniper rifle.
** The people outside your booth are color-coded: immigrants are black, guards are blue, Sergiu is green, and the man in red is, well, red.
* ComicallyMissingThePoint: Early on, Jorji Costava will, as part of a long chain of inept attempts, try to enter Arstotzka with an obviously fake passport. If the player decides to pass him, the citation will ignore the numerous other problems with his papers and focus on the fact that "Cobrastan is not a real country".
* CrapsackWorld: Arstotzka is a nasty {{Ruritania}} in of itself, but what's worse is that there are people immigrating to it to get away from ''worse'' dictatorships.
* DamnYouMuscleMemory: Your first inclination when coming across a scripted immigrant (whether they comment on the decor in your booth or give you something or whatever) is to assume that they always have their papers in order. [[NotSoFastBucko Not so]]. With remarkably few exceptions (most notably [[spoiler: the brothel workers]]), scripted immigrants can have their papers in order or not, just like everyone else. This will throw you for a loop the ''second'' time you play through.
* {{Determinator}}: Jorji is really persistent about getting past that border, no matter how many times he gets turned away or detained.
* TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything: If, for some insane reason, you decide to approve Jorji's Cobrastan passport, despite the game not actually allowing you to highlight any discrepancies, you will actually get a citation from the Ministry of Admission saying "Cobrastan is not a real country."
* DirtyCommunists: Yourself and your fellow Arstotzkan state employees.
* DisproportionateRetribution:
** Later in the game, you can detain people for having inconsistent paperwork. However, these inconsistencies in the paperwork could point to something much more sinister. You are not paid to take chances.
** Your boss sentences you to forced labour if you are caught hanging anything but official plaques on the wall for a second time.
* DistractedByTheSexy: Some would-be immigrants will try to distract the player character by slipping in flyers for a certain Arstotzkan brothel with their official papers. Surprisingly, [[spoiler:the brothel workers are scripted, and their papers are always in order, so if a girl hands over a card she can be accepted right away.]]
* DystopiaIsHard: Arstotzka's border system is a mess of rules that change on a daily basis, yet the system pays so little and has such minor penalties for failure that corruption (whether for personal gain or moral reasons) is almost guaranteed.
* {{Eagleland}}: The United Federation is implied to be such, with its blue passport, eagle diplomatic seal, and computerised border control.
* EarnYourHappyEnding: Certain endings in the game, with elements such as the upbeat, cheerful music and optimistic narration, provide a stark contrast to the grim, oppressive nature of the rest of the game.
* TheEighties: The game is set in late 1982.
* EndGameResultsScreen: After each ending, the game shows you the stats on how many people you processed, denied, detained etc.
* EndlessGame: Unlocked when you get ending 20, or input a numeric code. There is also different modes and modifiers within this mode, including one where you have to avoid making ''one'' mistake.
* EpicFail: The guy who hands over ''two'' passports (in different names and places of issue) on day 14. You can even detain him immediately, no need for a check.
* EvenEvilHasStandards:
** The player character may be part of a corrupt bureaucracy in a dystopian society, but the player doesn't need to be completely heartless in their work. A briber can be told off before detaining him, and a sex trafficker can be denied despite his paperwork being in order. The game has many choices like this: one can try to do the right thing, or one can focus on doing their job.
** When a certain terrorist attack occurs, one of the messenger from [[spoiler:EZIC appears to inform you that they had nothing to do with it, making a point that they ''never'' harm the innocent, and even sends in an agent to investigate for you.]]
* EvilIsEasy: In the first part of the game, if someone's papers have a minor discrepancy, you can try to help them get their papers in order...or you can just deny their passport without explanation. The latter pays better. This is partly averted later, when you need to actually talk to the people who come up to your checkpoint before denying them, allowing them a chance to rectify any mistakes they've made.
* FakeDifficulty: A common citation is for when an immigrant's stated gender is different from their actual gender. However, the immigrant's faces are rendered in such a stylized fashion that it can often be nigh impossible to tell whether they are intended to look like men or women, rendering the exercise often one of trial and error.
* FeaturelessProtagonist:
** The player character doesn't have a name or even an icon. [[spoiler:The player character's wife finds a picture on the second to last day with the player character in it, though.]]
** The inspector appeared on the official website prior to release. He's a nondescript man with brown hair and glasses. In the endings, he is only shown in silhouette.
* {{Foreshadowing}}:
** Early on, a man will tell the player character that "They should have never opened this gate." [[spoiler:Terrorists carrying bombs will start trying to pass through it.]]
** A certain [[spoiler:EZIC agent]] will inform you that the [[spoiler: man in red is not as dangerous as they say he is.]] You will know what he means a couple days later...
* FriendlyEnemy: Over time, the Inspector becomes a lot more friendly towards Jorji Costava.
* GenderBlenderName: Some travelers, even when they are the gender they claim to be.
* GenderReveal: Some travelers' looks will not match their passport's stated gender. [[GenderReveal Searching them]] [[DudeLooksLikeALady may lead to]] [[LadyLooksLikeADude definite "Oh..." moments.]]
* GoodWithNumbers: You will have to be, or will learn to be, in order to properly carry out your duties. For example, you need to be quick on date math to make sure that a work permit expires at the same time as the duration of stay on an access permit. Likewise, you will have to be able to quickly realize that "eight weeks" and "two months" are (well, reasonably) equivalent.
* GreyAndGrayMorality:
** There are virtually no "right" or "wrong" choices in this game. Over the course of the game, you'll have to make ethical dilemmas whether or not you should sympathize with the entrant or obey the rules. For example, after an Antegrian man have his credentials and papers passed and allowed entry to the country (which his credentials is always correct), his wife will appear as well, but will always lack an entry permit. Allowing her in will net you a citation, but you will receive a token and a achievement for this.
** [[spoiler:The EZIC and Arstotzkan government are not very different. The Arstotzkan government is a totalitarian, corrupt, bureaucracy; but they are the player character's best chance of keeping a stable job and providing a better life for his family. EZIC wants to topple the current corrupt regime and is willing to grant the inspector's family a much better life than what Arstotzka offers; but like Arstotzka, they don't take traitors lightly]].
* GuideDangIt:
** Many new players get stuck on the third day when a bald man with no documents whatsoever shows up. The player has to select the rule about needing a passport and compare it with the empty table in order to dismiss him. The maker has been trying to make this more obvious, but with limited success.
** It won't occur to some people to highlight the newspaper article when the murderer from Republia appears.
** In the event where a woman asks you for help with a man she's afraid will make her a SexSlave, when the player encounters him the first action to come to mind is to deny him entry. This simply leads to the same outcome if the player accepts him, and costs the player a fine. The correct action to do is [[spoiler:inspecting the note the woman gives the player and the man's ID card, and then pressing the "Detain" button]]. Alternatively, [[spoiler:the player can just give the note to the man to enable the "Detain" button.]]
** An EZIC messenger [[spoiler:informs the player character about an assassin and provides him with some white powder in a card. It instructs him to press down on it. The correct way of applying it is to click the bottom powder while it's over the passport to apply it. [[SchmuckBait Just don't click the powder itself.]]]]
* HeroicSacrifice: An EZIC messenger will task you with ''killing'' a man in red (Clearly visible in the queue), and promises that your sacrifice ensures that Arstotzka will be saved, and your family will be protected. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, this leads to a DownerEnding, in which while they were able to relocate your family to a safer nation, they're unable to operate in Arstotzka, dooming them to hibernate. Whether or not you wanted to help them, this makes the sacrifice [[SenselessSacrifice pointless...]]]]
* HoistByHisOwnPetard: [[spoiler:An EZIC messenger provides you a key to a sniper rifle to assassinate a man (which you have to miss). At the last day, you can use that sniper rifle on the two agents that run an assault on the wall.]]
* IHaveManyNames: Some travelers state this as an explanation of why they might have a name discrepancy. Sometimes it's legit.
* ImperialStormtrooperMarksmanshipAcademy: All the border guards suffer from this.
* IneffectualSympatheticVillain: Jorji Costava, the world's least subtle and most harebrained illegal immigrant [[spoiler: and drug runner]]. Your character starts anticipating his visits over the course of the game.
* InterfaceSpoiler:
** If the inspector doesn't say "Cause no trouble" to a Kolechian passing through the checkpoint, expect something to go down on the other side.
** [[spoiler:Brothel workers -- the girls who hand you cards from the Pink Vice -- always have their papers in order, so you can just give approval and send them on. This can save you a lot of time.]]
* {{Jerkass}}: One Arstotzkan citizen will complain at you for being "slow" and that he has a bus to catch, even if you give him back his passport in less than five seconds. Go ahead and take your time.
* LampshadeHanging: At a certain point, Arstotzka gets a reputation for being a criminal haven, prompting a rule update that requires you to keep an eye out for the three most wanted criminals of the day trying to cross your border. On arriving at work and calling for the first person in line, s/he is ''always'' on the wanted list that you just started receiving.
--> '''You:''' How coincidental that you would arrive today.
* LuckBasedMission: It's up to random luck whether the next guy in line has a squeaky clean set of papers or not. Sometimes a string of easy passes will speed past your post, making that next one subtle flaw all the more difficult to notice. Some events are scripted, though, and on multiple playthroughs, you'll welcome them as you can stamp their paperwork and move on quickly.
* MandatoryMotherhood: Arstotzkan workers are required to marry and support large, healthy families. [[spoiler: If your entire family dies, you'll be fired from your job.]]
* MementoMacGuffin: Sergiu eventually gives the inspector a locket of his love, Elisa, so that she can be recognized when it's time. It's up to the player whether Elisa is let in or not, as she lacks proper paperwork.
* MissionControl: The Arstotzka Ministry of Admission. Updates to national immigration policies are received before missions and warnings and penalties, in the form of wage deductions, are sent whenever you make a wrong call.
* MortonsFork:
** Eventually journalists will start showing up and attempt to use their press passes to gain entry. Deny them for having invalid paperwork, and they'll insult you for trying to silence the media and write an article about it. Accept them, and you'll get a citation for breaking the rules to help them... and they'll insult you for your inefficiency in enforcing the rules and write an article about it.
** Day 29, when Jorji gives you his passport. You'll receive a citation regardless of denying or allowing him, either for denying a person clear for entry or for unauthorized passport confiscation.
* MultipleEndings: Depending on how much money you make and how you respond to certain events. A list of the endings: [[labelnote:Click to expand]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 1: If you end with a negative balance at the end of a day you are arrested for debt and your family is sent back to their village.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 2: Your entire family dies of sickness.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 3: If you hand over the EZIC Documents to the M.O.I Inspector, you get arrested for your connection to them.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 4: If you take the $1000 gift from EZIC and don't fix the problem by helping the EZIC agents that the cipher tells you to, then you are arrested for an anomaly in your finances.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 5, 6, 7, 8: Shooting an innocent man or guard with either the rifle or tranquilizer. The only differences are getting the death penalty for shooting a guard and\or with a rifle and forced labour if it was a citizen with the tranquilizer.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 9 & 10: On Day 23 if you do as EZIC tells you to kill the Man In Red. If you shoot him with the sniper rifle, you are arrested and sentenced to death for shooting an 'innocent man'. If you shoot him with the tranquilizer then you are sentenced to forced labour. EZIC moves your family to Obristan, but the new inspector isn't co-operative and EZIC's plans are ruined.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 11: If your supervisor warns you about unauthorized wall hangings such as the Pennant, Family Photo or Son's Drawing, you will be sentenced to forced labour for ignoring a direct order. It is possible to reload the day this happens and remove them from the wall before he gets there though.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 12: If you arrested Shae instead of waving through like your supervisor told you to do, he reports you for theft of Arstotzkan property, you are given forced labour and your family is sent back to their village.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 13: If you haven't done enough EZIC missions by Day 31, EZIC will attack both the wall and your booth. If you stop the attack on your booth by shooting the lower of the attackers, you are arrested for failing to defending the border.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 14: If you have done all the EZIC tasks, but then stop the attack on the border even after the EZIC Agent tells you to hold fire, your information audit leads to you being arrested and executed for working with EZIC. Before the execution EZIC manages to slip a note under your door condemning you for the betrayal.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 15: If you have done all the EZIC tasks, let them blow up the wall then shoot both the EZIC agents, EZIC still rises to power, but your betrayal sees you have no place in the new revolution and you are killed as an enemy of EZIC.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 16: On the day you received a bulletin about you being subject to an information audit, Jorji reveals that he knows a forger who can allow you to obtain entry to Obristan, for a certain amount of money and if you confisicate enough legitimate Obristan passports. This ending sees you unable to save your entire family and thus have a lesser ending than the others]].
** [[spoiler:Ending 17: If you helped EZIC some of the time, the Day 31 attack on the wall will also lead to an attack on your booth. If you kill the agents sent to kill you and blow up the wall and can't escape, the information audit will see you sentenced to death for betraying the Government. EZIC is destroyed and the fate of your family is unknown.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 18: If you gather enough passports and money the whole family escapes to Obristan.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 19: You let EZIC agents blow up the border wall on Day 31. Everyone waiting in line floods over the border. EZIC gains power and makes you an agent of the revolution.]]
** [[spoiler:Ending 20: You never co-operate with EZIC and do your patriotic duty as a protector of the Glory of Arstotzka.]][[/labelnote]]
* MundaneMadeAwesome: Be honest, do you think actual border control could ever be this engaging?
* MyCountryRightOrWrong: You can choose to play your character this way, following protocol to the letter and refusing bribes. After all, they did manage to give you the job to support your family (even if it was by chance).
* NeverHurtAnInnocent: EZIC makes it very clear that they abide by this rule.
* NoCommunitiesWereHarmed: Arstotzka and the other fictional in-game countries. Several countries have (city) names that allude to America (The United Federation, or Republia's Bostan, for instance) and others that sound more European. The result is that despite the Soviet overtones, it feels like it could be set anywhere in Europe, or even in North America.
* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished:
** Letting someone in when their papers aren't in order gets you a citation, even if it saves their life.
** [[spoiler:From the perspective of a loyal Arstotzkan, promptly handing EZIC-related evidence over to the inspector may be the right thing to do, but you'll be arrested ''on suspicion'' if you do so.]]
* NonStandardGameOver: Any ending that results in your death (such as [[spoiler:touching the poison you're meant to give to an EZIC target]]) abruptly returns you to the main menu without the EndGameResultsScreen and is not counted among the game's actual endings.
* ObstructiveBureaucrat: People can wait in line for hours to see you before being told that their entrance was denied because of a misspelled name or expired ticket.
* OhCrap: The man who gives you two passports (see EpicFail) instantly realises his mistake and starts begging you to give them back.
* TheOmniscient: The Ministry of Admission's citation printer. You may not have spotted the mistake in someone's documentation, but it did! According to the devlog, the gamemaker went this way instead of having a more fallible system so it would be obvious when you slip up.
* TheOrder: The Order of the EZIC Star. [[spoiler: They claim to be an ancient order dedicated to restoring Arstotzka through clandestine dealings. Whether you believe them or not is up to you.]]
* PerpetualPoverty: From beginning to end, you're going to struggle to make ends meet for you and your family. [[spoiler:Even if you accept a $1000 bribe, your superiors will catch on and yank it from you.]]
* PerspectiveFlip: In the "Escape to Obristan" endings, ''you'' are an immigrant handing forged documents to a border inspector. [[spoiler:Fortunately, he's worse at his job than you ever were.]]
* PetTheDog:
** If you let his friend into the country, then your BadBoss, Dimitri, will say that coming to the checkpoint doesn't seem so bad anymore.
** Considering the setting, the Arstotzkan government being willing to [[spoiler:overlook all your past bribes and wrong-doings for your loyalty and protection of the checkpoint]] seems uncharacteristically generous.
* PointAndClick: Gameplay mostly consists of inspecting paperwork for inconsistencies against your rulebook and each other. Find two things that don't pass muster and you can either confront the prospective immigrant about it or just bust out the denial stamp, no questions asked. For all the simplicity, however, gameplay is surprisingly complex, with multiple plots and a number of things to keep track of.
* PowerPerversionPotential: The scanner allows you to see under people's clothes. The options menu allows you to turn nudity on and off.
* PressXToDie: [[spoiler: When you get the poison powder from the EZIC agent, there is nothing stopping you from touching the powder, even with the warning on the packet itself telling you not to.]]
* PropagandaMachine: It's implied that ''The Truth of Arsotzka'' (the paper that we can read) is one of these. [[spoiler:Ultimately, it's remarkably closer to a free press in practice, with opinion pieces and headlines that are openly critical of the government policies.]]
* ProtectionMission: Sergiu is a guard who is stationed at the border for a few weeks of the story mode. He is very vulnerable, and his subplot will end if he is killed. If the player wants that [[spoiler:nice $100 reward for keeping him alive and letting his girlfriend through]], he needs to be kept safe from the various terrorists.
* PunchClockVillain: The player. Day in and day out you man your post at the border in order to support your wife, son, uncle and mother-in-law who will all starve and die without support from your wage. In other words he is a very literal punch clock villain. 6 to 6 each day.
* RedAndBlackAndEvilAllOver: The title screen is all over this.
* RedshirtArmy: The Arstotzkan guards. Almost all of the time, they have terrible aim, and the week cannot go by without at least one of them dying. Once you have access to a rifle, you can potentially save two of them when an attack happens (though saving Sergiu is the only one that matters). Somehow, an Arstotzkan border inspector has better aim than the men who are trained to shoot on sight. Sergiu will even lampshade his bad aim if you save him once.
** Consequently, [[spoiler: if you used the poison EZIC provided, you can get one guard killed. If you've been supportive of EZIC 100%, those guards at the end are necessary targets.]]
* {{Retraux}}: The game's graphical style resembles an EGA game from the early '90s, though the animation is a little too smooth for it.
* {{Retirony}}: Averted in the case of [[spoiler: Sergiu. If you save his life and let his lover through, he informs you that the next day he is getting a different post. Luckily for him there's no terrorist attack on his last day.]]
* {{Revenge}}:
** After news that a serial child killer named Simon Wens is returning to Arstotzka, a vengeful father asks you to let Simon in and confiscate his passport, so he can find and murder him. He even gives you a photo of his daughter, who Simon killed, to convince you further. He will be thankful to you if you grant him his chance. [[spoiler:Indeed, the next day Simon is found dead in a "confusing mess".]]
** On Day 19, Impor imposes trade sanctions on Arstotzkan imported goods, so Arstotzka responds by rejecting all Impor immigrants. This act quickly ends the trade sanctions from Impor.
* RightOnQueue: Each day a massive line forms outside your post and it's your job to see as many of them as possible. The line ''never'' gets shorter or thins out [[spoiler: except after one particularly brutal terrorist attack, when the line is noticeably much sparser the next day.]]
* RippedFromTheHeadlines:
** Vince Lestrade, a Republian track star accused of killing his girlfriend, is based on Oscar Pistorius.
** The daily newspaper writes about a domestic spying scandal in Antegria, and the whistleblower seeking asylum (and ultimately being granted it) in Arstotzka. This is based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Snowden the Edward Snowden whistleblowing scandal]].
* RunningGag: Jorji Costava, a man who comes in, speaking in mangled English, and always has something wrong. For example, his first appearance has him come in with no passport. The second time, he has a made-up passport from "Cobrastan" that you can reject outright. He'll also cheerfully admit that all his papers are forged (when he finally gets his paperwork in order, he tells you it's because he paid for ''really good'' forgeries), that he's a drug smuggler, and that he'll just bribe his way out of prison if you detain him again. You actually get friendly dialogue with him as he keeps appearing, including a "Sorry, Jorji" when he has to be detained again. [[spoiler:Funnily enough, knowing a criminal can come in handy -- he can ultimately help you escape the country if needed.]]
* {{Ruritania}}: Arsotzka, with all of the "lovely" features of a [=1980s=] Soviet Bloc country -- job lottery, daily rule changes, smugglers, terrorists, etc.
* SadisticChoice: There are a lot of these found throughout the game. You'll often have to decide between your paycheck and your conscience.
** For EZIC supporters, the day then you're tasked to kill the man in red will be this. Doing what they ask will result in your death, but not doing so will jeopardize the entire EZIC movement in Arstotzka. [[spoiler:A terrorist attack neatly solves the problem for you, as the man in red retreats back to Kolechia in the panic.]]
* SaveScumming:
** The very first day, being a tutorial, has the most lenient rules regarding who can pass through -- Arstotzkans versus non-Arstotzkans. As such, you can replay the day over and over for the most amount of processes in order to build up a buffer in your savings, with numbers greater than 20 possible with enough practice.
** If you get an unsatisfactory income or a bad ending on a given day, all you need to do is replay that day from the continue screen. This is intentional, as part of the AntiFrustrationFeatures.
* ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections: If the player detains his boss' whore at the checkpoint, [[spoiler: he'll be sentenced to forced labour on trumped-up charges]]. In addition, the player may decide to do favors for people who he likes.
* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: The player can, and in many cases probably should, take bribes to let people through the checkpoint. A few citations a day aren't exactly a danger to his position.
* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: Players can decide to violate protocol and let people in anyway despite papers that don't add up or exist.
%%* SecretPolice: The Ministry of Information.
* SeriousBusiness:
** Gain a few pounds since that ID card was created? Did you get married and have a new name? Was that just a bad picture day for you and the photo doesn't quite match up? All of this is grounds enough for the Arstotzkan Ministry of Admission Inspector (the player character) to throw you out or even detain you, though if he's feeling good about it, he might just ask you some additional questions.
** A second offense of having non-approved decorations on the wall of your booth is enough to get you sentenced to forced labor.
* ShmuckBait:
** [[spoiler:One of the Ezic messengers will hand you a slip with some powder in it labelled "DO NOT TOUCH POWDER". If you click on the powder, you white out and are returned to the main menu.]]
** That expensive gift you can take or burn? [[spoiler: Taking it will eventually cost you '''all''' of your savings to be confiscated and for you to be investigated. Letting an EZIC agent in the country can help clear things up though, but you'll never get your money back. Or, if you refuse the first gift but accept the second, more expensive gift, you'll soon get yourself a NonstandardGameOver. Accepting the first is ok if you're low on money to begin with; you can keep the money for a day, and move up to a better apartment which you can downgrade later and keep that money. Just be sure to help the EZIC agent clear your name.]]
* ShoutOut:
** The countries of Republia and Antegria come from Lucas Pope's previous game, ''The Republia Times''.
** Because of the pre-release name submission campaign, there are/were several unintentional cameos. Every name belonging to another property is immediately removed from the game when it's discovered.
-->'''@dukope:''' "You wouldn't believe how many people submitted [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic pony]]/[[{{VideoGame/Touhou}} touhou]]/licensed-property names for [=Papers Please=] immigrants. At least, I was surprised."
** A government official's mistress is named Shae, an allusion to the mistress of one of the main characters of ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''.
* SinisterSurveillance: Think you can get away with an easy-to-slip mistake? The citation machine would beg to differ.
* SniperRifle: One eventually gets issued to the player for those times when terrorists are about to make things a whole lot worse for Arstotzka and "budget reassignments" force some of the guards away from your checkpoint. It's only a tranquilizer rifle, though [[spoiler: until EZIC gives you the key to a sniper rifle...]].
* SpeakingSimlish: The spoken words in the game are filtered samples of nonsense words ("ehua?", "ihe", "gish-tot", "haouaeay", "lekrafezuh!") typed into the Mac "say" command.
* StylisticSuck: The game almost has a grim, bleak DOS-quality graphic style that looks hideous by today's standards. The benefits of this though are that it is easier to find discrepancies and also reflects the dystopian nature of the game.
* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial:
-->'''Jorji:''' Everything is definitely ok with me. For sure I am not in criminal bulletin or anything!
* TakingYouWithMe: A scripted event is for [[spoiler: a Kolechian with impeccable entry papers]] to self-destruct, killing three guards at the entry border. [[spoiler: This will happen twice, and both times, you will NOT be able to stop them because their papers are perfect.]]
** If you decide to deny them and receive a citation, the next person(s) in the line will do the same thing, [[FailureIsTheOnlyOption even if it's already past 6 PM]].
* TemptingFate: "For sure, I am not in criminal bulletin or anything" [[spoiler: Unfortunately, Jorji is...]]
* ThisIsGonnaSuck:
** Everytime you get a citation, you'll dread more and more the day your superior officer is scheduled to have a word with you.
** The inspector from the Ministry of Information. If you've been helping out the [[spoiler:rebel group, EZIC]], God help you when you have to see him again...
* TimedMission: Your pay is based on how many people you can (correctly) service by the end of the work day. You can't rush through people: if you admit entry to someone you should have denied, you are penalized. If you deny entry to someone you should have admitted, you are penalized. After Day 18, if you deny entry to someone you should deny, but don't stamp the denial reason, you are penalized.
* ToBeLawfulOrGood: Effectively the whole point of the game. In order to keep the government off your back and stay in the black, you need to abide to their standards, no matter how oppressive they are or how much they'll weigh on your conscience.
* TookALevelInBadass: The player, once you have access to a tranq rifle. Think of the many guards you could save from terrorist attacks with a well placed shot.
* {{Tuckerization}}: The developer was taking name submissions for potential immigrants from the public.
* VastBureaucracy: Arstotzka. You're assigned your job through a "labor lottery". Your rulebook is updated with new complicated rules every day. You have to deal with at least three different ministries, each with their own set of seals (they can't even agree on a single seal per ministry).
* VerbalBackspace: A surprising number of immigrants get their length of stay ''completely'' wrong. Not simply off by a short measure of time, but ''way'' off. When you confront them about the discrepancy, they universally have an "Oh, right, that" reaction.
-->IMMIGRANT: I stay for six weeks.\\
''(Access permit specifies 2 days)''\\
INSPECTOR: The length of your stay is different.\\
IMMIGRANT: I make mistake. I just pass through.
** Even more amusing is that the system sees this as clearing the discrepancy.
* VideoGameCaringPotential:
** Some good people might be unfortunately in possession of an improper set of identification or insufficient amount thereof and a kind player can "look the other way" and stamp them approved anyway. In one instance, a woman claiming to be at risk of becoming a {{Sex Slave}} to a man in line after her will slip you a note begging for your help. When his turn comes up you can swiftly kick him out or detain him.
** About halfway through the game, one of the guards befriends you. A few days later, he asks for a favor. Granting him his favor ''will'' make you feel really good about yourself (but get you in trouble).
** In the later days, you will learn that [[spoiler:your sister gets arrested, leaving her daughter up for adoption. She may be another mouth to feed, but she is family... And adopting her gets you rewarded with an extra $100, thankfully.]]
** You don't HAVE to ask questions to anyone with improper paper work [[spoiler:until the time comes where you need to find reasons to deny them]], in fact the moment you see an inconsistency, you can deny them out right. If you do ask, some of them may have made an honest mistake, or didn't make things clear. The fact that you're going through the extra effort just to see if it's a good person that can be admitted is showing that you care yourself.
** There's a man and woman claiming to be husband and wife that are fleeing from an oppressive regime that will kill them. His papers are in good order and he goes first. Her papers are not.
* VideoGameCrueltyPotential:
** You can let the guy running the sex trade through. You could also just deny everyone entry, whether their papers are good or not, though that'll get you in trouble very quickly.
** There's the man who tries to bribe you with both cash and a wristwatch (a "family heirloom"). You can deny him and give him back the money and the watch... or detain him and keep the watch and money for yourself.
** Giving Simon Wens a picture of his victim will cause him to exclaim, "What the fuck!" and run back to Kolechia.
** You can stop paying your family's bills and kill off all but one of them without losing the game.
* ViolationOfCommonSense: Many first-time players would give the EZIC documents to the M.O.I. Inspector, as what most law-abiding people would do in real life. Doing so will get you investigated and arrested for a NonStandardGameOver.
* VoiceGrunting: Everyone, including the player, speaks in this.
* WesternTerrorists:
** The Kolechians are responsible for most of the terrorist attacks early on.
** The EZIC, for all their righteousness, are not above terrorism (though never against innocent citizens).
* WhatTheHellPlayer:
** You will receive a printed citation every time you make a wrong call, and your superior officer may make a comment alluding to this depending on your performance. Some immigrants and citizens will also pull this on you, mostly if it's an immoral choice (which at least saves you from earning a citation). Although if you fall through in your word to certain people, this can be justified.
** You can give [[spoiler:Simon Wens the photo of his victim.]] He runs far, far away, and the man who wanted to kill him will not be happy.
** Work with the [[spoiler:EZIC group, and shoot the guys the messenger told you ''not'' to shoot? They will be suitably mad at you.]]
** Some of the endings are earned with you blatantly betraying both EZIC and the Arstotzkan government in one go, predictably leading you to forced labour or death.
* WireDilemma: Defusing a bomb that gets planted in the booth during a scripted event requires cutting a set of wires in a numerical sequence listed on the outer casing of the bomb. This obvious design flaw is lampshaded by the nearby guard.
-->'''Calensk:''' This is poorest bomb I ever see. A simple mind created this. Just cut the wires in order.
* YouBastard:
** The paper will reflect what actions you took (or didn't take) the next day, subtly condemning your actions if what you did was ethically questionable.
** The people in line will also sometimes tell you off if you red-stamp them. If their papers are fine, they might even say "You Bastard" verbatim.
** Jorji will return with the correct documents. If you're still bitter about him constantly getting it wrong, or deny him unjustifiably, he'll call you out for it.
* YouNoTakeCandle: Many characters speak in very stilted English. Likely a sign of them not quite grasping the language of Arstotzka fully. Though on the other hand, the player character sometimes speaks this way himself ("Where is passport?"), so who knows.
* YourDaysAreNumbered: During the final week, you'll be notified of an impending audit by the [[SecretPolice Ministry of Information]]. In fact, their special investigator will audit you ''personally''. [[spoiler:If you've worked with the EZIC group, even helped them once or accepted one of their gifts, but haven't done enough for them to be able to start their revolution in earnest, you may want to consider escaping from Arstotzka, otherwise, the Arstotzkan inspector will have you arrested for treason and sentenced to death by the last day. On the day of Christmas Eve no less.]]
----

->''"There appears to be a discrepancy."''
-->'''[DENIED]'''
->''"Next."''