[[quoteright:313:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dq_logo.jpg]]

->''A Slime draws near![[note]]In the original Japanese version, it simply says "A Slime appeared!"[[/note]]\\
Command?''

A long-running Japanese RPG series with eleven installments. Often credited as the first turn-based battle [[EasternRPG JRPG]] in history (though it's definitely not the first RPG to ever exist, as it's been said to be inspired by others such as ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}''). Absurdly popular in Japan, fairly obscure outside (at least compared to [[Franchise/FinalFantasy its more popular counterpart]]). Before their merger, ''Dragon Quest'' was to Enix what ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' was to Square. While never as popular in the US as the ''Final Fantasy'' series (but even more popular than ''Final Fantasy'' in Japan; since the companies merged, needless to say, Creator/SquareEnix owns the Japanese RPG scene), it's notable for its character art by Creator/AkiraToriyama, and maintains a sizable cult following. Most of its tropes, especially the battle screen, have been kept intact over the years.

Mostly due to the historical prevalence of console gaming over PC gaming in Japan, nearly all parodies of {{RPG}}s that show up in anime that aren't {{MMORPG}}s will reference ''Dragon Quest'' in some way.

The English localization of ''Dragon Quest VIII'' was noticeable for its solution to the [[KansaiRegionalAccent regional accent issue]]: many of the characters speak in British dialects rather than American ones. Similarly, the US releases of ''Dragon Quest IV'', ''V'', ''VI'' and ''IX'' on the DS and ''VII'' on the 3DS are using regional dialects -- there's a Russian town, a Scottish town, etc etc. The localizers also love to use [[HurricaneOfPuns puns]], something that's a bit of a bother to some fans, and [[NarmCharm another selling point]] to others.

Sequels to the franchise are always released locally on Saturdays, which according to the company is to prevent the predictably huge turnout of fans from skipping school or work during launch days to pick them up. This fueled an urban legend inflating the real cause to be political pressure from local Japanese municipalities or that the release rule was an actual local ''law''. (Although the Diet at the time ''did'' ask them to do something after a small boy was mugged and beaten during the ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'' launch -- however, the delayed launches were entirely Enix's decision.)

Few people know it, but there was an unrelated TabletopRPG called ''TabletopGame/DragonQuest'', whose trademark was the reason the ''Dragon Quest'' video game series was originally known as ''Dragon Warrior'' outside of Japan, until Square Enix finally acquired it for their series. Nothing to do with this franchise; it was bought out and buried by the owners of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' so it would not be a threat to their MerchandiseDriven empire.

For the manga and anime spinoff ''Dragon Quest: Dai no Daibouken'' (''Dai's Great Adventure'', translated into French and Spanish as ''Fly'' to [[NeverSayDie avoid pronouncing "die"!]]), see the ''Manga/DaiNoDaibouken'' page. The series that was dubbed as ''Dragon Warrior'' is at ''Anime/DragonQuestLegendOfTheHeroAbel''.

Not to be confused with the novel ''[[Literature/DragonKeeperChronicles DragonQuest]]'' or the ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' episode [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E21DragonQuest of that name]].

Also has a growing [[AwesomeMusic/DragonQuest Awesome Music]] entry. You can vote for your favorite game [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/crowner.php/BestEpisode/DragonQuest here.]]

----
[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: The ''Dragon Quest'' series includes: ]]


[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Main Series]]
[[index]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' (UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoEntertainmentSystem}}ES, {{UsefulNotes/MSX}})
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII: Luminaries of the Legendary Line'' (UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoEntertainmentSystem}}ES, {{UsefulNotes/MSX}})
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII: The Seeds of Salvation'' (UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoEntertainmentSystem}}ES)
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV: Chapters of the Chosen'' (UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoEntertainmentSystem}}ES)
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV: Hand of the Heavenly Bride'' ([[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]])
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVI: Realms of Revelation'' ([[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]])
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past'' (UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1)
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII: Journey of the Cursed King'' (UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation2}}S2)
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX: Sentinels of the Starry Skies'' (UsefulNotes/NintendoDS)
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestX: Mezameshi Itsutsu no Shuzoku[[note]]"Awakening of the Five Tribes"[[/note]] Online'' (UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}, UsefulNotes/WiiU, PC, [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]], {{Android|Games}}, {{i|OSGames}}OS, [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 PS4]], UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch ([[NoExportForYou all Japan only]]))
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestXI: Echoes of an Elusive Age'' ([[UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 PS4]], [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]], UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch)
[[/index]]

[[/folder]]

[[folder: Remakes and Rereleases ]]

* ''Dragon Quest I + II'' and ''Dragon Quest III'' for [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]] and later UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor
* ''Dragon Quest IV'' for the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}} and ''V'' for the UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}} [[NoExportForYou (both Japan only)]]
* ''Dragon Quest IV'', ''V'', and ''VI'' for UsefulNotes/NintendoDS; and ''VII'' and ''VIII'' for UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS
* ''Dragon Quest 25th Anniversary Collection'', comprised of ''I'' to ''III'', for UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]]
* ''Dragon Quest I'' through ''VI'' and ''VIII'' for {{Android|Games}} and {{i|OSGames}}OS devices
%%* ''Dragon Quest I'' is an EmbeddedPrecursor in ''Dragon Quest XI''
* ''Dragon Quest I'', ''II'', and ''III'' for UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}} and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS %%[[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Spinoff Games]]
[[index]]
* ''Mystery Dungeon'' series:
** ''Torneko's Great Adventure: Mystery Dungeon'' ([[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]])
** ''Dragon Quest Characters: Torneko's Great Adventure 2 - Mystery Dungeon'', released internationally as ''World of Dragon Warrior: Torneko: The Last Hope'' (UsefulNotes/PlayStation, UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]])
** ''Dragon Quest Characters: Torneko's Great Adventure 3 - Mystery Dungeon'' (UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}}, UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance [[NoExportForYou (both Japan only)]])
** ''Dragon Quest: Young Yangus and the Mystery Dungeon'' (UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 2}})
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters'' series (see that page for entries)
* ''Slime Morimori Dragon Quest'' series:
** ''Slime Morimori Dragon Quest: Shogeki no Shippo Dan'' (UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance, [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]])
** ''Slime Morimori Dragon Quest 2: Daisensha no Shippo Dan'', released internationally as ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesRocketSlime'' (UsefulNotes/NintendoDS)
** ''Slime Morimori Dragon Quest 3: Taikaizoku no Shippo Dan'' (UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS, [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]])
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestSwords'' (UsefulNotes/{{Wii}})
* ''Dragon Quest Wars'' (UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo DS}}i)
* ''VideoGame/ItadakiStreet'' series (aka ''Fortune Street'' in America, ''Boom Street'' in Europe; [[NoExportForYou all Japan only]] except for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} release).
[[/index]]
* ''Dragon Quest: Monster Battle Road'' series (Arcade, UsefulNotes/{{Wii}})
* ''VideoGame/{{Theatrhythm|FinalFantasy}} Dragon Quest'' ([[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]])
[[index]]
* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesTheWorldTreesWoeAndTheBlightBelow'' ([[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 PS3]] [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]], [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 PS4]], PC)
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesIITwinKingsAndTheProphecysEnd'' ([[UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 PS3]] [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]], [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation4 PS4]], [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationVita PSVita]] [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]], PC)
** ''Dragon Quest Heroes I & II'' (UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]])
* ''Videogame/DragonQuestBuilders'' (UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 3}} [[NoExportForYou (Japan only)]], UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}}, UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation Vita}}, UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch)
** ''Dragon Quest Builders 2'' (UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation 4}}, UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch)
* ''Dragon Quest Rivals'' ({{Android|Games}}, {{i|OSGames}}OS, PC)
[[/index]]
[[/folder]]

----
!!''Dragon Quest'', as a series, provides examples of:

* ActuallyFourMooks: While older ''Dragon Quest'' titles have universally resorted to RandomEncounters, the jump to the Nintendo DS with ''Monsters Joker'' changed the trend to spawning overworld monsters. Any game made or remade with 3D graphics instead of sprites uses this system where one monster on the overworld represents the group you'll actually fight.
* AddedAlliterativeAppeal: The English subtitles since ''VIII''; it's harder to notice with "Journey of the ''Cursed King''", but games since ''IX'' have been making it obvious. ''II'' through ''VII'' retroactively gained such subtitles with their DS and mobile releases.
* AfterTheEnd:
** In a sense. ''VII'' started out on the only land mass on the planet that was not destroyed by the demon lord. You do get to restore them, though.
** Downplayed with ''Monsters: Caravan Heart'', which takes place in the same world as ''Dragon Quest I - III'' long after everyone we know from those games has died.
** ''Builders'' takes place in a version of Alefgard, the setting of the first game, that had been ravaged when the heroes accepted the Dragonlord's offer to rule half of the world.
* AIRoulette: One of the givens of the series.
* AlchemyIsMagic: First appearing with ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'', the Alchemy Pot has allowed players to create better items, weapons, and armors out of basic ingredients; in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesRocketSlime'' it first was given the persona of [[AbsentMindedProfessor the Great Krak Pot]]. (Later games also produce alchemized items instantly; ''Dragon Quest VIII'' required [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness items to "cook" for a period of time before you could obtain them]]).
** ''Dragon Quest Builders'' has the entire construction system implied to be a form of this. [[note]]Admittedly, it's a heavily modified version of the build system of ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'', except without any need to know what goes where.[[/note]]
* AlcoholHic: Happens in the series (especially in the remakes) when you talk to guys who are drunk in pubs. There is also one time in ''IV'' when you talk to a drunken guy outside the bar in Endor at night, and he feels like he's not "[[{{Spoonerism}} wurring my slurds or anything]]".
* TheAlcoholic: Almost every town in almost every game has a pub ''somewhere'', so there's plenty of opportunity to find somebody under the table. Special note goes to Kalderasha of ''DQVIII'', who decided to go DrowningMySorrows years before the events of the game.
* AllInARow: All main installments except ''VIII'' (it was brought back in ''IX'') and the ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters'' games before ''Joker'' show all active party members on the screen when traveling by walking.
* AlwaysChaoticEvil: Notably [[AvertedTrope averted]] by many monsters in the series.
** This is best exemplified by a Golem that the player fights in the first game. In later games, it is revealed that said golem was guarding the village from outsiders.
** It's not unheard of to find monsters in towns minding their own business. [[VideoGame/DragonQuestV I'm not a bad slime!]]
* AlwaysCheckBehindTheChair: There are hidden items in barrels, pots, hanging bags, drawers, coffins, crosses, just lying on the floor...
* AmbidextrousSprite: Awesomely averted for all games except the original, Famicom version of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI''. Updating the sprites was one of the things that they did for the US version.
* AmericanKirbyIsHardcore: None of the American covers actually showed any of Akira Toriyama's artwork until the Game Boy Color remake of ''III''. In some cases, such as the original game, it featured a reinterpretation of the original art in typical 80s high-fantasy western art.
* AncestralWeapon: Erdrick/Loto's Sword is the most powerful weapon in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI''. The sword is also in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'', but it is nowhere near being the strongest weapon in the game.
** It appears that this sword is most likely [[spoiler:the King's Sword from ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'', judging by the official art, how the sword was obtained, and the fact that the game's hero ''is'' Erdrick/Loto]].
** [[spoiler: It makes a sneaky appearance in ''IX'', as well, right before the last boss, as the "Rusty Blade". Fixing it -- easily done if you [[GuideDangIt know how]] (or if you've done the DLC quests that include the recipes) -- makes said last boss... still NintendoHard.]]
* AndIMustScream: [[spoiler:The player character]] is stuck as a statue for nearly a decade in ''[=DQV=]'', as is [[spoiler:his wife.]]
** Happens to two towns in ''VII''. [[spoiler: The first time, you don't arrive fast enough to revert them, as they had been exposed to the elements for too long. The second time, the last survivor from the first town arrives in time to help.]]
** Nearly the entire population of Trodain was turned into lifeless vines by the sceptre's curse in ''VIII''. There are only three survivors: King Trode and Princess Medea, who were protected by a magical circle -- and the hero, for reasons unknown. [[spoiler: It is revealed much later that the hero was already "cursed" in such a way that [[CursedWithAwesome he is protected]] [[OneCurseLimit from other curses.]]]]
* AndNowForSomeoneCompletelyDifferent: ''IV''. In the last chapter (of the original; the remakes added an extra chapter and a prologue chapter), the hero (of which you name before the game starts) has to travel the world and [[CharacterMagneticTeam assemble them all]]. You can even switch back and forth between party members in battle once you secure the wagon.
* AnimatedArmor: A recurring enemy type, frequently capable of summoning healslimes or their variants.
* ArmorAndMagicDontMix: Mage and priest characters usually buy gear in the form of robes and gowns, while bulky and heavy armor is usually used for warrior characters and others with heftier builds; however, this tends to be an aesthetic choice only -- robes and gowns tend to have similar defensive scores to suits of armor. (Every now and again you'll find some armor that ''can'' be worn by mages).
* ArtifactOfDeath: In the first ''Dragon Quest'' game, there was a chance of you getting Cursed Belts and Cursed Necklaces from certain chests. They did nothing except strangle you, yet bizarrely they sold very well.
* ArtifactOfDoom:
** The Golden Claw in ''III'' and a few other games has a powerful curse laid upon it -- it increases your encounter rate to 100%, meaning you end up in a random encounter every single step until you get rid of it. In remakes, it's even worse -- it doesn't just raise the encounter rate to 100%, it also disables running from battles. As if that's not bad enough, it sells for much, much less than in the original NES version. As a tradeoff, however, the 100% encounter rate only applies to the pyramid itself once the Golden Claw is taken. Escaping the Pyramid and bringing the Claw with you does not affect any other area at all (and it makes a good weapon for fighters).
** The sceptre in Trodain Castle, stolen by Dhoulmagus just prior to the events of ''VIII'' proves to have several nasty side-effects that affect its wielder.
* ArtificialStupidity: When not being manually controlled, your party members seem to be inclined towards making the worst possible decisions ever. Spellcasters in particular love blowing their turns on (low success) instant kill spells so much that it's become a RunningGag of the series.
%%* ArtisticLicenseEconomics: Gold Golems.
* AsskickingEqualsAuthority: The hero of ''I'' [[StandardHeroReward marries into the royal family]] because of his heroics; a status which is then passed on to his descendants in ''II''. [[spoiler:The hero of ''VIII'']] similarly gets to marry into royalty (unless you go for the alternate ending in the 3DS remake) - though the post-game content and resulting good ending reveal that [[spoiler:he was of royal blood all along]].
* AuthorAppeal: Yuji Horii is a compulsive gambler, which is why games in the series often feature a gambling mini-game or few. (And the fact that you can only save in the town's churches make it so that going out on the field/into the dungeons would feel more like a gamble.)
* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: Several heroes are royalty, among them ''II'''s heirs to Midenhall, Cannock, and Moonbrooke; Tsarevna Alena of Zamoksva in ''IV''; the entire royal family of Gotha in ''V''; [[spoiler:the Prince of Somnia]] in ''VI''; Kiefer [[spoiler:and his descendant Aishe]] in ''VII''; and [[spoiler:the heir to Argonia]] in ''VIII''.
* AwesomeMomentOfCrowning: ''III'', after the first boss; also a sort of NonstandardGameOver.
* BadPowersGoodPeople: Priests and other healer-class characters have a remarkable propensity for the [[OneHitKill Whack]] series of spells. Kiryl from ''DQIV'', Angelo from ''DQVIII'', the Priest class from ''DQIX'', ''etc''.
* BadassFamily:
** In ''V'', you are not just the son of a king, but your party later in the game also consists of you, your wife, your children and your pets.
** The heroes of ''II'' also count; they're all cousins (all descended from the hero of ''I'')
* BeefGate: Death awaits beyond bridges for the insufficiently-leveled.
* BettingMiniGame: The casinos and Monster Arenas, starting from the second game.
* BigDamnHeroes: Happens all the time in ''VII'', as you save over a dozen lands from destruction, just in time. ({{Subverted}} in a few worlds.)
* BlackMage: Excusing for the moment the fact that almost all characters count, the Mage class in ''Dragon Quests III, VI, ''and'' IX'' all specialize in offensive spells. Barbara from ''Dragon Quest VI'' and Jessica Albert from ''Dragon Quest VIII'' count.
* BlobMonster: The slimes are certainly the cutest examples of this trope.
* BlowYouAway: The "Whoosh" series, which summons tornadoes to attack a group of enemies.
** The main character of ''Dragon Quest V'' is notable for possessing this as his primary form of attack magic rather than the fire and lightning elements that the "hero" characters throughout the series typically have. [[spoiler: This is one of the subtle clues that he is actually not the prophesied legendary hero of the setting, but rather it's ''his son'', who does get the fire and lightning spells]].
* BonusBoss:
** Divinegon in the ''DQ III'' remakes (and Grand Dragon, exclusive to the GBC remake). Both bosses can be challenged multiple times, and will require excessive LevelGrinding to defeat. Very, very few people have even fought Grand Dragon anyways, as it involves a massive spiked brick wall of a CollectionSidequest (see entry below). Defeating Grand Dragon rewards you with the game's InfinityPlusOneSword that all classes can equip.
** Also in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'' with the Epilogue Boss, Estark (who previously appeared as a major boss in ''IV'').
** In ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVI'', the Bonus Dungeon ends with a battle against Nokturnus, the demon whose main contribution to the story is to annihilate an entire castle's worth of people [[EvilIsNotAToy whose king pissed him off]]. [[spoiler: If you beat him, he'll waste the Final Boss for you without so much as breaking a sweat]].
** And in ''VII'', you fight {{God}} (called "the Almighty").
** The Dragovian Trials from ''Dragon Quest VIII'', which have heavy ties to the hero's true identity.
** ''IX'', having an immense amount of post-game content, tops them all. These include five post-game quests with bosses, twelve grotto bosses, and thirteen legacy bosses from previous games: [[spoiler:The FinalBoss of ''every previous main DQ game'', the DiscOneFinalBoss of ''III'', ''VI'', and ''VIII'', a major boss of ''IV'' that is also the aforementioned Epilogue Boss of ''V'', and ''VI''[='s=] ultimate Bonus Boss.]]
* BrainwashedAndCrazy: Several characters in ''VIII'' fall under Rhapthorne's influence... including a ''dog!''
* BreakingTheFourthWall: In the GBC remake of ''III'', the game addresses you, the player, for your personal information at the start of a new game. This disembodied voice actually belongs to an NPC you meet late in the game.
* BreakoutCharacter:
** The soldier design (female especially) from ''Dragon Quest III'' was appropriated for the generic soldier NPC sprite in later games.
** Robbin' Hood or Robbin' 'ood (Kandar in old releases and ''Kandata'' in Japan), the [[FanDisservice obscenely muscled and underdressed]] thief from ''III'', has several references throughout the series, including reappearances in ''DQV'', ''DQX'', and the remake of ''DQVII'', where he tries to steal something of important (like the Royal Insignia of Gotha or even the treasure of the moon). ''V'' also has Dwight "Da White" Dwarf, who shares his appearance in miniature, and ''VIII'', which brought back the Hood monster family, which has been heavily expanded on in the ''Monsters'' series from ''Joker 2'' on. As of ''Dragon Quest Monsters 2 3D'' there's Robbin' Hood himself, Robbin' Huddle (Kandata-kobun)[[note]]A handful of Kandar mini-mes[[/note]], the Prince o' Thieves (Kandata-oyabun, or "[[KingMook Kandata Boss]]"), Kandar's Wife ([[MoreDeadlyThanTheMale Kandata Wife]])[[note]]An obese, hooded slug of a woman who bears a more-than-passing resemblance to the Slugly Betsy monsters of ''DQIX''[[/note]], the Kandata Ladies[[note]]A trio composed of a little girl with a mace, a sexy dominatrix-type, and a HugeSchoolgirl even more ripped than Kandar himself[[/note]], and Kandata Rocks[[note]]A Kandata-inspired ''rock band''[[/note]].
** Torneko from ''Dragon Quest IV'' went on to star in a series of mystery dungeon games made by Chunsoft (the same fellows who made went on to make ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon''). Chunsoft also made a mystery dungeon game for Yangus from ''Dragon Quest VIII'' which picks up where Torneko's series leaves off, incidentally bridging ''IV'' and ''VIII''.
** Estark, ancient King of Hell in ''DQIV'', took on new life in ''DQV'' and several games after as a super-tough BonusBoss. He even partially inspired (along with his mutant clone [[spoiler:Psaro]]) the [=EvilMech=] series of monsters in ''DQVII''.
** Prince Keifer of ''DQVII'' starred in ''Dragon Quest Monsters Caravan Heart''.
** King Trode has made a few repeat appearances since ''Dragon Quest VIII'', including the implication of him playing a huge role in the ancient past of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesRocketSlime'' and as a secret monster in the DQM Joker games.
** Morrie, also from ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'', where he ran the Monster Arena. ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesRocketSlime'' introduced the slime Morrie-Morrie (complete with HotBloodedSideburns, ScarfOfAsskicking, and appropriate color scheme), who ran the ''Tank'' Colosseum. In ''Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker'', Morrie cameos as one of the common audience-sprites at the main arena, though now with a CoolMask. On top of all that, Morrie appears to do the announcing for ''Dragon Quest Monster Battle Road''.
** Captain Crow, ghost pirate from DQVIII, took on new life as a BonusBoss in the ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters Joker'' games.
** ''DQIII'' introduced the godbird Lamia, who reappeared in VIII as the Godbird Empyrea. Empyrea went on to appear in ''Monsters Joker 2'' with "normal" and "ascended" forms, but the "classic" Ramia design [[DivergentCharacterEvolution reappears as its own being]] in ''Dragon Quest Monsters: Terry's Wonderland 3D'', even though for a while they were one and the same, such as in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2_JDMgMGQI the specially animated opening for Dragon Quest's 25th Anniversary]].
* BroadStrokes: In any game that references another, especially where cameos and guest appearances occur, expect it to omit certain details. A good example of this is whenever the hero of ''DQIX'' appears in another game with his full [[GuardianAngel Celestrian]] wings, despite the fact that he lost them at the beginning of his own game.
* ButThouMust:
** The [[TropeNamer famous words]] of Princess Gwaelin/Lora from the original version of ''DQI''; it appears in just about every Dragon Quest game.
** It serves as a major plot point in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'': Celestrians cannot defy their superiors.
* CanonName: Many of the heroes are named in external appearances and cameos. However, "Canon" is a funny thing.
** The hero of the first game is named Alef (as in, "of ''Alefgard''") in Japanese novelizations and drama [=CDs.=]
** The Prince of Midenhall (jp. "Laurasia"), hero of ''II'', is named Allen in novelizations and drama [=CDs.=]
** His cousins, the Prince of Cannock (jp. "Sumaltria") and Princess of Moonbrooke are interesting cases -- they have their names selected from a pre-programmed list depending on what the hero's own name is. As such, they have ''many'' "Canon" names: the Prince is "Conan" in the CD theater drama and novelization, or "Cain" or "Cookie" in other books (''VideoGame/FortuneStreet'' settled on Cookie); while the Princess is "Nana" in the CD drama, "Seria" in the novel[[note]]Which is not, incidentally, one of her in-game options[[/note]], and "Pudding" in ''VideoGame/FortuneStreet''. The English translation of ''IX'' went "Screw It" and named them Princeton and Princessa.
** The heroes of ''IV'' were named Solo and Sofia (it's AllThereInTheManual of the remakes and ratified by ''Monster Battle Road''). In the CD Theater audio drama, the hero is named Rei, and in the official novelizations his name is Yuuril.
** The prologue of ''V'' indicates that the hero's father wanted to name him Madason in honor of his wife, but she named him whatever the player chose instead. Madason is the hero's name anyway in cameo appearances. The default name for the hero in-game in Japanese is Abel, while in the CD Theater audio drama and the official novelizations, the hero is named Luca.
** His children are named ''Sora'' ("Sky") and ''Ten'' ("Heaven") in the manga, but official English releases of the remakes named them Madchen and Parry.
** The default name for the hero of ''VI'' in the Japanese games is Rek. In the CD theater drama, his name is Will. In the manga, his name is Botts. In the novelization, his name is Iza.
** The hero of ''VII'' is Arus in the manga and ''Monster Battle Road''. In the 3DS remake's English promotional materials, he's named Auster.
** The hero of ''VIII'' is named "Eight" by Squeenix action figures, ''Monster Battle Road'', and the old Shonen Jump promotional disc (for those of you who got it way back when).
** The hero of ''IX'' is likewise "Nine" in ''Monster Battle Road''.
* CastingAShadow: The "Zam" series, which attacks individual enemies with "Stygian bolts".
* {{Catchphrase}}: Yangus' "[[StockBritishPhrases COR BLIMEY]]!" and Dhoulmagus' "Such a pity..." in ''VIII''.
* ChainmailBikini:
** This goes as far back as ''DQIII'', where (on top of the scanty armor of the female warrior) you could find "revealing bikinis" or "battle bikinis" that would change the character sprite. They were actually somewhat useful, as they increased your character's dodge rate by a LOT -- and affected the AI, to boot.
** A handful of female characters distinguish themselves with this trope; the Princess of Moonbrooke had the "Dangerous Swimsuit" in the [=MSX1=] version of ''Dragon Quest II'', and Jessica of ''Dragon Quest VIII'' (whose model would actually change depending on what clothes she was wearing) could also show off a few of the suits.
** DoubleSubverted with ''Dragon Quest IX'': the Dangerous Bikini set and the Dangerous Bustier both have [[RealityEnsues a pitiable defense score of +1]]... but will gain significantly higher scores after you start alchemizing them into their "evolved" versions.
* ChestMonster:
** The classic Cannibox monster, a little shadowy thing that hangs out in treasure chests, leers out at you with its nasty eyes, and uses the lid as a set of fangs. It and its UndergroundMonkey forms, Mimic and Pandora's Box, can all be considered BossInMooksClothing material, given their talent for critical hits and OneHitKill magic.
** We'll also mention the Urnexpected monster family, which works much the same way but, since it hangs out in a pot, is meant to punish {{Kleptomaniac Hero}}es. Not only are chests dangerous, [[EverythingTryingToKillYou so's the pottery!]]
** ''Dragon Quest VIII'' introduces the Trap Master family, what might be considered the "adult" form of the Cannibox line -- these things pop out and leer at you like demented skeletal jack-in-the-boxes.
** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII'' had Evil Books, Evil Pots, and Evil Well monsters. Be careful when exploring castles.
* ChokepointGeography:
** The swamp cave in the first game.
** The bridge between Trodain and Farebury is broken before the events of ''DQVIII'', so the kingdom of Trodain can only be approached from the west.
** Subverted with the door to Moonshadow Land (also in ''DQVIII''); the official (but legendary) doorway is atop Wisher's Peak, but the technical requirements are met by a window in Trodain Castle's library.
* CollectionSidequest:
** The classic hunt for Mini-Medals, which you can trade away to specific [=NPCs=] for cool stuff.
** Required to gain access to ''Dragon Quest III'' GBC remake's second half of a BonusDungeon and ultimately BonusBoss Grand Dragon. The sidequest spans throughout the entire game, as it involves collecting [[RandomDrop randomly dropped medals]] from almost every monster in the game, ''including bosses''. Doubles as a GuideDangIt, as there are a few monsters whose encounter rate is so low that one may never run into said monster during a regular playthrough. Oh, and did I already mention that those medals randomly drop?
* ContractualBossImmunity:
** Most bosses are completely immune to the series' StandardStatusEffects and resist both status debuffs and even certain elemental magics.
** The great and vexing thing about {{Metal Slime}}s, aside from their high agility and tendency to flee from battle, is that they have even more immunity than bosses; they NoSell everything except plain physical damage, usually possess some innate ability to dodge attacks, and usually have defense scores so high that even when you do land a hit it will only be for 0-1 points of damage (hits for 0 damage are treated as "misses" in these games, which adds somewhat to the frustration by making them seem even dodgier).
* CrisisCrossover: The Monster Battle Road series as seen in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKhVIej4hnE this video]].
* CrystalDragonJesus: The Catholic motif for the churches, priests, and nuns.
** In ''DQV'', the Dragon King is an ''actual'' CrystalDragonJesus, a PhysicalGod [[spoiler:who sometimes takes the form of a human.]]
** Also, the gender of the deity was changed--the original games had him addressed directly as "God" or "the Lord", but in the remakes they worship a Goddess instead. Presumably this was to avoid offending people. In ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'', the deity is male again, and referred to as "The Almighty". [[spoiler: However, at the end of the game his daughter takes over the role so it switches over to a Goddess again.]] The reason for the change is unknown, except perhaps the fact that God actually ''appears'' in the game (and is very much male). The Almighty ''also'' appears in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII'' as a BonusBoss and is male in that game as well; and in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonstersJoker2'', his English name is the rather appropriate Numen (look it up).
%%** ''IX'' could in fact be a subtle prequel to the other games.
* {{Cumulonemesis}}: Recurring enemies in the series such as the Cumaulus and the Hell Niño are sentient clouds.
%%* CursedWithAwesome: The hero from the eighth game was cursed as a kid, but in turn, this prevents him from being affected by any ''other'' curses, even those in-game.
%% Do we have a non-spoiler example?
* CuteBruiser: Character customization options can allow you to give large attack scores to cutesy characters. Examples include the female Fighter class from ''Dragon Quest III'' and Alena from ''IV''.
* DangerousSixteenthBirthday: ''III'' begins on your hero's sixteenth birthday with the king officially assigning you to pick up where your DisappearedDad left off. ''IV'' also has the hero's journey begin at sixteen (actually eighteen), though [[DoomedHometown that wasn't what your]] [[HiddenElfVillage Hidden Village]] ''[[DoomedHometown planned]]''... Played with in ''V'', as horrible things started happening to the hero when he was '''six''', but he didn't really start fighting back until he was sixteen.
* DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist[=/=]DeathIsCheap: The games have a fairly odd relationship with this trope from a narrative standpoint, thanks to the gameplay mechanics. Since this has a few moving parts and needs to be broken down a bit:
** Starting from the very first game, the only punishment for a TotalPartyKill is losing half your gold on-hand - which can definitely ''suck'' in certain parts of the game, but it's never unrecoverable. So player death is, at worst, a significant inconvenience, not a disaster, and there's no true GameOver screen (which was a huge part of the appeal early on - you can lose gold, but you can never lose ''experience progress''). This makes sense if you consider that ''Dragon Quest'' creator Yuji Horii is a gambler, and thus the mechanics themselves were meant as a risk/reward gamble, progress vs gold.
** Another interesting facet is that, from the start, dead has meant ''dead'' - the games haven't gone the route other RPG series have with 0 HP meaning a person is still-alive-but-can't-fight. 0 HP means you are straight-up biologically ''dead''. Thing is, dead characters can be resurrected in churches - and unlike the [[TabletopGames/DungeonsAndDragons D&D roots]] of this idea, it ''never'' fails. So the inhabitants of the games can come across as being a bit blasé about it all - nobody in your party ever freaks out if another party member is brutally murdered by monsters (even in games with a party talk feature), [=NPCs=] generally don't comment if you're dragging around a party member's coffin, and ''DQV'' memorably makes a gag on it all during a major plot moment.
*** Oddly averted in ''II''. Later in the game, there's a storyline sub-plot where one of the princes gets deathly ill, and you have to go and retrieve a mystical leaf to cure him. Since Death is so cheap, why not just let him die, then resurrect him later, saving a TON of trouble?
* DelusionsOfEloquence: Yangus from ''DQVIII''.
* DemonLordsAndArchdevils: Many of the Final Bosses and Bonus Bosses are great and powerful demons or devils.
* DidYouJustHaveSex: ''V'', presumably sometime after the marriage.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: In many of the games, notably in ''DQV'', you go more or less invade Hell, kick {{Satan}}'s behind, and [[ToHellAndBack escape unscathed.]] ''DQVI'' also has an optional sidequest where you basically beat up Satan, and then he kills the BigBad for you.
** In ''VII'' you get to fight ''God'' as a bonus boss, and very much ''can'' punch him out! ''III'' also has the Divinegon/Xenlon, a pseudo-deity dragon that hangs out in a tower in (more-or-less) Heaven, and has all kinds of nifty divine powers, who you can also beat into a bloody pulp and claim a reward from.
* DirtyCoward: Prince Charmles from ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII'', [[MeaningfulName appropriately named]] "Prince Charmless" in-game because he really is [[LoserArchetype that much of a loser]].
* DiscOneFinalBoss: If you know who the game's BigBad is within the first two or three hours of gameplay, you don't know who the game's BigBad is.
* DistractedByTheSexy: Later games and remakes provide a "Charm" stat that allows characters and monsters to distract their enemies with just how ''good'' they look. A few female characters and monsters even have the [[RunningGag Puff-Puff]] ability.
* DoppelgangerSpin: Linguar's specialty.
* DrawAggro: In the few games where "Whistle" can used in battle, it makes enemies target the user.
* DubNameChange: ''Dragon Quest'' has had several different dubbing teams over the years, which can make it something of a headache to chart continuity between games that's perfectly obvious [[LostInTranslation in the original Japanese]].
* EarlyBirdCameo: A fair few heroes got up to a surprising number of adventures in their youth. [[VideoGame/DragonQuestVI Terry and Milly]], [[VideoGame/DragonQuestVII Prince Keifer]], and [[VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII Yangus]] all star or feature in various series spin-offs.
* ElementalPowers: Primarily consisting of the various families of magic spells characters can learn. While most characters who can use magic at all learn only one element, dedicated magic users can mix and match.
* ElementalTiers:
** According to [[AllThereInTheManual the manual]] for ''Dragon Warrior'', HURT is a fire spell and HURTMORE is a lightning spell. In the Game Boy remake however, these spells were both fire spells. In either case, this did not actually affect the gameplay in any way -- elemental resistances were not incorporated until later games.
** This anticipates later games, where the magic options have expanded. Fire, Ice, and Wind spells are generally a lower-tier than lightning spells (which are not only more powerful and learned later in the game, but generally reserved for the hero).
* EncounterBait: The "Whistle" ability makes battles happen upon use in the field.
* EncounterRepellant: Holy Water generally will repel weaker monsters, and certain characters can learn spells to simulate its effects. Tiptoe/Padfoot can also be learned by the thief-class characters in some games that will lower the encounter rate instead of outright preventing them.
* EndlessCorridor: The looping stairway in Charlock Castle.
* EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses: Given the fantasy milieu, the prolific amount of royalty practically guarantees you will eventually see a princess ''somewhere''. Princess Player Characters can be found in ''II'', ''IV'', and ''V''. As a result of the titular curse of ''VIII'', its princess travels with you not as a party member, but rather as the horse pulling the party's wagon.
* EvolutionaryLevels: The "Secret of Evolution", a mysterious power and central element of ''IV'' (also referred to in ''V''), which Psaro and his minions are after so that they can build an all-powerful monster army to subjugate the world. This research also extends to [[SuddenlyVoiced giving animals the ability to talk]].
* {{Expy}}: The Celestrians of ''IX'' are quite similar to the Zenithians of the Zenithian trilogy (''IV'' to ''VI''): {{Winged Humanoid}} [[OurAngelsAreDifferent Angel-like beings]] living on a FloatingContinent who regard mortals as somewhat pitifully weak creatures, though naturally there are [[StarCrossedLovers exceptions]] to that. [[spoiler: Both also suffer some major PrideBeforeAFall, though the Zenithians' takes place between ''IV'' and ''V''.]]
* FairyBattle: Torneko's chapter in ''Dragon Quest IV''
* FaceDesignShield: The Boss, Tempest, and Slime shields.
* {{Fanfare}}:
** [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic The Overture]] heard at the start of each game.
** Also the Level Up fanfare, which is used for every single game.
* {{Fanservice}}: Every main game, either the original or remade, from Dragon Quest II on has fanservice ''somewhere'', usually provided by main characters.
* FetchQuest
* FieryRedhead: A common design theme - there's [[CuteBruiser Alena]] in ''IV'', [[LaserGuidedAmnesia Ashlynn]] in ''VI'', [[{{Tsundere}} Maribel]] in ''VII'' and [[MsFanservice Jessica]] in ''VIII''. ''IX'' also has this as a design choice; interestingly, however, the usual dark orange favored by the designers isn't available -- instead, ''IX'' features a very ''rich'' red.
* FirstLawOfTragicomedies: Several games start off with a fairly light and comedic tone, then get progressively darker (particularly near the end of the plot).
* FloatingContinent:
** Zenithia, which features prominently in ''Dragon Quests IV'', ''V'', and ''VI''.
** Two in ''VIII'': first is the Lord High Priest's residence, a glorious mansion atop a rock held aloft by what many assume to be holy power; second is the Black Citadel, the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon.
** The Observatory, base of operations for the Celestrians in ''Dragon Quest IX''.
* FunetikAksent: The remakes of ''IV'', ''V'', and ''VII'' use several different dialects for characters from different regions of the world. ''VIII'' did it first, though.
** Actually, ''all'' of them had this in the original Japanese script, as characters from different towns would speak in different Japanese regional accents. ''DQVIII'' was the first to do this for the English translation as well.
* GaidenGame: Games centering on Torneko from ''DQIV'', Yangus from ''DQVIII'', ''Rocket Slime'', and the ''Monsters'' series.
* {{Gainaxing}}: Jessica of ''DQVIII'', to an almost absurd degree. Depending on the camera angle it can distract from almost anything else occurring or being said on screen.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar:
** ''Many'' of the games feature random [=NPCs=] casually walking around who happen to be dressed like [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Playboy_Bunny Playboy Bunnies]]. They are ''especially'' seen in bars.
** [[MarshmallowHell The "Puff-Puff"]]. In battle, some characters can learn it, and it [[DistractedByTheSexy causes enemies to miss their turn]], whereas male characters who can learn this ability cause damage instead. The player character(s) can usually also receive this from a female NPC somewhere in the game. As a RunningGag though (and perhaps to keep a lower rating), the player is almost never shown exactly what a Puff-Puff entails, with the game usually employing a FadeToBlack or RelaxOVision -- and the times they do show something, it's more of a case of that particular game putting their own humorous spin on the subject to subvert the player's expectations. For instance, ''DQVIII'' shows a bunny girl performing a Puff-Puff with the traditional FadeToBlack... and then revealing she's actually using a pair of held slimes.
* GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere: The series occasionally does this with the final bosses.
** The original ''Dragon Quest'' played it so that the Dragon Lord's defeat accidentally let loose his vicious (not yet seen) pet dragon; but the English translation changed the scene so that the Dragon Lord ''[[OneWingedAngel transformed]]'' into the dragon, which later was retconned back into the Japanese remakes.
** The original English translation of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' is one of the all-time ''worst'' offenders of this trope, to the point that it almost makes [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX Necron]] look like less of an AssPull. Hargon is played as the BigBad for the entire game. When you finally kill him, he throws a demon named Malroth (Sidoh in the Japanese version) at you who turns out to be infinitely harder. Absolutely ''nothing'' in the entire game even so much as hints at Malroth's presence, with the exception of a quest item named Eye of Malroth (that has absolutely nothing to do with demons), and it's never fully explained exactly what the hell Malroth is or why you need to kill him right now (aside from the fact that he's trying to kill ''you''). In the Japanese translation and remakes, it's revealed that Malroth is the god that Hargon and his cult worshiped. This still doesn't change the fact that Malroth is a huge Giant Space Flea, though.
** ''DQV'' had this in its original version since Nimzo isn't even mentioned until late in the game. The DS remake rectifies this somewhat by namedropping him, at least in incidental NPC chat, far earlier.
** The seventh game mostly avoided this with BigBad Orgodemir, who is set up from the very beginning and is ultimately responsible for every single bad thing to happen to every place you've been (although you're mostly dealing with the effects of his villainy at first), although many lesser bosses you face turn out to be space fleas.
** The third and sixth also avert this trope, although this was originally a spoiler, especially in regards to ''III'', which was the TropeCodifier for the use of YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle in video games. [[spoiler: You didn't think Baramos was the only Archfiend, and Murdaw was the only Demon Lord, did you?]]
* GameFavoredGender: Since ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIII'', female characters tend to enjoy a larger selection of armor and accessories than their male counterparts. They may run into class restrictions, but it's not unusual to run into several points in a given game where the best armor currently available is a dress, skirt or robe, barring men from using them. By contrast, male-exclusive items tend to be more jokey, like boxer shorts.
* {{God}}: There are several different candidates, generally unique to their particular world.
** While earlier games made vague reference to "the gods" or even a specific "God", ''Dragon Quest VIII'' introduced "The Goddess", who has been treated the supreme deity of many different settings (and remakes of older games) since.
** ''Dragon Quest IX'' takes place in a world very explicitly created by a male deity, known as The Almighty; "The Almighty" is later used as a title for the God of ''VII'' in the 3DS remake. [[spoiler:They're known as Grand Architect Zenus and Numen, respectively, and Zenus' daughter Celestria fills in for Zenus during his absence]].
* GodIsEvil: A very rare JRPG example that almost completely subverts the trope. In fact, in ''DQIX'', [[spoiler:a player might well think that there's a lot of ''really obvious'' setting up for "God", as the Celestians understand Him, to be the major villain of the entire game. The truth of the matter is... substantially more complicated.]]
** Seems to be played straight in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVII''. [[spoiler: Except it's actually Demon King Orgodemir posing as God. When God actually ''does'' show up as the BonusBoss, he turns out to be a pretty decent guy.]]
* GoodMorningCrono: The protagonist is woken up by his/her mother in the beginning of ''DQ III''.
* TheGoomba: Slimes are usually the first, and easiest, enemies you face in these games. That just applies to the standard slime though. Except in ''DQVI'', where there's an even weaker variant of the slime and the standard slime doesn't appear until about an hour later (a subtle hint to the game's plot twist; [[spoiler:"true" slimes only appear in the real world]]).
* GottaCatchThemAll: The ''Monsters'' series, although ''DQV'' and ''DQVI'' both had monster catching as well, years before ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''.
* GratuitousForeignLanguage:
** Morrie from the NA version of ''DQVIII'' peppers his speech with Italian words. A slime version of him runs the Tank Battles in ''DQH: Rocket Slime''.
** In the DS remake of the fourth game, characters often use Russian words in the second chapter and French words in the fourth chapter.
*** Bishop Ladja speaks in gratuitous Russian in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV''. Gядйdмдsтзя Йiмzф дlsф dфзs тнis, дйd тдlкs щiтн д Яцssiдй дlрндьзт fфям фf lззтspздк.
* GreaterScopeVillain: Nokturnus, who debuted in ''VI'' by destroying a kingdom from an entirely different dimension, has enjoyed a reputation as a very powerful BonusBoss and demon. ''Dragon Quest X'' bumps up his reputation by establishing him to be a multiverse-scale God of Destruction.
* GroundhogDayLoop: Featured in one town in ''DQVII''.
* GuestStarPartyMember: Several in ''Dragon Quest IV'' and ''loads'' in ''VII''.
* HappilyMarried: The main protagonist of ''DQV''.
* HaveYouSeenMyGod: In both ''VII'' and ''IX'', the major deity is absent when the world really needs a BigGood (in other games, the Goddess is too far in the background to take a hand).
* HelloInsertNameHere: A series standard for the main characters. Yuji Horii has even stated that it's one of the series' essential elements.
* HeroesPreferSwords: Most of {{The Hero}}es are usually associated and depicted with swords and the like. Notably {{Averted}} with Madason, the main character of ''Dragon Quest V'', who is depicted with a SimpleStaff. [[spoiler: It is one of the subtle hints toward the fact that the main character is not actually the legendary hero of his game.]]
* HeroicMime: The Hero of every game. The series' insistence on a voiceless protagonist will occasionally highlight [[TropesAreNotGood the flaws of such an approach]]; players tend to assume a character with no voice and therefore no obvious personality to be their personal avatar, which doesn't mesh with the fact that each hero has his own personal story.
** In ''DQV'', you get to hear the hero speak a few lines [[spoiler: when he comes back to your childhood via TimeTravel to exchange the fake MacGuffin for the real one]].
** The hero of the first game has a few lines after defeating the final boss, when he rejects the offer to take the place of the King of Alefgard.
* HopelessBossFight:
** Marquis de Léon in Chapter 4 of ''DQIV''.
** ''DQV'' has this with [[spoiler:Bishop Ladja at the end of generation 1]].
** ''DQVII'' has a few of these as well at Alltrades Abbey.
** And also ''DQIX'' twice; not only can you not win, you can't do ''anything'' because ButThouMust has been weaponized ''against'' you.
* AnIcePerson: The "Crack" magic series involves summoning shards of ice to skewer enemies; higher levels also have increased range. One character who learns these spells is Borya of ''DQIV''.
* IconicItem: The Sword of Loto is used as a quickhand reference to the original trilogy (sometimes just Rubiss' Crest). The Sword of Zenithia is similarly used as a symbol for the second trilogy. ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters Battle Road Victory'' features them both prominently.
* ImpracticallyFancyOutfit: Some of the fancier gowns and robes are more suited to ballrooms than battlefields. Special note goes to the Shimmering Dress, which is not only impractical in design but in its ''special effect'': it sometimes reflects magic, including ''healing spells''.
* ImprobableAge: ''Dragon Quest V'' starts off the protagonist as six years old. He gets treated as such, and it shows in other things such as being unable to read signs, but this obviously does not stop him from donning Plate Armor and wielding a Broadsword to considerable effect.
** Not to mention you're forced into [[HappilyMarried marriage]] at 16 years old.
* ImprobableWeaponUser: Astraea's Abacus is one of the most powerful weapons available in Torneko's chapter of ''DQIV''. An ''abacus''!
* InUniverseGameClock: ''Dragon Quest III'' introduced a day/night cycle. Sleeping at an inn would always take you to morning, and there were also spells and items that would change it from day to night or back. This continued on for the rest of the series, though inns would eventually allow you to rest until evening instead of just the next morning.
** ''Dragon Quest VIII'' has a day-night cycle of about a half-hour. However, the player can circumvent this with most inns: going to an inn in the middle of the night has you wake up at dawn, and going to an inn during daylight gives you the option of sleeping until the next morning or only until evening.
* InevitableTournament: The fourth game, [[spoiler:though it's actually a ruse by Psaro the Manslayer to get Alena away from her castle so he can reduce it to smithereens. It's not clear why he needed to lure her away, though; she's strong, but not THAT strong]]. Also, an important focus of the ''Monsters'' series.
* InfinityPlusOneSword: Characters (especially {{The Hero}}es) will often have exceedingly powerful equipment that only they can use, creating a set of Infinity Plus One Gear. That said, there are a few cases where even these unique weapons are ''not'' in fact the strongest weapons in the game.
** In ''Dragon Quest V'', for example, the Metal King gear has the highest stats in the game, but can be equipped by anyone and achieved by [[SidetrackedByTheGoldSaucer spending too much time at the casino]].
** Another big example is the Falcon Blade, which has a comparatively pitiful Attack bonus, but since it allows you to attack twice in sequence, once the wielder's own Attack score is high enough, it deals more damage than any other weapon you could possibly have.
* IntentionalEngrishForFunny: This is the most noticeable trait of the Russian accents in the DS remake of ''IV''.
* Interchangeable Antimatter Keys: Both the door and key disappear when unlocked in the first game. Averted in all other games.
* ItemCrafting: Many of the games have this in the form of Alchemy.
* JackOfAllTrades: The second game avoided the tendency of [=RPGs=] to make the main character fit this role, instead giving it to the second party member out of the three -- i.e. the MagicKnight to the hero's purely physical attack and the princess's SquishyWizard.
** Additionally, the hero in each game ''may'' be a jack-of-all-trades by the end of the game, but he's almost always a healer type, assuming there's no job system. While he can and does get the most damaging spells in the game (Zap, Kazap, and (sigh) Kazapple), they are prohibitively expensive, and his physical power and healing spells are always more useful.
* {{Jerkass}}: Prince Charmles from ''DQVIII'' is a walking embodiment.
* JustAddWater: Alchemy in ''VIII'' and ''IX'' and breeding/synthesis in the ''Monsters'' series.
* JustAStupidAccent: The PoirotSpeak-using characters in the DS remake of ''DQIV'' are never actually seen speaking the languages the words they use are from.
* KleptomaniacHero: Ever since the introduction of openable drawers and pots and whatnot around-about ''DQV'', the series has gotten a hair infamous for this. None of the [=NPCs=] ever seem to care, either. ''VIII'' goes so far as to actively encourage you to help yourself -- if you find it, it's yours.
* {{Knighting}}: "Loto" or "Erdrick" is not actually a name -- it's a ''title'' bestowed only upon the bravest of heroes. [[spoiler:It is given to the hero of ''Dragon Quest III'', the heroes of ''Dragon Quest II'' (and possibly to their ancestor, the hero of ''Dragon Quest I'', though his adventure occurred before this part of the mythology had been developed), and to Prince Kiefer of ''Dragon Quest VII'' and his partner Luin, as per ''Dragon Quest Monsters Caravan Heart'']].
* LadyLand: A "queendom" in ''DQIV''. Referred to in the English localization of the DS version as "[[WonderWoman Femiscyra]]", it's chock full of AmazonianBeauties... one of whom makes it very clear [[AllAmazonsWantHercules what kind of guy she's after]].
** But who show you respect if you play the female protagonist.
* LazyBackup: Played straight by some, averted by others, especially the immensely useful system in ''DQV'' where your {{Mon}} and characters not in the active party would jump out to fight for you if the entire main party was knocked out. Interestingly, since only the main character can interact with others, if you enter a town with the hero unconscious, one of his party members (even his pet panther!) would drag him off to get revived.
* LegacyCharacter: A variant. There are [[AlternateUniverse multiple incarnations]] of certain characters and even certain locations that appear across the series -- this can be a little difficult for Western fans to pick up on, since there wasn't a consistent localization effort until the series' renaissance with ''VIII''.
** Patty of Patty's Party Planning first appeared in ''Dragon Quest III'', and has appeared in ''V'', ''IX'' (where she received her new design) and ''[[VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesTheWorldTreesWoeAndTheBlightBelow Heroes]]''.
** Alltrades Abbey appears in games with a character class system implemented; it first appeared in ''III'' as the Dharma Temple.
** Zigzagged with the Mini Medal collectors. In every game since ''IV'' (''III'' if we're counting remakes) you can collect little medallions and trade them for special items, usually to a king, but there have been games where you trade them to a princess or a pirate captain.
** ''Heroes 2'' features a returning Erinn (from ''IX'') to run the inn.
* LethalJokeItem: Some high level "armors" for girls are actually just [[ChainmailBikini lingerie]], like the Naughty Underwear or Bustier items. Unlike male underwear (like, say, the Boxer Shorts), these items actually have high stats and good effects... meaning many, many players have the female characters wearing them. Also due the blatant name, and its implication for the wearer venturing the land in nothing more than a sexy lingerie, the item is widely referred in [[{{Rule34}} Fanarts]] and {{Doujinshi}}.
* LevelGrinding: Varies between games, but the original was the worst of the bunch when it came to this.
** Although this trope can be averted -- the [[UselessUsefulSpell buff and debuff spells]] such as the ones that increase defense, mute the enemy, etc etc actually work quite well in most of the games in the series. If you don't use these spells you will have to [[LevelGrinding grind]] quite a bit to just overpower the fights. Smarter, not Harder, and all that.
* LickedByTheDog: The hero of ''DQV'', by a wild sabrecat. [[spoiler:It turns out to be Saber (or whatever you named him), his and Bianca's pet "kitty" from childhood.]] Ironically, the people of the town that the sabrecat was terrorizing think that it means the protagonist planned the whole thing.
* LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards: [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zagged]]. Some games allow casters to cast multiple times, attack groups of enemies, or rack up the damage, but other games have the casters lag behind because warriors can do the same for ''no'' mana cost, ''and'' on top of that can have their abilities scale with strength and damage multipliers.
* LockedDoor: Finding the keys are a major part of each game.
* MagicIsRareHealthIsCheap: Varies from game to game. However, it is usually far easier to acquire health-restoring items and potions than it is to find magic-restoring ones. Some earlier games don't even ''have'' the latter.
* MagicKnight: It's tradition for TheHero from every game in the main series to be one of these.
** Except for the second one, mind you, where the MainCharacter can't use a single spell; instead, the role of MagicKnight is played by his cousin, the Prince of Cannock. (Of course, this was [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness before the tradition was really formed]]).
** The main character being a MagicKnight descends from the set-up of the first game, where the character ''had'' to be something of the JackOfAllStats and do everything since he was solo the entire time.
** It was the hero of ''III'' who formalized the convention, where the hero was not only a Magic Knight, but ThePaladin, with unique lightning powers and the most powerful of Heal spells. This convention has been inherited by most of the other ''DQ'' heroes following him.
* ManaPotion: Magic Water, and the more potent Elfin Elixir.
* TheManBehindTheMan: ''Lots!'' Malroth behind Hargon ([[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere sort of]]) in ''II''. Zoma behind Baramos in ''III''. [[spoiler:Aamon behind Psaro in ''IV''.]] Nimzo behind Ladja in ''V''. Mortamor behind Murdaw (and many others) in ''VI''. [[spoiler:Rhapthorne behind Dhoulmagus in ''VIII''. Corvus behind Godwyn in ''IX''.]]
* MarketBasedTitle: Creator/{{TSR}} owned the trademark to the name ''Dragon Quest'' for many years, forcing the series to be released as ''Dragon Warrior'' in America until the eighth installment.
* MascotMook: The Slime family, including...
** MetalSlime: The {{Trope Namer|s}}, with almost a dozen examples in the series -- the Metal Slime, the Liquid Metal Slime, the Metal King Slime, the Metal Kaiser Slime, the Gold/Gem Slime, the Darkonium Slime, the Platinum King Jewel, the Diamond Slime, the Liquid Metal King Slime, the Metal Star, and whatever else they come up with in later games. All varieties are NighInvulnerable, usually susceptible to [[CriticalHit critical hits]] and not much else, often making their defeat a matter of luck (or the proper weaponry).
* MinigameZone: Most of the later games include a casino where you can win large quantities of cash and powerful equipment.
* {{Mithril}}
* MonsterArena: Starting with ''Dragon Quest III''. Later games even have subquests of you having to recruit monster gladiators for your teams.
* MonsterClown: Dhoulmagus
* MonsterCompendium:
** The Big Book of Beasts in the remakes of ''IV'', ''V'', ''VI'', and ''VII'' show the number of enemies defeated for each enemy beaten, what kinds of items received from them, and attack animations.
** The monster list in ''Dragon Quest VIII'' displays models, character animations, and flavor text for every enemy type defeated. Filling it up by defeating at least one of every monster, including bosses, nets the player a secret item that can prevent random encounters.
** The defeated monster list in ''Dragon Quest IX'' shows models, animations, number defeated, and items received from each monster type defeated, along with flavor text. The thief vocation's skill "Eye for Trouble" reveals a second page of flavor text for each monster observed using the ability along with revealing both possible item drops regardless of which items the player has attained from the monster.
* MonsterTown: ''Dragon Quest VIII'' has one, with the beginnings of one appearing way back in ''IV''.
* MosesInTheBulrushes: ''DQVIII'' has one of these, too.
* MushroomMan: Humanoid fungi appear as monsters.
* TheMusical: A musical was made in the early nineties featuring JPOP group SMAP playing the characters.
* MythologyGag: Boatloads in ''IX''. Player characters from previous games appear and there is armor based on their clothes, and major bosses from previous games appear as {{Bonus Boss}}es.
* NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast: Balzack, and his evolved form, Ba'''''a'''''lzack.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Marcello in ''Dragon Quest VIII'' [[spoiler:subjugates the BigBad and attempts to take power out of the hands of the nobles and church. Then the heroes come and beat him up, freeing the BigBad and, by a lucky coincidence, allowing the BigBad to reach his own body, thus regaining his full power]]. Whoops.
* NonIndicativeName: The Infernos spell found in the NES games. You would think it is a fire based spell (inferno) but is actually a wind spell. Later releases would change this to Whoosh.
* NonstandardGameOver: Say yes to the [=DracoLord=] in the first one. The GBC remake lessens it by making it AllJustADream.
* NothingIsTheSameAnymore: The original ''Dragon Quest'' trilogy allows you to visit the same locations at different stages in history. [[spoiler:''Dragon Quest Monsters Caravan Heart'' shows you much of the same world reduced to ruins]].
* NunsNRosaries: The church elements strongly resemble the Catholic church.
* OneWingedAngel: It would actually be easier to list the final bosses that ''don't'' do this (to date, only Malroth in ''II'' and Zoma in ''III'' have no OneWingedAngel form). Dhoulmagus gets special mention for being a [[spoiler: mid boss]] that does this.
** Orgodemir of ''Dragon Quest VII'' is an interesting case. The first time you fight him he plays this trope straight. The second time he ''inverts'' the trope, as he goes from his OneWingedAngel form to his ''normal'' form, and then further changes into a hybrid of the two forms.
* OnlyOneName: It's easier to name characters that have last names in the series than ones that don't.
* OnlySixFaces: The character designs of Creator/AkiraToriyama often resemble each other and even with his other character designs from [[Manga/DragonBall his]] [[VideoGame/ChronoTrigger other]] [[Manga/DoctorSlump works]].
* OptionalSexualEncounter:
** The series has a RunningGag with something called "Puff-Puff", where the main character gets his head massaged with a woman's breasts ([[SexyDiscretionShot offscreen]]). While this was played straight once or twice, by ''Dragon Quest III'' it had become just one more silly thing to parody. [[spoiler:After drawing you in to enjoy one in ''III'', the hero -- after clearly enjoying himself -- opens his eyes to discover he's been attended to by the girl's ''father''. In ''VIII'', the puff-puff is carried out with a pair of slimes. In ''Dragon Quest IX'', it's carried out with sheep butts]].
** In ''Dragon Quest I'', after rescuing the princess, you have to carry her back to the king. If you sleep at the inn while still carrying her, the innkeeper's farewell dialogue will change. This can ratchet up to RefugeInAudacity if you take a young woman who wants to tag along with you from Tantegel Town while holding the Princess in your arms to the inn, and since the message is the same for both of them, the game all but states ""you slept with two women at once!''
** In ''Dragon Quest V'', the player has a choice over which girl the protagonist should marry, after which a sexual encounter is implied with the bride of choice, though only one of them, Nera, makes sexual encounter references. In the Nintendo DS Remake, it is in fact required, because the game won't let you progress until you've gotten married, and then if you marry Nera or Deborah, you don't have to go back to the Roundbeck Inn in order to get a cutscene implying sex. Because apparently either one of them had already had sexual intercourse with the player character on her wedding night, the evening before she decided to become your traveling companion spouse.
%%* {{Orichalcum}}
* PartyInMyPocket: ''VIII'' and ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters: Joker'' use this trope. In ''VIII'' only the character in the first slot of the party (or the first living character if the ones in front are dead) is shown when walking and ''Joker'' only shows the protagonist.
* PetBabyWildAnimal: Saber, the Great Sabrecat from ''DQV''. Differs from the usual in that [[spoiler:it's the villain who does the ShooTheDog bit to turn him feral, but years later he recognizes his old master and rejoins him for the rest of the game]].
* PhysicalGod: The Dragon God / "King" of the Zenithia trilogy; he sometimes disguises himself as a human.
* PimpedOutDress: Quite a few, particularly Medea's wedding dress in ''VIII''.
* {{Pirate}}: The Pirate job class.
* PlayableEpilogue: Every main series single player title allows the player to walk around and receive the adulation of the various townsfolk, though most of the later titles only allow you to visit a few towns.
* PlayboyBunny: One of the most common character images in the series.
** If you have a female character in ''III'', you can actually ''play'' as one by equipping the outfit--which turns out to be very effective armor. The sprite even changes! You can also recruit a female [[JokeCharacter Goof-Off/Jester]] as a party member, whose sprite ''is'' a playboy bunny.
** Jessica's bunny outfit in ''Dragon Quest VIII''. There are some NPC bunny girls, though this amounts to a set of ears, a tail, and a short skirt.
** ''Dragon Quest IX'' has Bunny Ears, a Bunny Tail, Stiletto Heels, and different bustiers (some of which can be made through alchemy), as well as the {{NPC}} harlequin Bunny Girls.
* PlayingWithFire: There are ''two'' major spell series in this element (one of the oldest and most common): "Frizz", which creates fireballs to hurl at individual monsters, and "Sizz", which produces a field of flames to attack enemy groups.
* PowerNullifier: In ''III'' onward, but most annoyingly in ''V''. "Boss X sends [[StatusBuffDispel a disruptive wave of energy]]!" "All party stats are returned to normal." *groan* At least some of your {{Mon}} can do it, too.
** In fact, you ''have'' to be able to do it in order to remove the "Bounce" spell-deflecting field around the final boss of ''V''. Good thing using the [[spoiler: Zenithian Sword]] as an item will have the same effect. And since it's plot-relevant, you can't miss that item.
* PoirotSpeak: In the DS remake of the the fourth game, characters in the second and fourth chapters often use Russian and French equivalents of simple words such as "yes" and "no".
* {{Prequel}}: [[spoiler: ''DQIII'' in the Erdrick trilogy and ''DQVI'' for the Zenithia trilogy.]]
* PrettyInMink: A fair number of armor and character designs have fur.
* PreviousPlayerCharacterCameo: Iconic cast members and Ensemble Darkhorses are liable to make cameo appearances in later games.
** Special note goes to ''IV'', which has some of the earliest and most iconic of these characters. Torneko and Ragnar McRyan appear in ''VIII'' due to special invitation by Morrie.
** DLC allows supporting cast members from previous games to visit the Quester's Rest in ''IX'', and they'll even provide you with copies of their personal outfits, so you can make like they're adventuring alongside you.
** ''Dragon Quest Heroes'', as a Crisis Crossover, also has multiple characters from previous main-series titles returning, most of them either playable, fightable as bosses, or background helpers.
* PrinceCharmless: Charmles from ''VIII'' often is mispronounced this way, at least in the English language versions. Given his [[JerkAss personality]], this is intentional.
* PunnyName: A lot of the monsters, particularly in the DS games.
* RandomEffectSpell: Chance/Hocus Pocus, across the series.
* RareCandy: The stat-boosting seeds, found in drawers, pots, hanging sacks and nearly everywhere else.
* RealMenWearPink: The manly knight Ragnar of ''DQIV'' has brilliant all-pink armor.
* RebelliousPrincess: Alena from ''DQIV''
* RecurringElement: ''Dragon Quest'' was the ''original'' JRPG series, so it has a lot of lore of its own to call back upon. Many of the tropes on this page are recurring elements, but here are some highlights:
** The main character is usually a MagneticHero who collects party members for the cause over the course of the game.
** The main character is also usually a KleptomaniacHero who will demolish or rifle through everything in pursuit of loot. ''VIII'' goes so far as to explicitly authorize the player to do this.
** ''II'' introduced [[YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle gameplay and storyline expansion]]; while you may start the game simply romping around the local countryside on foot (as in the original Dragon Quest), it's not at all unlikely you'll be traveling the globe with a CoolShip, WarpWhistle, and often some form of GlobalAirship by the end. It's also likely you will be collecting special keys that allow you access to locked doors that would be otherwise inaccessible.
** The FinalBoss is usually a confrontation with an incarnation of the very powers of Hell.
** Parties of adventurers will be subject to CompetitiveBalance, and a few games even have an explicit CharacterClassSystem.
** A significant number of heroes are actually secretly {{Half Human Hybrid}}s or have some other SecretLegacy. It's also worth pointing out that there are a handful of humans who are secretly dragons in disguise (ironic, since the absolute first example of this in the franchise was an invention of the dub).
** Most healing items come in the form of herbs.
** Many kinds of weapons and armor recur in the game, including their special effects.
** Various {{Mooks}} will also reoccur, including, obviously, the MascotMook Slime.
** The games' traditional save point is always a church or at least a holy man, which almost always have the same aesthetic and leitmotifs even if they worship different gods.
** The Puff-Puff gag, in which a lovely young woman massages her cleavage into the player character's face. Ever since ''Dragon Quest III'', each game has found a way to riff on this idea, such as the massage actually coming from a male body-builder or a pair of Slimes.
** ''III'' introduced the idea of AnotherDimension to the series, and characters have been frequenting other worlds ever since. Taken to its logical conclusion in ''IX'' where your home base is effectively an InnBetweenTheWorlds.
** ''VIII'' introduced AlchemyIsMagic to the series, which has been a fairly regular element to the main series since.
** Later games are more than willing to sneak cameos of notable characters from previous installments, even if those characters technically belong in different worlds.
** Apparently Akira Toriyama has made it a point to insist that there be at least one {{Tsundere}} in every project he works on, including this series.
** There will often be a CollectionSidequest in the form of hunting Mini-Medals, little golden medallions hidden away in various nooks and crannies of the world. In any game with Mini-Medals, there will typically be a monarch somewhere willing to exchange some very neat stuff for your collection.
** There are many, ''many'' love stories in ''Dragon Quest'', all the way back to Alef and Princess Laura of ''I''; these are most typically StarCrossedLovers (and LoveHurts something ''awful'') and ChildhoodFriendRomance. In the latter category, there's such implied between Alena and Kiryl (and likely the hero and Elisa) in ''IV'', ''V's'' hero and Bianca, ''VIII's'' hero and Princess Medea.
** Gambling forms a core part of the game's philosophy, thanks to Yuji Hori himself. It's not only why there are casinos in every game, but also informs every LuckBasedMission (including more than one MonsterArena), and why it's series tradition to only let you save in churches.
* RedStringOfFate: Mentioned during the PlayableEpilogue of ''DQV''.
* RelaxOVision: Jessica's Puff-puff special ability in ''DQVIII'', which, um... well, [[MarshmallowHell let's just say only Jessica can use this]]. Actually a long-standing RunningGag -- each game has had a "puff-puff" scene in some way or another.
* RequisiteRoyalRegalia: Like most {{RPG}}s, crowns are used as armor, but in these games, so can the crown of the [[KingMook king slime]].
** The Metal King Helmet, found only in TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon of ''DQV'' and only if you landed in the right place for the sliding floor puzzle, is the best helmet in the game. It's even better than the [[TheChosenOne Legendary Hero]]'s Helmet.
* RewardingVandalism: See a pot or a barrel? Punch it or destroy it.
%%* UsefulNotes/{{Romani}}: Meena and Maya in ''DQIV''. Though they might be stereotypically a fortune-teller and a dancer, the game at least gives a nod to realism by making their family Indian.
* RunningGag:
** In ''DQVIII'', King Trode will pop up and make a comment when the team least expects to see him, always prompting a "COR BLIMEY!" from Yangus. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d late in the game, when Trode shows up at Tyran Gully, and Yangus starts to say his line, but then stops and says [[OverusedRunningGag he's getting sick of that old bit]].
** ''Dragon Quest V'' has a few slimes appear on maps. They're willing to tell you that they're not bad slimes and demand you to not attack them. They also usually give you some tips in return.
** Ah, the classic Puff Puff. At least once in each game, you're liable to run into a girl who'll offer to provide you with a Puff Puff, that is, she'll give you a massage with her breasts.[[note]]Puff Puff is the English transliteration of "Pafu Pafu", the Japanese onomatopoeia of breasts rubbing on something.[[/note]] The ''gag'' is that she won't actually do it, even if you accept her offer. Suffice to say, you do ''not'' get what you expect. So famous is the gag that it even featured in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' when there was a crossover with ''Dragon Quest X''.
* SacrificialRevivalSpell: Kerplunk does this with everyone in your party that is dead. It also removes all of your MP so you can't just have your newly revived healer revive you so you can use it again.
* SaintlyChurch: The churches of the unnamed deities. Averted in ''VIII'', where the church and its leadership is shockingly {{corrupt|church}}, but the local parishes still play it straight and are just as helpful as ever.
* SamusIsAGirl: Depending on your choice in the GBC remake of ''DQIII'', it is possible to discover that [[spoiler:Erdrick/Loto]] was a girl.
* ScaryImpracticalArmor: Late in the games, players can start finding armor with powerful stats and malevolent designs, like of skulls and demons. However, this armor is usually {{Curse}}d, and will inflict negative status effects on your character, like increased weakness to some or all kinds of attacks or even losing a turn in battle. This armor is also impossible to remove normally, usually requiring a trip to Church.
* SchizoTech: Despite otherwise being in a standard medieval, high fantasy setting, robot enemies are a staple of the series. Some places also have technology that shouldn't exist yet, including slot machines.
** The main character of ''Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker'' uses a jet-ski to reach new islands.
** A lot of the new spin-off games such as ''Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2'' feature airships, which were unheard of before ''Dragon Quest IX'' or so, unless you count flying castles.
** ''Dragon Quest IX'' also features a steam train, which, to be fair, can fly and was created by God himself.
* SchrodingersPlayerCharacter: Averted. ''Dragon Quest III'', ''Dragon Quest IV'', and ''Dragon Quest IX'' all allow you to choose whether TheHero will be male or female, but their plots and backstories are all identical.
* SealedEvilInACan: Rhapthorne, Orgodemir, etc.
* SequentialBoss: Dragonlord, Hargon/Malroth, Dhoulmagus...
* ShapeshifterGuiltTrip: In ''DQV'', a shapeshifting monster poses as [[spoiler:your mother, as the High Priestess of the ChurchOfEvil]].
* ShockAndAwe:
** The "Zap" (''Dein'') spells, which strike enemies with [[BoltOfDivineRetribution lightning from on high]]. The Zap-family is distinguished by how it restricts it's range as it increases in power and cost -- Zap can hit all enemies, while Kazap can only hit groups. It also has shades of LightEmUp, being opposed to the "Zam" spells.
** In early games, the "[[StuffBlowingUp Boom]]" series also counted as electric before becoming its own class.
* ShoutOut: ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesRocketSlime'' contains shout outs to other Creator/SquareEnix-published series, such as a Platypunk ally named Ducktor Cid (a reference to the recurring character name in ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'') and the hero goes up against a tank with a treant-like apperance called Chrono Twigger (an obvious reference to ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger''), whose in-game logo even resembles the ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' logo. These two are notable because the series referenced were formerly Square series, whereas ''Dragon Quest'' was an Enix series. It also has a shoutout to TMNT in Tokyo Tom, and one Tank called DQ Swords, subtitled "The Revolution is coming, Whee!"
** In addition, the two mercenaries from Torneko's chapter in ''DQ 4'' have been named "Laurel" and "Hardie" in the DS remake (named Laurent and Strom in the NES localization).
* SituationalDamageAttack: The Magic Burst spell deals the caster's remaining mana as damage, leaving them unable to use anything with an MP cost afterwards. Bosses that can use this often have unique abilities that allow them to instantaneously restore their MP at will.
* SoleEntertainmentOption: Most games have exactly one (sometimes two) casino in the world.
* SmashMook: Loads of different types.
* SpoiledBrat:
** Prince Harry in ''V'' [[spoiler: when he's young, the 10 years of slavery made him more laid back and optimistic ("We're locked up... I guess we can rest now!")]], and later [[spoiler: his son]].
** Charmles in ''VIII''. It's his primary characteristic.
* SpritePolygonMix: ''VII=]'', ''IX'', and the remakes of ''IV'', ''V'', and ''VI''.
* SquishyWizard:
** The Wizard class in ''DQIII''.
** Borya in ''DQIV''
** Jessica from ''VIII'' too. Not just literally, either. Well, she's a wizard, and, er, ''parts'' of her are squishy...
* StatusBuff: There are magic spells that enhance power, speed, and defense, and are very important in that these generally aren't completely mitigated by ContractualBossImmunity.
** Tension, introduced in ''Dragon Quest VIII'', allows a character to increase their power ''exponentially''. At its highest level, it will give the character a BattleAura (''DQVIII''[='s=] hero even has his hair fly straight up in a [[Creator/AkiraToriyama deliberate]] ShoutOut to the [[Manga/DragonBall Super Saiya-jin]]).
* SuspendSave: The only way to save in the field.
* TakeThat: The remake of ''IV'', especially, seems to direct one at [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Sephiroth]].
* TankGoodness: A big part of ''DQ Heroes: Rocket Slime'' is the tank-to-tank combat.
* ThoseTwoGuys: Alena's retainers, Kiryl the priest and Borya the wizard.
* TieredByName:
** The Slimes have a lot of buffed variants, including [[MetalSlime an infamous one that only takes one point of damage and gives out high EXP]]. All of them have "Slime" in their species names.
** The Killing Machine series has been enjoying this, too. First you had the Killing Machine, an endgame-class monster in its own right from ''DQII''. And then ''DQVI'' introduced the Overkilling Machine. ''DQIX'' introduced the Trauminator (that's the ''Super Killing Machine'' in Japan). And then there's a few variants unique to ''Dragon Quest Monsters'' titles not released in the west.
* TimeyWimeyBall: In ''Dragon Quest III'', where a city is destroyed during the day but intact and apparently in the past during the night; you need to use this trick to [[spoiler:obtain one of the Orbs you need to awaken Lamia]]. Also, one of the more complicated examples in ''Dragon Quest V'', [[spoiler:as a child, you find a glowing golden orb which does not seem terribly important. Later, you show it to a random traveler. Still later, TheDragon crushes it so you can never use it against him. Then, after the TimeSkip, you're given a fake orb and use a magic painting to go back in time to exchange balls with your younger self, which means that that traveller you showed the gold orb to was you (though you could tell that by his clothes the first time you met him) thus meaning that TheDragon destroyed the fake.]]
** The entire plot of ''Dragon Quest VII'' can be summed up with this trope.
* TrickBoss: Balzack in the fourth chapter of ''Dragon Quest IV''. At first, he is immune to all attacks, and the party needs to use [[GreenRocks a special item]] to render him vulnerable. After Balzack is defeated, Marquis de Léon, the ''real'' boss of that chapter, storms in and [[HopelessBossFight immediately wipes the floor with your party]]. You get to fight Marquis de Léon again in Chapter 5, but this time he's beatable.
* TwoGuysAndAGirl: ''Dragon Quest II'' and the second chapter in ''Dragon Quest IV''.
* UndergroundMonkey: A tradition from the earliest days of the series, Dragon Quest games always stagger monsters by giving them {{Palette Swap}}s, having them TieredByName, and assigning more abilities to later versions. They did this so much with the MascotMook Slime that it has its own ''class'' of monster, like "Dragon" or "Nature".
* UnfortunateNames:
** Balzack from ''IV''. He's named for French author Balzac, but if you're an English Speaker, you're probably snickering over PottyHumor.
** Also, there is a certain town in ''Dragon Quest III''. Later English versions call it "Ashalam" or "Asham". The NES version called it ''Assaram''. One has to imagine the Nintendo of America folks were asleep at the wheel for that one.
* UrExample: Of just about every JRPG trope in existence. No, really, [[OlderThanTheyThink just about every one.]] Even Franchise/FinalFantasy (the first of which came out a scant 2 months before '''Dragon Quest III''') has callbacks to ''Dragon Quest'' titles. Amusingly, given the length and influence of the series, it could also be called the {{Trope Maker|s}} and TropeCodifier for quite a few of them, too.
** ''Dragon Quest'' is in fact the TropeMaker for ButThouMust. See above.
* UselessUsefulSpell: Averted. [[StandardStatusEffects Death, Sleep, Silence, and the like]] are much more effective when used by your party than they have any right to be -- even on bosses. The party AI is usually good about using those to slow down an enemy's assault instead of spamming high-damage and high-cost magic attacks. Ironically, most American gamers ''expect'' this trope so much that ''Dragon Quest'' has a history of being NintendoHard and requiring lots of LevelGrinding -- which it does, if you don't use the {{Useless Useful Spell}}s.
** Even the {{Status Buff}}s can be very useful - in ''III'', for example, you bring along a Wizard as much for their ability to use Increase/Kabuff as anything, as even one application increases everyone's defense by a truckload - and you can apply it ''several times over''.
* WarpWhistle: Using a Chimaera Wing will allow you and your party to fly to the front gates of any town you've previously visited, saving you long treks in case you need to heal. Sooner or later, the hero will also gain the Zoom spell, which allows them to do the same thing for just 1 MP. One or two games even have the Hermes' Hat, which produces the effect for free.
* WeaponOfXSlaying: There are both weapons and skills that target specific families or types of monster; dragons, undead, and {{Metal Slime}}s are common targets for this extra punishment.
* WellIntentionedExtremist: Many of the villains that aren't a CardCarryingVillain are this instead, occasionally with a FreudianExcuse.
* WhipItGood: Several characters throughout the series use it, and one was one of the strongest weapons in the Game Boy Color remake of ''Dragon Quest III''.
* WhiteMage: The Priest class of ''III'' and many of the characters who inherit from it. Notably, in addition to healing magic, it's often the case that they also have [[BadPowersGoodPeople Instant Death]] spells.
* WholePlotReference: Basically, the entire sequence in the fairy world in ''V'' is one big ShoutOut to ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe''. However, despite what it [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment might seem like]], it ''does'' become important much later.
* WithThisHerring: The series tends to do this quite a bit... "You are the prophesied hero foretold to save our kingdom from doom! And so I bequeath you this modest stick, a burlap sack, and some lint I found under my pillow. God be with you!"
** Which makes ''V'''s subversion so much nicer: [[spoiler: "You aren't the prophesied hero... but your wife will give birth to him, after you grow up!"]] You don't even get to ''see'' the stick/sack/lint part of the game, since [[spoiler: your children rescue you on their own]].
** It's actually mostly justified in ''IV''. Ragnar and the other soldiers of Burland are stuck with poor quality weapons and armor due to his king's refusal to raise taxes. Alena is a princess, but her father explicitly refuses to let her leave the castle. Torneko starts out in a low paying job just barely making enough money to support his wife and son. And Maya is shown to be very bad at managing her and her sister's money.
* WorldOfBadass: ''Dragon Quest: Monster Battle Road'' assembles the heroes and supporting casts from the first nine games and gives them all NoKillLikeOverkill {{Finishing Move}}s. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odKPdhiY46s&feature=related The footage from that game]] practically demands this interpretation.
* WorldOfPun: A distinctive feature of the games that Westerners have only started encountering since ''Dragon Quest VIII'' is all the wordplay, which is actually native to the Japanese originals, resulting in a natural Woolseyism debate.
* WretchedHive: Pickham in ''Dragon Quest VIII''.
* YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe: Only the first two games in the [[{{Woolseyism}} original US localizations]], though they for the most part were good about their grammar. The team that took over the localization of ''Dragon Quest VIII'' is British-based, and a more modern version of YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe shows up. Cor Blimey! In addition, the DS remake of ''Dragon Quest IV'' has the Zenithians speak in YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe.
** This was removed for presumably space reasons in the Game Boy Color remakes of the first two, which were released on the same cartridge, as YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe takes up precious bits.
* YouKilledMyFather: ''Dragon Quest V'', Bishop Ladja was responsible for the hero's father Pankraz's death. Although the hero is a SilentProtagonist, to the player its obviously [[ItsPersonal personal]] and eventually [[BestServedCold the payback is returned.]]
* YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle: Are you playing a ''Dragon Quest'' game? Well, chances are good your initial goal won't be your only goal.
** Ragnar [=McRyan=] of ''Dragon Quest IV'' ends his own Chapter with the realization that a case of local missing children is actually a plot by the master of the Underworld and goes questing to stymie his further plans.
** In ''Dragon Quest VI'', TheHero and his friends gather their resources to bring Dreadfiend Murdaw to heel. [[spoiler: Not only is the original Murdaw you confront actually the King of Somnia under a curse, the real Murdaw is not the only Dreadfiend]].
** ''Dragon Quest VII'' also did this with panache: [[spoiler: After you've restored all the islands/continents that the Demon Lord sealed away and solved all the pressing crises in each location, you finally track down the Demon Lord himself and defeat him in combat, ensuring peace and prosperity for the newly restored world... except you haven't even gotten to Disc 2 yet.]]
** ''Dragon Quest VIII'' makes you ''think'' you've won the game [[spoiler:after beating Dhoulmagus]], but the party notices something is amiss when the King's and princess' curses aren't immediately broken. In ''Dragon Quest III'', you beat the BigBad Baramos, start in on the victory celebration, only to have the '''real''' big bad, Zoma, mock you for celebrating too early. Cue ExtendedGameplay.
** Exaggerated in ''DQIX'', where the quest to initiate Fyggbloom is fulfilled quite early in the game... and then somebody assaults the Observatory, casting the hero down to the Protectorate.
** Done with '''style''' in ''Dragon Quest Monsters: Caravan Heart'': [[spoiler: You beat the BigBad, causing him to flee the (good) High Demon Lord [[BodySnatcher he was possessing]], only... [[NeverFoundTheBody he ... fled... right?]] [[FromBadToWorse Whoops.]] After the credits, you see the 4 other (good) Demon Lords who helped you out throughout the game floating in the darkness... then the darkness sprouts a hideous face. Cue the hero having to run screaming back to the Alternate Universe to sort that little mess out...]])
* YourSizeMayVary: Most of the games in the series have trouble when it comes to distinguishing size, often leaving it to the player's imagination, and the bigger monsters are often very vague on ''how'' big they are (how big is Hargon's castle if it can fit [[OurGiantsAreBigger Atlas?]]). Games released during the renaissance (e.g. ''VIII'', ''Monsters Joker'', and ''Joker 2'') have utilized superior graphical capabilities to give a much better effort in scale. ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtkuNrzv7WM Dragon Quest Heroes]]'' appears to be going out of its way to avert this.
----