->''"Please stand clear. The doors are closing. *DING*"''

With two fully underground subway lines and four light rail lines, the Los Angeles Metro Rail system isn't exactly a world-class rail system. The system's predecessor, the Pacific Electric light rail/subway system and the Los Angeles Railway streetcar system, were all replaced by buses by the end of World War II, with the last streetcar operating until 1963. The Pacific Electric subway, in particular, remained in operation until the 1950s, leaving the city without a subway until 1993.

With rising gas prices and increasing traffic, residents of Los Angeles increasingly clamored for a new rail system. Consideration for a rail system started in the 1970s, with work on the first lines started in the 1980s. The Blue Line light rail line was opened in 1990, and the Red Line and Purple Line subways soon followed in 1993.

Over the years new light rail systems were added to the system, connecting places all over the Los Angeles basin with Downtown, allowing quick access between areas of the city. However, several important facilities, most notably the Los Angeles International Airport and the San Fernando Valley, are not connected directly to light rail, so riders have to use slower bus transportation to reach these destinations.

The Los Angeles Metro Rail System is rather obscure among non-residents, mostly due to Los Angeles's reputation as a city of cars. However, it remains the 9th busiest subway system in the United States.

The six current lines of the Metro Rail system, organized by opening date, are:

'''Blue Line''': The first line in the Metro Rail system, with the first station opened in 1990 and the last in 1991. Runs from the Pacific station in Long Beach to the 7th Street/Metro Center Station in Downtown Los Angeles.

'''Red Line''': The second line in the system and the first subway, with the first station opened in 1993 and the last in 2000. Runs from Union Station to North Hollywood. The Red Line is the busiest line in the Metro Rail system. All stations have some sort of unique artwork, but for the most part, they are sparse and are the stereotypical subway station. The Red Line shares the same track as the Purple Line until the Wilshire/Vermont station.

'''Purple Line''': The second and last subway line, with the first station opened in 1993 and the last in 1996. There is a planned extension to the Westside (western Los Angeles). Currently runs from Union Station to the Wilshire/Western station.

'''Green Line''': Entire line opened on August 12, 1995. Runs from Redondo Beach to Norwalk.

'''Gold Line''': The slowest line in the system. First station opened in 2003 and the last in 2009. Runs from the Sierra Madre Villa station in Pasadena to the Pacific station near Downtown Los Angeles. There is a planned extension to Citrus College in Glendora.

'''Expo Line''': The newest line in the system. All but two stations opened in April 2012, with the two left opened in June 2012. Runs, mostly along Exposition Blvd. from the 7th Street/Metro Center Station to Culver City. Currently undergoing an extension from Culver City to Santa Monica.

Planned new lines are:

'''Crenshaw/LAX Line''': Connects Downtown Los Angeles with the Los Angeles International Airport via the Crenshaw/Expo station of the Expo Line.

'''Regional Connector''': Connects the Blue and Expo Lines with Union Station.

The Los Angeles Metro uses a reusable near-field communication-enabled smart card called the TAP (Transit Access Pass) Card. Payment or passes are loaded at stations, and access to station platforms is unlocked by tapping the card against a target. TAP Cards also work on various bus systems, including systems not related to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the parent organization of the Metro Rail system. TAP Cards are mandatory for riding the system; other forms of payment are accepted only on buses and ticket machines. The cards have been much maligned for being unreliable and hard to use, though with correct usage, the TAP Card is superior to cash and tokens.

Normal fare is a flat rate of $1.50 for all Metro Rail, Metro Liner, and Metro Bus lines, except for the Silver Line busway (which costs $2.45 because it is elevated from the road). Whether the rider rides between just two stations or rides from one end of the line to another, the fare is always $1.50. If a transfer is made, the fare must be paid again. Day Passes can be bought for $5 at a ticket machine or $6 with a new TAP Card on a Metro Bus. Weekly passes can be purchased for $20, and monthly passes for $75.