%% NOTE: Real life examples only. In-universe examples go on TroubledProduction/FictionalExamples.

* The film version of ''WesternAnimation/AstroBoy'' managed to go through no less than three different directors, several different writers and a budget that spiraled out of control due to constant production delays. The bottom fell out when the film's production company went bankrupt a few months before opening. The final product manages to show the chaotic production with its unevenness and lack of direction in terms of plot.
* Creator/{{Disney}} and Creator/{{Pixar}} have been notorious for having multiple movies that went through this. Morever, during the reign of Michael Eisner and Jeffrey Katzenberg, it was even ''chronic'':
** ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' was subject to constant ExecutiveMeddling, pushing to make it [[DarkerAndEdgier more adult and cynical]]. Pixar, this being their first feature, dutifully followed the notes from the executives, even if they didn't agree with them. When a preview cut was declared unwatchable, Jeffrey Katzenberg, then head of animation at Disney, asked, with some concern, why on earth Pixar had followed all the notes he, and others, had sent. Production was shut down for two weeks, while Lasseter and the others basically rewrote the entire movie, into pretty much what they wanted in the first place. The movie would survive and get finished in time for release, though Katzenberg's job did not (he ended up quitting Disney a year before the movie's release to start up Creator/DreamWorks).
** ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'': The animators were given no vacation time during the film's production in order for everything to be absolutely flawless, partially owing to Jeff Katenberg's admitted impatience with the medium. Several of the artists' marriages were broken up as a result; some artists even claimed to buying new clothing on their break time because they couldn't go home to do laundry, and plenty more up and quit. The grueling work clearly shows, but Katzenberg decided not to do this again when he saw how miserable his staff was as a result.
** ''Disney/TheLionKing'' first suffered from [[AndYouThoughtItWouldFail lack of internal faith]] - only up-and-coming animators or people who wanted to do animals picked up the project, with most going to work on ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' instead. One of the directors, ''Disney/OliverAndCompany'' director George Scribner, who had even traveled with the other director Roger Allers and other people to Africa for reference, left as he disagreed on turning the film into a musical while his intention was focusing on the natural aspects. The script was so bad that it needed a reworking with the help of the directors of ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'' - and still was being fine-tuned during production, with completed scenes being reanimated due to dialogue changes. And just months before release, the Northridge earthquake hit Los Angeles, shutting off the studio and forcing animators to finish their work from home. Thankfully [[AndYouThoughtItWouldFail it was all worth it in the end.]]
** ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'' started as ''Kingdom of the Sun'', a PrinceAndPauper epic directed by Roger Allers. Since the writers weren't very successful in adding original material and test audiences weren't reacting well, another director, Mark Dindal, was hired to see if things evolved. As [[AnimationLeadTime the deadline got closer]] and Allers and Dindal were basically working at two movies simultaneously (the former with a drama, and the latter with a comedy), the higher-ups intervened and Allers quit. After a six-month interval where Dindal and some writers reworked the movie, the film became the screwball comedy that eventually saw the light of day. The ending then had to be rewritten just before release because Sting disagreed with the moral message and was going to quit the project. It was all documented in ''Film/TheSweatbox'', a film shot by Trudie Styler (her husband Sting wrote songs for the movie).
** ''WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}}'' was originally developed in 2001 by Jan Pinkava, but Pixar lost faith in Pinkava and ultimately replaced him with Creator/BradBird.
** ''Disney/{{Bolt}}'' suffered from this in spades. The film was originally helmed by ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'' director Chris Sanders, who wanted to make another quirky animated family film. To that end, he envisioned ''American Dog'', which followed a popular television star dog named Henry who (after being knocked out and waking up on a train to Nevada) enlists the help of two other talking animals, including a cat and oversized bunny rabbit, to drive him back home (while believing he's still in a television show). The film went through several different cuts (and suggestions from [[Creator/PixarRegulars John Lasseter and other Pixar directors]] on how to improve the film), but Sanders reportedly rejected all of the changes. Lasseter then fired Sanders from the project, causing the latter to jump ship to [[Creator/DreamWorksAnimation [=DreamWorks=]]], and the film was drastically reworked (under a constrained timeframe) into the final product. Tellingly, ''American Dog'' is not mentioned anywhere on the film's DVD features, and only receives a passing reference in the making-of book ''The Art of Bolt''.
** ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' took six years, a change in directors, a complete rehaul of the film's original FracturedFairyTale premise, and a cost of $260 million to see the light of day. It currently ranks as the second most expensive film in Hollywood history, coming behind only ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd'' in production costs. Happily for the future of [[Disney/{{Frozen}} other Disney fairy tale adaptations]], it became Disney's biggest hit since ''Disney/TheLionKing''.
** ''WesternAnimation/{{Brave}}'' had title changes, the dismissal of director/co-writer Brenda Chapman, and many scenes being rewritten and\or dropped during production.
** ''Disney/WreckItRalph'' went through a number of problems along the way. Originally planned to have been screened before ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'', it had went through a number of cancelled and uncancelled calls along the way before finally getting the go-ahead. As well, the many video game companies, ([[ValuesDissonance especially Japanese ones]]), had strict guidelines as to how their characters should act - Nintendo had guides as to how [[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros Bowser]] should drink a cup of coffee, Sega had them reanimate a scene were [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]] loses some rings because they said he could only lose rings if he were hit and the only reason Q*Bert got prominence in the movie was because Namco took offence at VideoGame/DigDug being the target.
** ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' actually has a relatively easygoing production -- at least in terms of the people involved getting along with each other. The problem was instead the ''story''. They spent several years changing the plot over and over. And then once production had gotten well underway, they were inspired by Idina Menzel's performance of "Let it Go" (Which was written as a VillainSong accompanying a "ThenLetMeBeEvil" epiphany for Elsa, but turned out much more positive and uplifting than they intended even for what was meant to be a sympathetic TragicVillain) to re-write Elsa as a hero rather than a villain. Making sweeping changes to the plot to accommodate this new characterization, they were left with under ''fifteen months'' to finish the film. Due to this change in mid-development, there has been a lot of info on the "Evil Elsa" plot leaked or dumped around compared to most Disney films, including concept art for ''VideoGame/DisneyInfinity'', unused models, ''a lot'' of concept art, and many unused songs.
** ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'' was an attempt for Pixar to WinBackTheCrowd as ''{{Cars 2}}'' and ''MonstersUniversity'' were considered a DorkAge, and thus lots of pressure ensued. The unique concept meant twice as much time spent on development. Production design alone lasted five years, the longest for designer Ralph Eggelston, and the emotions' distinct "grainy" surface texture was almost dropped because it was too difficult and expensive for just ''one'' character, let alone five. Towards the end of it, Pete Docter was seconds away from a nervous breakdown and quitting. But like many troubled Disney/Pixar productions, it was all worth it in the end, as ''Inside Out'' was heralded as Pixar's return to form, and, according to several critics, their new gold standard for movies.
** ''WesternAnimation/TheGoodDinosaur'' was originally scheduled to be released in June 2014, but plot troubles caused its director and producer to be replaced, the original script and recorded dialogue scrapped, and the entire cast replaced. The film's release date was pushed back to November 2015.
* Every! Single! Film! made by Creator/DonBluth, enough to force him into retirement in 2000.
** ''WesternAnimation/BanjoTheWoodpileCat'' was an attempt by Bluth and his RagtagBunchOfMisfits working with him at Disney during TheDarkAgeOfAnimation to [[TaughtByExperience teach themselves how to make the kind of movies Disney refused to make any more]]. To do so required a lot of after-hours work done on a shoe-string budget over the span of six years, working entirely out of Bluth's garage and using second hand equipment which was starting to fall apart. At one point, a malfunctioning movieola used for pencil tests pissed Don off to the point that he [[PercussiveMaintenance kicked it]], resulting in the machine ''eating the film,'' at which point they sprang for a new one.
** ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfNimh'' was similarly made in Bluth's garage with a budget so small that the last quarter of production was funded by Bluth, Gary Goldman and John Pomeroy mortgaging their houses. The high-quality animation Bluth was aiming for required the animators to work 16 hours a day, sometimes even taking work home with them. It was then ultimately given too small of a release to profit on even it's meager budget, not helped by the fact that it was competing with freaking ''[[ETTheExtraTerrestrial ET]]!'' However, it was [[AcclaimedFlop well-reviewed]] enough to become a CultClassic, gaining the attention of [[Creator/StevenSpielberg a certain rival director]] which led to the creation of [[WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail Bluth's more successful second film]].
** Then came several films which kicked off Bluth's notorious curse of ExecutiveMeddling. Starting with ''WesternAnimation/RockADoodle'', what few investors he had left forced him to tone down his trademark darkness in favor of a [[LighterAndSofter lighter, more marketable]] and, most importantly, [[FollowTheLeader Disney-esque]] style which completely contradicted his own philosophy of creating films which were dark, but had catharsis. Phil Harris's CaptainObvious narration was forced upon him at the last minute after test audiences, ironically, complained about certain things not making enough sense. It ended up bombing hard enough to close down Bluth's homegrown studio, taking the rights to all of his films with it.
** Pre-production of ''WesternAnimation/{{Thumbelina}}'' was slowed due to seemingly perpetual rewrites which lasted over a year. The original screenwriter had to be fired just to get physical production going, with Bluth writing the script himself and receiving his only solo screen writing credit.
** For ''WesternAnimation/ATrollInCentralPark'', Bluth made the mistake of [[WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants shortening production]], hoping that it would inspire more spontaneity among his crew. [[NiceJobBreakingItHero It wound up being his worst-reviewed film]].
** Late into the production of ''WesternAnimation/ThePebbleAndThePenguin'', Bluth had a falling out with Warner Bros. over the failure of his last two film, control of the project was [[ExecutiveMeddling seized by MGM/United Artists]] and everything went to hell: animation was farmed out for rushed completion, resulting in OffModel or outright incomplete shots being approved, fully animated scenes were cut and several voices had to be re-recorded. Bluth was [[CreatorBacklash furious with how badly the finished film looked]] that he and Gary Goldman outright [[ScrewThisImOutOfHere abandoned ship]], Bluth [[AlanSmithee taking his director credit with him]], to start up a new animation unit at 20th Century Fox.
** For his final film, ''WesternAnimation/TitanAE'', Bluth and Goldman were handed an already foundering project which had already blown through 18 other directors and $30 million on pre-production alone. The two were forced to scrap the whole thing and start over with a $55 million budget and less than two years to deliver. Much of the effects and post-production work were done ''two weeks'' before it's release. Then, just before it's premiere, Fox lost faith in the project, foresaw the rising trend of computer animation and closed down it's barely six-year-old 2D animation unit.
*** Bluth and Goldman have since taken to crowd-funding a prequel film to their 1983 game ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'' in the hopes of making a proper comeback, after years in DevelopmentHell. As of this writing, production has been slow.
* ''Family Dog'', a Creator/StevenSpielberg produced animated spin-off of ''Amazing Stories'' didn't debut until 1992 seven years after the original "Family Dog" episode of Amazing Stories had aired. Only five episodes of the finished product aired.
* ''WesternAnimation/FoodFight'', a film featuring Roger Rabbit-esque cameos by advertising mascots starring Creator/CharlieSheen was trapped in development for 10 years. Originally set for a 2003 release until being delayed to 2005, it became even further delayed when the harddrives containing all the animation files were stolen and the studio had to start all over again on an even lower budget. The final result was finished in 2009, given a small theatrical release and started to emerge direct to video in other markets in 2012.
* ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'', despite being instantly heralded as a classic and one of the defining series of the Disney Channel, suffered constant issues due to its creator Alex Hirsch's lack of experience in running an entire show (he was only 27 years old when it started). By the time the first season wrapped, Hirsch was so exhausted that he seriously considered ending the show right there, leaving it forever on an incredibly tantalizing {{Cliffhanger}}. It wasn't until he shared his plans with Jon Stewart, a huge fan who was horrified at the idea, that he decided to press on, though cutting his plans for the show to run three seasons down to just two. The Disney Channel execs weren't very happy about losing one of their most acclaimed shows so soon, and forbade him from revealing the plan to end the show to the public until the season was almost over, spending the entire time in between trying to talk him into continuing it to no avail. When the announcement finally couldn't be put off anymore, Hirsch was a complete stand up guy about it, making clear that the two season run was entirely his own decision and the fans shouldn't blame anyone at Disney for it, and ultimately came out of the experience with a highly acclaimed project he got to end on his own terms, about the happiest ending to the story possible.
* The [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1939]] Creator/FleischerStudios adaptation of ''WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels'' went through this. Many staffers, including animators ShamusCulhane and Creator/GrimNatwick, recall that the film had a lot of behind the scenes troubles that ended up hurting the quality:
** To begin with, it had a deadline that was far too short--production began in May 1938, and it was due Christmas 1939; this is less than half of the four years of production that went into ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'', the film it was meant to emulate to begin with.
** The studio was clearly under equipped to take on the challenge of making a Disney-like feature length animated film--many of their staffers weren't familiar with the West Coast style of animation and techniques pioneered by Disney. The studio had to expand their staff considerably to even make the film possible, even managing to hire many ex-Disney animators, but this resulted in the East Coast and West Coast animators clashing with each other on their approaches to animation, and the studio's decision to hire amateur, apathetic Miami art students, as well as newcomers who received a few hours' worth of cram-course art training[[note]] contrast this to the years of extensive art training and schooling Disney and Don Graham pushed upon their artists[[/note]] resulted in sloppy inking and bad in-between work, which resulted in the film having [[OffModel very uneven animation quality]]. The Fleischers' move to a new studio in UsefulNotes/{{Miami}} also resulted in many of their talented employees in New York getting left behind (including WesternAnimation/BettyBoop voice actress Mae Questel), with the few who did make the move becoming homesick, as well as putting up with the hazards and quirks of UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} (such as many mosquito infestations).
** A feud between story artists over which direction the story would take--it was planned as a Music/BingCrosby vehicle at one point, and at one point ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} was intended to be the star of the film, with its tone being more cartoony, as Max Fleischer actually did not wish to follow the Disney approach to animated films. Both of the previous stories were thrown out and rewritten by West Coast storymen, particularly ex-Warners staffer Cal Howard.
** A feud between Max and Dave Fleischer themselves over whether Dave himself or another person would compose the film's score. Ultimately, outside composers were brought in while songs were contributed by the studios in-house musicians like Sammy Timberg.
** The fact that the film was being made in the Fleischers' new studio in Miami, Florida (which was far too small to hold the 700+ staffers needed to complete ''Gulliver'') meant that if any equipment broke down, it would have been very difficult to get it fixed in any reasonable time. The lack of film industry in Miami also meant that, unless they wanted to use local actors or their woefully inadequate amateur orchestra (which was impeding the sound quality of the shorts from mid-1938 onward), they had to outsource recording sessions to West Coast studios (which they did for ''Gulliver'', ''WesternAnimation/MrBugGoesToTown'', and the WesternAnimation/SupermanTheatricalCartoons).
** In the end, while the film did modestly well at the box office, Paramount deliberately discounted the money the film made in Europe before WorldWarII broke out there, meaning the film had much overhead left to be paid, leaving the Fleischers in the red. Critical reaction was also mixed, with a cruel remark from rival WaltDisney quipping "We can make a better film than that with our second-string animators".
* The 1990s ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibleHulk'' AnimatedAdaptation was this [[http://marvel.toonzone.net/hulk/interviews/sebast/ according to the original producer.]] Specifically, UPN replaced most of the creative staff for the show's second season and {{ReTool}}ed the series to make it LighterAndSofter. They also demanded that ComicBook/SheHulk be [[AscendedExtra bumped up to co-lead status]] to better entice young girls who might otherwise be uninterested in the Hulk.
* ''WesternAnimation/IronMan'' was also a mess behind the scenes, with Marvel viewing it [[MerchandiseDriven as an afterthought whose sole purpose was to sell toys]]. The second season had no producer until three months into production, which resulted in 2-hour work days with no weekends off. The staff also had little say in things about plots and character designs, which were largely dictated by Marvel and Toy Biz.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheRenAndStimpyShow'' was, in its original run, one of the most talked-about shows on television and one of the biggest hits for the then-fledgling Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} network, and is now counted alongside ''The Simpsons'', ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', and ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' as a revolution in TV cartoons and one of the key shows of TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation. However, right from the start, it was fraught with production troubles that ultimately destroyed the show:
** Many of the season 1 episodes were massacred by bad outsourcing, due in part to work from the cheapskate, sweatshop conditions of FilCartoons, who handled ink-and-paint work for the entire first season, and more often than not heavily ruined many scenes due to their all-around cheap Xeroxing, ugly colors and even "reworking" drawings or whole scenes of animation; there were even some unintentional (rather than purposeful) off model moments, such as Stimpy's eyes inexplicably turning black in the "Stimpy's Breakfast Tips". Carbunkle director Bob Jacques had to fight tooth and claw to get the studio to turn in acceptable work for episodes like "Stimpy's Invention" (and even then the sporadic error slipped in, such as Stimpy's eyes floating off his face when he's showing Ren his new socks), and described the experience of working with them as "all damage control".
** One of the biggest sources of friction was over censorship. Nickelodeon was always uneasy with the [[GrossoutShow gross-out nature of the show's humor]], and [[MissingEpisode shelved]] one episode, "Man's Best Friend", due to its violent and scatological content. As a general rule, anything that had to do with religion, [[BanOnPolitics politics]], alcohol, and tobacco was put under a microscope by [[MediaWatchdog Standards & Practices]]; the character George Liquor had his last name removed from one episode and made only sporadic appearances due to opposition from the network, right down to axing an entire scene with him from "Rubber Nipple Salesman" and forcing Spumco to change a Liquor cameo in "Haunted House" into a parody of [[WesternAnimation/{{Doug}} Doug Funnie]] (a scene that got edited out in reruns anyway), while "Powdered Toast Man", featuring UsefulNotes/ThePope, removed a cross from his hat and credited the character simply as "The Man with the Pointy Hat", and the ending scene of Toast Man carelessly using the Constitution and Bill of Rights as kindling for a fire got edited out after its initial airing, which ironically ruined the episode's satirical message of how easily authority and power are abused.
** The show suffered from severe ScheduleSlip almost from the start, the result of, depending on who you ask, Creator/JohnKricfalusi's perfectionism or the constant battles over what was acceptable to air. Nickelodeon had to rerun the pilot episode in order to have something to show in what would've been the second episode's time slot; this helped the show build an audience but killed any hope for UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}. This became a trend; the first season had only six episodes air between August 1991 and February '92.
** Feuding between John K. and Nickelodeon over ScheduleSlip and censorship came to a head in September '92, in the middle of the second season, when Nickelodeon fired John K. and took over production themselves via the in-house studio Games Animation. The exact circumstances of John K.'s firing are [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment hotly debated to this day]]; John K. cites his refusal to censor "Man's Best Friend" as the final straw for Nick, while others blame the ScheduleSlip. Regardless, this is the moment when many fans claim that the show [[JumpingTheShark took a notable downturn in quality]], especially given that a good chunk of the staff left in protest at John K.'s firing. ''Ren & Stimpy'' finished its second season and ran for a total of three more before it was canceled at the end of 1995 (though one last episode aired on Creator/{{MTV}} the following year).
** Later on, in 2003, John K. relaunched the show as ''Ren & Stimpy's Adult Party Cartoon'', part of an adult animation block on Spike TV. The show once more suffered from ScheduleSlip, though the censorship fights at Nickelodeon were inverted at Spike TV; John K. maintains that Spike TV pressured him to turn ''up'' the adult content farther than he was willing to go. In any case, the show only lasted two months and seven episodes (the pilot being the previously-unaired "Man's Best Friend") before being canceled.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheRoadToElDorado'': The films director, Will Finn, said that the films production was an absolute bloodbath and that he still has nightmares about it to this day, and he has nothing but grim memories about it whenever it's brought up. It was bad enough that he resigned from Dreamworks to return back to Disney later in its production. He likened the turbulent making of it to being akin to a mashup of ''Film/MutinyOnTheBounty'' and ''Film/TheProducers''.
* Of all shows, ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndScrappyDoo'' ran into many production problems early on. Scrappy co-creator Creator/MarkEvanier [[http://www.newsfromme.com/writings/scrappy-days/ even wrote a very lengthy essay on its troubled history]].
** By 1979, ''WesternAnimation/TheScoobyDooShow'' was on the verge of cancelation by ABC, and Joe Barbera came up with the new character to help save it. None of the on-staff writers at HannaBarbera could write a satisfactory pilot script, and Evanier, the editor of their comic book division, was chosen. Barbera and Evanier worked together to finalize the character, and Evanier eventually turned in a satisfactory pilot script, and the show was picked up for a full season and made it on the air following endless salary and billing disputes, conflicts with Standards & Practices, and much ''much'' ExecutiveMeddling.
** Casting the character's voice was difficult in its own right, and the entire pilot was recorded at least five different times. Creator/MelBlanc was Barbara's first choice to voice Scrappy, but he turned the role down over salary disagreements. Then Creator/FrankWelker was considered before Creator/DonMessick was cast, and the pilot script recorded with the entire cast. Then ABC decided they didn't like Don's version, so Creator/DawsButler was cast and the entire script re-recorded. Then they didn't like his version, and Marilyn Schreffler was cast and the script re-recorded once again before Welker was cast, and the entire script recorded a fourth time. Then Paul Winchell and Dick Beals were cast at different points, though production was haulted while Barbera once again attempted to strike a deal with Mel Blanc. Ultimately, Lennie Weinrib was cast in the role simply because he was the first choice the network wouldn't veto. Even he would end up leaving the role at the end of the season over a salary dispute, along with a personality dispute with the voice director, and Don Messick became Scrappy's permanent voice afterwords.
* The pilot episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', "Some Enchanted Evening" went so badly wrong that it nearly killed the show before it even began. The big problem was that the key members of the production team didn't appear to be talking to each other. Creator/MattGroening and Creator/JamesLBrooks imagined a show with unique designs and color schemes, but characters who were animated in a realistic way. Animation director Kent Butterworth (and apparently the people at Klasky-Csupo) on the other hand thought it should be animated in a whacked-out, over the top style with little regard paid to keeping the characters on model. And nobody appeared to have told the Korean animators anything at all, meaning they were let loose on the episode with wildly inconsistent results. The end product, while sometimes defended by animation enthusiasts as how the show ''should'' have been animated, wasn't what the producers or Fox wanted at all, and the plug nearly got pulled on the series. Fortunately the second episode, "Bart the Genius" did fit what the producers were looking for, and so they reshuffled the episode order and kicked off the series with "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire," while "Some Enchanted Evening" got substantially re-animated and booted to the end of the season.
** There is a notorious story surrounding the first time the staff saw "Some Enchanted Evening". In one scene, Bart and Lisa watch a Happy Little Elves cartoon. For some reason yet to be determined, Butterworth had decided to have a bear tear off one of the elves's heads and drink its blood. Needless to say, this did ''not'' go over well with the production crew.
* The Franchise/TransformersAlignedUniverse [[http://tfwiki.net/wiki/Aligned#Clashing_visions is a]] [[http://tfwiki.net/wiki/Binder_of_Revelation clusterfuck]], between ''WesternAnimation/TransformersRescueBots'' being forced into it, the ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'' crew's decision to try to ignore the [[SeriesBible Binder of Revelation]] and [[http://sunnybutte.tumblr.com/post/131367083128/that-explains-a-lot-of-the-mess-that-was its own]] [[http://sunnybutte.tumblr.com/post/131368170623/and-if-you-were-wondering-why-beast-hunters-was behind the scenes drama]], and IDW 's inability to shift to help the universe out more.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheTwistedTalesOfFelixTheCat'' cartoon, an attempt to revive the WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat cartoons for the mid 90's, went through this, [[http://web.archive.org/web/20111219032547/http://classiccartoonreviews.blogspot.com/2011/03/twisted-tale-of-twisted-tales-of-felix.html according to animator Milton Knight]], who worked on the first season. He recalled the experience was fun, but not exactly ideal; other staffers have pitched in on the internet over time that the show's production was rather turbulent.
** One major problem during production was that they couldn't make up their mind what kind of cartoon this was supposed to be--studio head Phil Roman was most comfortable with the plot-and-dialogue-driven approach used in his commercial successes ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'' and ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', and had given this series what seemed like a guarded blessing--there was one group who wanted a Felix like the Creator/OttoMessmer shorts, one group who wanted [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Max Fleischer]] surreality, Don Oriolo, the current owner of Felix, wanting it to be like his dad's made-for-TV Felix cartoons (which most of the staff working on the show were against--they ultimately, but begrudgingly, added certain elements from it into ''Twisted Tales'', like the Magic Bag), one group who wanted the show to be ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpy''-esque (understandable, since some of the artists on the show were former ''WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpy'' artists), and one director who wanted a ''Creator/RobertCrumb'' influence! With so many cooks in the kitchen, the direction of the show tended to be all over the place, with Felix himself often getting swamped in importance by a large cast of supporting characters and his chaotic world. On top of that, per word of Mark Evanier, the studio had a terrible time finding a voice for Felix, saying they may have set a new industry record for most actors auditioned for one role (to where even staff of the studio were trying to audition for the role), and they wound up recording the show with a "scratch" (temporary) voice and animating to that. The final voice was only selected a few weeks before an episode aired and was dubbed in.
** Another problem was that in addition to having a month to storyboard, design and do layout work on each short, they could not learn from their mistakes, because by the time film began to come in, the season had been just about wrapped up. Some directors could handle writing and boarding a good cartoon, while some couldn't. The artists had no say on retakes in animation either, which was left to Phil Roman to decide--and unfortunately, the overseas animation on the show tended to be rather sluggish. This only got worse with the second season, with Korean company Plus One having to rush episodes through, resulting in sloppy artwork and very bad animation timing (with "Nightmare on Oak Street" being one of the worst examples in the second season). On top of that, they were behind schedule, so they couldn't order retakes to correct any mistakes.
** Eventually, Phil Roman and Don Oriolo found the "Cartoonist Driven" approach of the first season to be too taxing on them, and not even worth the trouble since, despite being one of the most expensive shows that Phil Roman's studio had made, the first season turned out to be a flop in ratings, due in part to a terrible time slot--it was sandwiched right between sports shows and then-ratings giant WesternAnimation/XMen, making it very hard to establish an audience for the show. On top of that, Don was just unhappy with the weird direction of season 1 having almost nothing in common with Joe Oriolo's Felix, so the second season went through an extensive {{retool}}--while the first season was storyboarded while working from a basic outline, and was absurdly surreal in its premises and animation, the second season decided to take the series into a direction more in vogue with the Joe Oriolo Felix cartoons and shift production to make the show a more standard TV cartoon, with scripts replacing the all-storyboard approach (usually provided by the writer of ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'', Creator/MarkEvanier, [[OldShame who has remained silent on the series ever since]]), resulting in much more linear plotting and less surreal humor and more emphasis on wordplay and one liners, as well as bringing back some of the Oriolo era characters like Poindexter, Master Cylinder and The Professor while forcing most of the new side characters to be scrapped in turn. This move was met with outright hostile reception from the shows staff, particularly the producer of the first season, who knew Don's meddling would only make things worse and [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the show]] just ''two weeks'' into the second seasons production. They even tried to have the writers voice direct the actors instead of the directors, but after a couple weeks of trying that, the results were so disastrous that the studio was forced to drop that and hand over voice direction back to the cartoon directors. The staff retaliated by [[WriterRevolt writing whole episodes that took jabs at the second seasons toned down retool]], such as "Attack of the Robot Rat" (which infuriated Don Oriolo for being a [[TakeThat ruthless parody]] of his dads made for TV Felix the Cat cartoons), "Phoney Felix" and "The Fuzzy Bunny Show". The first few scripts they received were followed closely, but the shows new producer finally fought for the artists to have more storytelling and creative control on the show, and they were able to completely scrap the scripts and write their own shows, ironically giving the crew ''more'' freedom than they had in the first season. Some episodes were tightly scripted and some were not. Unfortunately for them, the VP of Childrens Programming, Judy Price, who wanted the show picked up in the first place, got fired, and Felix the Cat Inc. was so unhappy with the show in general that they refused to renew the license for Phil Roman to continue using Felix, guaranteeing a third season wouldn't happen. To make matters worse, the second season turned to be an [[GoneHorriblyWrong even]] ''[[GoneHorriblyWrong bigger]]'' [[GoneHorriblyWrong flop in the ratings]], and it ultimately got the show canned, with season 2 [[CutShort ending after just 8 episodes.]] The second season was considered a disaster in the eyes of everyone involved in it (especially Don Oriolo, who is barely willing to acknowledge the existence of ''Twisted Tales'' these days) and the show's failure ultimately put the Felix the Cat cartoons on ice yet ''again'' (having already gone through it with [[WesternAnimation/FelixTheCatTheMovie the 1991 movie]], which was a box office bomb), with only low key revivals coming of the series after the fact.
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