* AcclaimedFlop: The movie received positive reviews from critics but was a disappointment at the box office, making ''Willy Wonka'' the first of at least [[Film/JamesAndTheGiantPeach three]] [[Film/TheBFG movies]] based off of Dahl's work to become an AcclaimedFlop. It has since gained a bigger audience through television airings and home video releases.
* AdoredByTheNetwork: Since the TurnOfTheMillennium, [[{{Creator/ABCFamily}} Freeform]] frequently runs this film as part of their weekend lineups, especially around holiday periods. Until the HBO networks reclaimed the TV rights to the [[Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory 2005 adaptation of its source novel]] in 2014, Freeform loved running ''both'' versions as a double feature!
* BeamMeUpScotty: Creator/GeneWilder says "Good day, sir!" and "I said 'Good day'!" but never "I said 'Good day, sir!'"
* BoxOfficeBomb: Its original release only grossed $4 million at the box office against a budget of $3 million. Later averted when the re-release grossed $21 million.
* BreakawayPopHit: For several years, the opening number "The Candy Man" was better known than the film when it was CoveredUp by Music/SammyDavisJr, but as the movie became VindicatedByCable, the cover version slowly became dismissed as kitsch. The Davis version has found use as a jingle/theme by Chris Evans on his BBC Radio 2 breakfast programme. In the mid-to-late-'70s and early-'80s [[RepurposedPopSong it became better known as a jingle for M&M candies in the US]], which Zedd and Aloe Blacc rewrote in 2016 for the candy's 75th anniversary.
* CutSong: An EditedForSyndication case -- Mrs. Bucket's solo "Cheer Up, Charlie" is often cut from commercial TV airings at the director's request, as he felt it was not vital to the narrative. Since the TurnOfTheMillennium, it's become common to leave this in but cut the boat ride sequence instead.
* TheDanza: Madeline Stuart (Mel Stuart's daughter) as Madeline Durkin, the girl in Charlie's class who tells Mr. Turkentine she opened "about 100" Wonka bars.
* {{Defictionalization}}: While they look nothing like they do in the film, [[http://smile.amazon.com/Gobstopper-24-1-77-Oz-Boxes/dp/B0017OX0HS/ref=sr_1_3?rps=1&ie=UTF8&qid=1441160849&sr=8-3&keywords=Everlasting+Gobstoppers there actually are real life Everlasting Gobstoppers]]. Appropriately enough, they're basically Gobstoppers (otherwise known as Jawbreakers)
** A Willy Wonka Candy Company has existed since 1971, and was originally a tie-in to the film. It was started by Quaker Oats and then eventually became the property of Nestle. The company tried to launch Wonka chocolate bars twice, in 1971 and 2005, but both times they were relatively unsuccessful. Instead, the real hits out of the Wonka line have been candies that have nothing to do with the film at all, but reflect the fictional candy company's quirky ethos. In the late 90's, pre-existing Nestle candies such as Nerds, Sweet Tarts, Laffy Taffy and Fun Dip were moved to the Wonka brand, where they've thrived under new branding.
* DisownedAdaptation: By most accounts Creator/RoaldDahl hated the finished film, to the point where he refused to allow a movie of [[Literature/CharlieAndTheGreatGlassElevator its sequel]] to be made and wouldn't release movie rights to his other children's novels for more than 15 years. This was due to the casting of Creator/GeneWilder (Dahl insisted that Creator/SpikeMilligan should have been cast in the role) and to the extensive rewrites done to his screenplay received without his foreknowledge.
* DVDCommentary: Originally recorded for the 2001 DVD release that marked the film's 30th anniversary, it reunited the five child actors.
* EditedForSyndication:
** Mrs. Bucket's song "Cheer Up, Charlie" is often cut from commercial TV airings, and this was the director's idea -- he felt the song was superfluous by that point in the story. Since the late 1990s, Freeform airings often cut the notoriously scary boat ride sequence.
** Freeform uses two different cuts of the film: a condensed one that runs for two hours, and a wholesale one that runs for two and a half. Which one they use depends on what else they want to air and, by extension, the mood that they're in.
* EnforcedMethodActing:
** The cast wasn't allowed to see the Chocolate Room set until the scene where they first emerge into the room was shot, so their reactions are genuine. Likewise, the Inventing Room was also off-limits to the cast before filming.
** Charlie's reaction to Wonka declaring he would get nothing due to defying the contract ("''Good day sir!''") is also genuine; in rehearsals Peter Ostrum was not told that Creator/GeneWilder would be shouting at him. Since Wilder and Ostrum had become friends on the set, Wilder desperately wanted to tell Ostrum that he would be shouting so that Ostrum wouldn't think that they had stopped being friends.
** For the riverboat scene, Wonka's ranting poem was not in the script (it's a lift from the novel), hence the disturbed looks on the actors' faces, who thought Wilder was actually losing his mind.
** Speaking of the riverboat, it was on a track under the water, but the Oompa-Loompa supposedly steering the boat wasn't told this.
** During the scene with Wonka's somersault, Denise Nickerson (Violet) genuinely thought that Gene Wilder (Wonka) had injured himself.
** Mel Stuart deliberately ran Paris Themmen through the lines when Mike explained the technicalities of television to Wonka in the Wonkavision Room so often that Stuart got the right "nasty and pissy" attitude from Themmen he wanted for the scene, as that was how Themmen naturally felt at that point.
** When the group hangs up their coats in the factory, they did not know that the hands were real and were going to grab their clothes.
** Violet's look of discomfort as a blueberry is not acted. Denise Nickerson was sandwiched between two halves of a styrofoam ball which took some forty minutes to get in to, meaning she couldn't get out of it for lunch. In addition, the costume was nearly as high as the Oompa-Loompa actors were tall, and she had to be rolled around a lot by them.
* ExecutiveMeddling:
** The film underwent a full-script rewrite after Creator/RoaldDahl, who was commissioned to write the original screenplay, kept failing to meet deadlines.
** According to the film's director, the producers changed the title of the film not only to promote the Wonka candy brand, but also due to the UnfortunateImplications revolving around the name "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory."[[labelnote:Explanation]]"Mister Charlie" is a slur used in black communities to refer to a white man in a position of power, and "chocolate" can easily be misconstrued as an insult to black people for obvious reasons. Thus, fear of offending African-American audiences became a big factor in altering the film's title, especially in light of the original novel containing several elements of ValuesDissonance (the naming of an Indian prince as "Pondicherry" and the original depictions of the Oompa-Loompahs as African pygmies).[[/labelnote]]
* FakeBrit: Paris Themmen [[WordOfGod mentions]] in the DVDCommentary that he and Denise Nickerson "hung around Julie (Dawn Cole, who played Veruca) too much" and Julie's British accent rubbed off on them as a result. Paris points out certain lines in the film where he and Denise affected British accents for no good reason, and the takes were kept. He also discussed that loved ones watching the film could not recognize that the lines were spoken by Violet or Mike and not by Veruca.
* InMemoriam: Freeform ran it in 2016 to pay tribute to Creator/GeneWilder who passed away that year.
* IronyAsSheIsCast: An inversion. Julie Dawn Cole actually hated chocolate, and was not a fan of filming the scene in which she scoops melted chocolate from one of the candy eggs.
* LifeImitatesArt:
** Julie Dawn Cole, who played Veruca, swiped a few props from the set, including a Golden Ticket and an Everlasting Gobstopper. However, she lost the mink coat that was made specifically for the movie, having apparently left it on the back of her chair when she went to lunch. The director yelled at her until she cried when he found out- it was real fur.
*** According to her memoir, Cole found the coat where she left it.
** Not only that, but she also got a peek at the Chocolate Room early (the other children only saw it during the main filming).
** On a darker note, Denise Nickerson (who played Violet), made her scenes and returned to school... and then, after two days, her face and hands start to turn blue! OhCrap! It turned out that the paint used to make her face and hands blue went deep under her skin, and then slowly resurfaced during next few weeks. Talk about art imitating life!
** The actors actually behave a lot like their respective characters during the DVDCommentary:
*** Denise Nickerson, Julie Dawn Cole, and Paris Themmen have a lively conversation throughout, with Themmen periodically making witty observations along the way;
*** Peter Ostrum was basically MrExposition, having been the first of the five main children to arrive for filming and the last to leave;
*** Michael Bollner says very little, and then only when prompted;
*** [[BookEnds Denise Nickerson asks for gum at the beginning and end of the commentary]].
* MeanCharacterNiceActor:
** Despite their onscreen animosity, Julie Dawn Cole (Veruca Salt) came to view Roy Kinnear (Mr. Salt) as a surrogate father.
** The Wonka kids also got along extremely well with each other, particularly Peter Ostrum, Julie Dawn Cole, and Denise Nickerson (see below).
* MidDevelopmentGenreShift: Mel Stuart originally didn't want Willy Wonka to be a musical... but producers convinced him by pointing out the success of ''Film/MaryPoppins'' and ''Film/TheWizardOfOz''.
* MilestoneCelebration
** 25th anniversary: A limited theatrical reissue and the first-ever CD release of the soundtrack album.
** 30th anniversary: The special edition DVD release, which reunited many cast and crew members for its bonus features, and the making-of book ''Pure Imagination''.
** 40th anniversary: A LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition Blu-Ray package that included the previous disc's bonus features, the ''Pure Imagination'' book, and a few other physical extras.
*** In a somewhat related note, 2011 saw the release of ''[[http://www.bearmanormedia.com/i-want-it-now-by-julie-dawn-cole-with-michael-esslinger?search=julie%20dawn%20cole I Want It Now!]]'', Julie Dawn Cole's memoirs, featuring, in-depth, a first-hand recollection of her experiences filming ''Willy Wonka'', as well as the subsequent reunions and commemorations of the movie over the years, with plenty of rare photos taken during the movie's production. As of 2015, she is the first and only "Wonka kid" to have published any recollections of making the film.
** 45th anniversary: The film's soundtrack was re-released on vinyl for the first time since 1971.
* OneBookAuthor: Peter Ostrum was offered a lucrative multi-picture film deal after playing Charlie Bucket, but found film acting to be too much hard work. Instead, he quit acting, went to college and became a farm animal veterinarian in Upstate New York. For years, he declined to talk about the film, to the point where his wife didn't even know he was in it until years into their marriage! He's since cooled to the film and does annual school assemblies in his hometown where he answers student questions about the film and his career in veterinary medicine. He occasionally does Wonka-related events (such as the commentary for the 25th anniversary DVD and television reunions).
** Upon learning of Creator/GeneWilder's passing, Ostrum changed his social-media profile to read, "Former-child-actor, veterinarian, inherited a chocolate factory on 29 August 2016".
** It was also the only acting credit for Michael Bollner, who played Augustus. He went to school and became a tax accountant.
* PlayingGertrude: According to the novel, Grandpa Joe is said to be ninety-six-and-a-half years old. Jack Albertson was 63 at the time of filming.
* RomanceOnTheSet: Julie Dawn Cole and Denise Nickerson both had a crush on Peter Ostrum, so they would hang out with him on alternating days. It was a congenial version of the [[TriangRelations Type 3]] LoveTriangle.
* [[ChannelHop Studio Hop]]: Creator/{{Paramount}} distributed the movie during its premiere. After it flopped, they decided not to renew distribution rights. Creator/WarnerBros then added the movie to their library after buying the production company, where it belongs to this day, and went on to produce two further adaptations of the original source material (the 2005 film and 2013 West End musical).
* ThrowItIn:
** According to her memoir, Julie Dawn Cole thought it would be in character for Veruca to do a LyingFingerCross when they promise not to show the Everlasting Gobstoppers to anyone. The director was unfamiliar with the gesture, but once she explained it, he filmed it in a closeup.
** While filming "Pure Imagination," the only rule for the cast was that they could not stand in front of Gene Wilder. Cole and Denise Nickerson decided to throw in some shoving of each other as they descend the stairs. Also, Paris Themmen improvised the bit where he steps in front of Wilder and doesn't step back with him.
** According to Paris Themmen, the "educated eggdicator" line was thrown in by Jack Albertson.
** Gene Wilder and Roy Kinnear also ad-libbed adjusting each other's ties for the last bit of the golden goose scene.
* VindicatedByCable: The film was a failure at the box office, but has become a classic in the years since.
* WagTheDirector: Creator/GeneWilder insisted on the disability fake out / somersault bit being included in Wonka's introduction because he had read the book, and saw Willy Wonka as something of a trickster. Mel Stuart, who had basically waived audition protocol and simply given Gene the part based on his resume, was not about to turn Gene down. Gene was also in full control of his costume, from the dimensions to the colors to the number of pockets. Read his thoughts [[http://www.wmagazine.com/story/gene-wilder-willy-wonka-costume here]].
* WhatCouldHaveBeen:
** Jean Stapleton was offered the role of Mike Teevee's mother at the same time she was also being offered the role of [[Series/AllInTheFamily Edith Bunker]]. Even the director, who begged her to be in the movie, later admitted that she made the right choice.
** Creator/FredAstaire was interested in playing Willy Wonka, but was ruled out as being too old.
** Joel Grey was also considered for the Wonka role. While he was a good match for the character's description in the novel, the filmmakers didn't think he would have the larger-than-life, commanding presence the character requires on screen, since he wasn't much taller than the kids would be.
** The songwriters wanted Creator/SammyDavisJr to play Bill the candy shop owner, but director Mel Stuart felt that StuntCasting the role would be too distracting for the audience and hurt the distinction between the real world the first half of the film takes place in and the unreal world of the factory. He nixed the idea of having "I've Got a Golden Ticket" become a CrowdSong for similar reasons.
** The entirety of Creator/MontyPython expressed interest in playing Willy Wonka, but they were all rejected because they weren't very well-known outside of the UK.
** Creator/JonPertwee was one of many people considered to play Wonka, but he was busy with ''Series/DoctorWho''.
** Creator/RoaldDahl reportedly wanted Creator/SpikeMilligan to play the part of Willy Wonka. The fact that Milligan was not cast as Wonka was allegedly one of the reasons Dahl refused to allow ''Charlie And The Great Glass Elevator'' to be made into a movie, even writing that decision into his will. (Dahl also would have been happy with Creator/PeterSellers, but Milligan was his first choice.)
** A great many British comedians were considered for Willy Wonka, including Creator/MichaelCrawford, Creator/FrankieHowerd, Film/CarryOn stars Creator/SidneyJames and Creator/KennethWilliams and double-act Creator/PeterCook and Creator/DudleyMoore.
** [[Series/GilligansIsland Jim Backus]] was the original choice for Mr. Salt, but he was considered too recognizable a figure.
** According to an interview with Peter Ostrum, [[Film/{{Oliver}} Mark Lester]] was turned down for the role of Charlie because of his high-pitched singing voice.

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