* ArtistDisillusionment: Led to the creation of this album. Roger grew tired of the larger audiences and the rowdy fans, and slowly started becoming a cold, destructive person, culminating in his infamous spitting incident, which proved to be the spark that inspired this album.
* [[BannedInChina Banned In South Africa]]: The album and movie were banned in South Africa due to anti-apartheid protesters' use of lyrics from "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)" to criticize racially biased propaganda and curricula employed by the nation's education system.
* BlackSheepHit: "Another Brick in The Wall, Part 2" is perhaps the best known song on the album, despite sounding completely different from the rest of the album. Some critics were irritated that Pink Floyd, one of the premier '70s "dinosaur bands", had the first #1 hit of the 1980s.
* ChristmasRushed: Creator/ColumbiaRecords offered the band a substantial bonus for completing the album in time for Christmas 1979. Roger Waters jumped on the offer, as the band was in dire financial straits at the time, and stepped up the recording schedule.
* CreatorBacklash: At the time the film was released, Waters didn't like it. Chiefly, because Bob Geldof was cast in the lead role instead of himself. Gerald Scarfe was off playing pool instead of attending the New York premiere since he "couldn't bear to see the film again."
** The critics have tended to give it mixed reviews over the years. (Creator/RogerEbert [[http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-pink-floyd-the-wall-1982 loved]] it.)
** It seems like the only people who really liked it are the fans.
* CreatorBreakdown: Allegedly how this album came into being. Waters' father's death, drug use, and complex relations are referenced in many songs, not to mention Pink's InUniverse breakdown.
* CutSong: In the film, there is no segment for "Hey You", one of the album's best known songs. One was filmed, but not included. The work print of the scene appears on the DVD. "The Show Must Go On", which appeared on the album (and was only played in its full form during the live shows), also did not appear in the film.
** "Empty Spaces" on The Wall album is re-worked in the Film as the song "What Shall We Do Now?", which runs longer and has additional lyrics. The longer "What Shall We Do Now" is the version also performed in the live Wall concerts.
** The Film also includes the song "When The Tigers Broke Free", played when the young Pink finds his late father's effects, given to his mother after being killed in WWII. This song, an unused song from ''The Wall'' sessions, was eventually inserted into later CD pressings (after 2004) of the next Floyd album, ''Music/TheFinalCut'', which deals more overtly with war and the loss of Waters' father (who was killed in the regiment and battle referenced in the song).
* {{Defictionalization}}: At least one Neo-Nazi group, the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammerskins Hammerskin Nation]] took its imagery from this movie.
* DoingItForTheArt: Pink Floyd's tour promoting ''The Wall'' ended up costing more money than it took in partially as a result of Waters's refusal to play in the stadium venues he had grown to loathe in their previous tour. Roger Waters' 2010 tour, which reproduced the original, was ''the most expensive concert tour in music history'', costing approximately $1 million U.S. per performance.
** Subverted in the second instance; Waters has stated he was only persuaded to do the tour when it looked like he could make money off of it.
* EnforcedMethodActing: The phone call heard at the end of "Young Lust"? Roger was actually calling Nick Mason, the drummer, who assumed he was getting crank called (the operator ''was'' asking for "Pink Floyd", after all) and promptly hung up; between that and the operator's confused reaction, it was just what Roger needed.
** Also, Jenny Wright wasn't told that Creator/BobGeldof would be throwing that bottle at her during his AngerMontage, so her reaction of ducking was totally spontaneous.
* ExecutiveMeddling: A positive example is responsible for "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2". Bob Ezrin was the one who pushed the band towards using a {{Disco}} beat for the song, despite David Gilmour's initial reluctance towards the idea. Also, in its original version, the song was only 1:20 long, containing one verse and chorus. Ezrin, recognizing the hit potential, insisted that the song needed two verses and two choruses, to which the band shot back, "Well you're not bloody getting them. We don't do singles, so fuck you." Once they left the studio, Ezrin used the studio's tape recorder to copy the first verse and chorus, placing them after a quick drumfill, and struck on the idea of using the children's choir to disguise the repetition.
* LifeImitatesArt: In 2016, footage of a teacher [[http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/13/nyregion/success-academy-teacher-rips-up-student-paper.html?_r=0 berating a student for answering a homework question incorrectly]] went viral, in case you thought that the Teacher's tactics from the album were a relic of the '50s.
* MoneyDearBoy: The band's financial managers had squandered their money on bad investments, so they needed to record an album to remain solvent. [[TropesAreTools It's still one of their best albums]] and one of the best-selling albums of all time.
* RealitySubtext: The album was inspired by Roger realizing that he was becoming a cold destructive person after he spat on a fan (and reportedly made said fan's night) during the final show of the ''Animals'' tour. Roger himself said that, if it wasn't for his wife Carolyne, he would have become something like Pink.
** While much of the Dark Lord persona comes from that tour, Pink's racism likely comes from EricClapton, who once infamously delivered a drunken rant against England's gradually-increasing black population. His contemporaries gave him a collective WhatTheHellHero, and he realized that he had hit rock-bottom. Today, he regards his words then as an OldShame among old shames.
* StuntCasting: Those are ''real'' Neo-Nazi skinheads in the film that Parker hired for the roles.
* TechnologyMarchesOn: Pink has "thirteen channels of shit on the TV to choose from". The use of collect calling and payphones also date the album to the pre-Internet-and-cellphone era.
* ThrowItIn: This was the reaction of director Alan Parker to Bob Geldof's accidental cutting of his hand while filming the destruction of the hotel room for the song "One of My Turns."
* TroubledProduction: Both the album (homesickness due to recording outside the UK, going behind schedule, Waters becoming even more of a ControlFreak that fought with producer Bob Ezrin and eventually fired Richard Wright) and the movie (Waters, Alan Parker and Gerald Scarfe were constantly into each other's nerves; Waters snarked on Hollywood in ''The Final Cut'', and Parker described the movie as "the most expensive student film ever made".)
* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Averted. One of Ezrin's first major changes to Waters' lyrics was to remove dates in the lyrics that placed Pink at 36 years old, the same age Waters was at the time of recording. Though having a rock star still be relatively a young man in the late '70s with a father who died in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII would date the album regardless.
* WhatCouldHaveBeen:
** Music/TheBeachBoys were scheduled to add backing vocals to "The Show Must Go On", but on the day of the session, Waters inexplicably cancelled and settled for just Bruce Johnston and Toni Tennille. In [[http://www.angelfire.com/ok2/wall/interview.html an interview with Jim Ladd]], Waters explained their absence from the album by saying that they were on tour at the time, and that he doesn't know how they would have reacted if they saw the lyrics of "In the Flesh", "Run Like Hell" or "Waiting for the Worms".
** In the rough-draft stages, Waters' idea was to end the story with the final brick being set. When the album eventually went on tour, this would have had the effect of trolling the audience. The wall goes up; the show is over. Fortunately, common sense prevailed, and he realized that it might be a better idea to see the wall come down.
** The follow-up album ''The Final Cut'' was originally intended to be a collection of songs that had been left off of ''The Wall'', with one rumored title being ''Spare Bricks.'' Then UsefulNotes/TheFalklandsWar broke out, and it became a case of RealLifeWritesThePlot, as Roger turned the album into a protest against the War.
** Roger originally presented the band with two concepts, one for ''The Wall'' and the other for ''The Pros And Cons of Hitch-Hiking.'' They chose ''The Wall.''
*** Waters would go on to record ''The Pros and Cons of Hitch-Hiking'' himself as his first official solo album. It would only reach #31 on the ''Billboard'' Top 200 Albums Chart and generally flop with the critics. ''Rolling Stone'''s Kurt Loder, who had given a glowing review to the otherwise maligned ''The Final Cut'', trashed ''Pros And Cons'' as a "static, faintly hideous record" and that "you could count the actual melodies here on MickeyMouse's fingers." He added that David Gilmour's ''About Face'' album, which he had given a modest, unenthusiastic three stars, assumed "new luster in comparison to this turkey." The album received an abysmal one star, thus proving the rest of the band right when they had rejected it in favor of ''The Wall.''
** The film was originally going to be a straightforward concert film with Gerald Scarfe's animation interspersed with footage of the band. For some reason, the live footage turned out to be unusable.
** The album was originally ''going'' to be a movie, a star vehicle for Roger Waters. The idea was scrapped when Waters turned in a dreadful screen test.
* WordOfDante: It's widely believed by fans that Pink's name is actually "Floyd Pinkerton", and that "Pink Floyd" is a stage name. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_Floyd_(fictional_character) His page]] on Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} even states this. This is never explicitly stated, but the plaque in the church and the royal notice proclaiming his KIA status gives his father's name as "J.A. Pinkerton", and his childhood friends call him "Pinky" (a reasonable nickname for someone with the surname "Pinkerton").
* WordOfGod: Roger Waters commented on the beginning of "Waiting for the Worms" that he was the one who shouted, "''Eins, zwei, drei,'' Anger!"
* WorkingTitle:
** For the album: "Bricks in The Wall"
** For individual tracks (listed in order they're played):
*** In The Flesh?: "The Show?"
*** Another Brick in The Wall, Part 1: "Reminiscing"
*** Another Brick in The Wall, Part 2: "Education"
*** Another Brick in The Wall, Part 3: "Drugs"
*** Comfortably Numb: "The Doctor"
*** The Show Must Go On: "Who's Sorry Now", "(It's) Never Too Late"
*** In The Flesh: "The Show"
*** Waiting for The Worms: "Follow The Worms"
*** The Trial: "Trial by Puppet"
*** Outside The Wall: "Bleeding Hearts", "The Buskers"