->''"Passion, you see, can be destroyed by a doctor. It cannot be created."''
->-- '''Martin Dysart'''

A play by Peter Shaffer that opened in 1973, ''Equus'' became a film in 1977 also written by Shaffer. In the play and film, a psychiatrist, Martin Dysart is called to investigate the case of a stableboy named Alan Strang. Alan, out of a religious and sexual fascination with horses, savagely blinded six horses with a metal spike. As he examines the boy, and his fascination, Dysart starts to have doubts about whether he can really help him, or whether turning people to a "normal" way of thinking is always the right thing to do.
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!!The film features examples of:

* BadDreams: Dysart's Greece dream in scene 4, and Alan's frequent dreams concerning "Ek" [[spoiler: or Equus.]]
* BestialityIsDepraved: Alan can't distinguish between affection for horses and sexual attraction.
* CriticalPsychoanalysisFailure: [[spoiler: Alan's Equus hallucinations are passed to Dysart.]]
* DawsonCasting: Frequently done with regards to 17-year-old Alan for understandable reasons. Peter Firth, the originator of the role, was twenty-four years old when the film version starring him was released. Averted by the 2007 West End revival (you know, the one that got the MoralGuardians up in arms).
* DysfunctionalFamily: The Strangs. Frank and Dora are of wildly differing personalities and perspectives, and their strongly conflicting views of how to treat their son only contribute to his psychosis.
* EyeScream: The blinding of the horses.
* FullFrontalAssault: Alan's attack on the horses is done in the nude.
* HistoryRepeats: As Doctor Dysart [[spoiler:prepares to 'cure' Alan, [[TheReveal he reveals]] that he himself has now become plagued by visions of Equus.]]
* MaleFrontalNudity: The script calls for the actor playing Alan to appear naked on stage. Predictably, the production starring Creator/DanielRadcliffe spawned countless jokes about Film/HarryPotter showing his "wand." Curiously, the script only calls for the actor playing Alan to mime stripping, never actually requiring any nudity. Radcliffe took it upon himself to nude it up.
* {{Minimalism}}: The original play features, among other aspects, only one setting and actors or dancers in lieu of horses; very much averted in the film version, naturally.
* NeverMyFault: Dora, who says the reason her son's blinding the horses is because he's possessed by the devil.
* NotSoDifferent: Alan and Dysart appear separated in a multitude of ways, yet it eventually becomes clear that the staid, predictable Dysart is himself obsessed with the kind of raw passion that Alan experiences, as evidenced by his monologues and bizarre dreams about ancient Greece - but is shown as too afraid to grasp it [[spoiler:until his final lines.]]
* SignificantDoubleCasting: Traditionally the actor who plays the rider who gives Alan his first horseback ride also plays his favorite horse Nugget, which highlights Alan's confusion over his sexuality.
* ShoutOut: There's a reference to "standing in the darkness, stabbing at heads" which seems to refer to the play ''Theatre/{{Agamemnon}}'' by Creator/{{Aeschylus}}.
* VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: The play was inspired by a headline of an actual horse blinding; Peter Shaffer then devised the story of his play from the ground up.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Or rather, the horses--we're not told their fate after Alan blinds them.
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