'''SPOILERS, WE REPEAT, SPOILERS AHEAD. DO NOT ADVANCE UNLESS YOU ARE PREPARED'''

* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIfza_s3X5k White phosphorus]], and the sight of a woman's scorched, smouldering corpse shielding the eyes of her child's body. The image is haunting to more than just the team.
** What makes it worse is that in the aftermath of that incident, Lugo has an epic breakdown where he claims that Walker turned all of them into killers. The tone of voice Lugo uses and the way Adams tries to defend Walker says it all, "What happened to us? I thought we were supposed to be the good guys!" They thought and hoped they were going to be in a typical story where the American good guys prevail and everyone gets out alright. The fact that they are in a deconstruction of that type of story becomes quite difficult to bear once they realize they are WrongGenreSavvy.
** When Walker hears the WhamLine "We were helping...", he replies, "What?" and then looks over at the mass of charred civilian bodies and simply says "Oh no..." You can practically hear his spirit breaking right there on the spot. You don't even need the words, really. Watch his eyes.
* Lugo's death. After a bout of failed CPR as Adams screams desperately at Walker to just ''let him fire'' on the civilians who murdered his fellow soldier, Walker - slowly and deliberately - closes Lugo's eyes and places his arms over his chest. None of it helps Lugo look any more peaceful. And then Walker has to make the choice to shoot the people they only came here to save or walk away from those that killed his subordinate. It's obvious either way that he and Adams are mired in utter despair.
** This ties into a very subtle tearjerker in regards to Adams' CharacterDevelopment - prior to the events at The Gate, he urges Walker to abandon Gould in favor of rescuing two civilians who would otherwise be executed. After Lugo's lynching at the hands of civilians, he's all-but ''begging'' Walker for permission to open fire on the unarmed crowd. The events in Dubai turned him from the type that [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight would disobey orders to save people]], to someone fully willing to slaughter a crowd of civilians for revenge.
*** The achievement you receive for doing so, the image shown on Steam and PS3 just sum up the moment perfectly. Check it out [[http://ps3trophies.varhyid.com/img/spec_ops_the_line/spec_ops_the_line_a_line_crossed.png here.]]
* Captain Martin Walker, leader, badass, soldier, "hero", sounding as though he's five years old because he's so broken by the weight of all his well-intentioned crimes.
** The final conversation with Shadow Konrad is notable not just because of that, but because even at the end, Walker is so desperate to deny the truth, he tries ''everything'' to convince Konrad not to shoot him and to absolve himself of his crimes.
-->'''Konrad''': I'm going to count to five; then I'm pulling the trigger. \\
'''Walker''': (''fearful'') You're not real. This is all in my head.\\
'''Konrad''': Are you sure? Maybe it's in mine! '''''One.'''''\\
'''Walker''': (''angry'') No. Everything, all this; it was your fault!\\
'''Konrad''': If that's what you believe then shoot me! '''''Two.'''''\\
'''Walker''': (''somber'') ''I- I didn't mean to hurt anybody...''\\
'''Konrad''': No-one ever does, Walker. '''''Three...'''''
* The ending where Walker dies in a SuicideByCop has him flash back to an earlier encounter he had with Konrad back in Afghanistan. Walker remembers that before the tragedy in Kabul (an off-screen incident), he was optimistically talking to Konrad about going home. In response to this Konrad sombrely scoffs at the idea; soldiers like them have a line they must cross. Home is a concept they have to abandon, men like them are ''lucky'' if they accomplish their duty before they die, but they inevitably will. Konrad concludes his statement by saying all he really wants is peace; the sadness in his voice speaks very poignantly of the trauma that soldiers like him and Walker suffer through, how tragic it is that they seek peace but can't find it. They have no "home" to go back to.
** It also shows you how in a way Konrad had always been Walker's hero. Even in his dying moments Walker can't let go of Konrad and the impact he had on his life. That flash back shows how much Walker wants to avoid crossing the line; Konrad's heroism is a line Walker ''wants'' to cross -- the prospect of being a good man like the Colonel excites him -- but the idea that the Colonel is right and that there is no positive end for a soldier of their breed terrifies him. In the end, perhaps trying to fulfil an impossible ideal destroyed Walker more than his vengefulness.
** During this same ending, you can see one of the soldiers standing over Walker shake his head sadly, apparently feeling both pity for the captain and regret at having to shoot someone he was sent to rescue. It's a heartbreaking echo of how Delta themselves felt when they killed (or were forced to kill) [=McPherson=], and it drives home the point that ''none'' of the soldiers who enter Dubai will walk out unscathed; not even those whose role was simply cleaning up the wreckage.
* The last piece of intel in the game is very simple: a short letter Konrad wrote to his son. It's less than twenty words long, but it says all it needs to say.
-->''Jeremy. Someday, people will tell you about your father. For that, I'm sorry. I love you.\\
-- Dad.''
** What makes it more tragic is that in ''{{Film/Apocalypse Now}}'' and ''{{Literature/Heart of Darkness}}'', the letters from both of the Kurtz characters were addressed to their loved ones to try and justify their actions, in order that they may find some form of vindication for their madness. In both of their stories, they also wanted the protagonist to be the bearer of those messages and tell those they loved the truth. Konrad neither justifies his actions, nor tells Walker to tell his son what really happened; a stark contrast to the characters he is inspired by. He seeks no vindication or absolution because he knows there can be none. This serves as a subtle hint that the story is not the downfall of Konrad but Walker. And, of course, in none of these three stories do any of these men get to repeat their heartfelt messages to those they love. All end up dying in a strange land thousands of miles from their homes - alone, insane and disgraced, in despair beyond redemption.
** The other piece of intel in the last level. It's titled "Poem for Elizabeth", implicitly written by Konrad for his wife.
-->''I've been forgetting when I am.\\
You should know,\\
You're always there.\\
\\
I keep repeating,\\
The next time, time next time.\\
You won't.\\
\\
I hate this lie the most.\\
Mostly I just hate\\
The want.''
* Even in the "happiest" ending where Walker goes home the future looks incredibly bleak for Walker. When asked how he survived the horrors of Dubai he says simply, "Who said I did?" Even if he goes home physically there is no guarantee he will ever emotionally or mentally recover from the evils he has witnessed, his body may be alive but his soul is more or less dead towards any sort of happy future.
** This is preceded by his call for Evac.
-->'''Walker:''' This is Captain Martin Walker... Requesting immediate evacuation of Dubai... Survivors... [[SurvivorGuilt one too many]]...
* The way that Walker discovers Konrad's corpse and the Shadow Konrad reveals that he was the personification of Walker's guilt all along is very sad on multiple levels. First and foremost, it basically invalidates all of Walker's accomplishments in one fell swoop. Secondly, it shows that Walker has been running away from his guilt for too long. Thirdly, his former commander, friend and hero is dead and here he was wasting all of his time demonizing the man. Lastly, he would have preferred facing an insane Colonel Kurtz-like figure to discovering that the whole thing was '''his''' downfall. Very few endings bring about such severe cases of the DespairEventHorizon.
* After Delta [[{{UnwittingPawn}} unwittingly dooms Dubai by helping Riggs blow up the water]], the Radioman chimes in, announcing what they've done. Being the game's [[{{BlackComedy}} very]] [[{{GallowsHumour}} dark]] and probably stoned off his ass PluckyComicRelief, you'd expect him to say something that takes the edge off. Instead, he simply says there's no way to sugar-coat what's happened, and announces that the water is gone. But what really sells it is the final line of his broadcast.
-->[[{{OOCIsSeriousBusiness}} "Everything's... everything's gonna be just fine..."]]
* Based on the gameplay and cutscenes alone, the Radio Man comes off as a rather demented individual, a JerkAss with moments of CrazyAwesome, but when you listen to the intel items he comes off as a much more tragic figure. In the intel items you learn that he cares deeply for the 33rd and Colonel Konrad and genuinely wants to be a calming presence for the Battalion, and wants to help uplift the spirits of the people of Dubai. What makes it so sad is that he starts out optimistically, but eventually his positive demeanor is crushed as the civil war escalates and Konrad's men have to do terrible things to maintain order. All of that insanity and GallowsHumor may very well be a coping mechanism so that the Radio Man can live with the horrors that he has witnessed.
* There's a brief scene after the helicopter crash where Adams turns to Walker and asks him to explain to him what will happen to Lugo after the mission's over. He quickly starts yelling at Walker and [[WhatTheHellHero berating him]] for the things he's put Adams and Lugo through, and just sounds so utterly broken and lost it's difficult to watch:
--> '''Adams:''' This whole mission is ''fucked''! [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone We just took out a tower of American troops.]]
--> '''Walker:''' They didn't leave us any choice.
--> '''Adams:''' ''You'' didn't leave us any choice! What the fuck ''happened'' to us, man?
* The endings are all custom made to have the player weep, but the "happiest" ending probably has the biggest tear jerker.
--> '''Soldier:''' What was it like? How did you survive all this?
--> '''Walker:''' ...who said I did?
** The ending in which Walker successfully slaughters the men sent to rescue him is upsetting as well. He picks up a radio from a dying soldier, and says his only line during the entire ending, the same line he said at the beginning of the game. "Gentlemen, welcome to Dubai." The look on his face as he slowly closes his eyes is straight up upsetting.
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