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Created in 1949 in Britain, ''Cluedo'' (''Clue'' in North America) is ''the'' iconic mystery board game. Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in North America) has been murdered in his own mansion and the six people that were present are now considered suspects. Players take the role of any of the six suspects and receive cards containing illustrations of the suspects, the rooms or the weapons. One card of each category is placed in an envelope. To play, the suspects must enter a room in the mansion and make a suggestion such as, "It was '''Mrs. Peacock''' in the '''kitchen''' with the '''candlestick!'''" A different player can reveal a card that matches the suggestion to disprove it. To win the game, a player must make an accusation that matches all three cards contained in the envelope. If the accusation is wrong, the player must sit out for the rest of the game. Note that a player can accuse his own character if he believes himself to be the murderer. [[FridgeLogic It doesn't make much sense if you think about it,]] though [[TheKillerInMe they could have had amnesia]].

The popularity of the game has caused it to be remade into a plethora of different locations and decades over the years. See ThemedStockBoardGame. It was popular enough to have its own [[Film/{{Clue}} film]], book series (each chapter therein involves Mr. Reginald Boddy and his color-coded guests participating in some activity or another, which would form the basis of a puzzle for the reader to solve, and the final story always involves Mr. Boddy's murder), video game adaptations, a game show, and a TeenDrama [[{{Series/Clue}} miniseries]] on TheHub. The film itself (starring TimCurry) is considered a cult classic. There is even an unofficial inversion of the game, ''Kill Doctor Lucky''.

Compare TenLittleMurderVictims, ''AndThenThereWereNone''.
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!!This board game contains examples of:
* AbsentMindedProfessor: Prof. Plum, in most versions.
* ApronMatron: Mrs. White.
* BallroomBlitz: The murder has a one in nine chance of being this.
* ColorCodedCharacters: The naming scheme partly does this.
* CorruptChurch: Rev. Green (the implications of this don't sit well for American audiences, supposedly, which is why he's turned into a CorruptCorporateExecutive "Mr. Green").
* DesignatedVictim: Dr. Black / Mr. Boddy.
* DolledUpInstallment: Many iterations of Clue were made based on popular franchises including TheOffice, 24, HarryPotter, TheSimpsons, SpongeBobSquarepants, Franchise/ScoobyDoo, Creator/AlfredHitchcock, Franchise/SherlockHolmes, Series/TheTwilightZone: Tower of Terror, and TheHauntedMansion.
* EagleEyeDetection: A necessary tool to weed out the killer, especially in the SNES video game version (you'll ''need'' pen and paper for that one).
* EconomyCast: Supplementary material and adaptations in other media will frequently try to explain why there are six and only six suspects in a BigFancyHouse where only one man lives that should have multiple servants at any given time. The most common is something to the effect of: Mr. Boddy was an eccentric millionaire who inherited the house from his parents but has no surviving family. One weekend, while the rest of the servants had the weekend off (with the exception of live-in maid Ms. White), he decides to throw a private party for his closest friends. While there, they become trapped in the house by a thunderstorm knocking trees over the road, blizzard, etc. While they're isolated on Boddy's estate, only then does one decide to kill him.
* FemmeFatale: Miss Scarlett
* GameplayAndStorySegregation: It is possible for a player to accuse themself; this is obviously to prevent the game from becoming unwinnable for that player.
* GenderEqualEnsemble: Three men (Green, Mustard, and Plum) and three women (White, Peacock, and Scarlet).
* GetYourMindOutOfTheGutter: Some players giggle at the implications of things like "Miss Scarlett with the candlestick in the Hall..."
* GrandeDame: Most versions of Mrs. Peacock.
* [[GreatWhiteHunter Great Yellow-hued Hunter]]: Col. Mustard.
* HotterAndSexier: In recent editions, Mrs White is depicted as a young woman. Granted, she doesn't look exactly "sexy", but considering that her older incarnation was an overweight ApronMatron...
* TheKillerInMe: Your character has a one in six chance of this trope.
* KnifeNut: Possibly. It is one of the ways Mr. Boddy could be killed off.
* LadyInRed: Miss Scarlett.
* MarketBasedTitle: "Clue" in North America, with Miss Scarlett losing a "T", Rev. Green being defrocked, and the distinguished Dr. Black given the pun name Mr. Boddy.
* MeaningfulName: The six suspects have their last names associated with the color they're wearing (peacocks are blue, scarlet is a shade of red, and so on). And of course, there's [[PunnyName Mr. Boddy]]. The British victim, Dr. Black, is sometimes illustrated as wearing black. Depending on what version you're playing, there may be various characters added in besides the main six, such as Emily Peach or Graham Slate-Grey.
* TheMovie: One in that rare genre, board-game-to-movie adaptations. What next, ''Man to Queen: A Pawn's Journey"?
** Not so rare. ''Ouija'', ''Monopoly'', ''Candy Land'', ''Risk'', and even another adaptation of ''Clue'' are all in development, and ''Film/{{Battleship}}'' came out in 2012. However, it is rare in that the 80s ''Clue'' is generally considered a good movie.
* MsFanservice: Miss Scarlett.
* MyCard: Parodied in the VCR Mystery Game. Mr. Green hands Professor Plum a card that says "Lyman Green, business."
* {{Novelization}}: There's a series of books based on the game. All of them give clues in the story and invite the reader to try to guess who did whatever crime occurred in the story. The crimes ranged from figuring out who stole something, to figuring out who ate a piece of pie, to (at least once per book as the GrandFinale) trying to find out who murdered Mr. Boddy. StatusQuoIsGod in these stories, so Mr. Boddy would always somehow survive and the criminal would either be forgiven or undiscovered entirely.
* OldDarkHouse
* PrettyInMink: Miss Peach (an expanded character in some versions), wears a white fox wrap in the VCR Mystery Game.
* PoisonedChaliceSwitcheroo: During the dinner scene in the ''Clue VCR Mystery Game''.
* PunBasedTitle: "Cluedo" is a pun on "Ludo" (an abbreviation of the Latin for "game"), the British name for the game known to most of the rest of the world as Pachisi (or Parcheesi, or Sorry!).
* PunnyName: Mr. Boddy - Body
* RaceLift: For a while in the '90s Miss Scarlett looked Asian.
** In some recent editions, Mr. Green is black.
* RedHerring: Sometimes wily players will suggest one of their own cards in their investigation in an attempt to mislead the other players into thinking he/she doesn't have it, and/or decrease their chances of being shown a card they've already seen.
* ReTool: Every few years, there is a new attempt to modernize the setting. It rarely ever lasts long, and it inevitably reverts to the GenteelInterbellumSetting.
* SecretUndergroundPassage
* SequelHook: In the miniseries.
* SinisterMinister: Rev. Green in the original version.
** CorruptCorporateExecutive: The North American version made Mr. Green an oil tycoon, making his name into a subtle pun on his wealth.
* SouthernBelle: Miss Peach (an expanded character in some versions), is portrayed as this in the VCR Mystery Game. A MeaningfulName, since Georgia (the state, not the country) is famous for its peaches.
* TamperingWithFoodAndDrink: The VCR Mystery Game includes a dinner scene in Boddy mansion where almost all of the guests end up poisoning something that is served at dinner.
* TomatoInTheMirror: When the winning player realizes that they were the actual culprit.
* {{Tontine}}: In the VCR Mystery Game version, [[DesignatedVictim Mr. Boddy]] does a variant in his [[spoiler:latest]] will where the last surviving person among those who attended the reading would claim the entire inheritance. Naturally, all sorts of attempted murders occur.
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!!The book series provides examples of the following:
* AbsentMindedProfessor: Professor Plum.
* AmusementParkOfDoom: Subverted. Mr. Boddy installs what appears to be one of these in his Ball Room in one chapter, but the dangers, which appear to kill five of the six suspects, are in fact all Hollywood special effects, and nobody is actually harmed (in fact, the five who "died" willingly go through the ride a second time afterward and love it). [[spoiler:Except for Mrs. Peacock, who was the last one left in the car and was so distressed by the incident that she spent the rest of the weekend in bed.]]
* AprilFoolsPlot: The first book has a chapter set on April Fool's Day, in which Mr. Boddy and the guests all play pranks on each other.
* BackwardsFiringGun: "Midnight Phone Calls" has a chapter titled "The Guest Who Couldn't Shoot Straight". While hunting an escaped rhinoceros, the six guests are armed with revolvers, two that only shoot to the left, two that only shoot to the right, and two that work normally. At the end, one of the first four revolvers is pointed directly at the rhino, but apparently hits one of the other guests instead. (As usual, it turns out the "victim" isn't really dead - the bullet hit his own revolver's handle, and he fainted from fear.)
* BookcasePassage: The second book features one in the study. It's also linked to one behind the fireplace and one behind the red chair, but doesn't say if it's linked to the one leading to the Kitchen.
* CatchPhrase
** '''Colonel Mustard:''' I challenge you to a duel!
** '''Mrs. Peacock:''' How rude!
* CloudCuckoolander: Pretty much everybody in their own way, but especially Colonel Mustard and Professor Plum.
* ConcealingCanvas: Mr. Boddy's safe in the Study is hidden behind a duck painting.
* TheDitz: Professor Plum.
* EasilyForgiven: Everyone, all the time.
* FemmeFatale: Miss Scarlett, to the point where Mr. Boddy uses the trope name to describe her in one introduction, adding that "she takes it as a compliment".
* GrandeDame: Mrs. Peacock
* HurricaneOfPuns: Oh so many, in practically every chapter.
* JackassGenie: Mr. Boddy owns a crystal ball with one of these in it. The genie hates the guests, and is always rude to them and gives them scrambled answers when they ask (such as anagrams of "Get lost" and "Fooled you"). When they smash the crystal, the genie gets loose and goes around knocking out most of them.
* KillerRobot: In one story, Mr. Boddy gets a robot butler. One guests uses it to their advantage by ordering it to kill another guest.
* LethalChef: Book 3's chapter "Bad Taste" has the guests deciding to make lunch for Mrs. White and Mr. Boddy, and while all their creations are horrible, one of them is nearly fatal. Fortunately, Mr. Boddy had bottles of stomach medicine on hand.
* NotQuiteDead: EVERYONE who "dies" in this series turns out to be this. Except for poor Pitty-Pat, Mr. Boddy's pet bird who died in the first chapter of the first book.
* ThePasswordIsAlwaysSwordfish: One of the mysteries revolved around the guests trying to figure out the password to the display case that held Mr. Boddy's latest treasure. It turned out to be, of course, "swordfish."
* PunnyName: Mr. Boddy's relatives, when they're mentioned, usually have these, such as his aunt Annie Boddy and his cousin Noah Boddy.
* TheScrooge: Mr. Green.
* SecretPath: Mr. Boddy has multiple secret passages in his mansion, most prominently the two that between the Kitchen and the Study, and the Conservatory and the Lounge, also featured in the board game. Others are discussed throughout the series, though they're usually only used in one chapter and forgotten about.
* TheyKilledKennyAgain: Mr. Boddy is killed in the final chapter of each book, then explains how he survived in the introduction of the next book.
* ThirteenIsUnlucky: Mr. Boddy was born on Friday the 13th. One story, set on Friday the 13th, involved the guests developing various phobias.
* WithFriendsLikeThese: In the books Boddy is fully aware that his friends regularly try to kill him on multiple occasions. The problem is he's too terrified to ''not'' be friends with them if ''this'' is how they treat him on friendly terms.