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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/twin_peaks_revival_poster_laura_palmer.jpg]]

->''"Through the darkness of future past, \\
the magician longs to see. \\
One chants out between two worlds...\\
fire, walk with me."''

A GenreBusting early-nineties television series created by Creator/DavidLynch and Mark Frost. Starting out as a hybrid CrimeTimeSoap[=/=]DetectiveDrama, it quickly took off for parts unknown with a pervasive supernatural element. The titular Twin Peaks is a LovecraftCountry, and the series revealed itself to be an OccultDetective story with very surreal elements, that smacked of off-kilter MagicRealism. Basically, it had a little bit of everything.

The plot kicks off with the discovery of a teen cadaver, "wrapped in plastic", one Laura Palmer. Eccentric FBI agent Dale Cooper responds to the matter in Twin Peaks, Washington, where he's teamed with the trusty-if-skeptical Sheriff Harry S. Truman. With the arrival of the Feds, further scandals start to bubble to the surface along with this supposedly unprecedented crime. Cooper, meanwhile, finds himself visited by enigmatic visions and dreams pointing to [[HumanoidAbomination the real]] [[TheyWalkAmongUs culprit]]. The show features a rather large and colourful cast with about as many subplots as there are characters, and the story contains quite a few examples of RedHerringTwist and PowersThatBe. Nothing can be taken at face value in this story, not even the basic premise.

The plot's focus shifts partway through Season Two, as the showrunners never really expected -- or [[WritingByTheSeatOfYourPants even intended]] -- for the show to run that long. To justify Cooper's [[TheMainCharactersDoEverything continued presence]], an old foe from his past arrives in town to menace him in cryptic ways. The two plot threads eventually dovetail into one other. The 1992 movie ''Film/TwinPeaksFireWalkWithMe'' (which functions as [[TemporalParadox both a prequel]] ''and'' [[TemporalParadox a sequel]]), though infamously does not resolve any of the plot lines left hanging in the series.

As the series was a huge ratings draw for a time, it naturally influenced and inspired several others across all media. Aside from being the first live-action TV series to have feature film-quality production, it also paved the way for shows like ''Series/TheSopranos'' (which stole its dream sequences), ''{{Series/Carnivale}}'' (whose own showrunners/creators drew heavily on the mystical Manichaean themes and crypto-Masonic imagery that were Mark Frost's signatures in ''Twin Peaks'') and ''Series/TheXFiles''. As far as video games influenced by ''Twin Peaks'' go, they range from the obvious like ''VideoGame/DeadlyPremonition'' and ''VideoGame/AlanWake'', to the less so like ''VideoGame/NelsonTethersPuzzleAgent'' and even ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening''.

The existing series finally saw a [=BluRay=] boxset release in mid-2014, which contains an exclusive 90 minute compilation of scenes from ''Fire Walk with Me'' edited together (by Lynch himself) into a quasi-film called 'The Missing Pieces'.

After years of rumors of a return, a sequel series titled ''Twin Peaks: The Return'' premiered in Showtime in 2017. As referenced in a cryptic line from the first episode, we return to Twin Peaks 25 years later. Lynch and Frost returned as showrunners along with a large section of the original cast. The resulting season majorly ups the surrealism factor of the story and provides a final resolution (such as it is) to the series.

'''Character tropes go on to the [[Characters/TwinPeaks Characters Sheet]].'''

----
!!"I've got to find out what kind of tropes these are--they're really something..."

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:A-D]]

* EightiesHair: Mullets and perms, as far as the eye can see[[note]]which, to be fair, are two styles that remained popular well into the early '90s[[/note]]. Averted with Audrey, who has a very '90s haircut.
* AbusiveParents: Played solemnly for tragedy and terror, mixed in with a lot of RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil. Makes all the movie all the more horrifying when [[spoiler:Laura can never tell when she is talking to her "real" father or to BOB]].
* AdultFear: The disappearance and murder of Laura Palmer, and the subsequent disintegration of her parents' lives.
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Discussed when Shelly reminisces about how cool Leo seemed when she was in high school, with his leather jacket and cool car
* AloneWithThePsycho: [[spoiler:Maddy]]'s final scene.
* AmbiguousDisorder
** In the first episode, Audrey Horne comes across this way, which coupled with her mentally disabled brother makes the Horne family seem [[DysfunctionJunction particularly dysfunctional]] right off the bat.
** Nadine's has some obvious mental problems, exhibited by her violent mood swings and paranoid behavior. She seems to have made a lot of ground by The Return.
* AmbiguousSituation: Most of the accepted lore about the supernatural elements of the series is pieced together from [[AllThereInTheManual the scripts, the extra material, the canon spinoff books and audio media]], and a great deal of [[UnreliableNarrator in-universe hearsay]], with most of it being inferred by fans at best. The ending of season two, in particular, is incredibly ambiguous, save for the fact it's clearly [[BolivianArmyEnding dark and unhappy]].
* AnAxeToGrind: Leo Johnson and Bobby [[spoiler:at the end of the first season]] and [[spoiler:halfway through the second]].
* AnotherDimension: Two of them -- the White Lodge and the Black Lodge. You ''don't'' want to go to the second one. Notably, the series never clarifies any visually or tonally identifiable difference, or exactly [[MindScrew which one we're seeing at any given time]].
* AntiHero: Bobby, Shelly, MIKE, Jacobi (kind of) and Laura Palmer.
* AnythingThatMoves:
** Laura Palmer. [[spoiler:Considering her part-time job...]]
** Also, BOB, apparently.
* ArbitrarySkepticism: For an FBI agent who relies heavily on dreams and visions as part of his investigative technique and decides which of several leads in a case to pursue by tossing rocks at a glass bottle until it smashes, Cooper is remarkably reluctant to ask the Log Lady's log about what it knows about the case.
** To a certain extent, this applies to Sheriff Truman as well. Despite being a part of a [[spoiler:secret society that is sworn to protect Twin Peaks from an unknowable, eldritch evil lurking in the woods outside of town]], he seems fairly skeptical of Cooper's dream-based reasoning.
* ArchEnemy: Windom Earle to Dale Cooper.
* ArcWelding: ''The Return'' makes sense of many of the unresolved plot points from the first two seasons... Well, it makes sense [[MindScrew in same the way that any David Lynch work can]].
* ArcWords:
** In the original run: "Fire walk with me." To a lesser extent, "the owls are [[OminousOwl not what they seem]]".
** In ''The Return'': "We live inside a dream."
* ArsonMurderAndJaywalking: "Ladies and gentlemen, Laura Palmer is dead. [[spoiler:Jacques Renault]] is dead. Ronette Pulaski and [[spoiler:Leo Johnson]] are both in comas. [[spoiler:Waldo the bird]] is dead."
* ArtisticLicenseLaw: There are several points in the show, notably when the Twin Peaks Sheriff's Department search Jaques Renault's house, that police work is overtly simplified for the purpose of storytelling. There is little to no talk of search or arrest warrants in the first season of the show, which makes sense, since having to follow those rules would completely derail the dramatic flow of the show. This gets a possible lampshade later on when it is revealed that the local judge travels around in a Winnebago from city to city in his district to hold court, so [[spoiler:Leland Palmer's]] arraignment and [[spoiler:Leo Johnson's]] competency hearing all have to be jammed into one day of hearings.
* ArtisticLicenseReligion: In the last episode, Ben Horne, displaying the pile of religious scriptures he means to study, follow "the Koran, the Bhagavad Gita" by picking up another single volume which he identifies as "the Talmud." Literature/TheTalmud would, at a minimum, take up a trunk.
* AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence: Hinted to happen to Laura at the end of TheMovie.
* AscendedExtra: Ascended Actor, anyway. Sheryl Lee was originally cast to play Laura's corpse and limited flashbacks, but Lynch liked her so much he created the character of Maddy for her, [[RealLifeWritesThePlot feeding into BOB's modus operandi as revealed by the movie.]]
** BOB is perhaps the ultimate example of this, being an Ascended Stagehand. Frank Silva received the role of BOB after a filming error by series creator, David Lynch in the pilot. Lynch liked the scene with Silva in the pilot, and decided to make him into a recurring character.
* AsLongAsThereIsEvil: Invoked by Albert when trying to explain the existence of BOB.
* AssholeVictim: Leo Johnson
* AstralCheckerboardDecor: The chevron floor pattern in the Red Room fits the spirit of the trope.
* TheAtoner: MIKE claims to be this, but it's really difficult to say.
* BackForTheFinale: The Log Lady, Ronette Pulaski, Maddy and Laura, Leland and Sarah Palmer all appear in the final episode after significant absences.
* BadassBaritone: Big Ed, whose voice is significantly deeper than anybody else in the cast.
* TheBadGuyWins: Implied by the BolivianArmyEnding of the second season.
* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Windom Earle's quest to [[spoiler:find the Black Lodge]] goes poorly for him.
* BecomingTheMask:
** Ben Horne starts a campaign of saving the pine weasel as a way to derail Catherine's real estate plans. Somewhere along the way he actually starts to care, and this leads to extensive soul-searching on his part.
** Denise Byrone became transgender after an undercover operation that required her to cross-dress.
* BeethovenWasAnAlienSpy: ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'' introduces American history from the days of Lewis and Clark and even well before as a conflict between figures who are proxies for the White and Black Lodges, shown as a long-running hidden battle between good and evil which includes such figures as {{UsefulNotes/Lewis and Clark}}, {{UsefulNotes/Aaron Burr}}, {{UsefulNotes/Richard Nixon}}, and {{UsefulNotes/L Ron Hubbard}}. Many of these historical figures are [[GoodIsNotNice Not on the Side]] [[LightIsNotGood you'd expect they'd be]].
* BiTheWay: In the companion book ''The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer,'' Laura mentions having slept with both Josie Packard and her pimp/madame Blackie O'Reilly, Ronnette Polaski, and a lot of other women.
* BlackComedy: Windom Earle is a FUNNY guy, even if he is a complete psychopath. It also helps that most of the humor is [[KickTheSonOfABitch at Leo's expense.]] The sequel season plays around with even more BlackComedy elements, such as a DeathBySex at the hands of something that looks like TheGreys and a clumsy, mentally addled tenant stumbling on a grim but almost comically exaggerated murder scene in her neighbor's apartment.
* BlackmailIsSuchAnUglyWord: Bobby Briggs prefers "business proposition".
* BlackScreenOfDeath: ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'' uses a text-based version of a DiscretionShot: [[spoiler:Briggs]] recounts how he goes to approach Cooper on his return from the Lodge, [[spoiler:and never writes another word or is ever heard from again]].
* BlessedWithSuck: Only two kinds of people can see BOB's true face, and thereby have the power to stop his savagery - the gifted and the damned. One of the series' main remaining mysteries is [[spoiler:which category Cooper falls into]].
* BlueAndOrangeMorality: The Black Lodge, who are strict about their own world's rules but clearly have just a ''slightly'' different set of values than everyone else.
* BolivianArmyEnding: "How's Annie?"
* BookEnds: An exchange takes place between Bobby, Shelley and a German waitress in the diner in the pilot episode, which is repeated almost verbatim in the final episode.
* BunnyEarsLawyer: Some of Agent Cooper's investigation methods are ''unique'' to say the least. Surprisingly this is tolerated and even factored into serious case work by the officers of the Twin Peak's sheriff's department, who have probably never seen an FBI agent before and don't know any better.
* CampbellCountry: Twin Peaks itself and its surroundings, of course.
* CaptainsLog: Agent Cooper's tape recorder messages for Diane.
* CatchPhrase:
** "Harry, you're all right."
** "Damn good coffee."
** "Diane..."
** Major Briggs: "That's classified."
* CallARabbitASmeerp: From the subtitles at the end of ''Fire Walk With Me'':
--> '''Philip Gerard / The Man From Another Place:''' "BOB, I want all my... Garmonbozia (pain and suffering)."
* CelebrityParadox: One of the bands featured in Season 3, Trouble, has David Lynch's son and Dean Hurley, a sound designer for the show, as members.
* CharacterizationMarchesOn: Cooper is noticeably more standoffish and reserved in the pilot episode than in every subsequent episode. Granted, he's meeting everyone in the town for the first time, but he's already become much more friendly and gregarious by the following episode, which takes place the next day. It also makes sense for him to try and get as much information as he can while the case is still a little warm, given how much harder the location and that era's technology would make things.
* ChekhovsGun: Andy's shooting lessons.
* TheChessmaster: Windom Earle is a rather literal example of this trope. He [[spoiler:determines his victims through]] a game of chess played against Cooper, and even at one point ''dresses a victim as a giant chess piece'' before [[spoiler:shooting him with a crossbow]]. By contrast, Pete Martell, who is even better at chess, but lacks the ambition or the capacity for cruelty to really be this trope.
* ChildByRape: The orphaned boy Little Nicky was conceived from a rape and his mother [[DeathByChildbirth died in childbirth]].
* TheChurch: With a few exceptions such as Deputy Hawk, most of Twin Peaks' locals are unambiguously Christian with funerals and weddings conducted by Laura's ex-Sunday school teacher, a clergyman whose polite manner evokes TheVicar of British rural settings. The only overtly devout or obsessively religious member of the community, however, is the mystically-inclined Jesuit Catholic Major Briggs.
* CliffHanger: Both original seasons ended this way. In Season 1, the final scene ended with [[spoiler:Cooper being shot by an unknown assailant]], while Season 2 ended with [[spoiler:half the cast killed in an explosion while Cooper got trapped in the Black Lodge, with BOB possessing his body and laughing maniacally in triumph]].
* CliffhangerCopout: Episode Three in the first season ends with Agent Cooper having a dream from which he learns [[MysteryArc who killed Laura Palmer]]. Cooper immediately wakes up from the dream to call up Sheriff Truman to tell him that he knows who the murderer is but teases that the answer could "wait 'till morning." Come the next episode, taking place that following morning, Cooper recaps all the events from the dream that ended with Laura Palmer whispering the name of her killer in his ear. Then, once he's asked who the killer is, Cooper nonchalantly responds "I don't remember."
* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}:
** Agent Cooper, who talks to a tape recorder while hanging upside-down by his boots in his room. His superior, Gordon Cole -- played by the real {{Cloudcuckoolander}} of the series, Creator/DavidLynch himself -- was obviously an influence.
--->'''Cole''': COOPER, TODAY YOU REMIND ME OF A SMALL MEXICAN CHIHUAHUA.
** On the Twin Peaks side, Margaret (the Log Lady), the source for at least one of the page quotes and the following:
--->"Wait for the tea! The fish aren't running!"
** Nadine, though played for a kind of awkward tragedy.
** To a lesser extent, Audrey, especially in the earlier episodes.
* {{Cloudcuckooland}}: The FBI, judging by the agents that we see.
* ColorMotif: More day-to-day scenes usually involve some variant of brown or beige. Green hints at deception and illusion - Twin Peaks' outward face is represented by its green logo and sign, and [[spoiler: the Lodge Ring]] is green. Not to mention Dougie's jacket and the green glow that hovers over Dougie's coworker's face as [[spoiler: Cooper, in the form of Dougie]] calls his bluff. Red usually turns up suggesting danger and sexuality, most obviously in the curtains of One Eyed Jacks and the Black Lodge, as well as the glimpse of the Black Lodge in the casino and the red door of Dougie's house.... not to mention the existence of a dangerous, psychotic gangster named Red. You can't trust blue either, which seems to be associated with BOB - he wears denim, is often cloaked in blue light, and in the movie, a possessed [[spoiler:Leland]] laments the appearance of MIKE, BOB's nemesis, "out of the blue".
** WaterIsBlue, and almost always associated with death.
** Teresa Banks and Laura Palmer's murders were [[SpySpeak "Blue Rose Cases"]].
** Major Garland Briggs goes around everywhere in his blue dress uniform, and formerly worked on Project Blue Book.
** "Questions in a World of Blue" is the song Laura cries to shortly before [[spoiler:her demise at the hands of BOB]].
* CompanionCube: Margaret's log, which arguably [[spoiler:allows her to communicate with her dead husband, who now inhabits the Black Lodge and is probably Jurgen Prochnow]].
* ConcealmentEqualsCover: Averted in the third season. Two criminals are trying to escape from an altercation with another criminal by rushing off in their van. He sprays the van with bullets from a machine pistol and they both end up dying.
* ConspiracyKitchenSink: "The Secret History of Twin Peaks" doubles down on this including the FantasyKitchenSink the series already had, including everything from UFO's to Merryweather Lewis's death and nuclear waste on Twin Peaks, to make things worst is left unclear how much does any conspiracy plays with the others and how much does each side knows, for instance the FBI seems to know pretty well about the mystical elements meanwhile the USAF knows about alien life.
** Both worlds seem to be mostly unrelated and aside from a particularly traumatic event the "Alien life" side of things is still mundane compared to the rest.
* ConsultingMisterPuppet: The Log Lady.
* CoolCar: Leo's red muscle car. It helped win him Shelly's affections when she was in high school.
* CrazyPeoplePlayChess: Windom Earle. When he's not killing people and stuffing their corpses, he enjoys a good chess game. Averted with Pete Martell, who is the best chess player around and is a perfectly sane and kindly old fella.
* CreatorCameo: Cooper's superior, Special Agent Gordon Cole, is played -- very loudly -- by Creator/DavidLynch.
* CriminalMindGames: The Windom Earle arc. Interestingly, the most elaborate and traditionally SerialKiller-esque aspect of his mind games (the chess game, in which he kills a victim for everyone of Cooper's pieces he takes) [[spoiler:is actually just a diversion from his ''real'' goal.]]
* CrypticConversation[=/=]WordSaladHorror: Cooper's encounters with the GrotesqueGallery.
-->'''The Man From Another Place:''' She's my cousin. But doesn't she look almost exactly like Laura Palmer?\\
'''Cooper:''' But she is Laura Palmer. Are you Laura Palmer?\\
'''Not-Laura:''' I feel like I know her, but sometimes my arms bend back.\\
'''The Man:''' She's filled with secrets.
* CreepyChild: Mrs. Chalfont's grandson is creepy in the TV series.
** Even more so in the movie.
** Those familiar with David Lynch might find the grandson creepy (or alternately, hilarious) because he looks and acts ''identical'' to him, right down to the voice inflections and mannerisms. Which makes sense, as he's played by Lynch's son Austin.
* CreepyJazzMusic: Jazz is always the soundtrack of the Black Lodge, a location that is nothing if not sinister. The last episode of Season 2 takes this up to eleven with an extended scene of Jimmy Scott singing a jazzy ballad that is incredibly unnerving.
* TheCuckoolanderWasRight: Played straight with the Log Lady and several other characters. Averted by Cooper in that everyone takes his far-out theories seriously anyway (except for Albert, the only person who actually ''does'' have good reason to believe him).
* CuttingTheKnot: When confronted with a puzzle box that opens to reveal more puzzle boxes (in the vein of a Matryoshka doll), Catherine, Pete, and [[spoiler:Andrew]] all try their hands at solving it. The first box is opened by accident (Pete dropped it), the second is opened by inputting a code, and the third is opened because [[spoiler:Andrew]] got tired of the charade and smashed it open with a rolling pin. The final box is opened by the same character getting similarly frustrated and shooting it.
** When Truman gives Cooper Laura's diary in the first episode, Truman repeatedly mentions that they need to find the key to open the diary. Cooper responds by successfully prying the diary open with his bare hands.
* DarkIsNotEvil: The inhabitants of the Black Lodge could not by any stretch of the imagination be called good (they ''eat pain and suffering'', after all) but some of them do help Cooper with his investigation on numerous occasions.
* DeadlyPrank: Windom Earle does this sort of thing a lot.
* DeathBySex: Three of BOB's victims include Teresa Banks, Laura Palmer and Ronette Pulaski (the latter of whom survives), all of whom were sex workers.
* {{Deconstruction}}: A woman backstabbing her mentally ill lover? [[spoiler:She's trying to obtain her best friend's diary to present it to police.]] Instead of being a pure [[BlackAndWhiteMorality black and white, with bad people doing bad things with bad intention and good people doing good things with good intention]], [[MoralityKitchenSink bad people do good things for bad reasons, good people do bad things for good reasons, bad people do bad things for good reasons, and the full spectrum of morality exists]]. There are truly good characters, flawed characters with good intentions, redeemable characters with bad intentions, [[spoiler:[[BreadEggsMilkSquick and evil demonic beings]]]]. Not to mention that the MagicRealism prevalent in many soap operas is turned on its head: [[spoiler:the supernatural elements generally include [[NightmareFuel incredibly horrifying]] [[EldritchAbomination eldritch abominations]] and other [[MindScrew surrealist elements]].]]
* DeliberatelyMonochrome: The White Lodge appears in this color palette, to distinguish itself from the more colorful Black Lodge. Confoundingly, [[MindScrew a prologue sequence set in the in-universe version of the "real" world also appears in the same]] DeliberatelyMonochrome filter.
* DemonicPossession: [[spoiler:Leland]] and finally [[spoiler:Cooper]]. In all likelihood, [[Music/DavidBowie Agent Jeffries]] as well.
** And to a smallish degree, [[spoiler:Laura]]. Or at least [[RapeAsDrama something's in there.]]
** By contrast, Gerard and [[spoiler:the old bellhop]], who are inhabited by much more benevolent spirits. Maybe.
* DemotedToExtra:
** Johnny Horne, Audrey's brother, appears in a few early episodes before disappearing until a late season 2 cameo.
** Ditto for Sylvia Horne who appears in the first three episodes then only subverts ChuckCunninghamSyndrome by appearing in the last episode.
* DepravedBisexual:
** Josie Packard and Blackie O'Reilly are confirmed as this in ''The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer'', and there is heavy hinting for Blackie in the show as well. Although Josie, at least, is a pretty complicated character, and her apparent bisexuality is never played for any particular discomfort or associated with her moral failings.
** Leo Johnson's ''Fleshworld'' ad.
* DidWeJustHaveTeaWithCthulhu: Cooper understands his dream in episode 2 is significant. It takes some time, however, before he realizes [[spoiler:its characters are extra-dimensional monsters who feed on human suffering.]]
* DisguisedInDrag
** It's fairly obvious (and not at all odd, considering the show) that the stout Japanese businessman with the impressive moustache is really a woman but it's not obvious that she's [[spoiler:Catherine Martell]].
** Dennis/Denise Bryson, being of AmbiguousGenderIdentity, can pull off the sleek DEA agent look as well as the sultry waitress look without breaking a sweat. In fact, this is how she initially discovered her different feelings, during an undercover operation that required her to dress as a woman.
* DisposableSexWorker: Averted - the main plot arc is the investigation of who killed Laura Palmer, and Laura Palmer is one of the most developed and fleshed-out characters in the show despite being both a sex worker and a PosthumousCharacter (she later serves as the protagonist of TheMovie). Nor is Ronette Pulaski treated as any less human because of her profession.
* DistressedDamsel: Many, but above all ''Laura''.
* TheDitz: Lucy and Andy.
* DoesNotKnowHerOwnStrength: Nadine, after returning from the hospital (after [[spoiler:attempting suicide]]).
* TheDogBitesBack: Parodied when [[spoiler:Leo]] gets hold of the remote control for his shock collar... and points it at Windom Earle like a weapon, without realising that he's still wearing the shock collar himself. HilarityEnsues.
* DonutMessWithACop: [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/copslovedonuts.jpg "A policeman's dream!"]]
* DoomedByCanon: [[PosthumousCharacter Laura Palmer]] is the main character of [[TheMovie the prequel film]]. The movie's ending is a bit of a ForegoneConclusion.
* DoubleMeaningTitle: TheMovie, ''Fire Walk With Me''. The title refers to Laura's own troubled journey, but also has another meaning. [[spoiler: Both Laura (revealed in ''The Return'' as the ChosenOne) and BOB the BigBad are associated with fire, alluding to how fire can both protect and destroy - the title refers to commanding its protective fire, made all the more symbolic by Laura's HeroicSacrifice at the end]].
* DoubleStandardRapeDivineOnMortal: Maybe. BOB's fellow Lodge creatures don't always seem to care that he's been raping and murdering young women left and right. [[BlueAndOrangeMorality Just that he won't front them any of the suffering he takes from his victims]]. On the other hand, MIKE claims to have "seen the face of God" and become TheAtoner, but then, he could be lying. MIKE's motivation is one of the greatest mysteries of the show.
* DownerEnding: [[TheRevival For 25 years,]] the season two finale. [[spoiler:Half the cast is dead and Cooper's soul is trapped in the Black Lodge while BOB makes use of his possessed body]]. It was not the intended finale, and the uncut version of ''Fire Walk With Me'' was meant to offer a bit more closure, though if anything it made things [[GainaxEnding even more unclear]]. Released to the public on the blu-ray set, it gives a few more tantalizing minutes after the end of the season finale, but the DownerEnding remained essentially unresolved until season three came along.
* TheDragon: Hank, first to Mr. Horne and later to Jean Renault.
** Also, Leo to Windom Earle.
*** Jonathan, and later Miss Jones, to Thomas Eckhardt.
* DragonLady: Josie.
* DragonTheirFeet: [[spoiler:Miss Jones carries out Thomas Eckhardt's order to assassinate Sheriff Truman despite Eckhardt's death.]]
* DrJerk: Albert.
* DreamingTheTruth
* DreamSequence: Cooper's is a famous example.
* DrivingQuestion: The Laura Palmer case.
* DroneOfDread:
** In episode 6 of the first season, during the scene of the conversation with the log lady at her house, a low rumbling drone is heard in the soundtrack.
** Near the end of season two, a droning tone fills the air as some characters have uncontrollable spasms. Exactly what it implies is never made clear.
* DrugsAreBad: A heavily implied (but not quite {{anvilicious}}) aesop. While drugs are indeed a major part of Laura's downfall, her drug use doesn't exactly lead to her problems so much as result from them.
* DualityMotif: Used extensively throughout the original series and ''The Return''. Among other things, the town is called ''Twin'' Peaks, there are two different pairs of characters named Mike and Bob, and there are two characters played by Sheryl Lee, [[spoiler: both of whom are murdered by a possessed Leland ("It is happening again").]] ''The Return'' extends this, with the main plot revolving around [[spoiler: two different Coopers walking on Earth]].
* DueToTheDead: Donna is noticeably uncomfortable when Audrey confronts her about Laura's past, as she sees posthumously keeping up her end of their friendship as an obligation to NeverSpeakIllOfTheDead.
* DyingAsYourself: [[spoiler:Leland Palmer]]
* DysfunctionJunction: Laura was the prom queen and overall darling of the town. [[spoiler:She was also heavily into cocaine and BDSM prostitution. Plus, you know, she's being repeatedly raped by her demonically-possessed father.]]

[[/folder]]

[[folder:E-H]]

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Or rather, ''lack'' of weirdness. The pilot's tone is much less loopy than the series, and lacks the fantastical elements that start showing up in the very next episode. The townsfolk are just slightly quirky as well, as opposed to a batch of nutcases, with the exception of Nadine, which is easy to write off as a unique situation since everyone seems to regard her as an ''actual'' mental case.
* EccentricTownsfolk: Everyone in ''Twin Peaks'' is weird in some way ranging from the fact Nadine is an amateur inventor with super strength to the Log Lady. Oddly, one of the compliments the show frequently got was that by including all these peculiarities, they actually felt more like real people than many more mundane dramas.
* TheEighties: Although both the series and ''Fire Walk With Me'' were released during the 90s, and done in a style filled with visual reference to TheFifties, both are set during the tail end of the 1980s.
* EldritchLocation: The Black and White Lodges are the clearest example. Also applies to the convenience store in ''The Return'' - it's pitch-dark and decaying, infested with Woodsmen, is BiggerOnTheInside and has a staircase that leads back outside in a different location entirely.
* EnemyWithin: [[spoiler:BOB to Leland, and later Cooper]].
* EnergyBeings: It's implied that BOB and other Black Lodge inhabitants can travel through electric wires when they're not possessing people.
* EvenTheRatsWontTouchIt: The food at the local hospital looks (and smells) [[{{Squick}} downright disgusting.]]
* EvilIsNotAToy: [[spoiler:Windom Earl]] has been seeking the Black Lodge for decades in order to harness its evil power for his own ends. He doesn't last a day in the place before overstepping his welcome and suffering a FateWorseThanDeath.
* EvilTastesGood: Averted. If you didn't already find creamed corn disturbing, you will now.
* EvilTwin: [[spoiler:Of Agent Cooper, and possibly the Man From Another Place and Laura]], within the Black Lodge.
-->'''The Man From Another Place:''' The next time you see me, I won't be me.\\
'''The Man From Another Place:''' (''the next time they meet'') Doppelganger! Doppelganger!
* ExpositoryHairstyleChange: Leland Palmer's hair turns white in the first episode of the second season, at which point he ceases to be paralyzed by grief.
--> "God, I feel like singing! Come on, everybody, and just get happy!"
* EyepatchOfPower: Nadine. Good old casually-600-pound-pressing Nadine.
* FailureIsTheOnlyOption: Averted due to ExecutiveMeddling. Lynch wanted to take as long as possible to solve the murder.
* TheFairFolk: The residents of the Black Lodge. Okay, so they're not really "fairies", but they still fit the bill.
* FakingTheDead: [[spoiler:Catherine Martell]] and [[spoiler:her brother, Andrew Packard]].
* FantasyAmericana: One of the defining examples, with a sleepy Washington town being the epicenter of a cosmic struggle between good and evil, and the surrounding forest being TheLostWoods, host to a menagerie of terrifying spirits who would give the worst of TheFairFolk a run for their money. ''The Return'' expands the scope to include the rest of the United States, most prominently Las Vegas and South Dakota.
* FantasyPantheon: Though this is never commented on by the townsfolk of Twin Peaks or the law enforcement and visitors who show up there, the Lodge creatures are functionally a pantheon of evil deities for the purposes of the series' narrative, with some of their wilder and more sinister escapades resembling existing mythological stories about gods and titans at their worst moments. Although their actual status may be somewhere between demons and TheFairFolk.
* FatalFamilyPhoto: A security guard at the Twin Peaks bank discovers that his wife has just given birth to a boy [[spoiler:seconds before a massive explosion apparently kills everyone.]]
* FateWorseThanDeath: Being possessed by BOB. Being raped by BOB. Being trapped in the Black Lodge for twenty-five years that could either go back in time, forward in time, or completely nonlinearly, and [[NarniaTime may not even equate to human world time.]]
* FemmeFatale / FilleFatale: Audrey Horne is on the border, since she's 18.
* FinalExamFinale: Everybody comes BackForTheFinale, [[AnotherDimension including the dead characters]] and [[PutOnABus characters still in town who'd not been seen for ages.]] The show asks you to remember Jacoby describing a smell like scorched engine oil, what Hawk said about the [[EvilDoppelganger Dweller on the Threshold]], and that [[OutOfFocus Ronette Pulaski and Sarah Palmer ever existed.]] Of course, [[spoiler:[[CliffHanger Cooper's still in the Black Lodge, everybody's in mortal peril, and the last shot of the second season is BOB in Cooper's body laughing about the turn of fortune...]]]] ''[[{{Revival}} for 25 years]]''.
* FiveManBand: The police department.
** TheHero: Cooper
** TheLancer: Truman
** TheBigGuy: Andy and Hawk
** TheSmartGuy: Albert
** TheChick: Lucy
* FoilerFootage: The scene of [[spoiler:Maddy's murder]], which reveals who killed Laura Palmer, was filmed twice with both [[spoiler:Leland]], the real killer, and [[spoiler:Ben Horne]], the red herring, to confuse anyone who might be tempted to leak. At the script stage, no less than ''three'' versions of the scene were reportedly distributed, with the third having [[spoiler:Dr. Jacoby]] as a second red herring candidate.
* FoodPorn: Coffee, pie and donuts.
* {{Foreshadowing}}: There's a lot in Cooper's first mystical dream.
** BOB's line "You may think I've gone insane, but I promise I will kill again". [[spoiler:Who is the only person at this stage who appears actually insane as opposed to just odd? Leland.]]
** "She's my cousin. But doesn't she look exactly like Laura Palmer?" referring to Maddy. Also, in a way, Laura herself could be considered The Man From Another Place's cousin, since [[spoiler:BOB is possessing her father, BOB is the 'familiar' of MIKE, and The Man split off from MIKE like Athena from Zeus.]]
** Cooper is asked about Waldo and says he doesn't like birds. The primary antagonist, which spinoff audio media implies [[spoiler:he had previous and very negative encounters with]], takes the form of an owl.
** A bit of a stretch, but the fact that the third season of the show is taking place 25 years after the events of the finale, both in real life and in the show, seems to indicate Cooper's first meeting with The Man From Another Place to be this.
* FootFocus: After successfully completing a complicated gambit, [[spoiler:Catherine]] reveals her identity to Ben Horne by showing him her pedicured foot.
* TheFourthWallWillNotProtectYou: Phillip Gerard's interrogation at the Sheriff's Station.
-->'''MIKE:''' This is [[BigBad his]] true face, but few can see it: the gifted... ''[he turns to look directly at the camera]'' and the damned.
* FreakierThanFiction: The most insane and improbable things mentioned in ''The Secret of History of Twin Peaks'' are things that actually happened. Whereas things like people catching a glance of The Giant in the woods and the the soul of the Log Lady's husband being trapped in her log are pretty benign and dull by comparison.
* FromBadToWorse: The series starts with the relatively mundane murder of Laura Palmer, but by its end has become a full-blown CosmicHorrorStory.
* GainaxEnding: The ending for the "International Version" of the pilot episode. It ended up being heavily edited and recontextualized for Cooper's dream at the end of the second episode.
* GambitPileup: The show definitely trends towards this, especially regarding the real estate deals. At times, it feels like half of the town is constantly working to ruin or destroy someone else.
* GambitRoulette: Catherine's machinations to get control of the real estate are helped by heaps of luck; there's even an "Everything is going exactly as we planned..." line midway through season 2.
* GenreBusting: It's a [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructive]] [[MindScrew surrealist]] [[ParanormalInvestigation paranormal]] PsychologicalHorror PoliceProcedural CrimeTimeSoap [[{{Dramedy}} with comedy, drama,]] [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] [[TeenDrama teen angst]].
* GoMadFromTheRevelation: The long-lost Philip Jeffries, disappeared crime-fighting hero, appears to have experienced this. He briefly reappears in TheMovie barely able to string two coherent words together and raving madly about canned corn, [[spoiler:before suddenly disappearing again]]. In reality, [[spoiler:he's been trapped in the Black Lodge so long that he's "gone native" and can only speak in the Lodge creatures' prophetic style of CrypticConversation, in addition to fearfully recognizing Cooper's future (or past) role]].
** A more overt example crops up in ''Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me'' in the form of the residents of the Deer Meadow trailer park. As explained by ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'', they've, uhh... [[TheseAreThingsManWasNotMeantToKnow seen some things]] in their time.
* GodzillaThreshold: When BOB finds another victim, everyone begs Cooper to use any of his kooky methods that they previously disparaged in order to catch the killer.
* GoodIsNotNice: While the closest the series comes to this trope is [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold Albert Rosenfield]] and Audrey's confrontational personalities, ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'' involves a long-running portrayal of good guys aligned with the White Lodge, a roster including some notoriously corrupt, dishonest, or unstable public figures.
* GovernmentAgencyOfFiction: The FBI in the ''Twin Peaks'' universe often deals heavily in supernatural cases. These more often than not tend to be just a little more dangerous than the usual kind of work. The movie implies that FBI code for these cases is "Blue Rose".
* GovernmentConspiracy: Dale Cooper is a strong believer in conspiracy theories. Given his own experience...
** Major Briggs is sort of a part of one. In one scene, he gives Cooper a piece of very sensitive information and apologizes for not being able to tell him any more. Cooper responds that, as a fellow employee of the federal government, he understands completely.
** ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'' alludes to both positive and negative aspects of a broader secret conflict between factions of spiritual darkness and spiritual light stretching throughout history. {{UsefulNotes/Richard Nixon}} is portrayed by the book's compiler [[spoiler:Major Briggs]] as a mad if well-meaning leader in the good guys' faction, engaging various characters from his trusted circle in covert diplomacy/contact with alien races.
* GreenAesop: More of a peripheral subtext than a focal point of the series, aside from Audrey's advocacy for environmental conservation. Dealt with more explicitly in ''The secret History of Twin Peaks'', which alludes to the idea of settlers and their descendants interfering with the environment as a partial cause of some of the more malevolent (super?)natural weirdness that plagues Twin Peaks.
* GrotesqueGallery: Lodge inhabitants include The Man From Another Place (a dwarf, who is actually [[spoiler:a severed arm in human form]]), The Giant (a ... giant, obviously), [[spoiler:a one-armed man]], and a singer played by Jimmy Scott (who suffered from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kallmann%27s_syndrome Kallmann Syndrome]]).
* GuardianAngel: In TheMovie, Laura keeps a painting of one in her room for protection. When it [[spoiler:disappears]], things get [[{{Understatement}} really bad]].
* HandicappedBadass: An unassuming example in the form of friendly CloudCuckoolander Gordon Cole, who is apparently in charge of a large amount of dangerous ParanormalInvestigation.
* HannibalLecture: Jean Renault gives Cooper one.
* HarsherInHindsight: A buffet lunch of in-universe examples after watching TheMovie or reading the Laura Palmer's diary spinoff book.
** Most prominently Leland's wacky self-expression in the first and early second season: [[spoiler:TheReveal in season 2 shows that he's forcing the most extreme types of positive expressions on himself - to the point of becoming ''borderline insane'' - trying to fight off being completely overtaken by BOB and losing his humanity. TheMovie takes this a step further and reveals that he's trying to keep BOB not only from possessing him, but from leeching on to his despair and ''feeding on his suffering''. It fails]].
** MIKE tells the Twin Peaks Sheriff's Department that BOB can only be seen in his real form by [[CursedWithAwesome The Gifted]] and [[BlessedWithSuck The Damned]]. So [[spoiler:which is Cooper]]?
* HeelFaceTurn: [[spoiler:Ben Horne becomes a nice guy toward the end of season 2 (see WeWantOurJerkBack).]]
** [[spoiler:Leo Johnson is a irredeemable, abusive control freak toward Shelly in Season 1, but suffers much of the same abuse at the hands of Windom Earle in Season 2. His HeelFaceTurn begins when he is reluctant in assisting Windom Earle kill an innocent victim, then sets fellow captive, Major Garland Briggs free and asks him to keep Shelly safe. Bear in mind Leo previously tried to immolate Shelly at the end of Season 1.]]
* HeldGaze: Audrey and Cooper share one near the end of episode 208.
* HeroOfAnotherStory: Doug Milford, retroactively, thanks to ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks''.
* HiddenHeartOfGold:
** Audrey Horne. At first sight she seems to be a spoiled troublemaker who aspires to be a femme fatale (often successfully), but with time it is revealed that she's actually an lonely innocent with good intentions.
--> '''Director Todd Holland on Audrey's character:''' "She's one of my favorite characters because you thought she was such a big slut and she's probably the most moralistic person in Twin Peaks and that's all tremendous fun. The ones like her father feign morality and are incredibly treacherous, but they carry on a good business front."
** Albert Rosenfield is an obvious JerkAss, but eventually reveals a great love for the teachings of Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., and he mellows out.
* HiddenVillain
* HookerWithAHeartOfGold: [[spoiler:Laura]]. And [[spoiler:Audrey]] invokes this when she tries to get into the business for investigative purposes, but doesn't stay long enough to do any actual hooking.
* HormoneAddledTeenager: Laura Palmer's peers. And she herself, but with a bit of extra baggage.
* HorrifyingTheHorror: MIKE does this.
* HumanoidAbomination: Whatever else the inhabitants of the Black Lodge are, they are all surely this -- even the seemingly more benevolent ones, such as the Giant. [[spoiler:As of ''The Return'', at least one of them isn't even remotely "humanoid" anymore.]]
* HumansAreBastards: While Cooper believes everyone around him has an inherent goodness that it's his moral duty to bring out, [[spoiler:The Doppelganger]] sees things the opposite way and makes it his mission to bring out peoples' pettiness with the most murderous and tragic possible consequences.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:I-L]]

* IdiotBall: Happens sometimes towards the end of the series with both Harry and Cooper. The greatest offender, however, is Major Briggs, [[spoiler:whose first decision, immediately after establishing that a murderous psychopath is hiding out in the forest, is to take a casual relaxing walk in the forest on the way home. Harry and Cooper thinks it's a great idea.]]
** The entire investigative team. They deduce from the first episode that Laura's death was part of a string of killings including Theresa Banks and was to have included Ronette Pulaski and yet they make absolutely no efforts to connect the three girls, and aside from a brief talk with Ronette's parents, they completely ignore anything to do with her. No attempts are made to talk with her friends or any other relatives, this in comparison to the efforts they go to investigating Laura Palmer's life. Essentially they just decide that Laura was the primary target of the attack since she was the one that died.
* IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace:
** [[TheLostWoods Ghostwood National Forest]]
** [[EldritchLocation The Black Lodge]]
** [[KingArthur Glastonbury Grove]]
** Dead Dog Farm
* IJustShotMarvinInTheFace: In Episode 4, Andy drops his gun and it goes off by accident. In the next episode, Bobby gives a braggadocio-filled impression of how he'd handle being caught having an affair while waving a gun around with his finger on the trigger.
* IJustWantToBeYou: Donna to Laura in the movie. After briefly snapping out of her nihilistic haze, Laura has to quickly set Donna straight that trying to be like her will come to no good.
* IllTakeTwoBeersToo: A non-verbal example when the Hornes are hosting a reception for the Icelanders. Catherine and Pete enter the reception and Catherine takes two glasses of champagne from a waiter, downs the first in one gulp, then promptly walks off with the second one.
* ImprobableAimingSkills: [[TheAce Agent Cooper.]] He fires six shots at the range, leaving four bullet holes on the target.
-->'''Cooper:''' I put four through the eyes and two through the nostrils.
* InformedAttractiveness: Lana Budding Milford is describes as entrancingly beautiful by everyone who sees her.
* InnocenceLost: Laura, in the most tragic way possible.
* InsaneTrollLogic: An out-of-universe one which Sherilyn Fenn noted in interviews that they officially broke up Agent Cooper and Audrey (even though they never got together officially) because Audrey was too young for him. However, as a quirk of DawsonCasting, they had Agent Cooper's love interest replaced by Heather Graham who was playing older than Audrey but younger than Sherilyn Fenn.
** An in-universe one where Jean Renault blames Agent Cooper for the death of his brothers despite the fact they were killed as part of the drug trade and Laura Palmer investigation respectively.
* InterimVillain: In Season 2, Wyndom Earle served as this, until BOB, the original BigBad, returned. This may be more HijackedByGanon, though since Wyndom Earle remains one of the show's iconic villains.
** Jean Renault and Warren Eckhardt may be more traditional examples.
* InvisibleBackupBand: James' song he sings while playing guitar in the episode "Coma" has bass and percussion come out of nowhere halfway through.
* IsThisThingOn: Played painfully straight with the town's mayor in the pilot and later on in the second season.
* ItMakesSenseInContext
** Surprisingly, yes. The [[DreamingOfThingsToCome prophetic dream]] that Agent Cooper has in the second episode is full of surreal imagery, but everything eventually comes to make sense.
*** "You may think I've gone insane, but I promise I will kill again," foreshadows [[spoiler:Leland Palmer's]] death scene, specifically that ''he'' wasn't insane, his [[DemonicPossession inhabiting spirit]] was.
*** The shadow that passes behind the curtain [[SpecialEffectsFailure is supposed to be]] an OminousOwl.
*** "That gum you like is going to come back in style," will be said to the killer while Cooper's in earshot, [[TriggerPhrase triggering his memory of]] Laura telling him who killed her.
*** "She's my cousin. But doesn't she look almost exactly like Laura Palmer?" [[{{Foreshadowing}} foreshadows]] Maddie and her fate, as well as hinting at the DemonicPossession that links the Man From Another Place to Laura.
*** "I feel like I know her, but sometimes my arms bend back" references Laura LivingADoubleLife as a bondage prostitute.
** Outside of the dream, other [[SurrealHorror seeming]] [[SurrealHumor nonsense]] makes a bit more sense when considered in full context than it may initially seem.
*** "Wait for the tea! The fish aren't running!" is a BrickJoke, referring to the fish in the percolator from a prior episode.
*** The Log Lady in general makes more sense [[FridgeBrilliance the more you come to learn about the Ghostwood Forest.]]
*** "Leo needs a new pair of shoes," foreshadows how Leo Johnson keeps [[{{Blackmail}} precious and valuable things]] in the soles of his boots.
* ItMakesAsMuchSenseInContext
** [[CloudCuckooLander Everything about Nadine.]]
* {{Japandering}}: [[http://www.kylemaclachlan.com/viewer.php?id=5 This Georgia is damn fine coffee!]]
* JerkJock: Bobby Briggs and Mike Nelson, although they both mature a lot by the end of the series. Also see NamesTheSame.
* JerkWithAHeartOfGold: Albert defines this. After an amazing speech in which Albert's heart of gold becomes apparent, he and Sheriff Truman -- formerly bitter enemies -- [[spoiler:become close friends and even hug one another]] in a later episode.
** Bobby Briggs, initially a whiny JerkJock who's barely any less abusive to Shelley than her husband (and also ''killed a guy'' in a coke deal gone bad), becomes a not-too-bad guy by the end of the show.
%%* JigsawPuzzlePlot
* JurisdictionFriction: Averted right off the bat in the pilot episode when Agent Cooper specifically asks Sheriff Truman if he is going to have any trouble with this. Played straight with the very crooked Deer Meadow jurisdiction in ''Fire Walk With Me'', though, who learn the hard way not to give Chris Isaak any trouble.
* JustFriends: Audrey and Cooper, to the ire of both [[WordOfGod David Lynch]] and the FanPreferredCouple crowd.
--> Audrey: But don't you like me?
--> Cooper: I like you very much. You're beautiful, intelligent, desirable. Everything a man wants in his life. But what you need right now, more than anything, is a friend. Someone who will listen.
* KarmaHoudini: [[spoiler:BOB in the original series]].
* KarmicDeath: [[spoiler:Windom Earle]] and presumably [[spoiler:Leo Johnson]].
* KilledOffForReal: [[spoiler:Jacques Renault]], [[spoiler:Maddie Ferguson]], and [[spoiler:Leland Palmer]].
* LanternJawOfJustice: Agent Cooper
* LargeHam: ''Twin Peaks'' has at least a few of these, most notably BOB, Windom Earle, Nadine Hurley, and Gordon Cole.
** Bobby Briggs definitely has his moments as well.
** Ben Horne's always been the kind of person who likes to hear himself speak, but he gets especially in the early second season when he begins to lose his composure as things start to fall apart for him. It begins around the time he [[spoiler:gets falsely accused of murdering Laura Palmer and is forced to spend jail time,]] but he's probably at his most hammy when he [[spoiler:goes completely off the rails and thinks he's General Robert E. Lee.]]
* LatexPerfection: [[spoiler:Catherine Martell]], disguised as [[spoiler:a mysterious Japanese businessman after FakingTheDead]].
* LeftHanging: For 25 years, there was no resolution to any of the plotlines in the series, having been left on a {{cliffhanger}}.
* LeftTheBackgroundMusicOn: Happens quite frequently.
** The first episode has Audrey doing this, much to her father's dismay.
** She does it again with the jukebox at the diner in the second episode.
--> "God, I love this music. Isn't it too dreamy?"
** This happens on a radio (which is immediately changed) in Season 2 Episode 2.
** In another season two episode, some melancholy flute music plays over an establishing shot of the abandoned house Windom Earle is occupying, which turns out to be... Windom Earle himself playing the flute. It sounds kind of silly, but it's in fact a pretty eerie moment since [[spoiler:he's doing it while waiting for Leo Johnson to come to so he can torture him.]]
* {{Leitmotif}}: "Laura Palmer's Theme" and later (in the second season) "Audrey's Prayer" are repeatedly used as love themes. Some characters (Hank Jennings or Windom Earle, for example) have their own themes as well.
* TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday: The little trailer park trailer that isn't there today. And the convenience store that apparently [[spoiler:the Lodge creatures once lived above.]]
* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters
* TheLostWoods: The [[IDontLikeTheSoundOfThatPlace Ghostwood]] National Forest that surrounds Twin Peaks. Home to a portal to an EldritchLocation, numerous drug dealers, the occasional rogue FBI agent, and the {{Ominous Owl}}s. [[WhatAnIdiot Some people want to build a country club out of it.]]
* LoveDodecahedron: And how. It's easier to name the characters who aren't a part of it. To put it simply, nearly everyone in town has at least two lovers, which leads to a lot of sharing.
* LoveMakesYouCrazy: Windom. Freaking. Earle.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:M-P]]

* MagicRealism: Though it increasingly starts to resemble straight up horror or fantasy as the series goes on.
* MalevolentMaskedMan: The Chalfont/Tremond child.
* TheManBehindTheMan
* MasterOfDisguise: Windom Earle, master of the [[WigDressAccent Wig Moustache Accent]]. In fairness, most of the people he's trying to fool have never met him and have no reason to be on their guard.
* MasterOfYourDomain: Agent Cooper, of a sort.
** His [[SignatureScene throwing-rocks-at-a-bottle-to-determine-leads]] method is described as an exercise of mind-and-body cohesion. He's already determined what the answer is subconsciously, throwing the rock just lets his body dig it out of his mind, and because [[ImprobableAimingSkills he's got the best aim in the FBI]], he'll hit the rock once his body becomes attuned to what his mind already knows.
** Later, he survives being shot three times at point blank range without going into shock simply by [[Franchise/{{Dune}} keeping fear from his mind.]]
* MeaningfulName: Mostly averted as the character names are mostly an arbitrary jumble of common Anglo-American names, but the fact that the surname "Cooper" refers to the profession of building cages is more than a little appropriate.
* MedicateTheMedium: A variant where the medication actually inhibits the talent.
* MindRape: ''Literally.''
* MindScrew: Anything involving the Black Lodge.
* MinorCrimeRevealsMajorPlot
* MirrorMonster: BOB, perhaps the most iconic example of this in television history.
* MissingWhiteWomanSyndrome: All of BOB's victims are white women ([[spoiler:not counting Jacques, whose murder BOB may have had nothing to do with]]), although this may be simple statistics; rural Washington is a pretty white place.
** Played with in how [[spoiler: BOB's]] victims are treated. Ronette Pulaski is a young pretty white woman who suffers the same rape and torture as Laura did and even goes to the same school. However, her attack barely seems to effect anyone but her parents.
* MixAndMatch
* MonochromeCasting: Every recurring character is white except Josie Packard and Deputy Hawk. In the entire course of the series, very few non-white people even have lines, usually only appearing as extras at the Great Northern, as well as a couple of black school teachers at the local high school: with the only other exceptions being an Asian gangster and an unnamed AmbiguouslyBrown employee of Ben Horne. The predominantly WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant demographics aren't ''entirely'' inaccurate to the locale, but Twin Peaks is still a noticeably white place.
* MoodWhiplash: The series changes from serious crime drama to lighthearted comedy to surreal horror extremely frequently, especially at the beginning of the second season.
* MurderersAreRapists
* MustHaveCaffeine: Agent Cooper's catch phrase is "Damn good coffee." Indeed, all the cops seem to ''love'' coffee and [[DonutMessWithACop donuts]].
* MsFanservice: Audrey.
* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Both Laura and Leland experience these moments... though in the second case, it's for a pretty good reason. Ben as well, albeit in a much more Narm-filled fashion.
* MythArc: The investigation of Laura Palmer's murder, though there quickly turns out to be much, ''much'' more going on than just that.
* NamesTheSame: The name of Bobby's partner in crime is [[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 Mike Nelson]]. In-universe, Bobby and Mike have the same names as BOB and his former accomplice, MIKE.
** Not to mention the obvious examples of Sheriff Harry S. Truman (who even hangs a stag's head over his death with a placard reading "The Buck Stops Here") and Ben & Jerry Horne.
** In episode 7 of season 1, Cooper and Big Ed adopt the aliases of [[TheFlintstones Barney and Fred]].
* NarniaTime: Time in the Black Lodge is a somewhat more MindScrew-worthy take on the idea.
* NeverFoundTheBody: [[spoiler:Catherine Martell]].
* TheNineties: While the show is mostly done in a {{Retraux}} style meant to evoke TheFifties, the 90s style is still very evident in the clothing styles and technology.
* NoDeadBodyPoops: The aversion is mentioned, but not depicted.
* NoHoldsBarredBeatdown: [[spoiler:Maddy's demise.]]
* NoIndoorVoice: REGIONAL BUREAU CHIEF GORDON COLE, AS PLAYED BY DAVID LYNCH HIMSELF. AND HE'S CALLING YOU FROM ''ORRRRRRRRRRR-'''EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE'''-GONNNNNNNNNN!''
* NoMedicationForMe: [[EnforcedTrope Forced]] on Phillip Michael Gerard to [[SealedInAPersonShapedCan force a transformation]] into MIKE, his "inhabiting spirit." [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] by Windom Earle, who uses haloperidol to mimic the symptoms of schizophrenia, first to get out of a jail sentence, then later to drug his captives.
* NoodleIncident: What exactly ''did'' happen to Cooper in Pittsburgh?
* NotHimself: This seems to be the case with Leland Palmer due to his daughter's sudden and tragic murder. [[spoiler: In fact, his entire life has been a case of this as he's been off-again-on-again possessed by BOB since late childhood. His murder of Jacques Renault allows Bob complete control over his body until his death.]]
* OccultDetective: The natural result of Agent Cooper becoming aware of the town's less-than-normal qualities. Of course, he started out using such investigative techniques as throwing rocks at a bottle while listening to the list of suspects to determine which leads to follow, which he learned from the Dalai Lama in a dream. Keep in mind, given what we find out in TheMovie, Cooper had already foreseen Laura's death and Gordon Cole likely informed him beforehand that he was working on a [[TrustPassword Blue Rose]] case. Which means the rules are, to put it mildly, just a little different.
* OddFriendship: Well, most of the town's residents and the agents dispatched there are odd, to say the least, but the trope is best exemplified by [[spoiler:Albert and Truman]] later in season 2.
* OldCopYoungCop: Windom Earle and Dale Cooper ''might'' have been this before Earle went insane.
* OminousOwl: They are the eyes of BOB. Maybe. In any case, they [[ArcWords are not what they seem]].
* OneSteveLimit: Averted. There are two Bobs (Bobby Briggs and the spirit BOB), three Mikes (Mike Nelson, the spirit MIKE and Mike Boyd), two Dougies (Milford and Jones), two Phillips (Gerard and Jeffries), two Richards (Tremayne and Horne), two Johns (Horne and Wheeler), and even two Toads (a regular and an employee at the Double R).
* OnlyBadGuysCallTheirLawyers: Played with. In the pilot, several of the more sympathetic characters who indeed did not kill Laura do not call their lawyers when being interrogated by Cooper and Truman. However, while [[spoiler:Bobby Briggs]] is at least initially one of the less sympathetic characters and could be viewed as a "bad guy", he did not kill Laura either - and yet his family's lawyer is present at his interrogation.
** DoubleSubverted by ''Fire Walk With Me'', [[spoiler:by RetCon to the above. Bobby killed a drug dealer two days before Laura's murder, and has every reason to believe he's going to prison.]]
* OutWithABang: Mayor Doug Milford, in the "wedding night" variant.
* OverlyLongGag: The Season 2 opening with the wounded Cooper trying in vain to get the hotel waiter to realize that he has been seriously injured and needs medical attention. Even when Cooper realizes that it is a fool's errand and decides to just go with the flow and humor the waiter, the scene ''just keeps on going'', eventually totalling a wooping five minutes.
* ParanormalMundaneItem: Freddie Sykes' green gardening glove which gives him superhuman strength.
* ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything: The Bookhouse Boys are supposedly dedicated to battling "the evil in the woods," but they seem to be mostly just a social club. Even when DemonicPossession and unexplained disappearances start happening right in front of them they don't seem to make the connection.
* PlaceBeyondTime: The Black Lodge, where [[spoiler:Cooper winds up stuck for at least 25 years while still communicating with himself and others through their dreams at various points in time -- including before Laura Palmer's murder, which brought him to Twin Peaks in the first place]].
* PowersThatBe: The White Lodge is meant to be a force for good that counterpoints the Black Lodge. The Giant, for example, sincerely gives Agent Cooper clues to solving Laura Palmer's murder [[spoiler: and flat out tells him Leland did it in the episode which reveals him as the killer. He also warns him of BOB who frequently takes the form of an owl.]]
* PowerWalk: The first shot of Season 2, Episode 9.
* PrayerIsALastResort: Annie in the season 2 finale, Ronnette Pulaski in ''Fire Walk With Me''. [[spoiler:In both cases it seems to kind of work.]]
* PrecociousCrush: The reason why Cooper can't return Audrey's feelings.
-->"Audrey, you're a high school girl. I'm an agent of the FBI."
* PropheticDream: Cooper foresees [[spoiler:Laura Palmer's death]].
* PsychicPowers: Cooper has a PropheticDream when something significant is about to happen, a trait played up further in TheMovie. Also may explain his way of intuitively figuring things out in seconds when he is introduced in the series.
* PutOnABus: James. After [[spoiler:being betrayed by a girl ''again'']] he decides to go on the road, but promises to eventually come back to Donna. He does... 25 years later.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Q-T]]

* RaisedCatholic: In ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'', Major Briggs describes his parents as holding on to traditional Catholic beliefs and practices while living a creative, bohemian lifestyle. Later in life he subscribes to a tradition of Jesuit mysticism involving outward respect to spiritual tradition and an inward respect to more individualistic paths, which is why he [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure does not act offended that his son makes mocking gestures at an altar to Jesus]] in the series.
* RapeAsBackstory:
** [[spoiler:All but stated for Leland, who seems to have been abused as a child by BOB, who was likely in the form of someone who lived near (or...in) the Palmers' lake house. Laura faced the same fate of abuse at the hands of BOB, but allowed herself to be killed rather than go on to be possessed.]]
** The "Cooper's Diary" book suggests that Cooper was also sexually abused by BOB (he came into his room) as a child.
* RapeAsDrama: Throughout the series.
* RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil: Part of what makes BOB so frightening.
* RasputinianDeath: [[spoiler:Leo Johnson. He survives being shot twice, two axe battles with Bobby Briggs (one of them being right after awakening from a coma from said gunshot), survives being out in the woods with no water, gets electrocuted by Windom Earle on a number of occasions, then finally it is implied Leo met his fate at the hands (fangs?) of a venomous spider.]]
* RealMenTakeItBlack: Detective Dale Cooper is a talented, experienced FBI agent who always takes his coffee black.
* RecklessGunUsage
** Andy drops his pistol and has an accidental discharge, causing Cooper and Truman to assign him extra shooting practice.
** Bobby and Shelly have a love scene in the final episode of the first season that involves some breathtakingly stupid messing around with a pistol, including Bobby inserting it barrel first into her cleavage with his finger on the trigger. It's played not as deliberate risk-taking, but as if they're both completely blind to the danger.
* RecursiveAcronym: Beware Of BOB.
* RedemptionEqualsDeath: Laura Palmer's death.
** Also [[spoiler:Leland Palmer's death]].
* RedemptionInTheRain: [[spoiler:Leland Palmer's death]]. Sort of. It's actually a sprinkler.
* RedHerring: During the investigation into Laura Palmer's death, the big money for her killer was Leo Johnson. Talk show host Phil Donahue, who devoted an entire hour to ''Twin Peaks'' wasn't buying any. He described Leo Johnson as "the biggest RedHerring since Nikita Kruschev". And of course, turns out he was right.
** Agent Cooper describes Red Herring as his least favorite kind of fish.
* RedHerringTwist
* TheResolutionWillNotBeTelevised: The movie ''Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me''. Subverted in that it was [[spoiler:actually a prequel]]. Well, [[TemporalParadox sort of...]]
* TheReveal: Numerous.
* {{Revival}}: "I'll see you in 25 years." TheMovie came out in 1992, season three will begin in 2017.
* RuleOfCool: Try not to think about how a roadhouse in a nowhere Washington town can get such cool bands to play every night.
* RuleOfSymbolism: Moderately downplayed in the series except during the Lodge sequences and the scenes discussing BOB, but TheMovie has this in spades with images of angels and hellfire. Of course some of what seems like it *could be* symbolism (like the disappearing horse) is most likely just [[TrollingCreator David Lynch screwing around]].
* ScarilyCompetentTracker: Cooper and Hawk.
* SceneryPorn: ''Twin Peaks'' has some truly beautiful cinematography. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2lkvrMa27c The opening]] also gives you a good first look at some of the breathtaking nature scenery you're going to see in the show.
* SchmuckBait: Thomas Eckhardt leaves his enemies a tantalizing series of puzzle boxes that lead them to a safety deposit box [[spoiler:booby-trapped with high explosives.]]
* SenseFreak:
** Special Agent Dale "Damn fine coffee, damn good cherry pie" Cooper.
** Gordon Cole is a strange example. He's deaf as a post, goes around with his very old fashioned hearing aids cranked up to maximum, and has NoIndoorVoice. But when he meets Shelly Johnson towards the end of the series, he's shocked to discover he can hear her voice with perfect clarity, becomes obsessed with it, and immediately falls in love with her.
* SerialKiller:
** BOB.
** Windom Earle, kind of.
* SeriesContinuityError: Despite being at least 90 percent canon, ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'' and ''The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer'' include a few of these that should be immediately noticeable by any fan with a good memory. Possibly [[TrollingCreator done intentionally]].
* SexIsEvilAndIAmHorny: Laura angsts over having this attitude in ''The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer''.
* ShoutOut: Many. Most notably Laura Palmer is named after to the titular character from the Creator/GeneTierney film ''Film/{{Laura}}'' while her cousin, Madeleine Ferguson, is named after the two main characters from Creator/AlfredHitchcock's ''Film/{{Vertigo}}''
* ShowWithinAShow: ''Invitation to Love''
** Complete with StylisticSuck and PlotParallel
* SmugSnake: Ben and Jerry in the first season.
* SomeOfMyBestFriendsAreX: Played for laughs:
-->'''Gwen:''' God, how you must hate us white people after all we've done to you.\\
'''Hawk:''' Some of my best friends are white people.
* SortingAlgorithmOfEvil: Petty criminals like Leo Johnson and Jacques Renault eventually give way to more effective and dangerous men like [[spoiler:Hank Jennings and Jean Renault]].
* SpellMyNameWithAnS: BOB -- all caps.
** Not to be confused with [[http://www.subgenius.com "BOB!"]].
* SpotTheImposter: Cole is quick to note that [[spoiler:the Doppelganger]] doesn't greet him with [[spoiler:Cooper]]'s usual style after playing along and noting Albert's reactions.
* SpySpeak: In-universe, the FBI uses a visual variant of this (seen in the form of Lil the dancing girl) and it is implied they utilize the phrase "Blue Rose" as a code for cases that may involve the supernatural or other bizarre phenomena. Also arguably one interpretation of Gordon Cole's bizarre WordSalad one-liners.
* StalkingIsFunnyIfItIsFemaleAfterMale: Nadine is very persistent in her attraction to Mike even after he has made it perfectly clear that he is not interested in her, even forcing a kiss on him in the diner in one episode (and the show makes it very clear that she is ''much'' stronger than him physically). Presumably their relationship would not have been PlayedForLaughs if it had been an exceptionally strong thirty-five-year-old man lusting after an eighteen-year-old woman still in high school.
* StylisticSuck: From what little we see of it, ''Invitation to Love'', the soap opera ''everyone'' in Twin Peaks apparently watches, is fairly ridiculous. Considering the fact that it mirrors some events of the show, it may be a case of SelfDeprecatingHumor.
* SuddenNameChange: Mrs. Tremond and her grandson are the same characters as Mrs. Chalfont and her grandson, with no explanation as to [[MindScrew whether the name change is at all meaningful]].
* SurrealHorror
* SweaterGirl: Audrey
* SwitchingToGEICO: In the surreal Black Lodge:
--> "I've got good news. That gum you like is going to come back in style."
* TalkingThroughTechnique: Windom Earle engages Cooper in a chess game via newspaper, in which for every one of Cooper's pieces Earle takes he will claim another victim. Cooper seeks Pete Martell's help in playing a stalemate game, losing as few pieces as possible. As Earle once played a game of chess with Cooper every day for three years he is intimately familiar with Cooper's playstyle, and so when reading one of Cooper's early moves he instantly recognizes it as out of character for Cooper, and hence surmises that Cooper is receiving outside help and that he is trying to play to a stalemate.
* TheyWalkAmongUs: Pain-eating spirits with day-to-day names who can take human form through DemonicPossession.
* ThingsThatGoBumpInTheNight: BOB.
* ToHellAndBack: Cooper in the series finale. The Black Lodge may not be Hell itself, but neither is it pleasant. [[spoiler:But did he really come back??? As ''The Return'' reveals, he didn't, but [[HumanoidAbomination something else]] did.]]
* TomTheDarkLord: Killer BOB.
* ToneShift: Although the series constantly vacillated back and forth between police procedural, soap opera parody, slapstick and MagicalRealism, the horror and supernatural elements of the series really start to come to the fore from the start of the second season. As [[Website/TheOnion the AV Club]] put it: "It's as if Frost and Lynch decided to ditch the noir for nightmares."
** ''Really'' played up in TheMovie, wherein we go from the series' quirky and tongue-in-cheek character-driven comedy (played up in even some of the more serious episodes' B-plots) to jarring, abrasive sequences of nightmarish orgies, a brutal murder portrayed in grisly detail, flashing footage of screaming animals, and a lifetime of [[spoiler:child abuse and rape]] by someone who [[spoiler:may or may not always be himself]].
* {{Transvestite}}: A young and studly David Duchovny as DEA Agent [[strike:Dennis]] Denise Bryson.
* TownWithADarkSecret: The corrupt businessman who pretty much runs Twin Peaks is secretly funding a brothel and casino beyond the Canadian border. The town darling is a prostitute and drug addict in her spare time. Did we mention that the town also contains hidden access to the home of some [[SurrealHorror really weird]] [[TheFairFolk creatures]] that [[CrypticConversation speak almost only in riddles]]?
* TurnInYourBadge: Season 2, episode 10.
* YellowFace: The original run had a plot point relying on an exaggeratedly racist disguise, a gimmick that notably dates the first two seasons and is particularly cringe-inducing to most modern viewers.

[[/folder]]

[[folder:U-Z]]

* VillainousRescue:
** In the Season 1 Finale, Hank Jennings inadvertently saves Bobby Briggs' life when he shoots Leo Johnson just as the latter was about to put an axe through Bobby in his home.
** In the GrandFinale, [[spoiler:Windom Earle attempts to steal Cooper's soul. Coop agrees to the trade, Earle stabs him in the same spot he stabbed him before, [[BackForTheFinale and then BOB undoes the injury, complains that Earle broke the rules, and steals his soul]].]]
* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: {{Lampshaded}} by Mädchen Amick when discussing fan reaction to the solving of the central mystery:
-->"As much as I heard, everywhere I went, 'Who killed Laura Palmer?', I don't think anybody was very happy to find out who it was. They liked to ''want'' to know, not necessarily to know."
* WalkingSpoiler: [[spoiler:The Doppelganger]] in the new series.
* WeirdnessCensor: Many of the residents of Twin Peaks are unfazed by the strange goings on in their town. This is justified as most are simply to absorbed in their own matters to care. For example, Nadine excitedly mentions to a stranger that she finally figured out how to make quiet drap-runners by using cotton balls. During this explanation, she nonchalantly mentions she figured it out while waiting for her husband to be released from intensive care, not elaborating on how he got there. The others are members of the Bookhouse Boys and are already accustomed to the paranormal nature of the town. Subsequently they accept Agent Cooper's strange methods at face value, as his unorthodox tactics appear practical to them.
* WellDoneSonGuy: A female example involving Norma and her mother in the second season.
* WeWantOurJerkBack: Several characters react to [[spoiler:Ben Horne]]'s trauma-induced HeelFaceTurn in this fashion.
* WhamEpisode:
** The final one, and several others along the way, including [[spoiler:Maddy's]] death at the hands of Laura's killer. Basically, whenever The Giant shows up you know it's going to be one of these.
--->It is happening. Again.
** And of course, the first season finale. [[spoiler:Audrey is captured at "One-Eyed Jack's", Nadine tries to commit suicide, Leland murders the newly captured Jacques Renault in the hospital, Leo tries to kill Bobby but is shot by Hank, the mill burns down with Catherine and Shelly inside as Pete rushes to the rescue and Cooper is shot in his hotel room by an unknown assailant.]]
** Mark Frost has talked about how he really wasn't sure the show would get a second season, so he packed every conceivable cliffhanger he could into the first season finale (to the point that it almost became a parody) in the hopes that ''someone'' would say, "Okay, I ''have'' to know what happens next."
* WhamLine:
** "That gum you like is going to come back in style" is one of the [[MemeticMutation well known quotes of the series]], but when we eventually [[ItMakesSenseInContext see it in context]], it suddenly serves as this, completing the "magic spell" Cooper is trying to weave to solve the mystery.
** "It is happening again."
** [[BolivianArmyEnding "How's Annie?"]]
** [[spoiler:[[TheReveal "Hello Diane."]]]]
* WhamShot: There are two involving [[spoiler:BOB appearing in place of character's reflection]].
* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic: InUniverse, Albert suggests this explanation for the events of the series that he would otherwise be unlikely to believe, thus playing heavily to the perspectives of the audience and [[TakeThat perhaps acting as a parody of some of Lynch's fans and critics]] in an ironically symbolic manner. It's all sort of subverted in the last episode, though...
* WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant: Twin Peaks is a town whose residents are majority upper-middle class white people with Anglo-American names who attend some kind of mainline protestant church. The series has a lot of fun subverting stereotypes of WASP wholesomeness with troubled backstories and EccentricTownsfolk of varying degrees of discomfiting. Notably, the Native American Deputy Hawk is one of the very few locals deeply attuned to the somewhat intimidating natural truths of the town and its surroundings.
* WholesomeCrossdresser: FBI Agent [[strike:Dennis]] Denise Bryson.
* WidgetSeries: It's a detective show created by Creator/DavidLynch. What did you expect?
* WigDressAccent: Windom Earle uses several of these to get around Twin Peaks.
* WildMassGuessing: Due to the extremely ambiguous nature of WordOfGod (we're talking about Creator/DavidLynch here after all), much of what is accepted as canon online (especially on this page) is based on some of the more probable and believable examples of WildMassGuessing as to what's going on in the series. Even that isn't exactly saying much...
* WildWilderness: The setting has a creepy lodge in the middle of the woods that may or may not be there and no one seems to notice it.
* WriterOnBoard: While the series doesn't carry any specific ideology with it besides the notion of a spiritual struggle between good and evil (occasionally flavored by David Lynch's interest in eastern mysticism and Mark Frost's interest in western mysticism), Naomi Watts' character gets a rant in very in line with some of Mark Frosts' political views.
* WrongGenreSavvy: Early viewers of the series thought they were getting a straightforward mystery/soap opera, albeit a quirky one. It's actually incredibly dark fantasy/supernatural horror, and no, it's ''not'' the GenreShift a less observant viewer might mistake it for. Albert, the series' most overtly WrongGenreSavvy character, [[TakeThat exists as a parody of the more reactionary of these viewers]].
* {{Yellowface}}: A fairly blatant and somewhat racist in-universe example. Surprisingly, most of the main characters fall for it.
* YourSoulIsMine: [[spoiler:Josie Packard]] falls victim to a type two-B. [[MindScrew Or maybe her soul is just trapped inside the knob of a dresser drawer.]]
** Wyndom Earle tries this on Cooper, but it doesn't work.
* YouthIsWastedOnTheDumb: Most of the younger characters in Twin Peaks are downright ''stupid''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: The Return]]
* AdultFear: Walking your son across the street, only to see a reckless drug-addled driver smash into him and kill him while you're helpless to watch.
* AlienInvasion: [[spoiler: Seemingly what the PuppeteerParasite in New Mexico is doing, aided by the Woodsmen]].
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: It's InTheBlood for Shelly and her daughter. It may have even led Shelly to dumping her husband when he reformed.
* AlternateUniverse: It's strongly hinted in the finale that [[spoiler: there is another universe where Laura Palmer survived under another name, but the Lodge spirits are going out of their way to ensure that the two realities don't meet]].
* AmbiguousSituation: This is a series Creator/DavidLynch was involved in, so it's kind of packed with these. Among others:
** [[spoiler: We're left unsure if Audrey Horne is sick, deranged, in a coma, or just in an alternate dimension. All of these are entirely possible in the series' universe]]. ''The Final Dossier'' eventually clears this up, and indicates that the unhappy marriage to Charlie was [[spoiler: real and ''not'' AllJustADream]].
** Are Richard and Linda in episode 18 [[spoiler: Richard Horne and the disabled Linda mentioned by Carl? Or, as the series implies, are they the new personalities/characters of Cooper and Diane? And what accounts for the darker, AntiHero version of Cooper we see in the finale?]]
** What's going on with the alternate universe? In ''The Final Dossier'', it's revealed that the FBI's Blue Rose task force is aware that [[spoiler: the entire narrative of what happens in Twin Peaks has been tweaked, although they may not be aware Cooper was responsible]]. But why do they remember what happened in the original timeline while not one living resident of Twin Peaks does?
* AndHereHeComesNow: In Episode 17, Cole mentions that they should heard by then from their dear friend Dale Cooper. Cue the phone ringing with Agent Headly reporting they have found Dougie Jones in Vegas.
* AndIMustScream: [[spoiler:The first episode reveals that Agent Cooper is still trapped in the Black Lodge twenty-five years later while BOB has been gallivanting around in his body torturing, murdering and pitting people against each other to feed off of their suffering.]] What's worse is that, at times, he is also able to see these things happening but is powerless to do anything about it.
* ArcNumber: Lots:
** 8 resembles a parabola, the symbol for infinity [[spoiler: and is also connected to Judy]], and the shape also alludes to the duality of the Black and White lodge.
** The number 430 is mentioned in a few different contexts - first as the exact time of day that Andy busts a criminal operation, then as the amount of miles it will take Cooper and Diane to get to their destination.
** 253 crops up a few times, most often as the time 2:53. The arm states, "253 time and time again."
* ArcSymbol: A black circle with two antenna-like appendages on top, first seen on the playing card Mr. C carries with him and later on the old native map that Hawk has. It stands for great evil, specifically representing the face of [[spoiler: Judy, the being who gave birth to BOB]]. Hawk tells Truman YouDoNotWantToKnow when he asks about it.
* ArtificialHuman: A few people were "manufactured" seemingly by BOB and set loose onto the world for a variety of purposes. Dougie Jones was one and so was [[spoiler:the woman they believed to be Diane Evans]]. When they return to the black lodge they're reduced to a small golden ball. Tammy calls one a {{Tulpa}} upon discovering that it wasn't human.
* ArtisticLicense - Government/Criminal Justice: The ''Secret History'' and ''Final Dossier'' spinoff books feature investigative reports written with a level of editorializing that would never fly in real life from the employees of a criminal justice agency. Justifiable in-universe, as Cole's team are a [[RagtagBunchOfMisfits group of intuitive renegades who speak from the heart]] and can implicitly get away with expressing more personal opinions than would be realistically acceptable.
* ArtisticLicenseGunSafety: In Episode 18, Cooper waves his gun around the diner in dangerous ways which an FBI agent would know to avoid. [[spoiler:May be justified if the theory of this Cooper being a CompositeCharacter of Dougie and the two Coopers holds true.]]
* ArtisticLicenseHistory: In ''The Final Dossier'', Sarah Palmer's father is stated to have been an employee of the Department of Defense at the time of her birth in 1943 and during the Trinity nuclear test in 1945. However, the Department of Defense did not actually ''exist'' until a few years later - meaning that he would have worked for its predecessor agency, the War Department.
* AscendedExtra: Gordon Cole has a bigger role than in the previous run (where he appear in four episodes and his voice was heard in two others).
* AsHimself: All the bands that play at the Roadhouse, with the exception of [[spoiler: James Hurley]]. And then, in possibly one of the strangest instances of this ever, [[spoiler: Creator/MonicaBellucci in Cole's PropheticDream in Part 14]].
* AssholeVictim: A few of Mr. C's victims, including [[spoiler: Bill Hastings' wife, Richard Horne, Ray, and Renzo]]. There's also the borderline rapist bar patron [[spoiler: who gets his throat ripped out by an apparently possessed Sarah Palmer]].
* AsskickingEqualsAuthority: Ray's gang used to appoint the best arm wrestler as their leader.
* BadassBystander: The accountant who ends up gunning down [[spoiler: Hutch and Chantal]] in a firefight after they park their car in his driveway.
* BearerOfBadNews: Sheriff Truman feels uncomfortable telling Benjamin Horne that his grandson Richard [[spoiler:was the one who ran over and killed the little boy]].
* BittersweetEnding: This is the fate of those Twin Peaks residents who didn't get an EarnYourHappyEnding or DownerEnding.
** Bobby Briggs has cleaned up his life and become a respected Sheriff's Deputy. He also has a daughter he loves. Sadly, his relationship with Shelly did not survive the ensuing years.
** Norma Jennings is still operating her dinner 25 years later with no sign of Big Ed in her life but still financially stable and seemingly happy.
** Benjamin Horne has a monster of a grandson but has reformed and become a respectable human being.
** Jerry Horne is living as TheStoner but with three times as much profit from his legal pot business as his millionaire brother.
** Doctor Jacobi has given up his life as a psychiatrist to sell gold-painted shovels and serve as a late night Creator/AlexJones EXPY. He seems satisfied with his life despite the complete ludicrousness of it.
** The good ([[spoiler: maybe]]) Cooper returns, but has abandoned some of his former pure personality by the end of the series and shows aspects of his evil doppelganger emerging.
** Laura is [[spoiler: still alive]] in some form, but [[spoiler: has lived in fear and on the run]], unaware of her role as TheChosenOne. Just when it seems like Cooper is about to save her and take her to live out the rest of her life, [[spoiler: it's revealed that the Tremonds/Chalfonts have been warping reality by eliminating her family from existence. ''Maybe'' - the hints that her family still might exist actually make things much, much worse]].
* BloodierAndGorier: Just as TheMovie is DarkerAndEdgier than the original series in thematic content and emotional impact, ''The Return'' is DarkerAndEdgier in tone than the original series in terms of the graphic content portrayed: including, among other things, a graphic, slasher flick style [[spoiler:death by sex]] at the hands of a mysterious alien creature, a brutal ice pick murder by a midget [[LittlePeopleAreSurreal of course]], [[spoiler: The Woodsmen]] making people's heads [[YourHeadAsplode explode]], and the kind of crime scene sequence that would make Creator/DavidFincher wince.
* BookEnds: The two canon spinoff books for ''The Return'', ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'' and ''Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier''. Both involve collections of thoughts and annotations by Tammy on the events of both series and wrap up a few plot points while also raising some new questions.
** Both the original series' beginning and ''The Return'''s conclusion involve Dale Cooper arriving in the town of Twin Peaks.
* CameBackWrong: Agent Cooper is perhaps the ultimate example of this as not only did he ''first'' come back with Bob possessing him but also later comes back as an EmptyShell.
* CaptainObvious: Gordon Cole's deadpan delivery of "He's dead!" after staring at the [[YourHeadASplode exploded head]] of [[spoiler: Bill Hastings]].
* CharacterDevelopment: Ben Horne has abandoned the majority of his {{Jerkass}} tendencies and made a complete HeelFaceTurn. ''The Secret History of Twin Peaks'' says this was in part due to the events of the orginal series and his daughter's coma. Jerry Horne, by contrast, is a subverted example as he's virtually unchanged after 25 years.
** Bobby has become a responsible adult, police officer, and good father with seemingly none of his earlier bad habits remaining.
* CharacterShilling:
** In the second episode Shelly gushes about how cool James is. This seems to be part of her characterization that she likes [[AllGirlsWantBadBoys bad boys]].
** There's an early scene where Gordon must defend recruiting Tammy by talking about what a great agent she is.
* CleaningUpRomanticLooseEnds: Exaggerated and possibly parodied in episode 15. How do [[spoiler:Ed and Norma]] end up together after decades of pinning for each other? [[spoiler: Nadine gives Ed his blessing to be with Norma. Shortly after, Norma ends her relationship with her business partner over a disagreement in the business then ''immediatly'' Ed proposes to her and they kiss.]]
* CliffhangerCopOut: ''Averted'' big time. From the very first episode we see that the aftermath of having Cooper's BOB-possessed Doppelganger run free for twenty-five years has been taken to it's [[TheDreaded logical conclusion]].
* ClusterFBomb: A few characters indulge in this now that the show has greater freedom with its content, most notably Richard Horne.
* CoitusEnsues: In episode 1 with Tracey and Sam. {{Justified}} as Tracey has been trying to drop some mammoth clues she doesn't want to wait around for him to make a move. [[spoiler: Too bad it doesn't end well.]]
* ComicallyCrossEyed: A cross-eyed mook in Episode 13 provides some comic relief in the otherwise tense confrontation between Evil Cooper and Ray's gang.
* CosmicHorrorStory: Probably the one of the most extreme examples, after 25 years in the lodge Cooper [[spoiler: has learned to predict the future, make fabricated tulpas, open the curtains of the waiting room by the shake of his hand, yet at the end he is confused, and utterly defeated by the sheer mindscrew of the unfolded events which may or may not be his fault.]]
* CountryMatters: The drunk trucker in Episode 14 insults Sarah Palmer with the line "It's a free cunt-ry."
* CriminalMindGames: [[spoiler:Cooper's BOB controlled Doppelganger]] has evolved significantly from the crude, [[spoiler:demonic]] thrill killer he was in the original series by ''The Return'', and goes out of his way to toy with his victims/[[spoiler:food]] before killing them, including [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness some of his own minions]]. Justifiable as [[spoiler:BOB gets to know the victims of his possession and is using Cooper's more measured character traits and more complex thought process as a vehicle for his actions]].
* CursedWithAwesome: The White Lodge gave Freddie SuperStrength that lands him in jail when he gets in a fight, and as part of the deal must wear a non-removable gardening glove because his hand will begin gushing blood if he removes it. Luckily it pays off when [[spoiler: he uses his gloved punching hand to defeat the series' BigBad]].
* DarkerAndEdgier: The third season and by lightyears of distance. While the original show had it's nightmarish and violent moments, it was obvious that Creator/{{ABC}} at the time (c. 1990) was VERY restrictive with all the heavy subject matter the show dealt with (rape, murder, incest, vicious sexual violence, drug-addiction, etc). And the original series featured a lot of goofy offbeat humour, adorable quirky characters, fun pieces of music and soap-opera romance that made you forget about all the dark content at the core of the show. These themes were treated more explicitly and unrestricted in the film, anyway. And now, 25 years later, being a limited series in nothing less than the adults-only network Creator/{{Showtime}}, Lynch and Frost do not skimp on disturbing content; grisly imagery, [[ClusterFBomb f-bombs]], on-screen gruesome deaths, gore, nudity, and dark-as-midnight-on-a-moonless-night atmosphere. With little-to-nothing humour and with almost no musical score, the third season so far can be placed among Lynch's most unsettling works ever. Which [[Film/BlueVelvet is]] [[Film/LostHighway saying]] [[Film/MulhollandDrive a]] [[Film/InlandEmpire lot.]]
* DeathBySex: In Episode 1, while making out [[spoiler:Sam Colby and Tracey]] are murdered by something from the Black Lodge that looks like one of TheGreys.
* DeathOfAChild: In The Return part 6, Richard Horne commits a hit and run on a little boy [[AdultFear in front of his mother]].
* DeliberatelyMonochrome: All of the scenes set in [[spoiler: the White Lodge]].
* DemotedToExtra: Many recurring and even main characters from the original run only appear in bit parts in "The Return". Notably, James Hurley has only one silent cameo in the first half of the season.
* DistantFinale: One of the most triumphant examples in television history as the show was revived ''twenty-five years later'' with the story going on with only minor interruptions.
* DoubleMeaningTitle: ''The Return'' is the return of the show after 25 years, but [[spoiler:Cooper's attempts to return himself to the outside world and BOB to the Lodge]] are a big part of the plot.
* DownerEnding: This is the fate of those ''Twin Peaks'' residents who didn't get an EarnYourHappyEnding or BittersweetEnding.
** Sheriff Truman is terminally ill from stomach cancer. A DownplayedTrope as he's lived a decent life by all accounts.
** Major Briggs [[spoiler: was murdered by Doppel Coop not long after the series. His headless body continually turns up across the country due to his connection to the Lodges.]]
** Sarah Palmer lives alone in her home and spends all of her time drinking and watching nature documentaries (understandable, given what we found out about her) and is possibly [[spoiler:[[DemonicPossession possessed by a demon]] that lives in a mysterious black void behind her face]].
** Shelly is working the same job she did 25 years ago with a daughter trapped in the same abusive marriage she was. [[spoiler: Oh and she divorced the HeelFaceTurn Bobby Briggs to continue dating losers.]]
** Audrey [[spoiler: survived the bank explosion, but is now trapped in an unhappy marriage and traumatized by the events involving Ghostwood. To make matters worse, she's potentially the mother of Richard Horne, a sexually abusive criminal now in trouble for killing a little boy.]] Oh, and the worst part of it all? It's heavily implied most if not all of her experiences since the season 2 finale set in the 1990s [[spoiler: are AllJustADream]].
* DroneOfDread: Much of the soundtrack consists of this. There's even a brief, eerie drone right before the opening theme now.
* DroppedABridgeOnHim: [[spoiler:William Hastings]] after being dragged into the plot and helping Gordon uncover some mysteries related to Cooper, meets an abrupt and violent end by one of the Woodsmen.
* EarnYourHappyEnding:
** This is the fate of those residents who didn't get a BittersweetEnding or DownerEnding.
*** Nadine's silent drape business, [[{{Pun}} Run Silent, Run Drapes]], is an apparent success and in business 25 years after its creation.
*** Lucy and Andy despite their relationship issues in the original series have been stably married for the past 25 years.
*** Gordon Cole is the Deputy Director of the FBI.
*** Denise Bryson has transitioned, overcoming what Gordon Cole called a "wild and confused time", and become the Chief of Staff for the FBI.
*** A DownplayedTrope example with Tommy "Hawk" Hill as he's now Deputy Chief of the Twin Peaks Sheriff's Department--which seems close to his original rank. The only reason it qualifies is the Sheriff's Department is now much-much larger.
** With regards to the series itself, [[spoiler:BOB is finally destroyed along with Cooper's doppelganger, who is subsequently regenerated into a "good" version that spends time with Diane. Meanwhile, the real Cooper goes back to Rancho Rosa to provide for Dougie's family]]. However, the final episode serves as an epilogue which comes across as a GainaxEnding beyond this point.
* ElephantInTheLivingRoom: In the last episode [[spoiler: Carrie Page has dead man shot in the head in hers and neither she nor Cooper talk about it.]]
* EveryEpisodeEnding: Almost every episode has ended with a different indie band performing at the roadhouse in Twin Peaks while the credits roll.
* EvilTowerOfOminousness: Inverted with [[spoiler:the White Lodge, whose denizens dwell in a giant, ominous tower perched above an alien sea, but are the most purely good spiritual beings in the series' mythos]].
* {{Fanservice}}:
** David Lynch includes quite a bit of it in this series that make use of Showtime's allowance of nudity. Mostly it is of the very beautiful female cast but the women in the audience also get a few moments like Dougie Jones' doctor's appointment where he's shirtless. Creator/KyleMacLachlan is ripped for a man his age (or in general).
** Agent Tammy Preston's exaggerated [[SexyWalk hip movements]] clearly deconstruct this trope.
* GainaxEnding: Part 18, aside from the bit mentioned under EarnYourHappyEnding above (which ''does'' provide a conclusion for the main plot in a coherent way). It outdoes even the original series and the TropeNamer in mind screwiness, and is possibly the most extreme example ever aired on American television. [[spoiler:Cooper and Diane apparently travel to an alternate universe through the power lines. They stop at a motel and have sex before she mysteriously disappears in the morning, Cooper finds a letter written by a Linda addressing a man named Richard, and then he drives to Odessa, Texas, looking for Laura Palmer. He finds her, but she is a completely different person named Carrie Page, and is preparing to leave town after having apparently killed a man. He takes her up to Twin Peaks to see her mother, believing this to be the key to the mystery, only to learn that another family, the Tremonds, live there, and the house was previously owned by the Chalfonts. Cooper desperately questions what year it is and Carrie/Laura stares up at the house before she hears someone (most likely Sarah) calling out Laura's name. She screams, and all the lights in the house and on the street go out. Roll credits.]] Given that this is a Creator/DavidLynch work, it's not too surprising to see his story end on a weird note, although at the very least it plays out like a SequelHook for another potential season more than anything.
* GenerationXerox: Shelly's daughter Rebecca Burnett is essentially her original series incarnation.
* GoryDiscretionShot: Subverted: We don't get to see [[spoiler: Bill Hastings']] [[YourHeadAsplode head explode]] on-screen, but we get a good long look at what it [[{{Gorn}} looks like]] afterwards.
* GreenAesop: [[spoiler: ''The Return'' implies that a nuclear test explosion that destroyed part of the southwestern wilderness attracted an infestation of Lodge creatures and Woodsmen who saw ample feeding ground for garmonbozia.]]
* GroinAttack: In Episode 18, Richard disables one of the cowboys by kicking him in the nuts.
* HateSink: [[AxCrazy Richard Horne]] and [[DirtyCop Deputy Chad Broxford]] stand out as particularly loathsome, even in comparison to the actual demons on the show. [[AddledAddict Steven Burnett]] also qualifies, being a deadbeat drug addict and domestic abuser.
* HaveYouToldAnyoneElse: Richard Horne asks Miriam, who identified him during his hit-and-run, if she had told anyone else besides writing to the Sheriff. She says no. [[spoiler: Bad idea]].
* {{Homage}}: The [[spoiler: nuclear explosion]] in Part 8, with its abstract visuals and terrifying modern classical soundtrack, appears to be one to Creator/StanleyKubrick, particularly the Star Gate sequence in ''2001: A Space Odyssey''.
* HookerWithAHeartOfGold: Jade the hooker who Dougie was with before he's taken back to the lodge. Even beyond her business relationship with Dougie she still takes the time to give catatonic Cooper (whom she mistakes for as Dougie having a stroke) a ride and when she finds the key to the Great Northern that he dropped she takes the time to send it back to the hotel rather than tossing it.
* TheImmodestOrgasm: Naomi Watts' character screams in ecstasy while making love to her husband which disturbs her little son enough in his bed to perform a CatapultNightmare.
* JerkassHasAPoint: The Mitchum Brothers beating up the Pit Boss was a KickTheDog moment but the odds of hitting 30 jackpots simultaneously are so astronomically unlikely, it had to be a case of TooDumbToLive to believe that [[spoiler: Cooper]] wasn't cheating. Which he was, [[spoiler: just with the help of the Lodge spirits.]] Any respectable Pit Boss would have kicked him out of the casino after his third jackpot. Which they're allowed to even if they can't prove he was cheating.
* LastEpisodeNewCharacter: Carrie Page [[spoiler: a waitress who looks like Laura Palmer and might actually be her under a new identity.]]
* LastNoteNightmare: A rare ''narrative'' example of this. In the final two episodes of the series, [[spoiler: [[EarnYourHappyEnding BOB is destroyed, the real Diane returns and reunites with Cooper, a new doppelganger is created to provide for Janey-E and Sonny Jim, and Cooper apparently finds Laura Palmer alive and living under a new identity, "Carrie".]] However, when they go to the house where Laura's mother lives, "Carrie" hears Sarah Palmer calling her name and lets out a [[HellIsThatnoise bloodcurdling scream.]] ]] [[GainaxEnding End series.]]
* LaterInstallmentWeirdness: It was more or less confirmed by Lynch and Frost that ''The Return'' would have a good bit of this, in no small part due to a changed up cast and more creative control on the part of David Lynch. And with the ToneShift from the original series' mystery and TheMovie's tragedy into outright morbid and abrasive surrealism along with grimmer BlackComedy replacing the first two seasons' folksy charm, ''does it ever''.
** Within the story itself, [[spoiler: BOB]] has switched from the personification of evil in its most chaotic form to a more calculating type of BigBad, though an explanation can be chalked up to the personality of who he's possessing.
** While the original series had a limited setting in both its number of major characters and physical scope, ''The Return'' has a great deal of fun with its LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and varied settings.
* LeaningOnTheFourthWall: When Cooper [[spoiler: finally breaks out of his EmptyShell state in Part 16, he immediately contacts MIKE, who responds with an exasperated "Finally!"]]
* LeaveTheCameraRunning: A favorite technique of Lynch's, it's used more than ever in ''The Return''. Special mentions:
** A long extended sequence of Dr. Jacoby spray painting shovels.
** ''Several'' minutes of watching the roadhouse janitor sweep the floor.
** Gordon Cole's French girlfriend/escort drawing out her exit of the room to ludicrous levels while Albert glares in impatience.
* LeftHanging: As of the series' end, BOB [[spoiler: is defeated]] and the situations with Dougie and the Doppelganger are resolved, but several mysteries remain:
** We still have no idea [[spoiler: where Audrey is when she wakes up from her existential dream]]. Eventually addressed in ''The Final Dossier'': [[spoiler: she is in an asylum as viewers had speculated prior. However, her marriage to Charlie did exist - we just don't know if what we saw of it was her daily life or an anxiety dream]].
** We have no idea [[spoiler: how Beverly Page's marital strife is resolved, or whether Ben Horne chooses to act on his attraction to her]].
** Is Cooper [[spoiler: as "Richard", slowly losing his individuality in the new dimension he created?]]
** What's going on with Linda's state-provided wheelchair, and will Carl Rodd be able to look out for his trailer park residents in their time of need?
** The stories of the characters introduced in EveryEpisodeEnding at the Roadhouse are never followed up on. Of course, it's also possible that several of their sequences could be AllJustADream.
** And ''what'' exactly is going on with Red, the designer drug trade (and its apparent zombie-like effects on the town of Twin Peaks), and will the Twin Peaks Sheriff's Department be able to put a stop to it?
** Further, what's to become of Shelly's relationship with drug runner Red while co-parenting with the local deputy assigned to the drug trade.
** What becomes of the Gersten/Steven/Becky LoveTriangle? What did Steven do that he was so distraught over in his final scene? And [[spoiler:did he kill himself or not]]?
** One cliffhanger from the second season finale that is never even addressed is what happened to Leo. We last saw him bound in an apparent DeathTrap, with a cage of spiders dangling over his head and keeping it aloft with his teeth.
** Most importantly, how does the main twist at the end resolve? Does Laura/[[spoiler: "Carrie" awaken to her possible true identity, and if so does she get past the Tremonds/Chalfonts and let herself be destroyed by JUDY? Or is she doomed to go on living while Judy survives, unable to fulfill her HeroicSacrifice? Does she even ''need'' or ''want'' to?]]
* TheLegionsOfHell: [[spoiler: The Woodsmen]].
* TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday: In Episode 15 we see the Woodsmen's convenient store disappear at the clearing after Evil Cooper has left the place.
* MadnessMantra: The woodman's haunting incantation in Episode 8, repeated over 10 times in less than four minutes.
-->"This is the water, and this is the well. Drink full, and descend. The horse is the white of the eyes, and dark within."
* MayDecemberRomance: Gordon Cole's M.O. After hitting on a 18ish Shelly in the original series, he's now set his sights on women apparently in their 20s and 30s, played by the 70-year-old David Lynch. He does seem to make an exception for Monica Bellucci though.
* MonochromeCasting: Hawk is now the only non-white major character in the show, with Josie Packard gone and all new characters being white.
* MonochromePast:
** In Episode 8, most of the scenes set in 1945 and 1956 are shown in black & white.
** Episode 17 has footage of the original Twin Peaks series from 25 years back which are shown colorless.
* MultipleGunshotDeath: [[spoiler:Hutch]] gets riddled with bullets from the BadassBystander accountant in Episode 16.
* NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: ''The Final Dossier'' indicates that Lana Milford had a relationship with none other than UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump.
* NonProtagonistResolver: [[spoiler:Evil Cooper is killed by side character Lucy and BOB gets defeated with a few KO punches from secondary character Freddie's magical punching glove gifted to him by the White Lodge.]]
* NotHimself: The story is centered around three versions of Cooper: [[spoiler: There's Doppel Coop who is BOB and another Black Lodge spirit riding around in the original's body like ''Fast and the Furious'' villains. There's actual Coop who is an EmptyShell with no personality and seeming possible brain damage from 25 years in the Black Lodge. Then there's Dougie Jones who is ''another'' clone of Cooper and a sleazy insurance salesman]]. In the last few episodes, [[spoiler:original-flavor Coop, determined, kind-hearted, and capable, finally returns and sets many things right]]... but in the finale [[spoiler:yet another variation appears. He believes he is Cooper, and tries to help Laura. But he is inexplicably referred to as "Richard," deals with problems much more ruthlessly than Cooper ever did, and frequently seems confused and out of his depth.]]
* NotStayingForBreakfast: The next morning after Dale and Diane had sex in Episode 18, she is gone but left a note.
* OffIntoTheDistanceEnding: Episode 8 ends with one of the Woodsmen walking off from the radio station into the distance.
* OffscreenBreakup:
** Episode 11 confirms that [[spoiler: Shelly's daughter Becky is also Bobby's]] but [[spoiler: they are now separated and Shelly is dating someone else]].
** By implication [[spoiler: Audrey and Jack since the former is now unhappily married to a man named Charlie]].
* OhCrap: In Episode 13, this is Ray's response after [[spoiler: Coop's doppelganger defeats Ranzo in an arm wrestling and [[OneHitKill kills him in one punch]] to become the new gang leader.]]
* OnePhoneCall: In Episode 4, Gordon Cole requests local police to give Coop's doppelganger his phone call in jail.
* OneSidedArmWrestling: Evil Cooper seems like an underdog in the arm wrestling contest against the giant mook, but it turns out the one-sidedness goes the other way.
* OrpheanRescue: In the penultimate episode, [[spoiler: Cooper travels backwards in time to try and save Laura Palmer's life, apparently by leading her to the White Lodge. He appears to her in the forest and takes her by the hand, leading her deeper into the woods. However, just as in the original Orpheus myth, he turns around to discover that she has disappeared. After this, the forest echoes with her disembodied scream]]. Exactly ''what'' happens there is extremely ambiguous, but he ''did'' apparently [[spoiler: save Laura's life. Just not in the way he intended]].
* OutOfCharacterAlert: Cooper refuses an offer of coffee from the Twin Peaks constabulary.
* ThePatientHasLeftTheBuilding: Defied by Cooper. When he awakes from his coma, he request the doc to check his vital signs to prove that he is ready to leave the hospital, which he does with official approval five minutes later.
* PetTheDog: The show establishes that the Mitchum Brothers are okay when Bradley firmly states that they ''can't'' fire Candy because "she'll have no place to go!"
* PoliceCodeForEverything: In Episode 1, the cop mentions a "possible 1054" with regards to the lock they needed to crack. The neighbor misunderstands and corrects him that the address is actually 1349.
* QuestionableConsent: [[spoiler: In Episode 10, Janey-E has sex with Agent Cooper, whom she believes to be her husband. He's barely responsive to anything said to people but they have apparently mind-blowing sex despite it.]]
* RaygunGothic: [[spoiler: The Giant and Señorita Dido live in a giant, otherworldly tower with this sort of aesthetic]].
* RealPersonCameo: The owner of the Palmer house at the end is played by the real owner of the house.
* {{Retraux}}: The final segment of Part 8 mimics 50's sci-fi B-movies.
* RevengeOfTheSequel: "The Return" has this stock title feeling to it.
* ScareChord: The epic nuclear explosion montage in Episode 8 is accompanied by a collage of [[https://youtu.be/4IKUeIEdRMY?t=25 scare chords]].
* SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: [[spoiler:Cooper tries to do this in the last two episodes regarding Laura's murder, but things don't go as planned.]]
* ShortDistancePhoneCall: In Episode 4, Frank Truman calls Lucy from his mobile while walking into her office which gives her a good fright because she doesn't understand how cell phones work.
* ShoutOut:
** Gordon has a portrait of Creator/FranzKafka in his office. Lynch is an admitted devotee of Kafka.
** The name of Nadine's store Run Silent, Run Drapes is a play on the film ''Film/RunSilentRunDeep''.
* SilentWhisper: At the White Lodge in Episode 18, Laura whispers something in Cooper's ears, but we never know exactly what.
* SocietyMarchesOn: The initial portrayal of Denise Bryson comes within a hair of portraying her ambiguously transgender identity for comedy. In ''The Return'', Gordon Cole alludes to the struggle to get her colleagues to accept and respect her, and her standing as a highly competent special agent is emphasized to a greater extent than her ambiguous gender identity.
* SoundtrackDissonance: The sex scene between Dale and Diane in Episode 18 is accompanied by an eerie soundtrack.
* StockholmSyndrome: An unnerving example - Audrey keeps [[spoiler: a portrait of Cooper]] on prominent display in spite of [[spoiler: having been forced on by his evil doppelganger while she was in a coma and being the mother of his illegitimate child]].
* ToneShift: ''The Return'' switches the orginal show's quirky, soap opera atmosphere out for a dry, disjointed, and often darkly comic style consistent with mid-career David Lynch films like ''Film/MulhollandDrive'' and ''Film/LostHighway''.
* TrademarkFavoriteFood: Even in his barely conscious form of Dougie Jones, Cooper still ''loves'' coffee and cherry pie.
* TravelingAtTheSpeedOfPlot: For the climax of Episode 17, everyone of importance is transported to the Twin Peaks sheriff station by cinematic trickery.
* TrickedOutShoes: In Episode 17, Chad Broxford breaks himself out of his prison cell by using a key which he had hidden inside the sole of his right shoe.
* TrunkShot: When the police search William Hastings' car in Episode 1.
* VerbalBackspace: When Cooper informs Janey-E he has to leave Vegas for Twin Peaks, he first talks about Dougie in the third person but then corrects himself in order not to sound suspicious.
-->'''Cooper''': Dougie... I mean...I will be back.
* VomitIndiscretionShot: Of Dougie Jones vomiting on the floor in Episode 3.
* WeirdnessCensor: Nobody is capable of recognizing Dougie Jones' odd behavior. His wife Janey-E suspects him of having had a stroke but after the doctor confirmed his well-being she puts up with him being a BlankSlate like everyone else does.
* WhamLine: Episode 18
-->[[spoiler:'''Cooper''': What Year is This?]]
* WhamShot: Episode 16 abruptly ends with [[spoiler:Audrey running towards the camera after a fight breaks out at the roadhouse begging Charlie to get her out of there, and then immediately to her in an all white room in white clothes looking into a mirror in confusion.]]
** After several episodes of Sarah Palmer slipping into alcoholism and madness in a downward spiral that has gone on for the past twenty-five years, we're treated to a jarring shot of her [[spoiler: screaming as she tries to destroy Laura's portrait]].
* WhatYearIsThis: [[spoiler: Literally the final line spoken by Cooper (or is he Richard now?)]]
* YouCantFightFate: In episode 18, [[spoiler: Cooper tries to use his access to the Black Lodge to save Laura before her death]]. While he does alter the exact sequence of events, it's strongly implied that it doesn't work.... at least as he intended.
** Addressed further in ''The Final Dossier''. In the alternate timeline, [[spoiler: Laura mysteriously disappears, but the effect is no less traumatic, and many of the same people who died tragically in the original timeline also die in the new one]].
[[/folder]]
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