* Creator/{{Tokyopop}} is a meta-example.
** They were the first U.S. manga publisher who published a lot of unflipped, read-it-right-to-left manga in English.[[note]]This had been done before, but extremely seldom. We're talking a total of less than ten manga books, tops, and most of them were too obscure for either comics fans or manga lovers to have heard of them.[[/note]]
** The affordable ten-dollar digest editions that pretty much all U.S. manga publishers use nowadays was their idea. Before Tokyopop started publishing those, the norm had been to publish translated manga flipped left-to-right, in single-issue comic books with a chapter or two in each issue, which were then collected in trade paperbacks, just like American comic books.
** Nowadays, almost all U.S. manga editions leave the original SFX in, but Tokyopop were the first ones to make it standard procedure. Nowadays, people will simply be annoyed by how there's no translation of the SFX at all in the Tokyopop editions, so that you'll have to figure out what it's supposed to sound like on your own.
** Another idea of theirs was the concept of having your manga sold in bookstores instead of in comic book stores. This really helped increase their potential customer-base. This is also because a lot of bookstores may be placed in area(s) of the town where kids without cars can access them -- i.e. the mall. Not to mention, comic book stores don't even exist in some towns in FlyoverCountry -- but bookstores themselves do.
** And content-wise, they were the first ones to publish high school romance shoujo manga. Pretty much all of what little shoujo had been published in the USA up until that point had featured some element of adventure or fantasy that the publishers hoped would appeal to male readers, but Tokyopop published high-school romances like ''Manga/KareKano'' and ''Manga/MarmaladeBoy'', that had no supernatural or adventure elements and were clearly intended for girls (but good enough to be read by anyone regardless of gender). In short, Tokyopop was the first American manga publisher to fully accept that manga didn't have to pretend to be American comic books. Nowadays every publisher does this, so Tokyopop's editions come off as cheap-looking compared to, say, Viz's and Kodansha's manga. Especially the early Tokyopop releases. The translations of Sailor Moon and Magic Knight Rayearth were absolutely painful with spelling and character name inconsistencies galore. And the fact that it's unflipped is just AsbestosFreeCereal now that it goes without saying that you don't flip your manga.
* This also happens a lot with dubbing. Since the standards for anime dub voice acting have improved so much in recent years, many dubs that were considered [[SuperlativeDubbing huge steps forward in quality]] for their time have become increasingly unpopular among modern viewers. Examples include ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' and ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion''. An even better example would be the ''Anime/TenchiMuyo'' franchise. Back in the day (around 1994, to be exact), the use of union actors combined with clever dub scripts was considered a groundbreaking development in the world of anime dubbing. While many people still look back fondly on the dub even now, more level-headed viewers without a NostalgiaFilter will notice the dubs' miscast actors and actresses, awkward delivery, and overall poor acting quality in comparison to modern dubs for anime like ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann'' and ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist''.
* ''Anime/CuteyHoney'' will make you cringe, until you realize it created the template for anime fanservice, for the Warrior MagicalGirl achetype and possibly featured the first ActionGirl main character. If you don't remember it from the early 70s, you'll think it's just another typical high-schooler gone superhero story.
* ''Manga/DokiDokiSchoolHours'' got hit by this hard. The manga is one of the early examples of the "WackyHomeroom"-format, up to and including a childish teacher, and likely formed the inspiration for other works like ''Manga/AzumangaDaioh'' and ''Manga/LuckyStar''. Alas, the anime got released ''after'' those other series, which made a lot of viewers cringe at the "tired and old" jokes.
* ''Franchise/DragonBall'' for that matter. It seems horribly cliché now (even more so than ''Fist Of The North Star'', if only because it was copied more, or at least more directly) but it was refreshing at the time. One of the big ones is the IdiotHero, which has been done to death in Shonen, but Goku was one of the first, though predated by the title character of ''Manga/{{Kinnikuman}}'' (and besides that Goku is more naive than stupid. That's TheThemeParkVersion for you - the real version will take forever to read.)
* ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'' seems like horribly cliché shonen, but keep in mind it more or less helped create many of the shonen tropes that exist today. Along with ''Manga/DragonBall'', many people cite it as a GatewaySeries or an inspiration for other Shonen creations.
* ''Manga/LoveHina''. Yes, if you just started reading or watching it today, it just seems like another [[ClicheStorm cliché]] harem anime. This mainly comes from the fact that the show redefined nearly every rule of modern anime romance/harem comedy, and has been copied relentlessly since.
* {{Magical Girl}}s. If you're not an old-school, die-hard fan, you'll probably think that everything in the genre is a ripoff of ''Franchise/SailorMoon''.
** ''Anime/SailorMoon'' itself gets this as well, as it created a sub-genre, and in many countries also contributed to make Anime popular in the first place. When compared [[Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica to]] [[Manga/TokyoMewMew some]] [[Franchise/MaiHiME more]] [[Anime/PrettyCure modern]] [[Franchise/LyricalNanoha shows]], it can look overly cheesy, {{Filler}}-ridden, and low-budget.
** Another {{magical girl}} series to suffer from this and which predates ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' is ''Anime/MajokkoMegChan'', from 1974. It introduced many now-common elements to the genre and was groundbreaking as far as the genre was concerned. Nowadays, since the tropes it introduced have been done repeatedly since, it isn't highly regarded.
* ''LightNovel/MariaSamaGaMiteru'' is gradually getting there; the series has been copied and especially parodied mercilessly, to the point where viewers suspect it to be a parody ''itself''. Admittedly, the [[RomanticTwoGirlFriendship romantic entanglements between the girls]] of the depicted all-girl school do get rather fluffy and melodramatic at times, but it mostly kept in check by the tight storytelling and outstanding voice-acting in the anime.
* ''Anime/MazingerZ'', the TropeCodifier for SuperRobot shows, never got that much love outside of Japan, due to the fact that it was usually picked up sometime ''after'' successive shows, such as ''Anime/{{Voltron}}'' and even ''[[Anime/UFORoboGrendizer Grendizer]]'' got popular, leading to ''Mazinger'' often being called a ripoff of its own derivatives.
** Similarly, while ''Mazinger Z'' and ''Manga/GetterRobo'' were hugely influential and are often seen as the grandfathers of the SuperRobot genre, the shows themselves often get criticized by modern fans for being really repetitive and boring by modern standards. The treatment of women, while par for the course in the 70's, also comes under fire from many modern anime fans.
* Likewise, ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'', the TropeMaker for RealRobot shows, never quite caught on in the States, airing after the explosively popular ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing''. Even many fans of Universal Century timeline, the continuity of ''Mobile Suit Gundam'', prefer the sequel series ''Anime/MobileSuitZetaGundam'' or the more modern OVA series.
* ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' has single-handedly popularized the concept of {{Deconstruction}} for formulaic, beaten genres, as well as demonstrating just what circumstances would realistically result in a token teenage action protagonists having to save the world, and how much pain, isolation and psychological pressure would they have to endure in the process.
** This of course prompted imitators who went full steam ahead with DarkerAndEdgier deconstructions that applied CerebusSyndrome to anything from {{Mons}} (like ''Anime/DigimonTamers'' and ''Manga/{{Narutaru}}'') to MagicalGirl series (including hits such as ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'' and ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'') to shonen action series (such as ''Manga/HunterXHunter'' and ''Manga/AttackOnTitan''). Likewise, {{Reconstruction}} series also emerged that attempted to justify the casual, hot-blooded nature of a SuperRobot show (such as ''Anime/GaoGaiGar'', ''Anime/RahXephon'', and ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann''). As as result, the modern viewer is likely to be familiar with some themes and aesthetics started by ''Evangelion'' but would probably not consider its approach and message as innovative.
** The series has also become so ingrained in Japanese pop culture that the [[Anime/RebuildOfEvangelion sequel/remake series]] doesn't even ''try'' to retain some of the elements that were treated as {{Shocking Swerve}}s or {{Driving Question}}s in the original show. There's just an assumption that thanks to PopCulturalOsmosis, the audience already knows stuff like [[spoiler: Kaworu being an angel or Lilith being locked up underneath the NERV base]], and the producers instead preferred to concentrate on the original's other strong side: unique designs of the Evangelions, Angels and locations, as well as VisualEffectsOfAwesome. The public was impressed, but those who debated the original were quite uncertain as to what message do the new movies try to convey, or whether there even is one.
** Partially due to the above reasons, the third film in the ''Rebuild'' saga was rewritten from the grounds up to outdo the original series in the ShootTheShaggyDog department. The end result wasn't as well received as the previous two. New viewers were dismayed by the blatancy and shoehorning of drama, while the hardcore fanbase had an outcry over the misaimed shock value. Like the sequels to ''Film/TheMatrix'', 3.33 played up the aspects that were supposed to surprise and shock the viewer as if they were just as groundbreaking as when the original was released in 1995. However, due to various anime series that responded to everything that the original ''Evangelion'' stated, or refuted the original show's cynicism, the third film didn't have the expected emotional impact, and when analyzed, turned out not to actually be all that thoughtful due to the rushed plot and so many TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt situations the viewers won't be surprised by anymore.
* Creator/OsamuTezuka falls victim to this in the American market. His characters look much closer to Disney and Fleischer cartoons than modern anime and manga, making his art look quaint to modern manga readers. Additionally, it's hard to spot the sheer innovation in his page layouts and stylized pacing when they've more or less become the norm after around fifty years.
** ''Manga/AstroBoy'' is THE Anime and Manga. It was the first truly popular piece in not only Japan, but also in the States, where it was one of the first Anime it and other foreign audiences had ever received. It's hard to articulate how much Astro Boy means to the medium; it's on par with ''Mickey Mouse'' in how important of an animated work it is.
** ''New Treasure Island'', Tezuka's breakout work and often incorrectly referred to as his debut[[note]]He had been drawing for a few years already; this was simply his first long-form adventure work, as opposed to the simple gag comics he'd been doing previously[[/note]], has been most widely cited for its [[http://www.tcj.com/tezuka-osamu-outwits-the-phantom-blot-the-case-of-new-treasure-island-contd/shintakarajima-2-3/ first two pages]], depicting its lead character driving a car. Manga creators such as Fujiko Fujio have praised these pages' cinematic qualities and then-unparalleled sense of excitement, and they were highly influential to a generation of authors, but after 70 years of ever more dynamic manga art, the pages seem rather flat and slow.
** To the modern-day reader, ''The Mysterious Underground Men'' is just another relatively obscure Osamu Tezuka manga from his early days. No masterpiece, but still a fun book to spend half an hour or so reading. But to the people that read it when it first came out in 1948, it was shocking to see a manga with some genuinely tragic moments. Not only was Tezuka bringing tragedy to manga, he was doing it by using plots where [[AnyoneCanDie main characters died]] in a medium where this was unheard of until now.
** Naoki Urasawa's ''Manga/{{Pluto}}'', an UltimateUniverse of an ''Anime/AstroBoy'' story arc from the '70s, is a lot closer to the original story than some people may realize. The primary change is simply a PerspectiveFlip.
* ''Anime/{{Robotech}}''. With its dramatic tone and unvarnished depictions of the death and destruction caused by war, it was the first localized anime to really display Japanese animation's capacity for weighty, dramatic stories to a western audience. With uncut translations of space opera now a dime a dozen, and with the series' multiple flaws now harder to forgive, many now ignore the series' achievements and instead focus on the compromises made in the franchise's creation--namely, the stitching together of three distinct and unrelated anime series into one narrative, necessary for the series to get a syndication deal. The {{Macekre}} page goes into greater detail about the significance of ''Robotech'', [[YouKeepUsingThatWord despite the title]] being a TakeThat to Carl Macek for said compromises.
** The Expanded Robotech Universe, particularly Sentinels, blew the marriage of Rick and Lisa out of proportion by modern standards. The wedding took two comic book issues to tell and that was after about ten issues of "anticipation" leading up to the big day. Sentimental fans might be to blame. New fans were wondering when they were going to just launch the mission.
* ''Manga/SaintSeiya'' suffers from this quite badly if one were to watch if after seeing more recent {{Shonen}} series, especially during the Gold Saint arc. It pretty much ''created'' the RescueArc, and if not, it certainly was what popularized it.
* ''Manga/KatteniKaizo'', a comic about a boy who believes his world to be a FantasyKitchenSink and forms a club based around it, in the end [[spoiler: it all turns out to have been a CuckooNest]]. That description makes it sound like a parody or a {{Deconstruction}} of ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya''; thing is, Kaizo predates Haruhi by a couple of years.
** ''Haruhi Suzumiya'' itself has fallen into this pattern in recent years; with its plot and jokes being [[FollowTheLeader copied by many other series to cash in]], the WolverinePublicity of the character, and the decline in popularity following [[SeasonalRot the Endless 8]]. Other MundaneFantastic SliceOfLife anime series, such as ''Manga/AzumangaDaioh''; have remained well-regarded in the time since their original airing.
* Most SchoolgirlSeries from the zero years suffer from this, especially Manga/KOn, Manga/AzumangaDaioh, and Manga/LuckyStar. In our time, it is very difficult to believe that these works, intentionally dedicated to the most common things in the life of ordinary high school students, could become such huge cult successes that they got TV series with more than 20 episodes. This is partly due to the fact that these works were the first big successes in this genre and they were copied many times during the distribution trend of {{Moe}} anime, especially the adaptations from Creator/KyotoAnimation. Most of these series now seem boring by comparison, and so almost never get more than 13 episodes and try to depict as many unusual situations as possible, which makes the popularity of [=K-On=] and Azumanga somewhat incomprehensible to modern viewers.
* HaremGenre has a lot of this among its settings, since the huge popularity of the genre has translated many of his cliches into this genre.
** At one time the idea of ​​ChildhoodFriendRomance as OneTrueLove was very popular and was considered sweet for the majority of the audience because of the sweet romantic charm. However, subsequently, a great many authors began to use this as a cliché and lazy justification for the central romantic line, for which it is now considered very boring and to the point of stupidity an obvious moment in a lot of romance.
** OrdinaryHighSchoolStudent or UnluckyEverydude used to be 90% of the protagonists of all such works, as it helped to make the main character closer to the audience. However, over the years, these tropes have so often been abused and used to indulge the fantasies of the audience that now it will be perceived as an obvious PanderingToTheBase even in old works.
** As well as the two examples above, ChickMagnet was originally a popular element of SugarWiki/SweetDreamsFuel in similar works. Now it will be perceived as a lazy attempt for ill-founded erotica and artificial romance due to the excessive use of this element as the basis of most harems as such. Especially if in combination with the previous paragraph, the protagonist is too simple and unremarkable to attract so many charming and popular girls.
** And finally, most of the old straight HaremGenre works (especially the adaptation of {{Visual Novel}}s like ''VisualNovel/{{Shuffle}}'' or ''VisualNovel/DaCapo'') will now be perceived as silly, unrealistic and indulging the audience, since, due to the years of ClicheStorm, most modern harems are firmly in the SupportingHarem zone in an attempt to depict the story more adequately.
* ''LightNovel/SisterPrincess''. When you watch it in 2010s, it seems to be incredibly cliche. But it's one of the TropeCodifier of "otherworldly harem" anime.
* ''Anime/ScienceNinjaTeamGatchaman'' is the TropeCodifier for nearly all giant robot AND FiveManBand tropes. It started the entire Sentai genre. Today, it's just seen as another combinable mecha show.
** Furthermore, while the ActionGirl is common in both eastern and western works today, both Jun the Swan and Sayaka Yumi (Mazinger Z) are contenders for the first action girl in anime.
* To one who grew up in the 2000s and the new tens, ''Anime/TheVisionOfEscaflowne'' may come of as one big ClicheStorm - especially since a lot of people (Despite its initial run in Japan not faring so well) have actually used it as an influence.
* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' has been homaged, parodied, referenced, and exposed to so much MemeticMutation from various other anime and video games that it can sometimes come off as a bit predictable, and some of the most infamous moments have become less shocking (especially when you WatchItForTheMeme). It's important to remember the manga started in ''1986'', and a lot of the {{Manga/Shonen Jump}} series that share elements with it, such as ''{{Manga/YuGiOh}}'' and ''{{Manga/Yu Yu Hakusho}}'' were inspired by it, not the other way around.
** Ironically, the 2012 anime adaptation helped revitalize attention to it. With modern production values and no fillers, good soundtrack and voice actors, ''[=JoJo=]'' seems fresher now than a lot of more recent anime and manga that it likely inspired in the first place.
* The cover of the manga anthology book ''Four Shôjo Stories'' boasts that it contains "Japanese comics from a uniquely female perspective." In other words, the manga in it is shôjo made by women. When it was first published, this was pretty much unique for a manga published in the USA. Nowadays, the American manga market is brimming over with shôjo manga that women made, and it's hard to understand just how unique this book was when it was first released.
* The {{Tsundere}} archetype as a whole is slowly starting to go down this path. There are several reasons for this. The tsundere archetype was originally created to make certain female characters different from the usual submissive-styled Japanese female characters in not just anime, but traditional Japanese stories as well. Originally, the character itself was just someone that had a harsh outer personality with a soft happy center, but was usually never outwardly violent. However, by the Early 2000s the aforementioned ''Manga/LoveHina'' took this concept to the point where people associate with them calling someone they were secretly in love with names, becoming increasingly jealous at any other female contact, and paired with an IdiotHero who would never notice her feelings, making her even more aggressive. This in turn, caused many, many authors to copy this formula in both Harem and other series that had some form of romance, and run it into the ground. It also contributed to the creation of the ShanaClone; a sub-type of tsundere comprised of mainly short and flat-chested girls which was popularized by ''LightNovel/ShakuganNoShana'', and has spawned numerous [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] ever since, but even this is fading out of appeal by many fans. Nowadays, this style of female tsundere is seen as tired and unoriginal (If not written well). Only deconstructions like ''LightNovel/{{Toradora}}'' and ''LightNovel/ChivalryOfAFailedKnight'' seem to be the sole exceptions today, where they tone down on the tsundere personality to make the female lead less harsh through character development.
* LittleSisterHeroine and BrotherSisterIncest in general, have also been subjected to this recently. Originally, visual novels like ''VisualNovel/YosugaNoSora'' and ''VisualNovel/KanaLittleSister'' that are dedicated to this were considered to be something exceptional and unusual, and the "little sisters" were considered to be very cute and likable TokenMiniMoe characters. By the end of the 2000s, the manga and ranobe in this genre have reached such avalanche sizes that imouto-titles are, at best, considered an extreme ClicheStorm because of the same set of plot twists, and at worst, propaganda of incest and the exploitation of pervert fantasies on par with lolicon and the like. Although at the same time, many similar works have become a hit even outside of Japan, but this is exceptionally rare and a lot of disputes are also caused by the fact that many such heroines are often {{Tsundere}}s (Particular examples include light novels like ''LightNovel/{{Oreimo}}'' and ''LightNovel/TheIrregularAtMagicHighSchool'' from Dengeki Bunko), which itself has been subjected to overused cliches. Combined with ValuesDissonance for western audiences and readers, and you will understand why the sisters are quickly becoming this trope.
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