->"''Our band could be your life!''"
-->--'''The Minutemen''', "''History Lesson, Pt. II''"

[[quoteright:354:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Minutemen_poster.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:345:Coming Soon! [[AuthorExistenceFailure Or not...]]]]

Minutemen were a punk rock band from [[UsefulNotes/LosAngeles San Pedro]], California.

Active from 1980 to 1985, when their frontman D. Boon [[AuthorExistenceFailure died in a van crash]] in Arizona. One of the well known bands from the US underground rock scene of the [[TheEighties 1980s]]. A PowerTrio consisting of guitarist D. Boon, bassist Mike Watt and drummer George Hurley, they started out creating very short, simple punk songs, usually with a political theme. Unusually they incorporated jazz influences as well other other styles that reflected their DIY ethic.

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!!!"Double Tropes on the Dime":
* {{Acrofatic}}: D. Boon was constantly jumping around and energetically dancing onstage despite his weight.
* AlternativeRock
* BadassBeard: Mike Watt (though he alternated between having one and being clean shaven).
* BeigeProse: "Take 5, D", due to it's lyrics being taken verbatim from a note a friend received from his landlady about a leaky shower. This was Mike Watt's playful response to D. Boon complaining that the original lyrics were "too spacey".
* BigFun: D. Boon
* BreakupBreakout: After the band disbanded, Mike Watt experienced a bit of success in other bands, such as playing bass for Music/TheStooges and recording with Music/SonicYouth for their [[Music/{{Madonna}} Ciccone]] Youth album (his voice is also heard on Sonic Youth's "Providence"). He's even played bass for more popular acts such as Music/KellyClarkson.
** Watt and Hurley were heartbroken after the death of Boon and both planned to never play music again. However, a Minutemen fan from Ohio, [[PromotedFanboy Ed Crawford]] ''drove to California'' to convince Watt and Hurley not to do so. The three soon formed fIREHOSE, a band whose albums sold very well (for albums in the early years of AlternativeRock), scored a big rock radio hit ("Time With You") and even wound up getting signed to a major label before splitting in the early 90's.
* BreathlessNonSequitur: According to Mike Watt, most of his lyrics were like this due to his obliviousness about the nature of most song lyrics, hence moments like the "Big fucking shit" in "It's Expected I'm Gone."
* ClusterFBomb: Being a punk band, they naturally break this out in their more political-driven songs. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in "Political Song for Michael Jackson to Sing" with the line "If we heard mortar shells we'd cuss more in our songs."
** The version of "Ain't Talkin' 'bout Love" featured on the compilation ''The Blasting Concept Volume II'' changes the lyric "I got no time to mess around" to "I got no time to fuck around - FUCK YOU!".
* CoverVersion: "[[Music/CreedenceClearwaterRevival Don't Look Now]]", "[[Music/BlueOysterCult The Red and the Black]]", "[[Music/VanHalen Ain't Talkin' 'bout Love]]", "[[Music/CreedenceClearwaterRevival Have You Ever Seen the Rain?]]", "[[Music/The13thFloorElevators Going to Bermuda]]", and "[[Music/SteelyDan Dr. Wu]]".
* ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: Some of their songs were named this way, such as "Shit from an Old Notebook" and "Political Song for Michael Jackson to Sing."
** "Spoken Word Piece" is, well, a spoken word piece.
* HeterosexualLifePartners: Watt and Boon. To the point where, as told in the band's career retrospective documentary ''We Jam Econo'', Watt eerily felt sick the exact minute that Boon was killed.
** According to Mike Watt's hootpage and a couple interviews, when people ask what kind of bassist he is, he still gives the answer, "I'm D. Boon's bass player."
* InNameOnly: "History Lesson - Part II" is musically and lyrically unrelated to "History Lesson."
* IntentionallyAwkwardTitle: A lot of their songs have titles like "The Roar of the Masses Could Be Farts," "Do You Want [[NewWaveMusic New Wave]] Or Do You Want the Truth?" and "Mr. Robot's Holy Orders."
* InTheStyleOf: They did funk/punk covers of Music/VanHalen, Music/CreedenceClearwaterRevival, Music/SteelyDan, and several others.
* ItIsPronouncedTroPay: D. Boon pronounces "measure" as "may-sure." Mike Watt admits this is a large part of the reason why he used the word in some of their lyrics.
* LeadBassist: While D. Boon receives a lot of acclaim as a guitarist and was usually the lead singer, Mike Watt tends to get at least as much praise for his distinctive bass lines. The fact that he wrote (or at least co-wrote) a majority of the band's music and had a bit of a BreakupBreakout certainly helps as well.
* MeaningfulName: When they first started making music, their average song length was a minute or less. Even if they occasionally moved away from that, their songs still tended to be short.
* MinisculeRocking: Their signature.
* NeoclassicalPunkZydecoRockabilly: Their usual style is a mixture of punk rock, funk, and jazz, though they also venture into other genres.
* NewSoundAlbum: Each of their studio albums to a certain degree, although ''3-Way Tie (For Last)'' is the most markedly different, featuring more effects on D. Boon's guitar, more songs with acoustic guitars, longer songs, a more rock-oriented sound with only a couple punk songs, etc.
* NonAppearingTitle: It would probably be easier to list their songs whose titles ''do'' appear in the lyrics than those that don't.
* NotChristianRock: "Jesus and Tequila" is a song that talks about Jesus in a somewhat positive light and "God Bows to Math" references God and Enoch from Literature/TheBible in a non-hostile manner (despite the title). Also, in some pictures and videos of the band, drummer George Hurley is seen wearing a Christian cross necklace. Despite this, however, they have enough songs with ClusterFBomb lyrics to avoid being remotely categorized as ChristianRock.
* ProtestSong
* PunBasedTitle: "The Toe Jam."
* RealSongThemeTune: The theme to ''Series/{{Jackass}}'' is "Corona" from ''Double Nickels On The Dime.''
* RecordProducer: All their material up until ''Double Nickels'' was recorded by SST Records' in-house producer, Glen "Spot" Lockett. Starting with ''Nickels'' they switched to former BlueCheer keyboardist Ethan James.
* RockTrio
* {{Rockumentary}}: ''We Jam Econo: The Story of the Minutemen.''
* RuleOfFunny: Mike Watt admits he only wrote the line "Big fucking shit" in "It's Expected I'm Gone" because he thought it'd be something funny to hear D. Boon say. Some of their other lyrics and song titles also appear to follow this rule.
* SelfBackingVocalist: Their cover of [[Music/SteelyDan "Dr. Wu"]] had Mike Watt do two tracks of vocals. In one, he sings the lines and in the other, he speaks the lyrics amelodically.
* SelfDeprecation: "One Reporter's Opinion" is a song whose lyrics make fun of bassist Mike Watt, who wrote the song.
* ShoutOut: The title of ''Double Nickels on the Dime'' alone has a few. ''Double Nickels'' is trucker slang for 55 miles per hour (if you look at the dashboard on the album art, you'll notice the speedometer reads 55). ''The Dime'' is a nickname for California Interstate 10.
** [[WordOfGod According to Mike Watt]], "on the dime" means "on the spot." They thought it would be funny to make the album's title a response to "I Can't Drive 55" by Sammy Hagar -- they thought the idea being the song wasn't rebellious, so they decided to mock it in the title of the album.
-->'''Watt''', about Hagar's song title: Okay, ''we'''ll drive 55, but we'll make crazy music!
** ''Double Nickels'' also had a solo song for every member ("Cohesion" was D. Boon's, "Take 5, D." was Mike Watt's, and "You Need the Glory" was George Hurley's), which was inspired by Music/PinkFloyd's ''Music/{{Ummagumma}}''.
** "History Lesson - Part II" lists several of the band's influences like [[Music/TheClash Joe Strummer]] and Richard Hell.
** D. Boon stylized his shtick of going by his first initial and last name after E. Bloom of Music/BlueOysterCult, a band they often covered and referenced in songs like "History Lesson - Part II" and "Tour Spiel."
** The title of "Spillage" was meant as a shout out to Music/{{Descendents}}, a punk band who were fond of making their song titles end in "-age" ("Bikeage", "Myage" and "Marriage" for example).
* TheSomethingSong: "Song for El Salvador," "#1 Hit Song," "Political Song for Music/MichaelJackson to Sing," and "Untitled Song for Latin America."
* SpiritualSuccessor: fIREHOSE
** The Minutemen, themselves, were a spiritual successor to The Reactionaries, a shortlived band with Watt, Boon, and Hurley on their usual instruments, along with their friend Martin Tamburovich serving as their lead singer.
** While Mike Watt's solo album, ''Hyphenated-Man'' is lyrically different than what the Minutemen wrote songs about, the MinisculeRocking format of the album's music was inspired by Mike Watt listening to the Minutemen for the first time since D. Boon's death and returning to the straightforward style.
* StepUpToTheMicrophone: D. Boon did vocals on most songs, but Mike Watt did vocals every now and then. George Hurley also did vocals on two songs: the "speech" during "Ruins" and the scat singing in his solo song, "You Need the Glory."
* StudioChatter: At the beginning of "Joe [=McCarthy's=] Ghost," there's a brief conversation between Mike Watt and the rest of the band, in which he tells them to "just keep saying "Joe [=McCarthy=]" for the song's outro.
* TakeThat: Lyrically, "#1 Hit Song" is a parody of bland chart-topping love songs. "Music/BobDylan Wrote Propaganda Songs" is a weird case, because while it parodies Bob Dylan's early lyrical style, [[AffectionateParody it also pays tribute to him, especially since Dylan is one of Mike Watt's heroes.]]
** The liner notes of Double Nickels on the Dime reads, "Take that [[Music/HuskerDu Hüskers]]!" According to Mike Watt, he wrote that to give them credit for giving the Minutemen the idea to record a double album (Hüsker Dü's double album, ''Zen Arcade'' was in the same year as ''Double Nickels''), in an odd case where a TakeThat doubles as a friendly ShoutOut.
** The origin of the title, though, is less friendly. The band said it was a mockery of Sammy Hagar's "I Can't Drive 55", and their feeling that protesting the national speed limit wasn't a terribly rebellious thing to do.
** Also "Political Song for Michael Jackson to Sing" and "This Ain't No Picnic," the latter targeted at a racist auto parts store owner who wouldn't let Boon play jazz on the radio.
* ThreeChordsAndTheTruth: ''The Punch Line'' is ThreeChordsAndTheTruth turned UpToEleven. The songs had a very stripped down style with no choruses or guitar solos, making the 18 songs on the album over in only 15 minutes.
* TitleOnlyChorus: "This Ain't No Picnic," "Nature Without Man," arguably "Little Man With a Gun in His Hand."
** "BOB! DYLAN! WROTE PROPAGANDA SONGS!"
* VitriolicBestBuds: In ''We Jam Econo'', it's revealed that neighbors didn't really complain about the band practicing too loudly; instead, they complained about Mike Watt and D. Boon cursing and yelling at each other.
** This trope is also referenced in "Tour-Spiel" with the line, "We'd fight at practice then jam econo." It was also the inspiration behind the [[http://www.musicfearsatan.com/DSK/minutemen_buzz_(big).jpg the cover art]] to the EP ''Buzz or Howl Under the Influence of Heat''.
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