A subtrope of BlindIdiotTranslation and a relative of RecursiveTranslation. This is when a work in one language uses a word from another language, but when the work is translated into the language which it borrowed that word from, the translators are thrown off and try to translate it (even though it's already in their language) instead of leaving it as is. There are a few possible outcomes;

* In the case of loanwords, they might remain untranslated, even if they're used differently in the work's original language.
* The phrase might be reworded either because the translator fails to realise that it's a word from their language or is determined to translate every part of the script whether necessary or not.
* If the word is a loanword or has roots in another language entirely (for example, French phrases like "coup de grace" or Greek and Latin suffixes like "phobia" are both used in English often enough to be treated as a part of the language), then it's translated from that (for example, phobia becomes "fears" and "coup de grace" becomes "blow of mercy"). This makes even less sense than the above, as it requires that the translator realise they're dealing with a word that's supposed to be foreign.
* Finally ([[{{Woolseyism}} and possibly more benevolently]]), the translator might translate words in the original script which are in the language being translated into the language of the original script to KeepItForeign, or just apply a TranslationCorrection if the script's original implementation of the translator's language [[GratuitousForeignLanguage was badly done]].

However, bear in mind that loanwords sometimes evolve into "false friends," acquiring a different meaning in the new language. While 'confetti' is borrowed from Italian, we haven't taken very good care of it: it means "sugared almonds" in its mother tongue. Conversely, a German might think that she doesn't need to tell an English speaker what 'handy' means... except that it's a noun meaning "mobile phone" in German.

When someone demands something be translated from a language they speak anyway, it's CompletelyUnnecessaryTranslator; if they simply took something in the original language that would be [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch too rude for native speakers]], it's TactfulTranslation; if the "same" language actually does need translating, it's SeparatedByACommonLanguage. ElNinoIsSpanishForTheNino is the [[InvertedTrope inverse]]; when a phrase from the first language is left untranslated because it's a loanword in the second.
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!Examples:

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[[folder: Anime And Manga ]]
* Some fansubs of the ''SoulEater'' anime translate "Arachnophobia" (the name of the antagonists' organisation) from the Japanese script into "Fear of spiders" or "Fear of Arachne".
* A small one shows up in ''TheMelancholyOfHaruhiSuzumiya''. In one scene Kyon says a few words in Japanese, then in English. In the dub and some subs he does the opposite.
* Parodied in ''Anime/ExcelSaga'': At one point there's an English text scroll, so there are Japanese subtitles. The English version then provides a hilariously inaccurate translation of those subtitles.
* There is a fansub of ''Anime/YuGiOh'' which humorously translates duro/draw (as in draw a card) as "pick."
* The "[[CorruptChurch Ripoff Church]]" from ''Manga/BlackLagoon'' was translated as the "Church of Violence" in several fansubs. The official subs (and dub) keep the name intact.
* In ''Franchise/SailorMoon'':
** In general, foreign translations of ''Sailor Moon'' often translate the CallingYourAttacks incantations, even though in the original Japanese version they were in English -- and thus ''meant'' to be in a different language.
** Some attack names mix Japanese loanwords from European languages with English words, which can get confusng quickly. Conflict often arises between those who want a literal translation of all non-Japanese dialogue and those who prefer to [[{{Woolseyism}} smooth things out to sound better in English]]. As a result, the same attack can easily have about three or four different names depending on who you ask. Take Sailor Mercury's シャボンスプレー, for example. Shabon Spray? SabŃo Spray? Soap Bubble Spray ("soap" being the English translation of the loanword "shabon")? Who the hell knows?
** An infamous case in the original Creator/{{Tokyopop}} translation of the ''Manga/SailorMoon'' manga in Act 39 of the Dream arc, which wasn't about a single word, but an entire English poem by W.B. Yeats. Portions of his "TheSecondComing" were translated back into English without recognizing that it was originally an English poem. (This was fixed in later releases.)
** In the German dub of ''Anime/SailorMoon'' (at least as seen on TV), the "make up" part of the Sailors' [[ByThePowerOfGreyskull transformation invocation]] was overly literally translated to "mach(t) auf!", despite already being a perfectly fine loanword in German. It managed to not come across as entirely ridiculous on account of the translated phase in turn basically meaning "open!" or "unlock!" -- which actually works pretty well in context, too.
** Even TheNineties english dub renamed them, and often gave the same attack multiple names...
* The translators who worked on ''MegamanNTWarrior'' somehow managed to mistranslate half the GratuitousEnglish. Not only was it in English to begin with, but the first two ''MegaManBattleNetwork'' games had already been released in English without any of the same errors. Yet somehow, many instances of "punch" became "thump", and many a "bomb" became a "boomer". This was actually do to ExecutiveMeddling on the part of Kids WB, which aired the English version of the show.
* Diablomon served as the villain of the ''DigimonAdventure'' movie ''Our War Game.'' When the film was dubbed [[CutAndPasteTranslation as part of]] ''DigimonTheMovie'', he became "Diaboromon", a [[SpellMyNameWithAnS possible pronunciation]] to a Japanese tongue. This doubled as [[{{Bowdlerise}} avoiding mentioning the Devil]].
** The same film also translates Cherubimon as "Kerpymon", possibly another way of dodging around religious references.
** Also, "Arukeni" is the Japanese pronunciation of "Arachne," making calling her "Arukenimon" instead of "Arachnemon" another case of changing the name by ''not'' changing it. It does, however, serve to keep the secret of the fact that she turns into a GiantSpider. The card game has ''many'' such situations where the names are romanized and then left alone, making English words into non-words. The show usually corrects this.
* Similar to Diablomon/Diaboromon above, Bra from ''Anime/DragonballGT'' became Bulla, likewise [[SpellMyNameWithAnS a technically possible pronunciation]] in Japanese, to [[{{Bowdlerise}} avoid mentioning feminine undergarments]].
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[[folder: Eastern Animation ]]
* ''Adventures of Captain Vrungel'' used "obviously {{bowdlerized}} dub" gag (see above), including "cretino!" dubbed as "untranslatable wordplay".
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[[folder: Literature ]]
* Creator/JorgeLuisBorges initially named one of the volumes of his collected works with the English ''The Maker'', which he then translated into Spanish as ''El hacedor''. The first English translators were unaware of Borge's intentions, and were unsure how to translate "hacedor" (which can mean either "maker" or "doer"), so they just sidestepped it and named the book ''Dreamtigers'' (after one of the stories from the book).
* In ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'', Professor Aronnax recalls an expedition to the Nebraska [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Badlands badlands]], which he gives in the original French as ''les mauvaises terres du Nebraska''. Some English translators have failed to recognise the term, resulting in translations like "the disagreeable territory of Nebraska".
* In the short story "The Chief Designer", Russian spacecraft names usually left in Russian when being discussed in English (Vostok, Mir) are translated into English as well ("The East", "The Peace").
* In a Russian translation of ''The Road to Oz'' from the ''Literature/LandOfOz'' cycle, the character name Polychrome was translated into Russian, into something like "Manycoloria".
* In ''Literature/{{Otherland}}'', a German-speaking character is in a virtual reality simulation with an automatic and near-instantaneous language translator. When she attempts to use the word "doppelganger", the software insists on rendering it in English as "double-goer", despite "doppelganger" being a loanword.
* A background character in one of E. M. Delafield's ''Provincial Lady'' novels is overheard asking how to say "charabanc" in French. Her friend replies that it is "autobus".
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[[folder: Live Action Television]]
* ''Series/DoctorWho'': In-universe example in "The Fires of Pompeii" - a running gag is that while the [[TimeMachine TARDIS]] allows the Romans to hear English as Latin, they interpret The Doctor's and Donna's Latin phrases and loanwords as "Celtic" (although it's never made clear if Donna's "veni, vidi, vici" was translated into period Celtic or simply gibberish that the merchant simply assumed was Celtic).
* Another in-universe example, in ''Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses'': Delboy knows the French for "duck", but can't figure out how to how to translate the "a l'orange" bit of his favourite meal.
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[[folder: Music]]
* Spoofed in the liner notes for Music/PDQBach's composition "Capriccio 'La Pucelle de New Orleans'", which at one point "translates" the lyrics, "Hinky dinky do you speak."
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[[folder: Toys ]]
* A subset of Transformers fans, particularly prior to 2000 or so, was fervent about referring to characters by their "Japanese" names when talking about Japanese G1 series. You know, where the leader was actually "Comboi", not that crazy "Convoy" term other fans would use when talking about Optimus Prime's Japanese name. Another notable one is insisting on using "Minelba" instead of "Minerva".
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[[folder: Web Original ]]
* TheOtherWiki does occasionally; for example, their article on ''MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' gives the Japanese "name" in katakana, and then romanizes it to "Metaru Gia Soriddo Suri Suneku Ita".
* {{IMDB}} has [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0208155/ similar issues]] sometimes. It used to be far worse, but has been cleaned up considerably in the past few years... yet there are still the likes of [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0164767/ "Bţsuto u˘zu ch˘ seimeitai Toransuf˘mÔ supesharu"]] or rather "Beast Wars: Super Life Form Transformers Special".
* This quote from ''Series/XPlay'' reviewing ''{{Gladiator}}'' the game:
-->'''Young Augustus Ceasar''' (thinking): "'Et tu, Brute...' And you, Brutus...."
-->'''Morgan:''' "That's right: He's translating Latin -- ''to himself!''"
* ''Good'' translations, fan and official, often do this because of the GratuitousEnglish trope, and the fact that many loanwords aren't used by the borrower in the same manner as in the original language. Chances are, you've probably never heard 'diamond' shortened to 'dia,' ice cream merely called 'ice,' or a two-person team called a 'combi' if you're a native English speaker. In the same vein, there are even terms that are not immediately recognizable as English (such as portmanteaus of two words' katakana spellings. Dekotora = '''deco'''rated '''tru'''ck.[[note]]If you care, dekotora basically involves decorating your big rig the way you would a christmas tree.[[/note]]) You can get even more confusing with "tension" - which can mean excitement. Think of an upcoming game, battle, CookingDuel, or somesuch. Leaving it turns the character's feelings of "Oh, yeah!" into "OhCrap!" - the ''exact opposite'' of what the writer intended the speaker to be feeling. There's more where those examples came from, in ''each'' category.
** This extends to names, too. When you're translating something that uses loanwords from literature, it can get a little draining. Like the ''Manga/SailorMoon''-Yeats example above, entire themes can be missed because someone didn't read ''Theatre/{{Othello}}''.
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[[folder: Real Life ]]
* Brazilian former president Fernando Henrique Cardoso saw fit to explain to an English speaker interviewing him what French loanword "malaise" meant. All of that in a horrible pronunciation of English.
* A joke on ''Series/MockTheWeek'' went: "I don't know why they insist on calling it a ''putsch'' when we have a perfectly adequate English word: ''coup d'Útat''." Which is French. The actual English is probably ''mutiny'' or ''overhaul'', but the foreign ones are so much better.
* James Fallows of The Atlantic recalls a time when a Japanese person once asked if there was an English counterpart for the Japanese concept of ニュアンス, or nyuansu. That is, "nuance."
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