A wartime broadcaster who transmits propaganda to the enemy in order to undermine their morale.

"Tokyo Rose" was the nickname given to Japanese female propaganda broadcasters by allied servicemen during the [[WorldWarTwo second global unpleasantness]]. The broadcasts were in generally excellent English, and appealed to Allied troops to give up their hopeless and unnecessary war against the mighty and invincible empire of Japan. You know, [[PropagandaMachine standard propaganda]] stuff.[[note]]And perhaps deliberately so, since the broadcasts were written and produced by coerced Allied prisoners under threat of torture. ImperialJapan, in direct contrast to modern Japan, had become so isolationist and parochial during the era of militarism that they did not have enough citizens with sufficient English skills to produce the broadcasts on their own.[[/note]]

In spite of the single name, there were multiple Roses, as the voice was not the same each time. At least four women (three Americans and one Canadian) have been identified, three who broadcast from Tokyo and one from Manila. To the best of our knowledge nobody has done voice-analysis to ascertain if there were any others, and it is probable that adequate recordings do not exist. Famously vanished aviator Amelia Earhart was considered a prime candidate during the war, but her husband listened to some recordings and denied they sounded anything like her.

Tokyo Rose was actually pretty popular with Allied servicemen. Either [[SoBadItsGood out of the comedy value of the obvious propaganda]], or because it was a female voice to people that might not have heard another for quite some time (and might not live to hear one again). Probably both. The moniker "Tokyo Rose" itself almost certainly orginated with the servicemen themselves, since it does not appear in any of the surviving broadcast scripts or documentation. The surviving scripts also show that rumors that she was remarkably well informed about Allied intentions, units and movements were purely apocryphal.

Only one person was ever prosecuted for these broadcasts: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iva_Toguri_D%27Aquino Iva Toguri D'Aquino]], an American daughter of Japanese immigrants who was stranded in Japan at the begining of the war, admitted to broadcasting under the name "Orphan Ann". Though neither the occupation authorities nor the FBI could find sufficient evidence to prosecute her in Japan she was prosecuted on multiple counts of treason upon her return to the United States in 1948. Despite the paucity of evidence (and considerable evidence that she'd risked her life aiding the allied prisoners forced to write and produce the broadcasts) she was convicted on only one count in 1949 and served six years of a ten year sentence. She received a full pardon in 1977 due to the proven unreliability of her key accusers (who both claimed they'd been coerced into perjuring themselves) and the lack of any proof that she had actually said anything treasonous. An FBI case study found that her effect on Allied morale was, if anything, positive, and in a crowning irony the US World War Two Veteran's Committee gave her their highest award for her bravery and patriotism shortly before she died in 2006.

In the European theater, the [[ThoseWackyNazis Axis]] employed two American women as broadcasters who were both given the nickname "Axis Sally" by American troops. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rita_Zucca Rita Zucca]] broadcast from Rome and used the on-air name "Sally," while [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mildred_Gillars Mildred Gillars]] broadcast from Berlin and usually called herself "Midge." Both served prison terms for treason after the war.

The Germans also employed a male version, "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_haw_haw Lord Haw-Haw]]," the host of a regular program entitled ''Germany Calling.'' Though the program had several hosts, the name "Lord Haw-Haw" eventually became associated with a single individual: Englishman William Joyce, who held the job beginning in 1940. He had a nasal drawl and so his opening line sounded like "This is Jairmany calling". Joyce was captured in Germany in 1945 and put on trial for treason in Britain, after some legal debate over whether an American citizen (as came out during the trial) could be charged with betraying the Crown. The ruling was that since he'd got a British passport (he'd lied about his citizenship to get it), he was supposed to have loyalty to the King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He was convicted and hanged in 1946. Incidentally enough, he was the last person imprisoned in the Tower of London. The Japanese equivalent was an Australian named Reggie Hollingsworth, about whom little is known but who has been described as sounding like "Churchill broadcasting from Tokyo".

American [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Henry_Best Robert Henry Best]] was a [[{{Expy}} Lord Haw-Haw wanabee]] who also worked for the Germans. He had the dubious distinction of being [[{{Cancellation}} taken off the air]] by [[ThoseWackyNazis the Germans]] in 1942 because his antisemitic propaganda became ''too strident!''

"Tokyo Rose" or "Axis Sally" recordings are occasionally featured in war movies to establish atmosphere. Unfortunately, this is sufficiently obscure these days that it almost qualifies as a GeniusBonus.

Note that the Axis powers were not the only users of this trope: A recent search of the BBC archives turned up a series of concerts recorded by the Glenn Miller Orchestra in 1944 for broadcast to Germany, all hosted by a German speaking woman known only as "Ilsa". Sadly, Ilsa's identity has been lost to time. The most subtle and effective Allied propaganda broadcast was probably Britain's ''Soldatensender'', which convincingly mimicked an official ''Wehrmacht'' propaganda station but gave out rather more information about the problems plaguing the German war effort than the German high command would have wanted to divulge.

Creator/JaneFonda, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_fonda#.22Hanoi_Jane.22 who made propaganda broadcasts for the North Vietnamese during a visit to Hanoi in 1972]], acquired the nickname "Hanoi Jane" as a reference to Tokyo Rose and Hanoi's own female propaganda broadcaster "Hanoi Hannah"

During both the Persian Gulf wars, stories circulated in the American media about a broadcaster nicknamed "Baghdad Betty" whose research was a little shaky ("Remember boys, back home in America movie stars are seducing your wife. Burt Reynolds is seducing your wife. [[TheSimpsons Bart Simpson]] is seducing your wife.") These may have been influenced by Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf, AKA "Bagdad Bob", the Iraqi information ministry official whose farcically inaccurate statements (culminating in the proclamation that "There are no American troops in Bagdad" while two American tanks ''were clearly visible maneuvering behind him'') amused and perplexed media observers.

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[[folder: Film ]]

* In the 1943 film ''We Dive at Dawn'', a "Haw-Haw" broadcast reports the sinking of the starring submarine ''HMS Sea Tiger'' (In fact, [[PlayingPossum it pretended to go down to throw the Germans off]]). The British Admiralty buy the story and the British press report the vessel as lost.
* Tokyo Rose shows up in 1958's ''Run Silent, Run Deep''
* 1959's ''OperationPetticoat'' presented a Tokyo Rose broadcast to the pink submarine. "We don't know what you're doing, but it won't work. Surrender."
* In ''In Harm's Way'', a Tokyo Rose broadcast is heard. The female lead (Patricia Neal) asks, "Why don't they jam her?" The Admiral responds, "They don't want to. She doesn't scare anyone and the boys like the music."
* ''FlagsOfOurFathers'': Tokyo Rose is heard under her less well known but historically accurate pseudonym "Orphan Ann".

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[[folder: Literature ]]

* In [[Literature/TheHungerGames Mockingjay]] [[spoiler:Peeta Mellark]] is forced to do this when he's captured by the Capitol.

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[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

* Tokyo Rose is mentioned by Colonel Potter in ''Series/{{MASH}}'', and with this being the Korean War, they have their own version, "Seoul City Sue", though she is rarely heard from.
* ''Series/{{Tour of Duty}}'' briefly featured a Vietnamese equivalent, with one GI asking another why he listened to that stuff. He replied that the propaganda was annoying, but that the ''music'' they played was actually pretty good.

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[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]

* During Games' Workshop's ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' "Eye of Terror" event, a mini-campaign featured the Third Stage Expansion of the Tau, who were clear on the other side of the galaxy from the main action. During the event, one gamer started posting a series of "broadcasts" by a Human collaborator named "Sa'cea Sally". During the post-event articles in ''White Dwarf'' Magazine, these messages were [[FandomNod codified]] into actual events during the expansion.

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[[folder: Video Games ]]

* The ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}'' series: [[TheVietnamWar ''Battlefield Vietnam'']] featured broadcasts from a Tokyo Rose-esque character before certain stages. Some of them were rather pretty, actually -- "Your helicopters will fall like broken butterflies, [=GIs=]."
** This was actually the real life Hanoi Hannah, who was the equivalent of Tokyo Rose for The Vietnam War.
** She also appears in ''VideoGame/{{Conflict}}: Vietnam''.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'', there's a Chinese Propaganda radio station that broadcasts in Arlington Cemetery out of an old cannery that echoes this trope.
* ''{{Homefront}}'': During the CrazySurvivalist level two of the survivalist are talking about the resistance fugitives (you) and mention TokyoRose by name.
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