->''"We're waiting for the pendulum to swing back again, which I am absolutely confident it will."''\\
--An exceedingly optimistic '''Creator/DonBluth''', speaking about hand drawn animation

This is the Age of Animation we live in now, starting from the early 2000s--with the end of TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation--and continuing to the present day. The usage of traditional 2-D animation methods that thrived in the previous eras is now seemingly all but abandoned, at least when it comes to American works; [[AllCGICartoon CGI]] and [[AdobeFlash Flash]] animation are the rule, not the exception--just as LimitedAnimation ruled the [[TheDarkAgeOfAnimation Dark Age]] during the '60s and '70s (especially animation not coming from the USA or Japan). A lot of these shifts resulted from the constant deterioration of the global recession, which came to a head in 2008 and resulted in cheaper production procedures like outsourcing, studios taking safer bets, higher competition, bankruptcy, and massive layoffs. It did not help that any fan of content from the Renaissance Age could not get any decent work in the field by the time they were finally grown up and out of college by 2005. Studios hired unpaid interns by the hundreds, and veterans from the past eras were either out of work, doing their own thing, or dead.

{{Disney}} began to experience its first box office failures since the early '80s. ''Disney/TreasurePlanet'' is often cited as the film where the downward spiral began, though some might say it began earlier with ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}''. The company's next three films would each do worse than its predecessor; after the failure of ''Disney/HomeOnTheRange'', Disney announced that it would discontinue traditional animation for good ([[NeverMyFault blaming the medium itself]] instead of, perhaps, the MisaimedMarketing that went on for most of these movies). For the next five years, they certainly tried to kill 2-D animation; their second attempt at producing a CGI film of their own, ''Disney/ChickenLittle'', had a mediocre showing (but ended up making a profit)--then there was a two year gap before their next [[DisneyAnimatedCanon canon entry]], ''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'', was released. That film was followed in 2008 by ''Disney/{{Bolt}}'', which achieved (at least) critical success in spite of having languished in DevelopmentHell after a much-needed ExecutiveMeddling by John Lasseter.

While this was going on, Disney was undergoing a shake-up in upper management. Since the release of ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'', Disney had been the distributor for all of Creator/{{Pixar}}'s films, which were making much more money for them than most of their in-house fare. There was prolonged wrestling between the two companies over creative control, IP rights, and financial stakes over the films. In 2004, Pixar announced that they would be seeking other distribution partners when their contract with Disney was up--despite this, the two companies continued to negotiate in an attempt to patch things up. While this was going on, Michael Eisner left Disney in 2005--some say "pushed out", as Disney was struggling across the board and Eisner was one of the main obstacles to cooperation with Pixar. Ultimately, Disney bought Pixar outright in 2007, though Pixar was allowed to remain a separate entity; as part of the deal, Pixar co-founder John Lasseter became Disney's Chief Creative Officer and Pixar studio president Edwin Catmull also became president of Walt Disney Animation Studios. Allegedly, one of Lasseter's first executive actions was to discontinue the rampant DirectToVideo sequels of Disney's back catalog and put that specific animation division - [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DisneyToon_Studios DisneyToon Studios]] - to work on new properties (such as the current CG ''[[Franchise/DisneyFairies Tinker Bell]]'' series). Under Lasseter's watch, traditional animation also got a second chance with ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''. The movie was successful enough to make Disney agree to greenlight a new traditionally animated film every two years, starting with a reboot of ''Disney/WinnieThePooh''. Around this time, a number of Disney classics got converted to the 3D format using the same process as Disney/WinnieThePooh and were re-released in theater in short runnings, the first title of which - ''Disney/TheLionKing 3D'' - has been met with rave success. Their next 2D release was to be an adaptation of ''Discworld/{{Mort}}''; however, the film was canceled due to rights issues, most likely because of the upcoming Discworld live action TV series. On March 23rd, 2012, 38-year-Disney-animator and producer Glen Keane officially resigned, signalling that Lasseter has yet failed to bring hand-drawn animation back to the forefront, and proving that despite his efforts, Disney ''still'' has no hand-drawn animation on the pipeline! Their other originally planned hand-drawn movie, based on Creator/HansChristianAndersen's ''Literature/TheSnowQueen'', was taken off the [[DevelopmentHell shelf]] and has since been released under the title ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' as a CG feature, becoming one of the most successful movies in the DisneyAnimatedCanon, surpassing $1 billion in box office gross (a first for the canon) and winning two Academy Awards (including Best Animated Feature, also a first).

NetworkDecay has had a devastating effect on television animation. Many channels have jettisoned their {{Saturday Morning Cartoon}}s and after-school blocs due to cable competition and [[MoralGuardians increasing restrictions on advertising]], and for the longest time, FourKidsEntertainment created a monopoly over what's left (and even they'd been [[http://www.animationmagazine.net/tv/4kids-ceo-takes-pay-cut/ facing financial problems]]), before bankruptcy came and forced them to sell their empire to Saban Brands, who plans on revitalizing their block on TheCW, to be renamed "{{Vortexx}}", by taking advantage of the internet to extend its reach, specifically marketing in a way that invokes a PeripheryDemographic. Creator/CartoonNetwork is pushing increasingly towards live-action kids' shows in order to compete with Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} and the DisneyChannel, which are in turn becoming increasingly dependent on their respective {{Cash Cow Franchise}}s (live-action {{kid com}}s for Disney and ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' for Nick), while Creator/AdultSwim also followed suit by increasingly pushing live-action comedies while at the same time becoming over-reliant on it's {{Cash Cow Franchise}}s to keep all of CN afloat such as ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' and ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad''. ToonDisney was consumed by Jetix and eventually scrapped altogether to make way for DisneyXD.

Overall, thanks in large part to economic woes mentioned above, animation as a whole is widely considered to have suffered, though there are exceptions. ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' started a growing trend of high-budget animated action series for TV, and is one in a long list of popular shows that are pushing against the walls of the AnimationAgeGhetto. On a different but related front, the phenomenally successful ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' is creating a stir in large part because it has taken great steps to blur [[GirlShowGhetto the line between "girl shows" and "general audience shows"]]. The influence of anime on American shows is largely the reason for the rise of shows with continuous, overarching story lines such as the aforementioned ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'', which may be a TropeCodifier in this regard. Further examples of shows of this type include ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'' (the Tartakovsky cartoon), ''StarWarsTheCloneWars'' (the Lucas CG show), ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'', ''TheSpectacularSpiderMan'', ''WesternAnimation/TheBatman'', ''WesternAnimation/SymBionicTitan'', and ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice'', a number of them becoming smash successes in their own right. One could very well say that, generally speaking, action cartoons produced in America have actually reached a higher medium standard than what was the case during the Renaissance Age (back then, while mature action cartoons did exist, the vast majority were quite juvenile and rarely had very complex storylines). A looser continuity is still the norm when it comes to comedy shows however, such as ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'', which rose to the position of Nickelodeon's CashCowFranchise, and Disney's ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb''. This era also saw "adult-aimed" cartoons, which started their comeback with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' in the 80s, reaching mainstream status with the ongoing success of shows like ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', as well as ''The Simpsons'' itself, along with many others.

Cartoons from previous eras are either shoved onto Boomerang or not shown at all, relegated chiefly to DVD releases. While home video releases of classic cartoons initially thrived during the early-to-mid 2000s, this trend eventually came to a crawl when a combination of piddling sales, the high cost of restoring the cartoons, and the general state of the economy caused many companies to pull back or scale down future releases of old cartoons, much of the chagrin of many collectors. [[note]] This is the reason why the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Golden Collection series and the ''WoodyWoodpecker'' collections were discontinued.[[/note]] Fortunately, older cartoons are starting to see more of a comeback, with future DVD releases lined up for Creator/WarnerBros (including an all new and improved ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' collection and, to the delight of animation purists everywhere, the first official home video release of ''[[CensoredEleven The Censored 11]]''). Creator/ColumbiaPictures has also began reairing many of [[Creator/ColumbiaCartoons its old cartoons]] on Antenna TV, with plans for DVD releases in the works; Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox is also planning to release a ''WesternAnimation/MightyMouse'' collection in a couple of years, and Jerry Beck has been attempting to get the classic cartoon anthology program "Totally Tooned In" to finally air in the US--but the real highlight of all of this is that the original WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes have finally returned to air on Creator/CartoonNetwork! Many fondly-remembered [[SaturdayMorningCartoon Saturday morning cartoons]] during the [[TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation Renaissance Age]] such as ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuestTheRealAdventures'' or ''WesternAnimation/{{Centurions}}'' have yet to receive this revival (with ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' having only been saved by TheHub at the close of 2012 and ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures'' in mid-2013), much to the outcry of the young adult demographics.

Anime dubbing has struggled too; Creator/{{Geneon}} and Creator/ADVFilms both folded from poor sales, NetworkDecay resulting in disappearing anime blocks on television, and competition from online subtitled episodes (which could be posted shortly after their Japanese premieres) released by [[FanSub fans]] and streaming services such as Crunchyroll. Creator/FUNimation is probably the only dubbing studio to remain prosperous--it acquired a number of Geneon, ADV, and 4Kids' titles, while continuing to license new titles--but even they have financial issues. After its fold, ADV eventually formed Creator/Section23Films, and along with Funimation, Aniplex, the recent newcomer [[NipponIchi NIS America]] and (who else?) Disney, are currently holding licenses to the majority of essential anime titles on this side of the Pacific (though NIS America is ''not'' actually dubbing them). Around New Years Day 2012, Creator/BandaiEntertainment announced their end releasing prints and [=DVDs=] of manga and anime, focusing on digital distribution, broadcast and merchandising instead.

In contrast to the problems that animation for television has faced, the theatrical feature film market is thriving. Before, it was a high risk field with intimidating high stakes that has eventually crushed all comers outside of Disney, even greats like [[FleischerStudios the Fleischer Brothers]] and Creator/DonBluth. Now, it has became a highly competitive field with more animated features being produced by more major American companies as viable, sustained competitors than any time in history. The opening signal could be considered when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) introduced the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature Film starting in 2001, indicating a new level of respect and vibrancy for the art form; it could also be considered an aid to encourage more films, since they now have an Oscar of their own to shoot for. This presented a problem, too: with animation in its own category, there is an implication that an animated film will [[AwardSnub never be considered]] for plain old "Best Picture". This trend was reversed thanks to Pixar--''WesternAnimation/{{Up}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory3'' got nominated for Best Picture in 2009 and 2010, respectively.

The big champion in the field of American animated films is undoubtedly Pixar; it still flourishes and finds success to this day, thanks to their extremely solid track record in regards to the quality of their films, at least until '' Franchise/{{Cars}} 2'' proved a critical embarrassment in 2011. However, the company that blew open the field was Creator/DreamworksAnimation (the spiritual successor to Creator/StevenSpielberg's earlier animation studio, Creator/{{Amblimation}}). Although its traditional animated films like ''WesternAnimation/SpiritStallionOfTheCimarron'' and ''WesternAnimation/SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas'' all flopped (the exception being ''WesternAnimation/ThePrinceOfEgypt''), the company's partnership with AardmanAnimations (with features like ''WesternAnimation/ChickenRun'' and ''WesternAnimation/TheCurseOfTheWereRabbit'') proved a real success. However, it was their runaway success of ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' in 2001 that finally helped get the company begin to wrestle down the AllAnimationIsDisney stereotype while taking the first Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. Alas, while ''Shrek 2'' was an artistic success, the company fortunes sank through the decade until they hit their nadir in 2007 with their films sinking with critically derided embarrassments like ''WesternAnimation/SharkTale'', ''Shrek The Third'', and ''BeeMovie'', while alienating Aardman into ending their partnership when ''WesternAnimation/FlushedAway'' underperformed. However, everything changed in in 2008 when the studio [[GrowingTheBeard grew its beard]] with hailed new franchises like ''WesternAnimation/KungFuPanda'' and ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon'' that signaled a new commitment to good storytelling even as the ''Shrek'' series wound down and the ''WesternAnimation/{{Madagascar}}'' series made the transition beautifully with improving films.

There are also the efforts of production studios like Creator/BlueSkyStudios (for TwentiethCenturyFox) and their ''WesternAnimation/IceAge'' series, Warner Brothers' ''WesternAnimation/HappyFeet'', Sony's ''OpenSeason'', and Universal/Illumination's ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe''. Even {{ILM}} got in on the action with its debut film, ''WesternAnimation/{{Rango}}'', a film so successful that distributor Creator/{{Paramount}} has decided to get into the animation game with their own department 40+ years after they fired Creator/RalphBakshi in closing their old one in 1967. (Incidentally, ''Film/{{Avatar}}'' isn't listed here because--despite the fact that the bulk of it involves a handful of live-action actors in a [=CGI=] setting--it is generally considered a live-action film.)

On the DirectToVideo market, the fans of the now-deceased DCAnimatedUniverse franchise found a new source of sophisticated SuperHero animation with the WesternAnimation/DCUniverseAnimatedOriginalMovies--and, to a lesser extent, the MarvelUniverse videos. All of these films were explicitly produced for the formerly PeripheryDemographic of teens and adults.

European traditional animation, meanwhile, has made a comeback with the development of several new studios and directors who have produced critically acclaimed films, including ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells'' and ''WesternAnimation/TheTripletsOfBelleville''. These films tend to address serious or artistic subjects in an avant-garde style (influenced by [[LimitedAnimation John Hubley]] and lost animated classics such as ''WesternAnimation/TheThiefAndTheCobbler'') while still going out of their way to appeal to [[AnimationAgeGhetto families with small children]]. [[StudioGhibli Hayao Miyazaki]] and his colleagues have carried the torch for traditional, movie-plotted, fully-animated films in Japan, returning to hand-drawn films which Disney (and especially John Lasseter, [[OneOfUs a Ghibli fanboy]]) has taken it on to [[NetworkToTheRescue promote]] in the US, with [[ScrewedByTheNetwork mixed results]].[[note]]This dates back to 1996 when Disney and Tokuma Publishing inked a deal for Disney to distribute Ghibli's catalog, but after ''PrincessMononoke'' had a disappointing box office run, it took Lasseter's intervention (while he was still at Pixar) and ''SpiritedAway'''s 2001 Oscar win for the rest of it to see the light of day.[[/note]] The result has been a series of art films that didn't do well in the US, but were critically acclaimed enough to grow their studios. The challenge, of course, will be to determine how long the backers of such films insist on making [[LeFilmArtistique art films]] restricted to [[AnimationAgeGhetto families with children]].

Adult aimed animation found a new home on Cartoon Network's nighttime block, Creator/AdultSwim, which turned out to be responsible for ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' both getting UnCancelled. After the fall of {{Toonami}}, Creator/AdultSwim continued airing adult-oriented anime as well, while [[FourKidsEntertainment 4Kids]] still aired [[{{Bowdlerise}} watered-down dubs]] of anime on Saturday mornings for the kiddies. SyFy showed Anime for a period, but was short lived, ending in 2011 [[NetworkDecay as part of the network's shift from Sci-Fi in general]]. MTV revived their Liquidation animation block since the '90s in 2011 and kicked it off by bringing back ''BeavisAndButthead''! Anime continues to be popular among teens and young adults, although the effects of the AnimationAgeGhetto polarize it just as it does WesternAnimation, with an extra spoonful of AllAnimeIsNaughtyTentacles. Meanwhile, adult WesternAnimation tends to rely a bit much on pop culture references and BlackComedy, but at least the AnimationAgeGhetto is slowly disappearing.

On the Internet, a huge amount of AdobeFlash animation (most of which can be viewed for free) has arisen in various genres, with fewer restrictions on creativity than commercial releases. Leading the way here is the popularity of the Flash site {{Newgrounds}}. While the early 2000s saw a rise of ultraviolent genre series like ''WebAnimation/MadnessCombat'' and ''HappyTreeFriends'', more sophisticated series also appeared as time went on.

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Series/Films that are associated with this era:]]
* For anime series from this era, see:
** AnimeOfThe2000s
** AnimeOfThe2010s
* WesternAnimation/AdventureTime: One of Creator/CartoonNetwork's better animated shows. (2010)
* WesternAnimation/AlmostNakedAnimals (2011)
* WesternAnimation/AlphaAndOmega: Lionsgate's CGI film about wolves that should really get more recognition than it does. (2010)
* Film/AlvinAndTheChipmunks: Receiving a new incarnation in seemingly every era of animation since their creation, now they're back as computer animated characters in a live-action setting--and because of this movie's success, WesternAnimation/YogiBear and TheSmurfs have already gotten similar treatments. Other HannaBarbera properties such as WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry and WackyRaces are rumored for future projects (to the dismay of many).
* WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball: A Creator/CartoonNetwork UK/US co-production made distinctive by it's [[MediumBlending blending of many different animation styles]]. (2011)
* WesternAnimation/AmericanDragonJakeLong (2005)
* WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce (2001 - present, currently (as of 2013) airing under the title of ''Aqua TV Show Show'', but the premise is still the same.)
* WesternAnimation/ArthurChristmas (2011)
* WesternAnimation/AstroBoy (2009 American CG film)
* WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender
** WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra
* WesternAnimation/AxeCop: Based on Ethan & Malachi Nicolle's popular webcomic. (2013)
* WesternAnimation/TheBackyardigans (2004)
* WesternAnimation/TheBatman (2004)
* WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyondReturnOfTheJoker (2000)
* WesternAnimation/BatmanMysteryOfTheBatwoman (2003)
* WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold: Re-invigorated the SilverAge essence of Batman and introduced this generation to more obscure DC characters (Blue Beetle, The Metal Men, Crazy Quilt, etc). It found success despite debuting not too long after Film/TheDarkKnight.
* WebAnimation/BeachedAz (2009)
* [[Franchise/{{Ben10}} Ben 10 series]]
** WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}} (2005)
** WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce (2008)
** Ben10UltimateAlien (2010)
** WesternAnimation/Ben10Omniverse (2012)
* Film/{{Beowulf}}
* WesternAnimation/BigBuckBunny (2008)
* WesternAnimation/BikerMiceFromMars (the 2006 {{revival}})
* WesternAnimation/BobsBurgers (2011)
* ComicStrip/TheBoondocks (2005)
* WesternAnimation/BrandyAndMrWhiskers (2004)
* WesternAnimation/{{Breadwinners}} (2013)
* WesternAnimation/BubbleGuppies (2011)
* WesternAnimation/BuzzLightyearOfStarCommand (2000)
* WesternAnimation/TheBuzzOnMaggie (2005)
* WesternAnimation/{{Cartoonstitute}} (2010) (A multi-short cartoon showcase project [[WhatCouldHaveBeen that never got off the ground.]])
* WesternAnimation/ACatInParis (2010)
* WesternAnimation/CampLazlo (2005)
* WesternAnimation/ChalkZone (2002)
* WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}} (2007)
* WesternAnimation/CJTheDJ (2009)
* WesternAnimation/CloneHigh (2002-2003)
* WesternAnimation/CloudyWithAChanceOfMeatballs (2009)
* WesternAnimation/CoconutFredsFruitSaladIsland: A [[FollowTheLeader shameless knockoff]] of WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants, made by Creator/WarnerBros Only lasted for 13 episodes.
* WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko (2003)
* WesternAnimation/CodenameKidsNextDoor (2002)
* WesternAnimation/{{Coraline}} (2009)
* Series/{{Cosmos}}: A Spacetime Odyssey (2014) (Contains animated science history segments each episode)
* WesternAnimation/DaBoomCrew (2004)
* WesternAnimation/DanVs (2011)
* WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom (2004)
* WesternAnimation/DespicableMe (2010)
* Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon:
** Disney/{{Dinosaur}} (2000)
** Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove (2000)
*** WesternAnimation/TheEmperorsNewSchool (2006-2008)
** Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire (2001)
** Disney/LiloAndStitch (2002): The only animated film in Disney's DorkAge to be a hit.
*** WesternAnimation/StitchTheMovie (2003)
*** WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitchTheSeries (2003-2006)
*** Anime/{{Stitch}} (2008-2011)
** Disney/TreasurePlanet (2002)
** Disney/BrotherBear (2003)
** Disney/HomeOnTheRange (2004)
** Disney/ChickenLittle (2005): Disney began experimenting with CG with this film, amidst pressures stemming from Pixar threatening to part ways with them and competition from Creator/DreamworksAnimation. This film in particular is often criticized for imitating the pop-culture-heavy humor in ''Shrek''.
** Disney/MeetTheRobinsons (2007)
** Disney/{{Bolt}} (2008)
** Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog (2009): Disney's return to hand-drawn features. Also the first time Disney has a black princess and a prince who ReallyGetsAround.
** Disney/{{Tangled}} (2010)
** Disney/WinnieThePooh (2011)
** Disney/WreckItRalph (2012)
** Disney/{{Frozen}} (2013)
* [[Franchise/DisneyFairies Disney's Tinker Bell]] and its sequels.
* Animation/DoggyPoo (2003)
* WesternAnimation/DoraTheExplorer (2000)
* WesternAnimation/DrawnTogether (2004)
* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation films:
** WesternAnimation/TheRoadToElDorado (2000)
** WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}} (2001)
** WesternAnimation/SpiritStallionOfTheCimarron (2002)
** WesternAnimation/SinbadLegendOfTheSevenSeas (2003)
** Shrek 2 (2004)
** WesternAnimation/SharkTale (2004)
** WesternAnimation/{{Madagascar}} (2005)
** WesternAnimation/OverTheHedge (2006)
** WesternAnimation/FlushedAway (2006)
** Shrek the Third (2007)
** WesternAnimation/BeeMovie (2007)
** WesternAnimation/KungFuPanda (2008)
** Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (2008)
** WesternAnimation/MonstersVsAliens (2009)
** WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon (2010)
** Shrek Forever After (2010)
** WesternAnimation/{{Megamind}} (2010)
** WesternAnimation/KungFuPanda2(2011)
** WesternAnimation/KungFuPandaLegendsOfAwesomeness (2011)
** Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (2012)
** WesternAnimation/DragonsRidersOfBerk (2012)
** TheCroods (2013)
** WesternAnimation/MrPeabodyAndSherman (2014)
** Film/{{Home}} (2014)
* WesternAnimation/TheDrinkyCrowShow (2007)
* WesternAnimation/DuckDodgers (2003)
* Film/{{Enchanted}}: This movie had traditional animation only at the beginning and a few more times throughout; the rest was CG/live action hybrid. A ShoutOut and AffectionateParody of classic Disney.
* ElephantsDream
* ''WesternAnimation/EscapeFromPlanetEarth''
* WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents (2001)
* WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy (1999, though it was canceled twice [once in 2000 and again after the show's third season in 2002. Due to high ratings on Cartoon Network, high DVD sales, and FOX [[ScrewedByTheNetwork dropping all of their replacement live-action shows left and right]], the show finally came back in 2005 and has completed its ninth season)
* WesternAnimation/FanboyAndChumChum (2009)
* WesternAnimation/FantasticFourWorldsGreatestHeroes (2006)
* WesternAnimation/FantasticMrFox (2009)
* WesternAnimation/FatherOfThePride: The first totally-CG theatre-quality rendered network sitcom, this Creator/DreamworksAnimation effort starred John Goodman and Carl Reiner as white lions in Seigfred and Roy's Las Vegas act.
* WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat Saves Christmas
* WesternAnimation/FishHooks (2010)
* WesternAnimation/FoodFight
* WesternAnimation/Foot2Rue
* WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends (2004)
* [[WesternAnimation/FourEyes Four Eyes!]] (2005)
* WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}} (1999; much like ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'', FOX dumped this show after screwing with its timeslot and gained a cult following that led to its revival -- only ''Futurama'' now has new life on cable TV. It found a temporary home on Cartoon Network until 2007, when it lost the rights to ComedyCentral, which now airs not only the original series, but also the made-for-DVD movies ''and'' new episodes)
* Literature/GeronimoStilton (2009)
* WesternAnimation/GetEd
* WesternAnimation/GIJoeRenegades (2010)
* WesternAnimation/GoDiegoGo (2005)
* WesternAnimation/GravityFalls (2012)
* WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy (2003)
* WesternAnimation/GrowingUpCreepie (2006)
* WesternAnimation/HappinessIsAWarmBlanketCharlieBrown (2011)
* WesternAnimation/HappyFeet (2006)
* WesternAnimation/HighSchoolUSA (2013)
* WesternAnimation/HiHiPuffyAmiYumi (2004)
* WesternAnimation/HarveyBirdmanAttorneyAtLaw: A parody of cartoons from TheDarkAgeOfAnimation. (2000)
* WesternAnimation/HeManAndTheMastersOfTheUniverse2002
* WesternAnimation/{{Hoodwinked}} (2005)
* Literature/HortonHearsAWho (the Creator/BlueSkyStudios film), (2008)
* HotelTransylvania (2012)
* WesternAnimation/HouseOfMouse: A much-loved MassiveMultiPlayerCrossover about Mickey Mouse owning a club for Disney characters only and showing animated shorts.
* WesternAnimation/IceAge (2002)
* WesternAnimation/InvaderZim: (2001)
* WesternAnimation/JakersTheAdventuresOfPiggleyWinks (2003)
* WesternAnimation/JohnnyTest (2005)
* WesternAnimation/{{Kaijudo}}: Rise of the Duel Masters (2012) A tie-in series for the Western re-boot of the Franchise/DuelMasters franchise, also known as {{TabletopGame/Kaijudo}}, which in turn was made to be WizardsOfTheCoast's answer to ''TabletopGame/YuGiOh''[[note]]who's CardGame roots are actually ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' inspired[[/note]]. This show is more in line with the idea Wizards wanted originally for Franchise/DuelMasters: a show about the world of ''TabletopGame/{{Magic|TheGathering}}'' itself, rather than the card battle show it eventually became.
* WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague (2001)
* WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited (2004)
* WesternAnimation/KappaMikey (2006)
* WesternAnimation/KimPossible (2002)
* WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill
* WesternAnimation/KongTheAnimatedSeries (2000)
* WesternAnimation/KorgothOfBarbaria (2006)
* WesternAnimation/KryptoTheSuperdog (2005)
* WesternAnimation/TheLastDaysOfConeyIsland (TBA): A series of shorts in the works by Creator/RalphBakshi.
* WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfTarzan (2002)
* WesternAnimation/TheLEGOMovie (2014): WarnerBros's first animated film since ''WesternAnimation/TheIronGiant''. Major financial and critical hit, a first for an animated film by Warner Animation Group.
* WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee (2005)
* ''Disney/TheLionKingOneAndAHalf'': A midquel reinterpreting the original movie from the viewpoint of Timon and Pumbaa, this is another of Disney's more successful direct to video sequels, as it doesn't go by their standard rules of storytelling.
* WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes: Many things related to it are listed below:
** LooneyTunesInTheSeventiesAndOnward
** WesternAnimation/LoonaticsUnleashed: While ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' got a fairly nice revival with ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerryTales'', WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes saw ''Film/LooneyTunesBackInAction'' flop at the box office and consequently got ''this''.
** Looney Tunes would get the short end of the stick again with ''WesternAnimation/BabyLooneyTunes'', which may even be worse than ''WesternAnimation/LoonaticsUnleashed''.
** Film/LooneyTunesBackInAction (2003)
** WesternAnimation/TheLooneyTunesShow (2011): Warner's latest attempt to revamp the ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' franchise, which so far has been fairly well-received, although also hated to a extent by fans of the original WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes and ''WesternAnimation/TinyToonAdventures''.
** ''WabbitALooneyTunesProduction'' (2014): A return to the wackier version of the Tunes follows the previous show.
* WesternAnimation/TheLorax (2012)
* WesternAnimation/{{Mad}} (2010): an animated sketch show based off ''MAD Magazine'' and may or may not be the revamped cable version of ''Series/{{MADtv}}'' (a live-action sketch show on FOX that was canceled in 2009 due to low ratings, budget restrictions, and SeasonalRot. Unlike ''MAD'', ''Series/{{MADtv}}'' was only tenuously related to ''MAD Magazine'').
* WesternAnimation/TheMarvelousMisadventuresOfFlapjack (2008)
* WesternAnimation/MegasXLR (pilot broadcast in 2002, series premiere in 2004)
* WesternAnimation/TheMightyB (2008)
* WesternAnimation/AMonsterInParis (''Un Monstre à Paris'', 2011): A French CGI and 3D animated feature.
* WesternAnimation/MoralOrel (2005)
* WesternAnimation/MotherUp (2013)
* WesternAnimation/MrPeabodyAndSherman (2014)
* WesternAnimation/MuchaLucha (2002)
* WesternAnimation/MyLifeAsATeenageRobot (2003)
* WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic (2010): The latest ''Franchise/MyLittlePony'' series, notable for its ''tremendous'' PeripheryDemographic.
** WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls (2013): A theatrical movie of the above.
* WesternAnimation/TheNutJob‎ (2014)
* WesternAnimation/TheOblongs (2001)
* WesternAnimation/OggyAndTheCockroaches (1999)
* OscarsOasis (2010)
* WesternAnimation/PacManAndTheGhostlyAdventures (2013)
* WesternAnimation/{{Peanuts}} (2015)
* WesternAnimation/{{Pearlie}}
* WesternAnimation/ThePenguinsOfMadagascar, the first Nicktoon from Creator/DreamWorksAnimation.
* WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb: Notable for its PeripheryDemographic (many parents and teenagers admit to enjoying the show, despite the show being marketed mainly to 8-12 year olds) due to its insanely clever writing, musical content, and engaging characterization.
* {{Pixar}}'s films:
** WesternAnimation/MonstersInc (2001)
** WesternAnimation/FindingNemo (2003)
** WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles (2004)
** WesternAnimation/{{Cars}} (2006)
** WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}} (2007)
** WesternAnimation/WallE (2008)
** WesternAnimation/{{Up}} (2009): In 2010, this movie became the second animated movie ever to be nominated for Best Picture.
** WesternAnimation/ToyStory3 (2010): Currently the highest-grossing animated film of all time.
** {{Cars 2}} (2011)
** WesternAnimation/{{Brave}} (2012)
** WesternAnimation/MonstersUniversity (2013), a prequel to WesternAnimation/MonstersInc
* Anime/PonyoOnTheCliffByTheSea saw a US release in August of 2009, though it performed well under expectations.
* WesternAnimation/ThePrincessAndThePea (2002)
* WesternAnimation/TheProblemSolverz (2011)
* WesternAnimation/PuppyInMyPocketAdventuresInPocketville (2011)
* WesternAnimation/{{Rango}} (2011)
* ''{{Animation/Ratatoing}}'' (2007)
* WesternAnimation/RecessSchoolsOut (2001): Based off [[WesternAnimation/{{Recess}} the animated series]] from TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation, the film served as the GrandFinale for the show[[note]]Not counting the three episodes of season six; thanks to the film's success, the show was renewed, but only made up of three episodes left over from 2000[[/note]].
** WesternAnimation/RecessTakingTheFifthGrade (2003): The sequel to ''Recess: School's Out'', and the ''official'' GrandFinale.
* WesternAnimation/RegularShow (2010): One of Cartoon Network's 15-minute animated series that airs on Monday nights (along with ''Adventure Time'', ''MAD'', ''Problem Solverz'', and ''The Amazing World of Gumball''). Based on J.G. Quintel's "2 in the AM PM" and "The Naive Man From Lolliland," this show (like many of Creator/CartoonNetwork's past oeuvres) is WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids incarnate.
* WesternAnimation/RiseOfTheGuardians (2012): The last Creator/DreamWorksAnimation film to be distributed by Creator/{{Paramount}} Pictures.
* WesternAnimation/{{Robotomy}} (2010): Cartoon Network's shortest-lived cartoon series ever (and one of the only current shows it had that used traditional cel animation). It only lasted ten episodes (it would have been 12, but two episodes were never finished), and was canceled due to high production costs and lack of appeal in foreign markets. The show is also the very definition of KeepCirculatingTheTapes (though a lot of episodes are available on iTunes): after the final episode ("From Wretchnya With Love") aired, Cartoon Network never reran the show and a week later, deleted all evidence that the show existed from their website. [[OldShame Seems like they were ashamed of it...]]
* WesternAnimation/{{Robots}} (2005)
* WesternAnimation/RomeoAndJulietSealedWithAKiss: A 2006 independent animated feature done entirely by ex-Disney animator Phil Nibbelink.
* WesternAnimation/RubyGloom (2006)
* WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack (2001)
* WesternAnimation/SanjayAndCraig (2013)
* WesternAnimation/ScaredySquirrel
* Franchise/ScoobyDoo, like Alvin, continues to be adapted into a slew of new shows and DVD specials--as well as [[LiveActionAdaptation two particular movies no one likes to mention.]] There was ''What's New, Scooby-Doo?'', which brought the original team back and updated the stories for the times, and then ''Shaggy and Scooby-Doo Get A Clue!'' "Scooby-Doo! Mystery Inc." is currently airing, which takes a darker, more action-oriented, and slightly dramatic spin on the show. Cartoon Network also produced a series of original, live-action TV movies about slightly younger versions of the characters.
** WesternAnimation/WhatsNewScoobyDoo
** WesternAnimation/ShaggyAndScoobyDooGetAClue
** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated
** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooDirectToVideoFilmSeries
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooOnZombieIsland (1999): Though technically came around at the TurnOfTheMillennium, it brought a series of ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'' DirectToVideo movies to the 2000's.
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheCyberChase (2001)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheLochNessMonster (2004)
*** WesternAnimation/AlohaScoobyDoo (2005)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooInWheresMyMummy (2005)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooPiratesAhoy (2006)
*** WesternAnimation/ChillOutScoobyDoo (2007)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheGoblinKing (2008)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAndTheSamuraiSword (2009)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooAbracadabraDoo (2010)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooCampScare (2010)
*** WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooLegendOfThePhantosaur (2011)
*** WesternAnimation/BigTopScoobyDoo (2012)
* WesternAnimation/SecretMountainFortAwesome (2011)
* Film/TheSecretOfTheMagicGourd: A CG and live action hybrid. Co-produced by Creator/{{Disney}} and China Movie Co Ltd and marketed towards mainland China.
* WesternAnimation/TheSecretSaturdays (2008)
* WesternAnimation/TheSimpsonsMovie: One of the only hand-drawn films in this era to be successful, and the most profitable [[TheMovie movie to be based on a TV show]].
* WesternAnimation/{{Skyland}} (2005)
* Franchise/TheSmurfs: with two 3D CGI/2D animation features from Sony Pictures
** [[WesternAnimation/TheSmurfsAChristmasCarol The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol]] (2011)
** [[WesternAnimation/TheSmurfsTheLegendOfSmurfyHollow The Smurfs: The Legend Of Smurfy Hollow]] (2013)
* SpiritedAway: The only hand-drawn animated film to receive an Oscar for Best Animated Film. (2001)
** [[Creator/HayaoMiyazaki ...by a Japanese guy!]]
* WesternAnimation/{{Spliced}}: a Canadian GenreThrowback of '90s Cartoons (2009)
* WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants: This is arguably the most popular show of this era. (1999)
* WesternAnimation/{{Stanley}} (2001)
* WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars (2003)
* WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars (2008)
* WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels
* WesternAnimation/StaticShock (2000)
* WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse: The first Cartoon Network series to be created by a woman. (2013)
* WesternAnimation/SuperDuperSumos
* WesternAnimation/{{Superjail}} (2007)
* WesternAnimation/SymBionicTitan (2010)
* WesternAnimation/TeamToon (2013)
* Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles:
** WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003
** WesternAnimation/{{TMNT}} (the completely CG movie in 2007)
** WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2012
* WesternAnimation/TeenTitans (2003)
* TeenTitansTroubleInTokyo (2006)
* Thomas Timberwolf: A short-lived 13 episode flash series, the very last work directed by Creator/ChuckJones.
* WesternAnimation/ThreeDelivery (2008)
* [[WesternAnimation/{{Thundercats 2011}} ThunderCats (2011)]]
* WesternAnimation/TitanAE (2000): Creator/DonBluth's final film, unless he ever gets around to making that ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'' movie. Its box office failure led to the closure of Fox's animation studio.
* WesternAnimation/TomAndJerryTales: An interesting ShoutOut to the original WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry shorts (something rare for this era), the series ran from 2006 to 2008, being cancelled when [[FourKidsEntertainment 4Kids]] took over KidsWB.
** There have also been quite a few ''Tom and Jerry'' DirectToVideo films in the past decade, all of which seem to have been far more well received than their first film in the 1990s.
* WesternAnimation/TotalDrama: Creator/CartoonNetwork's saving grace of the later half of the first decade (2006), resulting in more Canadian-made sitcom teen shows, including:
** [[WesternAnimation/{{Sixteen}} 6teen]] (2004)
** WesternAnimation/{{Stoked}} (2009)
** WesternAnimation/{{Sidekick}} (2011)
* WesternAnimation/TitanMaximum (2009)
* WesternAnimation/TotallySpies (2001)
* Animation/ATownCalledPanic (2000)
* WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated (2007)
* WesternAnimation/TransformersGoBots: The most obscure and short-lived series in the {{Transformers}} franchise. (2003-2005)
* WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime (2010)
* WesternAnimation/TransformersRescueBots (2011)
* WesternAnimation/TheTripletsOfBelleville (2003)
* WesternAnimation/{{Trollz}} (2005)
* WesternAnimation/UglyAmericans (2010)
* WesternAnimation/UncleGrandpa (2013)
* WesternAnimation/{{Valiant}} (2005)
* WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers: A wildly popular Creator/AdultSwim-distributed tribute to '70s HannaBarbera action shows like ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuest''. (2003)
* WesternAnimation/{{Wakfu}} (2008): From the French studio Ankama, and one of the culminating points of Flash art maturing into a legitimate tool for animation rather than a plague.
* WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder (2013)
* WesternAnimation/TheWild: A Disney-distributed film from Canada. (2006)
* WesternAnimation/{{Wishology}}: A WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddparents film aired in 2009.
* WesternAnimation/TheXs (2005)
* WesternAnimation/YakkityYak (2003)
* WesternAnimation/{{Zevo 3}} (2010)
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real life people who are associated/are directly involved with this era:]]
* Notable Disney Regulars (writers, directors, composers and songwriters for Disney films):
** Bob Iger, current Chief Executive Officer
** Ed Catmull, current President
** John Lasseter, current Creative Chief Officer (also see Pixar below)
** Mark Dindal and Randy Fullmer, directors (Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove, Disney/ChickenLittle)
** Stephen Anderson and Don Hall, directors (Disney/MeetTheRobinsons, Disney/WinnieThePooh)
** Chris Sanders and Dean DeMoise, directors (Disney/LiloAndStitch, WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon). Now at Creator/DreamworksAnimation.
** Ron Clements and John Musker, directors (Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog)
** Glen Keane, animator (Mulan [Disney/{{Mulan}}], Disney/TreasurePlanet [Silver]), producer and conceptual designer (Disney/{{Tangled}}) Resigned as of March 23rd, 2012.
** Mark Henn, animator (Meet The Robinsons [Wilbur], The Princess And The Frog [Tiana], Disney/WinnieThePooh [Pooh, Christopher Robin])
** Eric Goldberg, animator (The Princess And The Frog [Louis], Winnie The Pooh}} [Rabbit], LooneyTunesBackInAction [all cartoon characters], Flintstones Coco Pebbles commercials) Is now teaching.
** Tony Bancroft, director (Mulan), animator (The Emperor's New Groove [Kronk])
** Andreas Deja, animator (Lilo And Stitch [Lilo}, The Princess And The Frog [Mama Odie and Juju], Winnie The Pooh [Tigger])
** Dale Baer, animator (The Emperor's New Groove [Yzma], Home On The Range [Alameda Slim and Junior], Winnie The Pooh [Owl])
** Bruce Smith, creator of TheProudFamily, animator ('One by One' sequence for the scrapped Fantastia 2006, The Princess And The Frog [Doctor Faciliar], Winnie The Pooh [Piglet, Kanga, Roo])
** Alan Menken, composer (Disney/{{Tangled}})
** Henry Jackman, composer (Winnie The Pooh, Wreck-It Ralph, MonstersVsAliens)
** Rich Moore, director and writer (WreckItRalph)
* Notable Creator/PixarRegulars (writers, directors, composers and songwriters of Pixar films):
** John Lasseter (WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}, WesternAnimation/ToyStory3)
** Lee Unkrich (WesternAnimation/FindingNemo, Toy Story 3)
** Pete Docter (WesternAnimation/MonstersInc, WesternAnimation/WallE, WesternAnimation/{{Up}})
** Creator/BradBird (WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles, WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}})
** Andrew Stanton (Finding Nemo, WALL•E, Toy Story 3)
** Joe Ranft (Monsters, Inc., Cars)
** Creator/MichaelGiacchino (The Incredibles, Ratatouille, Up)
** RandyNewman (Monsters, Inc., Cars, Toy Story 3)
** Thomas Newman (Finding Nemo, WALL•E)
* Creator/SethMacFarlane
* [[Creator/DreamworksAnimation Jeffrey Katzenberg]]
* EmilyHamshire
* Henry Selick - director (WesternAnimation/{{Coraline}})
* Chris Wedge and Carlos Sandahla - directors (Creator/BlueSkyStudios)
* Chris Meledandri - executive producer (TwentiethCenturyFox, Illumination Entertainment}
* Creator/TressMacNeille
* Dan Povenmire and Jeff "Swampy" Marsh - creators, voice actors, writers, and producers of ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb''
* Noah Z. Jones - children's book illustrator, designer and creator of ''AlmostNakedAnimals'', ''FishHooks'', and ''7D''
* Creator/GenndyTartakovsky: Artist and creative director largely responsible for ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'', ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'', ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'', and the original launch of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'' (among others). He faded into obscurity with personal projects about 2005, but resurfaced in 2010 with ''WesternAnimation/SymBionicTitan'' and directed ''HotelTransylvania''. Is currently helming his own studio.
* Spike Brandt: Animator at WarnerBros who has directed much of the studio's output in recent years.
* GregWeisman: The man behind ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}'' has written for many recent animated titles seen above, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheBatman'', and has been heavily involved with ''WesternAnimation/TheSpectacularSpiderMan'' and ''WesternAnimation/YoungJustice''.
* Creator/WilliamJoyce: Children's book writer and illustrator whose stories were adapted by many studios (''Disney/MeetTheRobinsons'' and ''RoliePolieOlie'' for Disney, ''WesternAnimation/{{Robots}}'' for Creator/BlueSkyStudios, and ''[[Literature/TheGuardiansOfChildhood Rise of the Guardians]]'' for Creator/DreamworksAnimation).
* Peter De Seve: Illustrator and character designer (all of Creator/BlueSkyStudios' films, ''WesternAnimation/ABugsLife'', ''Film/{{Hop}}'').
* Creator/LaurenFaust: The wife of Creator/CraigMcCracken (creator of ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' and ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends'', who left Cartoon Network in 2009 thanks to CN Real) and the developer of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic''.
* Jeff Kline: Veteran animation producer, responsible for shows like ''WesternAnimation/BigGuyAndRustyTheBoyRobot'', ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'', and ''WesternAnimation/GodzillaTheSeries''. Seemed to have vanished for a while throughout the mid-to-late 2000s, but re-emerged in 2010 to produce ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeRenegades'' and ''WesternAnimation/TransformersPrime'', core series in Creator/TheHub's action block.
* Creator/PendletonWard: Creator of ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' and ''WebAnimation/BravestWarriors''.
* J. G. Quintel: Creator of ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow''.
** His friend Sam Marin, who has also animated at Disney.
* Rebecca Sugar: Creator of ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse''.
[[/folder]]
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!!Tropes associated with this era include:
[[index]]
* ThreeDMovie
* AdobeFlash
* AllAnimationIsDisney: Or, to update this trope to the 21st Century, ''All Computer Animation Is Creator/{{Pixar}}/Creator/DreamWorksAnimation''.
* AllCGICartoon: Chronic.
* AnimatedAdaptation: Actually is being seen less, though ''Film/TheMummyTrilogy'' and JackieChan randomly received animated shows, among a few others. Plus there was ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars''.
* AnimationAgeGhetto: While it's not as strong as it used to be, it still has quite the influence on works and viewership.
* {{Animesque}}: [[JustifiedTrope Justifiably]] more common. Many current animators grew up on {{Anime}} and [[TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation cartoons of the 90s]], and have blended the two styles together as a result.
* [[ArchEnemy Arch-Competitor]]: Creator/{{Pixar}} and Creator/DreamWorksAnimation, although they're very different as well.
** Pixar uses polygons to model characters, [=DreamWorks=] uses NURBS models.
** Pixar isn't [[UsefulNotes/UnionsInHollywood union]]. [=DreamWorks=] is.
** Pixar is owned by Creator/{{Disney}}, one of the six major Hollywood studios. [=DreamWorks=] is independently owned.
** Pixar has a reputation for more drama-based films, and has a release schedule of about one movie a year. [=DreamWorks=] has a reputation for more comedy-based films (though in recent years has gone a more dramatic route with films like ''WesternAnimation/KungFuPanda'' and ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon''), and has a release schedule of two or three movies per year.
** Around the 2010's, it was Disney and the Alvin and the Chipmunks movies with the mediocre second and third chipmunk movies somehow outperforming Disney's return to hand drawn animation with ''The Princess and the Frog'' in 2009 and the revival of The Muppets in 2011.
** Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network, and Disney channel were pretty evenly matched at the turn of the millennium in terms of animated shows. Now, Cartoon Network is the most consistent with their animation, with Nick and Disney diverting their attention towards live action shows. Although this is only because when Cartoon Network ''did'' attempt to do live action shows with it's CN Real block, it ended disastrously.
* CrossdressingVoices is increasingly averted, with preteen male characters in major properties like ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo'' voiced by actual boys and series like ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'', ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'', and ''WesternAnimation/{{Chowder}}'' explicitly aging the characters in real time to accommodate deepening voices.
* DancePartyEnding: A favorite ending to lot of animated movies (''Shrek'' is a big example... and is probably the TropeCodifier) end with everyone dancing to [[ParentalBonus old music kids have never heard before]].
* DirectToVideo: Had to release those Disney and ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'' sequels somehow.
* DreamworksFace: Phenomenon that changed how animated films are marketed. Characters who never sport a FascinatingEyebrow in the movie will do so on movie posters to make the movie seem more edgy and comedic.
* GenreThrowback: In an attempt to regain the ground it lost to various CG animation studios in the 2000s, Disney appears to be intentionally invoking this trope in their more recent films. ''ThePrincessAndTheFrog'' and ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' are meant to be throwbacks to the Disney films of TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation, and ''Disney/WinnieThePooh'' eschews the [[DarkerAndEdgier style of the more recent Pooh movies]] in favor of the tone from [[Disney/TheManyAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh the 1970s film]]. Even though we aren't very far removed from the Renaissance period, there's already enough nostalgia for the era for there to be a throwback.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Cartoons from the late 2000s/early 2010s are ''really'' pushing the envelope of what can be shown on children's television. Even some preschool shows are getting a bit edgier.
* HumanFocusedAdaptation: Just about every old cartoon character given their [[TheMovie own movie]] has this: ''Alvin and the Chipmunks'', ''Smurfs'', ''Transformers'', and so forth.
* InkSuitActor: Already existed for traditional animation, but this became far more feasible (and common) among CGI films as technology progressed.
* LighterAndSofter: The animated films of this era were less dramatic and were more comical than the previous era .
* LimitedAnimation: Carried over from the previous ages. Serves as the norm for most (if not all) television-based and Flash animated shows.
* LimitedSpecialCollectorsUltimateEdition: Disney did this a lot.
* LiveActionAdaptation: Or more increasingly, live action/CG adaptations.
* TheMovie: Continues to be strong from the Renaissance era.
* NetworkDecay
* NonHumanSidekick
* ParentalBonus
* SerkisFolk: The line between live-action and animation has become increasingly blurred. Computer-generated characters appear in movies of all genres.
* {{Sequelitis}}
* SmallAnnoyingCreature: There is a character like this in every movie. He is usually the sidekick.
* ThickLineAnimation: Nowadays if a cartoon isn't {{Animesque}}, it's this.
* ToiletHumour: Very popular in CG animated films throughout most of the 2000s, thanks to most American animation studios [[FollowTheLeader copying DreamWorks' style]] (or more specifically, copying ''{{Shrek}}''). Became less and less prevalent around 2007/2008 as the ''Shrek'' style [[DeaderThanDisco started to lose popularity]] and as the other animation studios (including DreamWorks) began to look at {{Pixar}} as the studio to emulate. It still pops up in films occasionally, however.
* ToonBoom: If a 2D cartoon in the Americas is not animated with Flash, it's most likely animated with this.
* UnusualAnimalAlliance: You can find this trope in about anything where the protagonist is an animal.
* VanillaEdition: If an animated movie from the Renaissance age was NOT Disney, chances are the VanillaEdition is the only one that exists.
* VillainProtagonist: ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Megamind}}'', and ''Disney/WreckItRalph'' all feature different variations on this trope. The first film is about [[HeelFaceTurn a villain who slowly becomes a hero]] throughout the course of the film, the second film is about [[GoodAllAlong a villain who comes to the realization]] that deep down he's really a hero, and the third film is about [[MeanCharacterNiceActor a villain who tries to prove to others]] that he can be a hero.
[[/index]]
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