-> '''Lelouch:''' A bold move. But you're about to be eaten alive, my little guppy friendó-\\
'''Mao:''' Checkmate.\\
'''Lelouch:''' FUCK YOU!
-->-- ''CodeMent''

In reality, the endgame of TabletopGame/{{chess}} is where one player knows he is about to lose and either [[KnowWhenToFoldEm gives up]] or clings on to the odd chance that he can find a way out.

In fiction, checkmate more often than not comes as a complete surprise, leaving the losing player baffled and the winning player smug about his intellectual superiority. Often paired with a handsome remark ("I believe, sir, that this is checkmate"). This works very well if the work is emphasizing the loser's obliviousness, but quite a few works use this trope to [[SmartPeoplePlayChess emphasize the winner's skill and foresight]], no matter how unrealistic that might be. (Also, giving the audience a clear view of the board [[TakeOurWordForIt is only optional]].)

If the players are main characters and the game is a [[ChessMotifs metaphor]] for their intellectual discrepancies, the checkmate often follows a conversational bomb ("The world will be sick and I'll be the only one with the medicine") and redirects the protagonists' shock and defeat to the level of the game.
In other cases, the guy with a kiosk on a New York street corner who has a running game of chess is often on the receiving end.

An especially unlikely form is where one of the players announces 'check', directly followed by the other player countering it with a 'checkmate'. This is virtually impossible to perform in an actual game of chess for several reasons:

* If a player merely moves a friendly piece to block the attempt on their king, the attacker can immediately capture it, reasserting the original check and blocking the attempted counterattack (thus, not a checkmate).
** Although this wouldn't work if the moving piece wasn't the one giving check in return (i.e. it was moved out of the way of some other piece, allowing ''that'' piece to put the enemy king in check).
* If a player moves their king to a safe square, even if this exposes a check attempt on the opponent's king by another friendly piece, the opponent can move their attacking piece to the recently vacated square to block the check attempt (thus, not a checkmate).
* If a player captures the attacking piece, even if this creates a check attempt on the opponent's king, the opponent will almost always have protected that square with a nearby ally who can immediately capture the player's piece in response (thus, not a checkmate).
** Although again it's possible if the capturing piece wasn't the one giving check.
* Speaking of which, advanced chess players are GenreSavvy enough to anticipate ''all of the above'' situations in advance.

However, as a check attempt severely limits the opponent's available options (move their king, capture or block the attacker), a classier (and more technically accurate) version is for the player to predict the number of moves until one player is forced into checkmate -- "checkmates Black in three moves", for example. [[note]]The fact that any decent player will almost always see at least ''one'' move ahead (which is to say that they always know every possible action the opponent can take in the very next move) is precisely why SurpriseCheckmate is so unlikely in real life. Perhaps non-regular-chess-players experience it often enough to think it's just part of the game?[[/note]]

This trope's LogicalExtreme is "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fools_mate fool's mate]]", a checkmate in two moves only possible if your opponent (a) [[GenreBlind has never heard of fools' mate]] and (b) is unlucky/bad enough to perform the precise moves that make it possible.

Related to ChessMotifs, SmartPeoplePlayChess.

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!!Examples

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Advertising]]
* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPkByAkAdZs An Audi commercial]] featuring Leonard Nimoy and Zachary Quinto starts off this way. Playing [[StarTrekTheNextGeneration 3-d chess]] on tablets, no less.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Anime and Manga]]
* In the ''CowboyBebop'' episode "Bohemian Rhapsody", Edward is completely surprised when her opponent puts her in checkmate. Her opponent is also surprised when Ed announces a move that will one-mate him, but then decides to not do it. Of course, Edward is an idiot savant with no formal chess training and her opponent is senile, so either of them being surprised at the other isn't really that surprising.
* Allegedly, [[Anime/YuGiOh Gozaburo Kaiba]] was a world-class chess player. It didn't stop prepubescent Seto from beating him.
* In ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'', when Colonel Mustang is playing a game of chess with General Grumman, the general is totally surprised when Mustang checkmates him. This is rather odd since he is incomparably Mustang's superior at the game: in their previous 112 games Mustang had lost 97, drawn 15 and not won one of them.
** Though considering he ''is'' Roy Mustang, it's entirely possible he'd deliberately played poorly ''just'' to surprise him with his true skill that one time.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comicbooks]]
* One issue of ''ComicBook/BlackPanther'' has him facing off against the Kingpin in chess, using the game as a metaphor for their coming conflict. Kingpin gets him in check and talks about how he'll always be several steps ahead, and is then immediately checkmated. When this appeared on ''Scans Daily'' a suggestion for followup dialogue was given.
--> '''Kingpin:''' That's not checkmate. For one thing, that's a bishop. Bishops can only move diagonally. And you even put it on the wrong colored space.\\
'''T'Challa:''' Indeed. You will find that I [[BadassBoast do not play by your rules.]]
* Though not a checkmate, an example between [[ComicBook/IronMan Tony]] and [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Reed]] during ComicBook/CivilWar came close enough. The two are having a debate whilst playing chess on 10 different boards or so, and at the end of the conversation, Reed's been put into check on all 10 boards ''simultaneously''.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSwanPrincess'', Derek has recently been dumped, and Bromley is taking advantage of his emotional pacing to make extra moves and captures, including Derek's queen. Derek stops pacing, decides what to do, and offhandedly checkmates Bromley. Surprise.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* ''Knights of the South Bronx'' has an especially {{egregious}} example: the final game ends with three consecutive checks from one of the boys, followed by a checkmate from his opponent.
* In ''Film/TheAvengers1998'', Steed moves his knight and puts Mrs. Peel's king in check, and she takes the knight with her queen, putting his king in checkmate.
* ''Film/BladeRunner''. Earlier in the movie J.F. Sebastian calls Dr. Eldon Tyrell a genius and says he's only beaten him once. Under Roy Batty's guidance, Sebastian checkmates Tyrell in two moves, and Tyrell is surprised by it. Mirroring the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immortal_Game Immortal Game]], Sebastian/Batty sacrifices his queen to Tyrell before taking the game. Specifically the last three moves are: Queen to Bishop 6, check. Knight captures Queen. Bishop to King 7, checkmate.
* In ''Film/FromRussiaWithLove'', a SPECTRE agent playing a high-level game of chess receives a secret message that he's needed elsewhere. His next move is so brilliant that his opponent immediately resigns. The opponent is clearly surprised, even though as an expert player he should have been able to see the move coming.
* In ''FromParisWithLove'', the protagonist (and operative-in-training) does this to his ambassadorial boss, possibly to note the [[EstablishingCharacterMoment difference in their games]], literally and proverbially.
* Used to [[PastimesProvePersonality define David Levinsen]] in ''Film/IndependenceDay''. Levinsen is playing chess with his father, and announces checkmate without any fanfare, even getting up and leaving as his dad is protesting that it's ''not'' checkmate. After further (futile) analysis, Dad is forced to concede defeat a short time after David is gone. Later on, David uses a chess metaphor to explain what the aliens are doing as they position their ships. He sees the terrifying checkmate before it happens, in enough time to save several major characters.
* In ''Film/BlazingSaddles'', the Waco Kid is shocked when Sheriff Bart checkmates him to end their game.
* While Macready is playing the "Chess Wizard" computer in ''Film/TheThing1982'', he appears to be totally surprised when it checkmates him. [[SoreLoser He retaliates]] [[DisproportionateRetribution by pouring a drink into its circuits and shorting it out]], which is an EstablishingCharacterMoment.
* HAL from ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'' does the "number of forced moves" version. Notably, it was cheating and not all of them were really forced.
* The climactic chess match in ''SearchingForBobbyFischer'' does not end in a checkmate, but the two players keep moving pawns down files well after the losing player should have realized he was beaten. Justified in that the losing player was playing a game he wasn't used to (speed chess), and is also about ten years old to boot: he's an excellent player, but he's still a kid. He just missed it.
* In ''Film/CubeZero'', Wynn keeps beating Dodd at chess with moves he never anticipated. This is partly explained by Wynn being able to [[AwesomenessByAnalysis visualize entire chess games mentally]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* As a child, Judge Ford played against her mentor, [[TheWestingGame Sam Westing]]. She got a thrill when she managed to capture his queen, shortly followed a dose of humility when he checkmated her in the next turn. This defeat gets referenced later, and she doesn't welcome the nostalgia.
* In the {{Nancy Drew}}/{{Hardy Boys}} ''Super Mystery'', "A Crime for Christmas", Nancy beats Frank in a chess game in eight moves. However, he's so preoccupied about his brother Joe's wereabouts that he doesn't even notice.
* Though not chess but [[AlternateUniverseEquivalent Cyvasse]], in ''{{Literature/A Dance With Dragons}}'', Tyrion Lannister does this to an opponent he'd previously [[ObfuscatingStupidity lost to on purpose]] in order to glean some vital information from him.
* At the end of the ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' novel ''The Also People'', the Doctor is playing chess with Kadiatu Lethbridge-Stuart, with the rules being that the first person who can announce the number of moves to checkmate wins. In the second game Kadiatu thinks she's doing well, until the Doctor announces "Mate in twelve" ... meaning ''she'' can win in twelve moves. Always know exactly what game you're playing before you start.\\
This gets taken up a level when the Doctor predicts the fifth game as soon as Kadiatu reaches for a piece ... and then the sixth game before she's even done that. And then they're just staring at each other as the Doctor rattles off predictions. Eventually Kadiatu gets a surprise checkmate when she just says "Twenty-one", and the Doctor is so surprised he glances down at the board to check.
-->'''Doctor''': You beat me! I don't believe it.
-->'''Kadiatu''': Cheer up, it was bound to happen sooner or later.
-->'''Doctor''': Not to me, it doesn't. You just said the first number that came into your head.
-->'''Kadiatu''': Ah, but it was the right number.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' - after a debate on belief between a monk and a military officer, the monk makes a surprise checkmate which he attributes to divine inspiration.
* In an early episode of ''DarkAngel'' Max and Logan are playing chess. Max makes her move and announces "Check." Logan tries to move, and Max announces that he can't make a move because it was actually checkmate.
* The ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' episode ''Chess Pains'' culminates in this trope.
* Averted by Reed in an episode of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' when he announces "mate in 12".
* In the teaser of an episode of ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'', George gets one of these from the girl he's dating and [[MinorFlawMajorBreakup breaks up with her because of it]].
* In ''You Wish'', Gillian wishes for telepathy so she can deal with her kids better. She changes her mind, but she and Genie finish up the episode with a telepath vs. telepath chess game. She takes the wind out of his sails with the check-followed-by-checkmate variant.
* At the end of "Man Hunt" in ''Series/{{NUMB3RS}}'', Don and Alan team up against [[GoodWithNumbers Charlie]], who thinks nothing of grading his students' papers while they play. When Don points out that Charlie misspelled "anomaly," Charlie gets indignant, and he sticks to his guns over the next few moves, even when Alan reminds him that he's not infallible. Eventually, Don gets the dictionary, and before Charlie can collect his wits, Alan delivers checkmate.
* In ''DoctorWho'' ''Nightmare in Silver'' this is used on Artie, who is specified to have fallen for the Fool's Mate mentioned in Real Life. Subverted with The Doctor, who is told that he will be checkmated in five moves by the [[spoiler: Cyber Planner]]. He responds by claiming that there's a trap that will give him victory in three moves. His opponent sees no way this can be done, but is worried by the claim and [[spoiler: deactivates the Cybermen to use their processing power to see how this could possibly be the case. It turns out the moves The Doctor was speaking of weren't chess moves at all - it takes him three actions to remove the Cyber Planner from his mind, rendering the game meaningless.]]
* StarTrekTheNextGeneration gets as close to this trope as you can possibly get with Data (so call it a subversion) by having Counselor Troi surprise Data with a move that would lead to check mate several moves later. For someone like Data, being completely unable to anticipate an endgame one move ahead of its execution is still unrealistic.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* ''FoxTrot''. Roger loves chess and invariably loses, despite his eternal hope that he'll win next time. Crowning example: he lets Jason have the first move, and Jason proceeds to rattle off a winning string of notation (The ''[[PressStartToGameOver four-move Scholar's Mate]]'', [[GeniusBonus if you're paying attention]]) without Roger setting up the board.
-->'''Roger''': Methinks my game may be getting a bit too predictable.
** The exact surprise can vary. For one Sunday comic, Roger spends multiple panels realizing the game is over no matter what he does. Andy wearily says, "Face it, Roger -- you win." He begs for one more game anyway.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Videogames]]
* Chess games, Natch. As well as Shoji.
* A meta example is used ''perfectly'' in ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' by [[BlackWidow Morinth]], who could be best described as a [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot psychic sex]] [[ItMakesSenseInContext vampire]]. She has a chess board set up in her apartment which she loves because her favorite games are ones where "the opponent is sure they are going to win until they are gutted". This describes not only her killer methodology but also how she views other people. You can then turn the tables and "[[DeadlyEuphemism checkmate]]" her to her complete shock by resisting her seduction and bringing in Samara.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
* Early in ''{{Pawn}}'', Baalah plays her first (and so far last) game of chess with Ayanah. Baalah puts Ayanah in check, and one turn later, Ayanah checkmates Baalah.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Original]]
* In Episode 14 of ''CodeMent'':
--> '''Lelouch:''' A bold move. But you're about to be eaten alive, my little guppy friendó-\\
'''Mao:''' Checkmate.\\
'''Lelouch:''' FUCK YOU!
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* In the ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' episode "Overdrive", Cyborg is able to checkmate Raven who freezes in shock.
* [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in the ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown'' episode "Oil in the Family," in which [[BrilliantButLazy Raimundo]] and an [[RuleOfCool intelligent, British-accented T-Rex]] play a game of chess with giant, dinosaur-themed pieces. The T-Rex isn't playing to win: it's trying to trap/knock out Raimundo with the giant chess pieces so it can eat him. Raimundo, meanwhile, is focusing on the checkmating the T-Rex to win the showdown.
* In ''WesternAnimation/MenInBlack'''s animated series, Jay loses at least twice to an imprisoned [[YouWillBeAssimilated Alpha]], but this may have been because Jay was trying to pump Alpha for information and not focusing on the game. This becomes a ChekhovsSkill -- Alpha won both games with the same distraction tactic, and when he escapes and starts an attack, Jay realizes there's more to the plan. Alpha's retreat includes a transmission, complimenting Jay on managing a stalemate.
* In one episode of ''{{Futurama}}'', two robots are playing chess. All the pieces are in their starting position, and the robot playing white announces a checkmate in some large amount of turns. The astounded robot playing black exclaims that he's lost again and offers the robot playing white a rematch.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* Most of the time a "Surprise Checkmate" only happens when a player is in time trouble. (Time trouble does not happen in fiction often). However, there are examples of it happening when a player is not in time trouble:
** In Japanese chess Habu, an enteral Meiji, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAWYQlElI4Q walked his king into a checkmate]] in a winning position.
** The infamous Kramnik/Fritz [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blunder_(chess) mate-in-one]].
** Two more cases of grandmasters walking into mate-in-one can be found [[http://streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com/2007/01/worst-move-on-board.html here]].
* Pretty much any time a 4-move checkmate or one of its variants happens is a surprise to the losing player.
** And sometimes, it's a surprise to BOTH players, like in [[http://turneringsservice.sjakklubb.no/viewgame.aspx?TID=TromsoBymesterskap2012-TromsoSjakklubb&GROUP=&gameno=43 this game]]. White wins a piece in move 14, but opens up the opportunity for a four move checkmate.
* Obviously occurs far more often when one player is a new to the game.
** The Fool's Mate [[note]]1. g4 e5 2. f4 Qh4++[[/note]] is a perfect example, though it only rarely happens because it requires a novice player to make a critical opening move mistake.[[note]] While opening with 1. g3 ... 2. Bg2 is a hallmark of hypermodern play and a valid way to build a solid pawn structure while maintaining central square protection, opening with 1. g4 (or "The Grob") is widely considered the worst possible opening move as it loosens the entire kingside structure and prevents the critical h4 square any sort of defensive coverage[[/note]] Players caught off-guard by this rather surprising mate never fall for this one again, nor will any spectators who see it happen to the novice player.
** The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scholar%27s_mate Scholar's Mate]], or Shepherd's Mate, is another beginner's mistake that, unlike the Fool's Mate, is extremely common.
* Although it's rare, there have been games at the master level where a check was answered by a checkmate. [[http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1018313 Even computers can fall for this one.]]
* The Immortal Game, referenced in ''Film/BladeRunner'', culminated with the sacrifice of a queen leading to check mate one move later.
[[/folder]]

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