Popular British GameShow aired by the stations of {{ITV}}; three eccentric couples competed to fulfill a contract of answers to a question in order to earn moves across an arch of screens. When said monitors are "struck", they would reveal either a prize or a Hot Spot, which would cause the couple to lose their turn and the prizes they earned from the previous screens unless they chose to stop. But the last screen if a team makes it that far, contains a final question (the "final Strike it Lucky Question") which often contained a major prize like a vacation.

The format originally premiered in the United States (as ''Strike It Rich''), but flopped after the 1986-87 season. The British version debuted a month after the American series began, and was considerably more popular, running from 1986-94 followed by a three-year revival in 1996 as ''Strike It Rich''.
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!!GameShow Tropes in use:
* BonusRound: Pick one of the rows for each column of screens, revealing a move, a Hot Spot, or a true/false question that turns into a Hot Spot if you answer incorrectly (there are 10 of each across the 30 monitors). Try not to hit more than the number of Hot Spots on which you bid beforehand, because making a lower bid increases the prize money; the higher the bid, the more Hot Spots you could hit without losing. Failing to win earned money for each successful move.
** Originally, the prize money was 1,000/1,500/2,000, then 1,000/2,000/3,000 (with lesser money of 100/200/300). Later on, after the [[GameShowWinningsCap ITV winnings cap]] was abolished, the prize money was increased to 3,000/4,000/5,000, with the lesser money increased to 300/400/500. When the show became "Strike it Rich", the money increased to 5,000/7,000/10,000, with the smaller prizes changed to 250/350/500.
*** The first three series had the prizes set at 1,000/1,500/2,000, [[AllOrNothing with no money per screens traversed without Hot Spots]].
* ConsolationPrize: Michael Barrymore was generous from time to time; if a couple didn't win much, he would either just strike a few screens to give them prizes, or give them back prizes lost from a Hot Spot.
* LuckBasedMission: ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin.
* HomeGame: A DVD game was released in 2007. Unlike many DVD games, it was [[ShownTheirWork surprisingly faithful]] to the actual show, and Michael Barrymore even hosted it!
* Personnel:
** GameShowHost: Michael Barrymore. Joe Garagiola did the American version.
** StudioAudience
* UndesirablePrize: Quite a few pop up, including "Llama Trekking in Sussex" and a "Personal Telephone Number".
* {{Whammy}}: The Hot Spots, they're not good spots.
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!!This show provides examples of:
* {{Catchphrase}}: What is a Hot Spot not?
** "[[StudioAudience ...a good spot!]]"
* ChristmasEpisode: The show had a number of them throughout the years, including at least one having children as contestants, and the 1991 special having members of the Armed Forces (Royal Air Force, Royal Navy, British Army) and their wives competing.
* MarketBasedTitle: Originally called ''Strike It Rich'' in America, but changed to ''Strike It Lucky'' upon its trip to Britain as the lower stakes forced by the IBA's GameShowWinningsCap of the era couldn't be considered "[[NoBudget rich]]" by any means. The ''Rich'' title returned in 1996 because Thames Television wouldn't let its 2 days a week only rival, London Weekend Television, use the old name (LWT and [[Creator/FremantleMedia Fremantle]] were co-producing). However, the revival '''did''' have a larger prize budget since the IBA cap was no more, justifying the new name.
** Fremantle's British subsidiary Talkback Productions ended up acquiring Thames' assets in 2002, hence later merchandise (such as the DVD game) returned to the old title.
* {{Retraux}}: Prize introductions were filmed in a 1950s slapstick style.
* TitleDrop: The Final Strike It Lucky Question always shoehorns in the words "strike it lucky" somewhere.
* ShowTheFolksAtHome: During the "Strike it Lucky" era (1986-1994), the home viewers are shown how many HOT SPOTS (5, 6, 7, or 8) there are on the game board at the start of the game, but are NOT shown where they are on the board.
* TransatlanticEquivalent: As mentioned above, the American version came first. This was a daily show with only two teams playing, Hot Spots were Bandits, and the Bonus Round was a little different.
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